Page 1

PORTFOLIO

L.WHITTINGHAM


TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTACT

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ii

CV

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ARCHITECTURE AS THE CRITICAL THINKER

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THE AFFECT DISSEMINATION MODEL UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO VI: SENIOR RESEARCH STUDIO A CRITICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EAMES HOUSE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - DESIGN THEORY

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RE-IMAGING ARCHITECTURE

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SLOT NOTCH + LOCK BIOME DIRTY

UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - ELECTIVE - RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - DIRECTED STUDY: COMPUTATION, ANIMATION + BIOLOGY

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ARCHITECTURE + THE URBAN CONTEXT

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INTERSECT SHIFT CONNECT + COLLIDE

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY - INTRO TO ARCHITECTURE

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UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO III: INTERMEDIATE STUDIO

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UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO V: TOKYO SENIOR RESEARCH STUDIO

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ARCHITECTURE AS WHOLE SYSTEMS

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CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO IV: COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

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WORK EXPERIENCE

PERKINS + WILL O2 PLANNING + DESIGN

82 88

TRAVELOGRAPHY

SELECTED TRAVEL PHOTOS

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ARCHITECTURE AS THE CRITICAL THINKER THE AFFECT DISSEMINATION MODEL A CRITICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EAMES HOUSE Two projects that explore big questions and provoke critical thinking towards society, design, and architecture as whole.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

MAPPING THE FIELD PROJECT WORKSHEET BACKGROUND CRITICAL QUESTIONS ANTICIPATED OUTCOMES

4 5 7 8

METHODOLOGY DESIGN DOCUMENTS EAMES HOUSE - DATA COLLECTION ACTIVITIES + PROGRAM EXISTING BOUNDARIES METHODOLOGY EXPLAINED METHODOLOGY EXECUTED SHIFTED OUTCOMES EXTRACTIONS

9 10 14 17 18 20 22 32 36

EVALUATING THE ANALYSIS

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WORKS CITED

40

APPENDIX BILIOGRAPHIC MAP PROJECT SCHEDULE

42 43

TABLE

what is a house? ii

what is a house? ii

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THE AFFECT DISSEMINATION MODEL UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - SENIOR RESEARCH STUDIO WINTER 2019 - STUDIO PROFESSOR, CATHERINE HAMEL This senior design research studio focused on social justice and it’s anchor in the potential of architecture as a catalyst for social change. The parameters consisted of understanding theoretical concerns of social justice through architectural design, by exploring the integration of those concerns into design process and solutions.

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The affect dissemination model is a framework, a series of adaptive components which forms a critique on media and information literacy. It is an intervention for the disruption of post truths, an exchanger of knowledge through the process of infusion. “The quality of information we engage largely determines our perspectives beliefs and attitudes”(UNESCO, 2019) and in turn challenges the health of our democracy. Future generations are facing information illiteracy as increase in access to media has prevented the ability to critically assess, use, and contribute content wisely both printed and digitally. The Affect Dissemination Model is a framework, a series of adaptable agents that subvert the distorted information and provoke the disruption of the “noise” empowering citizens to revitalize democracy.


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FAKE NEWS

CLICK BAIT

shatteredmirror.ca

70 % OF CANADA’S AD ONLINE REVENUES ARE FOREIGN COMPANIES

Concept research

Forgas, 1995

Framework

S NES ESS TIME MEL HO AN ALL T IS A H HIG

38% DECLINE IN COVERAGE OF CIVIC AFFAIRS

150.statcan.gc.ca shatteredmirror.ca

Concept research

40% OF CANADIANS INDICATED THEY HAD CONFIDENCE IN THE MEDIA

Site

FRAMEWORK The Affect Dissemination Model was conceived by the disconnection in systems of politics, media, and the people. Research indicates the critical state of the decline in news coverage, and the increase of influence that social media has on citizens’ knowledge. Affect Infusion Model

The concept was formed through the process of Affect Infusion (Forgas 1995), where information exerts

an influence on and becomes incorporated into the judgmental process, as it inhibits the judge’s deliberations, and the subconscious distorts understanding. The intervention becomes the perception of information, it is an architecture of exchange through acts of social agents. It generates an agitation to citizens’ awareness of the falsehoods which influence our democracy.


Time frame

Dissemination + Agitation

DISSEMINATION In distributing this awareness, a mobile intervention can be injected into any site across the city, giving agency to users determined to bring awareness of media and information of the falsehoods that surround us daily. Citizens are able to rent the mobile intervention and reconfigure the design through its system of parts, enabling the basic components to take form in a variety

of ways, giving agency to the user to design any type of campaign to participate in this framework. The time frame of the intervention ranges from minutes to weeks, as it agitates the urban fabric and generates a disruption of space.


INTERVENTION AS AN AGITATION The affect dissemination model can take form as a campaign agent, an ever-changing instillation - where it’s purpose is to call attention to the distraction, to the misdirected information, the false knowledge and post truths that clusters our daily lives - altering our understanding of the world. Agency is given to the user, allowing them to form a collective through the process of deploying these adaptive components, thus brining an agitation to the city.

These components become productive parasites that subvert the erosion of precepting analogies of distorted information being broadcasted. Generating citizens to question, engage, and deliberate the information that is fed to them through mass media, ultimately empowering revitalization of democracy.


3D printed connecting components

3d Printed Intervention Components

Multi-functional shelf components

Graphene Panels + Frames

Multi-functional seating components

3D Printed frame connecting components

TECTONICS The adaptability of the intervention relies on flexibility of its material which, consists of 3d printed graphene components. Graphene is the lightest, and strongest material ever tested. It is transparent, yet holds conductive properties, allowing the intervention to constantly change, adapt, and enable freedom toward the instillation designer. These components went through a series of iterations, which provided an understanding of how the system could be connected in various forms, enabling a quick and easy instillation process.

Connections

Panel

Projection Frames

Component Iteration


APPLICATION - PHONE FARMING An example of an intervention that a user could impose, and agitate the city to spark questions of media power, is to call attention to the use of Phone Farming. Phone Farming is a tool to propagate relevancy. Phones are programed to partake in click-farming, like-farming and link-farming. These tools enabled through algorithms, develop a magnitude of traffic, leading to an increase in exposure and profit. It pushes the campaigns to viral status through deception of fake-likes, fake-shares, and misconstrued information and falsehoods.

Applications such as these, target citizens through social media platforms as they falsely advertise relevancy, and inhibit ones judgment and understanding. Thus, inherently increasing society’s information illiteracy, and contributing to the decline in the health of our democracy.


AFFECT INFUSION IN 2019 “Ignorance is Strength” (1984 George Orwell) and to quote the infamous 45th President of the United States of America, “what you’re seeing and what you are reading is not what’s happening” (Donald J Trump, 2018); have played a duality throughout the President’s residency as citizens constantly compare his speech and attack on “fake news”, to the dystopian novel 1984 - “the party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command” (Orwell). Due to the administration often deflecting criticism by focusing on what is not true, and instead, on what could have been true through a way of re-contextualizing the issues.

Through Affect Infusion (Forgas 1995), citizens are not focusing on the facts, instead are focusing on what they are imagining to be true, or what they believe to be true due to the influence and infusion of mass media consumption. Future generations are facing information illiteracy, as the increase in access to media has prevented the ability to critically assess, use and contribute content wisely both printed and digitally. The Affect Dissemination Model is a framework, a series of adaptable agents that subvert the distorted information and provoke the disruption of the “noise” empowering citizens to revitalize democracy.


A CRITICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EAMES HOUSE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - DESIGN THEORY FALL 2017 - PROFESSOR, JOSHUA TARON Design Theory term project required an in-depth analyzation and critical reading of a significant post-1900 architectural project.

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How does design blur the boundaries of where the work of the designer ends, and that of the occupant begin? This critical question derived from Charles Eames’ belief of architecture as an “unconscious structure”, formed the catalyst in this theoretical investigation of Charles and Ray’s ideology of the House as an “unselfconscious”. The methodology was developed through the extraction of the plans, sections, and isometric drawings. These were then diagrammed to identify the house’s functions, spaces, circulation, and areas of activities, which formed an exercise of mapping out boundaries. Specific program areas were isolated, and new functions were inserted to shift the program boundaries. These boundaries were then identified, and areas of overlap were extracted, enabling the ability to note where these boundaries began to blur. The final step of the methodology took a critical look at the process and provided an opportunity for new information to emerge, ultimately questioning again the boundaries of the designer and occupant.


MAPPING THE FIELD PROJECT WORKSHEET BACKGROUND CRITICAL QUESTIONS ANTICIPATED OUTCOMES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF

METHODOLOGY DESIGN DOCUMENTS EAMES HOUSE - DATA COL ACTIVITIES + PROGRAM EXISTING BOUNDARIES CONTENTS METHODOLOGY EXPLAINE METHODOLOGY EXECUTE SHIFTED OUTCOMES EXTRACTIONS

EVALUATING THE ANALYS WORKS CITED APPENDIX BILIOGRAPHIC MAP PROJECT SCHEDULE

what is a house? ii

what is a house? ii

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STUDIO

“A function of centre of productive activities and a background for their life in work” 1 STORAGE/STUDIO

DARK ROOM

PHOTOSHOOTS KITCHEN DOCUMENTARIES

BEDROOM

MODEL MAKING + DESIGN LIVING ROOM

MEADOW [EXTERIOR SPACES]

PHOTO PRODUCTION

DOCUMENTATION

COOKING

DINNER PARTIES + PERFORMANCES

FILM PRODUCTION VOGUE PHOTOSHOOTS

Everything they produced could be rearranged; no layout was every fi FABRICATION + PROTOTYPE TESTING

Here (Figure 8) we begin to identify further the variety and differentiating scales activities that took place in the Eames house. Images extracted from the data co are extracted demonstrate the connections and how the activities deviated and to shift from in the previously annotated (Figure 1 -3) programmatic elements of house. It becomes more and more evident of the true flexibility of the spaces, b the question still remains if this flexibility was controlled by the designer, or that occupants truly took over the design.

POWER OF 10 [FILM]

ACTIVITIES | PROGRAM

1 John Entenza and Charles Eames, “Case Study Houses 8 and 9 by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen, Architects,” Arts & Architecture, December 1945. pg 44

Figure 8. Axonametric of the Activities + Program

2

“History.” Eames Foundation. 2017. Accessed September 17, 2017. http://eamesfoundation.org/house/h

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OCCUPANT OR DESIGNER?

http://constructionlitmag.com/featured-posts/the-eames-house/ http://eamesfoundation.org/ Modern Architecture Through Case Studies, 1945-1990

In a final review of the analysis, the Eames House produced results that can be extracted and projected; decoded and recoded to the broader society in the manifestation of how architects today, design the world. This project brings a greater awareness to the role of the designer, and questions if the designer’s design should dictate how one functions in the space. Or should the designer create a framework for the occupants to design the way they live, and function in the space.

http://www.eamesoffice.com/ arch daily The work of Charles and Ray Eames : “they transformed their image of the building as a specific and observable object to one that was a more neutral container of space, achieving what Eames had a legacy of invention Details sometimes sought as “unselfconscious architecture”

Robert Judson Clark, Andrea P. A. Belloli. Design in America: The Cranbrook Vision, Detroit Institute of Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) 1925-1950 http://www.artsandarchitecture.com/issues/index.html Q. What are the boundaries of Design? A: What are the boundaries of problems?

Interiview with Charles Eames http://www.eamesoffice.com/

EAMES HOUSE Eames House : Charles and Ray Eames Details

John Neuhart. Eames Design: The Work of The Office of Chalres and Ray Eames. 1989

CHARLES + RAY EAMES Charles Eames, Ray Eames. Editor: Daniel Ostroff. An Eames Anthology: Articles, Film Scripts, Interviews, Letters, Notes, and Speeches. 2015 “The Eameses’ wholehearted belief that design could ‘fix it’ and improve people’s lives remains their greatest lesson”

Studies 1945-1990; Peter Blundell Jones And Eamonn Canniffe, 2007

Albrecht, Donald. The work of Charles and Ray Eames: a legacy of invention. New York: Harry N. Abrams in association with the Library of Congress and the Vitra Design Museum, 2005

Perhaps there is neither a role of the designer nor the occupant, perhaps architecture itself as its own is the unselfconscious.

The “way-it-should-be-ness”: the idea of unselfconsciousness or unpretentiousness and, in a way, is the opposite of style for its own sake. What it meant is that when one looked at a design one did not think ‘how clever’ or ‘strange’ or ‘new.’ Hopefully, one did not notice it all. Ideally, one thought it had been doing whatever it was doing forever.” Eames Primer: Eames Demetrios, 2013

LAURA WHITTINGHAM EVDA 621 :INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN THEORY ASSIGNMENT THREE: EVALUATING THE ANALYSIS

“The partnership of Charles and Ray Eames departed from conventional practice by representing an alternative vision” Modern Architecture Through Case

“It is a kind of personal fame, but one from which the viewer is not alienated. It is not a case of simply admiring their achievements - the abstract, removed fame of the artist, to be admired with awe - but instead is something to take part in” Rachel Stevenson. Living Images: Charles

and Ray Eames “At Home” . Perspecta, Vol. 37, Famous (2005) “eventually everything connects – people, ideas, objects, etc., …the quality of the connections is the key to quality per se.” – CHARLES EAMES; “…everything hangs on something else” – RAY EAMES

Gloria Koenig. Eames.Taschen, 2005 Charles & Ray Eames, 1907-1978, 1912-1988 : Pioneers of Mid-Century Modernism i

BIBLIOGRAPHIC MAP

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INITIAL SHIFTS Figure 15 a + b

DINNING ROOM

ALCOVE PATIO

KITCHEN

LIVING ROOM

UTILITY ROOM

DARK ROOM BATHROOM

COURTYARD

STUDIO

BLURRING + OVERLAPPING BOUNDARIES

Figure 15a. Ground Floor Plan

TABLE OF CONTENTS

MAPPING THE FIELD PROJECT WORKSHEET BACKGROUND CRITICAL QUESTIONS ANTICIPATED OUTCOMES

4 5 7 8

METHODOLOGY DESIGN DOCUMENTS EAMES HOUSE - DATA COLLECTION ACTIVITIES + PROGRAM EXISTING BOUNDARIES METHODOLOGY EXPLAINED METHODOLOGY EXECUTED SHIFTED OUTCOMES EXTRACTIONS

9 10 14 17 18 20 22 32 36

EVALUATING THE ANALYSIS

38

WORKS CITED

40

APPENDIX BILIOGRAPHIC MAP PROJECT SCHEDULE

42 43

Similar to the shifting of the living room, the Eames studio and work space was not truly specific to one location, but dynamic throughout the whole house and site. As we can see in the transformation from the initial shifts (Figure 15 a+b) to the secondary shifts (Figure 16 a + b). In replacing this dynamic function to a more stagnate one, of the bedroom (Figure 14), restrictions become apparent in the flexibility of movement in the shifting. Shifts were isolated to areas that provide more privatized spaces of enclosure vs, that of the open and publicized shifts of the living room and studio.

BEDROOM

[UPPER LIVING ROOM]

STORAGE/ STUDIO [UPPER STUDIO]

DRESSING BATHROOM

Figure 15b. Upper Level Floor Plan SHIFTING

SECONDARY SHIFTS

Figure 16 a + b

PROGRAM CHANGE TO: BEDROOM

Figure 16a. Ground Floor Plan

Figure 16b. Upper Level Floor Plan Figure 14. Shifting the Studio

what is a house? ii

EXISTING PROGRAM: STUDIO

METHODOLOGY EXECUTED

PROGRAM BOUNDARIES

ITERATION #2: THE SHIFTING OF THE STUDIO

LIVING ROOM

STUDIO

SHIFTED OUTCOME BOUNDARIES (RIGHT)

BEDROOM

KITCHEN / DINNING ROOM

COURTYARD / PATIO

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iii

25

The ideology of design as not to be “the self-expression of the designer, [but] it was the occupant’s daily life that would leave its mark on the house” 1

THE EAMES HOUSE DATA COLLECTION ALCOVE PATIO

LIVING ROOM

DINNING ROOM KITCHEN

UTILITY ROOM

DARK ROOM COURTYARD

BATHROOM

Through extensive research, a large collection of data consisting of images as shown below in Figure 6, provides a snap shot into the lives of the Eames and the activities that took place inside and outside of the house. It is in these images that we can start to identify the same spaces, yet with different and varying scales of activities that occurred in them. In Figure 7, extracted moments of these different activities that occur in certain spaces are highlighted and we can being to see the iterations of overlapping and boundaries blurring. These multi-functional spaces are looked at again in the following page as we view the Eames house three dimensional in an axonametric view.

STUDIO

Figure 1. Ground Floor Plan

“good family living machines”

DESIGN DOCUMENTS FLOOR PLANS, FUNCTIONS, PUBLIC / PRIVATE SPACES CIRCULATION

In order to understand the framework of hose the Eamese’ lived, a digital model of the house was produced through a set of sourced 2D drawings1 and compilation of massing models.2 From these drawings and massing models, a dimensionally accurate 3D form was generated and provided a near true representation of the Eames House. Allowing for a better analysis and investigation of how the house was designed to function. From this generated 3D model, the plans, sections and isometric drawings were extracted, and identified the framework of an understanding of how the house was designed and what the intended functions were. Noted through data collection that the grouping of services in both the house and studio, as indicated in plan (Figure 1+2), present a positive and negative rhythm of spaces.3 These various parts are arranged to provide similar kinds of experiences.3

BEDROOM [UPPER LIVING ROOM]

STORAGE/ STUDIO BATHROOM

DRESSING

[UPPER STUDIO]

Figure 6. The Daily Lives of Charles + Ray Eames

Figure 2. Upper Level Floor Plan

Figure 7. A Series of Overlaps of the Daily Activities 1 Torresvarq: https://www.bibliocad.com/library/eames-house_77708. Accessed Oct. 10, 2017 2 Aaron Davies: https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/u2d641f65-ea26-48ba-8c3f-421a60cd3119/EamesHouse. Accessed Oct. 10, 2017. 3 Steele, James. Eames House: Charles and Ray Eames. London: Phaidon, 2007, pg 11

John Entenza and Charles Eames, “Case Study Houses 8 and 9 by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen, Architects,” Arts & Architecture, December 1945. pg 128 *Images were sourced through various search engines, websites and blogs. 1

10

11

14

15

INITIAL SHIFTS Figure 12 a + b

DINNING ROOM

ALCOVE PATIO

KITCHEN

LIVING ROOM

UTILITY ROOM

COURTYARD

DARK ROOM BATHROOM

STUDIO

OCCUPANT OR DESIGNER? BLURRING + OVERLAPPING BOUNDARIES

Figure 11a. Ground Floor Plan

UNCONSCIOUS SHIFT OF THE PROGRAM BOUNDARIES CONSCIOUS FUNCTION / ACTIVITY CHANGE

CONVENTIONAL CONSCIOUS FUNCTION / ACTIVITY

SHIFTING

In the shifting of the living room to a dinning and eating space (Figure 11), we can identify in the initial shifts (Figure 12 a+b) and furthermore in the secondary shifts (Figure 13 a+b), how the conventional living room becomes more prevalent too todays societal norms of the spaces has evolved into a more multi-functional area. The living room boundaries become dominant throughout the whole house and extend beyond to the exterior, identifying that this function does not hold itself to one singular space.

[UPPER LIVING ROOM]

BEDROOM

STORAGE/ STUDIO [UPPER STUDIO]

DRESSING BATHROOM

Figure 11b. Upper Level Floor Plan

EATING SHIFTING

SECONDARY SHIFTS

Figure 13 a + b

BLURRING OF BOUNDARIES

PROGRAM CHANGE TO: DINNING/EATING LIVING ROOM Figure 10. Isolation + Reaction

Figure 12a. Ground Floor Plan

Here, the methodology becomes refined, and begins the true process of understanding and identifying if and when the boundaries begin to shift. This process is done through the isolation of a single programmatic element (and conventional conscious function / activity) and replacing it with another conscious activity that is not conventional to that space. The reaction, or the unconscious shifts that occur in the programmatic boundaries, becomes identified through the transition of these boundaries.

METHODOLOGY ISOLATION + REACTION ILLUSTRATED

Images are used to delineate the programmatic elements/activities that took place in the Eames House. These are then overlapped to expose the shifting, while then overlayed to manifest the blurring of the programmatic boundaries that occur.

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Initial shifts are established through the rearrangement of the identified programmatic element and the one which it is being replaced by. Secondary shifts are depicted and start to question the unconscious shifting reaction of the programmatic boundaries - producing areas of overlap and the beginnings of the blurring of boundaries.

Figure 12b. Upper Level Floor Plan

EXISTING PROGRAM: LIVING ROOM Figure 11. Shifting the Living Room

METHODOLOGY EXECUTED

PROGRAM BOUNDARIES

ITERATION #1: THE SHIFTING OF THE LIVING ROOM

LIVING ROOM

STUDIO

SHIFTED OUTCOME BOUNDARIES (RIGHT)

BEDROOM

KITCHEN / DINNING ROOM

COURTYARD / PATIO

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OCCUPANT OR DESIGNER? Figure 32. Occupant or Designer?

The Eames House as a case study, can be understood further as an investigation to explore the relationship between the designer and the occupant, as previous to the analysis, research indicated that Charles and Ray designed the house to be a neutral container of space1, an unselfconscious architecture. Following the analysis, it is evident that the house was that of only a framework to their daily lives, but new information on programmatic adjacencies, and juxtaposition of public and private spaces within in the house was brought to attention in the closer examination of the spaces.

Figure 31. The Ripple Effect Sectionally

EVALUATING THE ANALYSIS OUTCOMES, QUESTIONS + REFLECTIONS

EXTRACTIONS Figure 31. The Ripple Effect Sectionally

The ultimate role of the house was that of the “shock absorber” which protects, the ever-changing and unique life style of the occupants. The ripple effect sectionally (Figure 31) delineates further the refinement and extraction of secondary shifts which occurred. Images extracted from the data collection are merged into these boundaries, illustrating the results of the activities unconscious movements and the ever-changing lifestyle of the Eames shifted throughout the entire house. Blurring the distinction between design and the occupant. 36

Noted throughout the execution of the methodology, a constant theme reoccurred in the shifting of the boundaries, where the designated public and private spaces constantly overlapped and interchanged with one another, often creating a juxtaposition in programmatic functions, where the bedroom and a highly publicized space, such as the living room, boundaries blurred. This observation sparked to question the relationship to public and private spaces and the fluidity of them; was this a natural occurrence or blurring that already existed? Further investigation noted that due the design of the Eames house, there was only a small boundary of private space, as it was mostly considered public space. The programmatic adjacencies of the house played a large role in the ease and magnitude of the multiple boundary shifts that occurred, thus indicating that the relationship and the proximities of the programs dictated how each space flowed into another, ultimately emphasized the results of blurred boundaries. Questions that arose throughout the process, resulted from the shifting in boundaries, as the once the initial shifts were deployed, and then the secondary, did this then produce a ripple effect, which would then cause all boundaries to unconsciously shift? How does this unconsciously shift the designated program boundaries? This became clearly evident in the shifting of conventional programs, produced boundaries that were

37

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no longer identifiable, one could not indicate where that of one program boundary began and that of another began. This was truly demonstrated in the sectional diagrams, where extracted images shifted together presented a result that traced the movement of the occupant’s daily lives, where they were not bound by the restraints of the predetermined boundaries, yet instead lived in the framework as they chose to. A constant thought was lingering throughout the execution of the methodology after secondary research was conducted in regards to a statement made by Charles: “[design is] a critical and changing area that represents the concerns of society as a whole. None of these areas are static. As client and designer get to know each other, they influence each other. As society’s needs become more apparent, both client and designer expand their own personal concerns to meet these needs.”2 With this statement, and a review of executed methodology, the Eames Case Study presents paradoxical notion to Charles’s statement, and to that of the initial critical questions asked: how can one measure the success of the unconscious structure? How does the designer blur the boundaries of where the work designer ends and that of the occupant begin? How does Charles and Ray develop this ideology of the house as an unselfconscious structure? As Charles noted that the client and designer influence each other as they work together, however, knowing that Charles and Ray designed their home themselves, further questions were exposed - with the goal of the house to function as an unconscious structure, does this consciously or unconsciously affect the design intent? Was Charles and Ray unconsciously designing their house to function in a prescribed consciously, unconscious way?

In a final review of the analysis, the Eames House produced results that can be extracted and projected; or decoded and recoded to the broader society in the manifestation of how architects today design the world. This project brings a greater awareness to the role of the designer, and questions if the designer’s design should dictate how one functions in the space, or should the designer create a framework for the occupants to design the way they live and function in the space? Perhaps there is neither a role of the designer nor the occupant, perhaps architecture itself as its own is the unselfconscious. Robert Judson Clark, Andrea P. A. Belloli. Design in America: The Cranbrook Vision, Detroit Institute of Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) 1925-1950

1

2 John Neuhart. Eames Design: The Work of The Office of Chalres and Ray Eames. 1989, pg 14

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RE-IMAGING ARCHITECTURE SLOT NOTCH + LOCK BIOME DIRTY Two projects that expand the realm of architecture and look to develop future technologies through research based design.


BIOME DIRTY BE DIRTY.

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SLOT NOTCH + LOCK UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - ELECTIVE - RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE WINTER 2019 - PROFESSOR, VERA PARLAC Responsive Architecture focused on theories in the development of the field, through understanding the latest research in cybernetics, biology, material science, synthetic biology, and bioengineering. The final project consisted of speculating on a new possibility for architecture that is integrated, responsive, adaptive, and productive within larger ecologies.

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Slot Notch + Lock, was developed as a group through a series of iterations in understanding how different materials, and locking techniques could generate a component to aggregate, and produce movement through a field. The final iteration consisted of a tripod component of pet-g, which was able to interlock with one another, and create a larger configuration. In order to generate movement, the development of a pneumatic vacuum was created by 3D printing negative molds of the designed muscle, and then silicon was casted to form the muscles. The soft robotic muscle enabled a ripple effect through the field of connected components. This project begins to stimulate new technologies, where cybernetics and architecture meet, and ultimately, creating a new approach and investigation on the way we build and imagine architecture. Group members: Meghan Lamb + Josh Schellenberg My role: shared, and contributed to concept design, research, model development and assembly


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MATERIALS

WOOD

PAPER

BIRCH PANEL

PLASTIC

CARD STOCK

PET-G SHEET

1 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

2

3

COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT

MATERIAL TESTING

PAPER

IPU LA TIO NS

WOOD

WOOD

PAPER

BIRCH PANEL

CARD STOCK

BIRCH PANE

L

PLASTIC

CARD STOCK

PET-G SHEET

LOCK

NOTCH

SLOT

MA N

MOVEMENT + CONNECTIONS

PLASTIC

T

PET-G SHEE

LOCK

NOTCH

?

WOOD

PAPER

?

LOCK

CONNECTION CONTINUITY: SHOULDN’T RELY ON MECHANICAL/ ADDITIONAL FASTENERS NOTCH

COMPONENT ITERATIONS

PLASTICS PET G // 0.04 MM

// 0202

NARROW NECK

4

PET-G SHEET SLOT

PNEUMATIC MOVEMENT

STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY: CAPABLE OF CONSTRUCTION MULTIPLYING TO 10X UNIT SIZE SLOT

PLASTICS PET G // 0.02 MM

NARROW NECK

LONGER SLOT

SHORTER SLOT

WITH NOTCHES

DOUBLE NECKS

5

6

CONNECTION DEVELOPMENT

COORDINATION FINESSING

COORDINATION: CUE PNEUMATICS TO TIME WITH LIGHTING (BIOLUMINESCENT)

?

Development Process

// 0101

COMPONENTS

PLASTIC

CARD STOCK NOTCH

Process PLASTICS PET G // 0.02 MM

PAPER CARD // 0.03 MM

THINER NECK

THINER NECK

COMPONENT CONFIGURATIONS

TESTING GOALS

BIRCH PANEL LOCK

MOVEMENT OF UNIT: BE ABLE TO HANG IN TENSION AND ACT IN COMPRESSION

SLOT

PLASTICS PET G // 0.02 MM

WITH NOTCHES

// 03

03

// 04

04

Component Configurations

CONFIGURATIONS

WIDER NECK

// 05

SOFT MUSCLES 3D PRINTED MOLDS

05

Component Iterations

// 01

// 02

01

// 03

02

03

TOP MOLD FLOOR OF MUSCLE

MIDDLE MOLD VOID INSIDE MUSCLE

BASE MOLD EXTERIOR OF MUSCLE

PNEUMATIC CONNECTION

// 02

// 03

04

// 01 01

// 04

TOP PLATE ACRYLIC // 6 MM

SEAL MOLD ACRYLIC // 12 MM

SOFT MUSCLES CONNECTIONS

03

BASE PLATE ACRYLIC // 6 MM

SOFT MUSCLES CONNECTIONS

// 01

02

SOFT MUSCLES SEALING STRATEGIES

SOFT MUSCLES DESIGN ITERATIONS

01

MOLDS

Soft Muscles - 3D Printed Molds

Field Studies - Pneumatic Vacuum

01 // 01

// 01 // 02

// 0202

SECOND MOLD ITERATION FULL LUNG WITH CONNECTORS

THIRD MOLD ITERATION DOUBLE LUNG WITHOUT CONNECTORS

FOURTH MOLD ITERATION HALF LUNG WITH FLOOR

// 0303

Soft Muscles - Design Iterations

MUSCLES

Soft Muscles - Sealing Strategies

02

// 02

MUSCLE

SMALL ORIGINA CONNECTION WITH MODIFICA SMALL ORIGINAL CONNECTION WITH MODIFICATIONS

03

LARGE 3D PRINT CONNECTION

// 03 SECOND ITERATION // 04

// 0404

SMALL ORIGINAL CONNECTION

LARGE ORIGINAL MOLD

// 03

FIRST MOLD ITERATION BALLOON BODY

SMALL ORIGINA CONNECTION

SMALL ORIGINAL MOLD

LARGE 3D PRINTED CONNECTION

04

STORE BOUGHT AQUATIC CONNECTION STORE BOUGHT AQUATIC CONNECTION

// 04 FINAL MUSCLE ITERATION

Connections

SEALS


ARCHITECTURAL VISUALIZATIONS

Architectural Visualization

PROCESS PHOTOS

Architectural Visualization

PROJECT SUCCESSES

LESSONS LEARNED

FUTURE CONSIDERATIONS

»» Development and refinement of the component through material testing, of varying thicknesses, orientation, and creating a field using multiple scales of four different sizes and iterations.

»» Designing the integration of the pneumatic muscles with the object component was not as strong as initially desired.

»» Beginning the design process by creating and testing simple versions of soft muscles could have contributed to a better overall understanding of the function of both the (dragon skin) material and the physics of the pneumatic system.

»» Iterations of possibilities to connect the components to create a field through either the component itself or using additional support through eyelets to create stronger connections.

»» Behaviour of the muscles was a weakness we encountered throughout the testing phase: the movement of the muscles to collapse along the x-axis instead of the »» Use of inflation instead of suction could have allowed z-axis was a hurdle to our experimentation. for opportunities to test. »» Throughout the iterative process, we were typically pursuing an additive design process - trying to make the existing iteration function by adding other elements instead of looking at the potential for re-design.

»» Harnessing the passive movement of our component more could have contributed to a more successful design of the pneumatic muscle. »» Spending more time on designing integration of component with pneumatic muscle would have been an advantage to the overall performance of the project integration of component.


BIOME DIRTY RESHAPE 17 WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY COMPETITION UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - DIRECTED STUDY - COMPUTATION, ANIMATION + BIOLOGY SPRING/SUMMER 2017 - PROFESSORS, JOSHUA TARON + MAHDIAR GHAFFARIAN This directed study lead by Mahdiar, was a platform for generating research-based design projects. The projects focused their research area in computational design, dynamism in design and the use of biological phenomena in design. During the course, our group entered into the RESHAPE 17 Wearable Technology Competition, which explored the concept of Programmable Skins. The proposals were to focus on wearables as prosthetic skins, and to provide augmented functions, while integrating holistic strategies of programmable materials.

--

BIOME DIRTY was designed for the RESHAPE 17 Wearable Technology Competition, in which myself and two classmates (Jordan Demer and Fiona Ramsay), along with our supervisor Mahdiar Ghaffarian, placed in the top ten finalist. BIOME DIRTY calls attention to our obsession with cleanliness in the face of reality where, global climate change, and the destruction of our natural ecosystems has become increasingly pressing. This proposal encompasses a 3D printed structure of a jacket, which houses fungus spores that are contained through a symbiotic relationship with the wearer’s microbiome, and their exposure to surrounding environments. BIOME DIRTY therefore functions as a feedback device for the wearer around a larger issue: communicating the health of their own bodies and their surrounding environments.


BIOME DIRTY BE DIRTY.

27


BIOME DIRTY As we face the reality of global climate change and the destruction of our natural ecosystems, the topic of sustainability has become increasingly pressing and present. While sustainability encompasses many things, we believe that it relies on our willingness to be dirty. BIOME DIRTY calls attention to our obsession with cleanliness. The jacket’s deterioration in overly clean environments exposes the incongruence of our modern human lifestyle with the ways in which nature achieves sustainability. BIOME DIRTY specifically highlights our preoccupation with antibacterial environments as this compulsion is detrimental, not only to the natural world, but to our bodies as well. The 3D printed structure of the jacket houses fungus spores that are contained through a symbiotic relationship with the wearer’s microbiome and their exposure to surrounding environments. In research done on human microbiomes, it has been found that less bacterial diversity leads to more fungal growth (Lynch, 2014). Wearer’s exposed to overly clean (i.e. less bacterially diverse) environments, with similarly unhealthy microbiomes, allows the spores of the fungus to germinate, push out of the structure, and begin to deteriorate the jacket. Ultimately, the clean geometry of the initial form is overtaken by the organic growth of the fungus. For a wearer with bacterially diverse surroundings and microbiomes, the fungal spores within the structure of the jacket are contained, allowing the jacket to maintain its clean, geometric form. Initial costs would include an application development, as the customization of the jacket relies on a body scanning app that creates the geometry for the structure to be modeled around. This gives the jacket an aspect of generative design. It also means that the ability to develop the jacket exists within maker spaces with 3D printers or robot arms that can build out the structure. Synthetic leathers are becoming increasingly available, and the leather of the jacket would be grown around the 3D printed structure, giving each jacket made a form unique to the wearer. The fungal spores would be harvested, and bred to be implanted into the structure of the jacket. All of the materials used are sustainable and biodegradable. The organic nature of the jacket means that when the fungal growth overtakes the structure of the jacket on wearers in unhealthy environments, the jacket will be fully biodegradable, giving diversity back to the environment, or returning to the environment that which the wearer has taken away. This aspect of the jacket continues the cycle of the wearer, the wearable, and the world, as the jacket becomes reintegrated into the environment as organic material. BIOME DIRTY therefore functions as a feedback device for the wearer around a larger issue: communicating the health of their own bodies and their surrounding environments. Can our wearables offer more to us and to the environment? We believe that such essential aspects of our daily lives has the potential to be more than simply worn, but to be communicative, and to be in relationship with us, and with our surroundings. See video here: http://youreshape.io/reshape17_biome_dirty/ Group members: Mahdiar Ghaffarian, Fiona Ramsay + Jordan Demer My role: shared, and contributed to concept design, research, rendering, diagrams + board layout.


1. Wearer's exposure to bacterial diversity from their surrounding environments. 2. Presence of bacterial diversity within the wearer's microbiome. 3. Bacterial diversity mitigates fungal growth within the jacket. 4. The containment of the fungus within the structure of the jacket ensures that the jacket to maintain its form. I. Hyper-clean environments destroy bacterial diversity. II. These kinds of environments jeopardize the wearer's natural biological and physiological functions (immune system, for example) through a changed microbiome. III. Less bacterial diversity allows greater fungal growth within the jacket. This relationship is based on research of human microbiomes and disease. IV. As fungal growth increases the jacket's initially clean geometric form deteriorates and is taken over by the natural growth of the fungus.

95R1 BACTERIALLY DIVERSE ENVIRONMENTS

HYPER-CLEAN ENVIRONMENTS

WORLD

HEALTHY MICROBIOME OF WEARER

CONTAINED FUNGAL SPORES

UNHEALTHY MICROBIOME OF WEARER

FUNGAL SPORE GERMINATION

JACKET MAINTAINS FORM

JACKET DETERIORATION

WEARER

WEARABLE

JACKET DETERIORATES

JACKET MAINTAINS FORM

95R1

95R1

The jacket consists of three layers: the formal structure (that also contains the fungal spores), the synthetic leather sewn into the structure, and the fungal growth that may grow out from within the structure.

3D PRINTED STRUCTURE CONTAINS FUNGUS

SYNTHETIC LEATHER

MATERIAL FABRICATION

Material of the jacket is embedded with fungal spores that are contained through a symbiotic relationship with the microbes on the wearer's skin, the healthier the wearer's microbiome, the healthier the jacket.

MODEL BODY

CUSTOMIZABLE FABRICATION

FUNGAL GROWTH

CREATE STRUCTURE

Our obsession to be clean is formally represented by the initial aesthetic of the jacket: geometric, with clean, hard lines. The jacket's exposure to the wearer's skin, and to the wearer's surrounding environments, dictates the longevity of the initial form. Exposure to healthy conditions of bacterial diversity maintains the jacket's initial form, with the fungus contained. Under unhealthy, overly sterile conditions, the material of the jacket begins to break down as the fungus embedded within the seams is able to overtake the structure of the jacket.

INDUCE GROWTH

GET GET DIRTY! DIRTY! APP

BODY SCAN

DESIGN

3D PRINT

LEATHER

GROW


ARCHITECTURE + THE URBAN CONTEXT INTERSECT SHIFT CONNECT + COLLIDE Three projects that explore different theories, algorithms and concepts toward generating programmatic design through methods of intersection, shifts and collisions, connecting the relationship between architecture and it’s surrounding context.


31


INTERSECT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY - INTRO TO ARCHITECTURE SUMMER 2015 This summer program in New York consisted of a 5-week design studio, where each week’s assignment amalgamated into a final design project. The main site was located at the Cathedral of St. John The Devine, where the first assignment involved the creation of a handmade celestial garment, to be worn through the Cathedral. Next was a threshold study, where detailed scaled drawings of elevations, plans, and sections, were drawn of the Cathedral and our current living spaces. Following this, using the characters of the short story, “Cathedral” as the clients, the floor plans of our living space and the Cathedral were integrated together to create an intensified living space for the clients. Finally, a sketch model along with a section, axonometric, and plan, was to be designed to inhabit a vestry, and a ice cream shop, within the existing Cathedral floor plan.

--

Intersect began in a process of exploring the construction of a handmade celestial garment, while walking through the Cathedral of St. John The Divine, with a heightened awareness of how the garment moves and feels. From this experience, it informed how the two provided programs of a vestry, and ice-cream shop, could co-exist with one another inside the existing Cathedral. The constraints were derived from the intensification, and openness, in the construction and wearing of the garment. Ultimately, generating a specific pattern of breathing. This juxtaposition curated the exploration in the design and understanding of interstitial spaces between programs.


33


Sight-lines

Breathe

Sketch model

Evolution

Plan


Section

PROCESS The diagram “Evolution” depicts how each project of this summer course has continued to build upon one another. It is an analysis of progression of the cathedral floor plan, which created the guidelines for the sketch model boundaries. Sight-lines through the sketch model were discovered by weaving string though my model to find a direct, un-obscured, sight line. This analyzed the open and closed spaces within the structure. In the diagram “Breathe”, parallel lines were drawn to illustrate the intensification of openness, and constriction of the garment, which generated this pattern of breathing. This structure’s plan plays with the juxtaposition of public vs. private, to relate the public quality of an ice-cream shop and the need for privacy in a vestry. The section was then cut to illustrate where the model had the most open and constrained areas.

Axonometric


SHIFT UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO III: INTERMEDIATE STUDIO FALL 2017 - PROFESSOR: JOSHUA TARON Intermediate Studio looks at material and technical complexities of the human environment and the impact that human constructs and infrastructures have on urban ecologies. This studio examines conditions, and forces that influence and shape programmatic, spatial and formal expression of the city to create social and cultural conditions of the place. A cross-sectional urbanism, where programmatic combinations are deployed over a series of connected sites that form an urban artery in the City of Calgary.

--

This project explores the possibility of reconstruction in the urban environment using SIFTS: Scale Invariant Feature Transformation. This is an algorithm which uses similar technologies as image facial recognition, except, it is applied through the use of city surveillance cameras to gather data on the urban context. Questions derived from research on SIFTS algorithms provided the conceptual explorations of the design and program: How can understanding SIFT imaging inform explorations in the urban environment [layers]? Does SIFT imaging exploit the architectural boundaries [site analysis]? How can SIFTS shift the program [overlaps + blurring of boundaries]? How can SIFTS reconstruct the urban environment [fragmentation: stitching the urban environment]? Intensities of the remapped SIFT images collected from an in-depth site analysis of programmatic explorations were then calculated to provide a methodology for generating form and projecting specific programmatic adjacencies. These projections allowed for a shift in the generic program identified throughout the broader site, and produced a diverse organization of the program within the building, through SIFTS that were projected and intersected together. This process of remapping, decoding, and recoding the manipulation of the SIFT algorithms onto the urban context enabled the re-imagination of how the City of Calgary can be viewed, constructed, and re-constructed.


37


Position of cameras

Frames per second

Image collection

SIFTED images


1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.

1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.

Reconstruction of images 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.

PROCESS SIFTS provide the opportunity to see the urban context through computationally deconstructing images into a set of unique features that can be identified + connected across a multi-perspectival image set1. Using this process of image retrieval, object recognition, image stitching, SIFTS are deployed onto the site, generating an avenue to the digital reconstruction of the site2.

Joshua M. Taron, Matthew Parker, Drawing Disruptions: Representing Automated Distortions of Multi-Perspectival Form, TAD, Volume 1, 2017 - Issue 2: Simulations: Modeling, Measuring, and Disrupting Design. 2 Jason. S Johnson, Matthew Parker, This is Not A Glitch - Algorithms and Anomalies in Google Architecture, Acadia 2014 1


SIFT Logic

Input image

Image gradients

Key point descriptors

Deployed sift descriptors

PROCESS [LAYERS] Using AI logic (similar to facial recognition) through the use of surveillance cameras, the processes of SIFT algorithms can provide new ways gathering information on the urban environment. SIFTS; scale invariant feature transformation is an algorithms

Images being sifted together

in which feature descriptors are extracted on an image’s pixel, providing contextual information which then reduces the image to a large number of distinctive features.

SIFT image outcome

Extracted vectors


SIFT

Extract vectors

Project composite data onto allowable FAR massing planes

Map composite data onto allowable FAR massing planes

Map composite data onto existing site planes

What information can be identified?

What information can be identified?

What massing forms can be produced?

Are there intersections; intensities..being produced?

ALGORITHM DEPLOYED | METHODOLOGY

SITE CONTEXT

Intensities of the remapped SIFT images were calculated to provide a methodology for generating form and projecting specific programmatic adjacencies. These projections allowed for a shift in the generic program identified throughout the broader site, and produced a diverse organization of the program within the building, as the SIFTS were projected and intersected together.

The site analysis focused on areas that were over saturated in similar programmatic elements surrounding the specific site. Images of these programs were taken and where processed through the SIFT algorithm and then projected back on to the site, generating new information of site context, the urban environment and patterns of circulation.

10th ave SW

4th street SW


PROGRAM Mapping and projecting the broader context of the urban fabric, onto the site provided the generation of the chosen program. These program elements were also selected based on their correlation to surveillance, and cameras accounted for - providing an avenue for the SIFT algorithm. These elements were then extracted and multiplied to generate intensification of the existing program. Intersections of the program where then projected onto the generated form, and enabled the identification of the intensities in overlaps and intersections.

25%

Retail

Office

Brewery + bar 4,000 sqm

40%

average number of cameras: 10-15*

12,000 sqm

15%

average number of cameras: 20*+

Park/outdoor event space 1,800 sqm

average number of cameras:5-15*

park office

Urban context

office bar

ret

ail

e c fi f o

20%

2,000 sqm

average number of cameras:15-20*


Sifted massing


SIFTED level one

SIFTED level two

SIFTED level three

PROGRAM ADJACENCIES + SHIFTING OF THE PROGRAM The aggregation and accumulation of SIFT projections provide areas of tension and intensity, as portions of the building become inhabitable, while other projections produce larger, open spaces; truly deconstructing any normative space. These projections allowed for a shift in the generic program identified throughout the broader site and produced a diverse organization of the program within the building, as the SIFTS were projected and intersected together.

office

Urban section

office

office


Level four

Level five

Level six

outdoor event space

brewery + bar retail

office

office outdoor event space

office retail brewery + bar office retail brewery + bar park / outdoor event space

parking


Level one

Bar interior render

Plaza

Lobby

Retail

Office

Lobby interior render


Level two

Lobby

Retail

Office

SHIFTED PLANS This methodology of remapping, decoding, and recoding SIFTS, allowed for the intersection of varied programmatic spaces on the interior of the building, enabling a mixture of functions throughout the structure which then curated a diverse experience on each level. Program adjacencies developed through this remapping process included intersections of office space with retail space and leisure space. The decoding and recoding ultimately produced converging interior geometries, deconstructing any normative space, allowing structure to form provocative programmatic spaces.

Office interior render

Level three

Lobby

Retail

Office

Bar


SIFTS, the reconstruction of the urban environment


CONNECT + COLLIDE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO V: TOKYO SENIOR RESEARCH STUDIO FALL 2018 SEMESTER ABROAD TOKYO, JAPAN STUDIO PROFESSOR: BRIAN SINCLAIR Done in partners, this studio focused on in-depth research and observation of Tokyo typologies, social, cultural and environmental relationships between the public realm, architectural form, cultural identity and a sense of place. The intervention is to be designed within the urban fabric with a goal to synthesize, existing and future urban conditions, and to acknowledge, reflect and celebrate the identity and culture of Tokyo.

--

This project explores the phenomenon of dividual1 spaces, through extensive research and analysis of Tokyo and it’s citizens. Connect + Collide plays on the temptation of risk, a-choose-your-own adventure experience that entices views and attractions, pulling users out of their comfort zone, fostering opportunities for connection and communication, while maintaining the desired need for privacy - this duality plays on the threshold of public and private in the collision of programs, and generating spontaneity in the grey-zone(s). Connect + Collide brings dividual programs together though the collisions of programs, inturn, generating hybrid programs for a spectacle and celebration of research based human centered design. My role: 3D modeling, landscape design, renders and graphic representations, shared concept design, program strategies, and shared research and writing. My partner (Meghan Lamb) focused on orthographic drawings - sections and plans, and shared concept graphic representation.


53


JAPAN’S POPULATION IS ISOLATED

Deaths now outpace births, marriage is plummeting, and young people aren’t having sex. The media are calling it sekkusu shinai shokogun, or “celibacy syndrome”—an alarming trend that has the Japanese government funneling tax dollars into speed dating and matchmaking services over fears of an impending economic collapse.

PRIVACY IS SCARCE MULTI-GENERATIONAL HOUSEHOLDS HIGH POPULATION DENSITY THE RISING AGE OF MARRIAGE

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

INCREASING LIFE EXPECTANCIES

PRIVATE VS PUBLIC DIVIDUAL SPACES

DIVIDUAL THEORY URBAN PHENOMENON

SOCIAL FACTORS CHARACTERISTICS

EXISTING TYPOLOGIES MANGE KISSA LOVE HOTEL KEKKO LAND KARAOKE BOX

AGGREGATE SCALE

Concept


Japanese people are experiencing drastic urbanization, lack of privacy, alienation, public mental health issues, and ‘extinction of experience’1. Cities like Tokyo, chaotic and organized, congested and vast, reinforce the sociological definition of Louis Wirth’s Urbanism as a way of life, where contributing factors of population density, size, and social heterogeneity affect social behaviour beyond the built environment2 . A distinct urban personality is generated in Tokyo’s duality of loneliness and the urge to find privacy yet having the desire to communicate becomes central to unexpected collision. This contributes for the need for Dividual Spaces - rentable spaces that are available for domestic activities1 . Our project aims to alleviate the rising issue of loneliness through the collision of dividual activities and providing opportunities to pull people out of their comfort zones and into the realm of possibility and human connection. Focusing on Odaiba as an ‘experimental playground’ of spectacles and large-scale building types including themed malls, amusement rides, racing courses, digital art museums, and iconic buildings with unique geometries. Dividual spaces1 exist but they are spread out and isolated within the confines of larger building: choosing one specified private activity currently denies the users the opportunity to interact with others. In designing the site, the approach gates are used as totems which mark the beginning of the journey, inspired from traditional Japanese Tori Gates. Moments of expression in the water courtyards are derived from the open spaces presented in the aggregation of the architectural program above. Finally, upon arrival at the entrance core, users are greeted with digital screens where one can choose their own adventure on the app to get a printed map leading them on their journey. Using the Japanese Sento as the primary program with the most structured circulation as an anchor, we then placed closed programs at the rear for shelter from northern winds and open program to the southern ocean side for water views and warmer conditions. Clustering the other primary programs – Mange Café, Love Hotel, Karaoke Bar – with collective programs around the core while pushing the most individualistic programs to the perimeters (a play of the smallest units of activity being the closest to the public realm). Extruding programs into the horizontal planes, we brought the most public programs to the top where the circulation journey beings allowing for enticement and curiosities to be piqued by the programs within view below. We then aggregated the primary programs based on the commonalities: where spaces like retail, cafes, or bars could become our secondary programs. The extruded program spaces become courtyards below and the boxes that have collided are now interesting programmatic hybrids. We can see that each of these layers can be pushed together to create a complex series of maze-like elements where users are taken on an adventure, this creates a spectacle to entice passersby to participate. Unexpected collisions aim to entice the temptation of risk and pull users out of their comfort zones into moments of communication and interaction. The architecture aims to alleviate Tokyo’s crisis of loneliness and the duality of need for privacy, due to lack of space in the home and the surrounding chaotic city. This is done through the collision of these dividual spaces, in forming new hybrid spaces, connected through thresholds of public to private gradients and intertwining gray zones that generate opportunities of spontaneity. Caballero, Jorge Almazán, and Yoshiharu Tsukamoto. “Tokyo Public Space Networks at the Intersection of the Commercial and the Domestic Realms Study on Dividual Space.” Journal of Asian Architecture and Building Engineering, vol. 5, no. 2, 2006, pp. 301–308., doi:10.3130/jaabe.5.301. 2 Wirth, Louis. “Urbanism as a Way of Life.” American Journal of Sociology, vol. 44, no. 1, 1938, pp. 1–24., doi:10.1086/217913. 1


Form

Approach

TYPOLOGIES Odaiba, Tokyo, is spectacle in nature as an experimental playground, which provided inspiration of form from the surrounding iconic buildings. Tokyo Typologies that were analyzed, help define the interstitial spaces that connect the primary dividual programs. These included: Open Air lobbies, Airing dirty laundry, Coexistence, and Domestic Rentals

Form inspiration

private public

AIRING DIRTY LAUNDRY

OPEN-AIR LOBBIES

PUBLIC / PRIVATE THRESHOLD GRAY ZONES ONE STOP SHOP LOVE HOTEL KARAOKE SENTO RETAIL

PRIVACY + COMMUNICATION

DOMESTIC RENTALS

COEXIST

Urban typologies


Tokyo

SITE SPECTACLE DIVIDUAL TRANSIT BUILDABLE AREA

PAN

FUJI

IG OB KY

TO

TV

L ITA

IG RI D

MO

Site plan + analysis

Site context

NIC

ASO

AR

T

HT

SIG

Odaiba has a vast, scaleless environment compared to the dense streets of Tokyo. The bridge located in the center of the island is a connecting corridor between two transit stations, posing a unique opportunity to create a node for the surrounding scale. The gates are placed before one begins their journey onto the bridge on either side - allowing users to be enticed from far beyond the confines of our site. The deviating pathways through water contributed to our own concept of building a city, while allowing the opportunity “walk around� the uplifted city, enticing citizens. Finally, upon arrival at the entrance core, users are greeted with digital screens where one can choose their own adventure on the app to get a printed map to lead them on their journey.

0

Urban pulls

20

40


bu

ild

ab

le

area

avg. height

clo

sed

op

en

1

al ntr

re

Co

Ce

collective

individual

nto

Se

e

qu

Se

al

du

ivi

ind

2

e nc

ctive

lle

co

public

individual

al

du

ivi

ind

e+ ctiv

l

ua

ivid

Ind

public

program collisions

3

4

c+

bli

Pu

SINGING SINGING

LOVING LOVING

te va

Pri

5

ns

tio

ec

nn

Co

collective

individual

individual

s+

6

ur

Co

public

s

ion

llis

Co

program collisions

24 HRS 7 DAYS

shared social

private

BROWSING BROWSING

BATHING BATHING

private

lle

Co

rd tya

NOOK 50 SQ.M

shared social

private

RETAIL SPECIAL 100 SQ.M

RETAIL GENERAL 100 SQ.M

YAKATORI BAR 100 SQ.M

Program parameters

24 HRS 7 DAYS

NOOK 50 SQ.M

GENERAL RECEPTION 100 SQ.M

RETAIL SPECIAL 100 SQ.M

RETAIL GENERAL 100 SQ.M

Program breakdown

DESIGN SEQUENCE

PROGRAM Parameters for the program consisted of: cores, the sento sequence, collective and individual spaces, public and private spaces, connections, courtyards and collisions. The program is broken-down by the primary Dividual programs. These were then aggregated based on the commonalities of their user groups, hours of operations, and the amenities they provided. Spaces like retail, cafes, or bars become the secondary programs. The primary programs were pushed and pulled based the parameters, and relation to their collective or individualistic nature and/or their closed or open plan in terms of their architectural description. The secondary programs were then inserted over the typical pathways to create adjacencies for shared amenities and social mixing opportunities.

1

4

MAIN CORES

HYDRAULIC ELEVATORS

STRUCTURE + EGRESS

2 GLASS INFILL FACADE + SKIN

PRIMARY CIRCULATION + EXITING

4 SOCIAL MIXING SECONDARY PROGRAMS

3

5

OBJECTS

MOVING SIDEWALKS

PRIMARY PROGRAMS

Design sequence

NOOK 50 SQ.M

CAFE FOOD 200 SQ.M

SECONDARY CIRCULATION + SERVICES

MILK BAR 100 SQ.M

NOOK 50 SQ.M


HEIRARCHY OF CIRCULATION

OPAQUE PROGRAMS TO FACE STREET SIDE

COLLECTIVE PROGRAMS

MANGA CAPSULES 100 SQ.M

INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMS TO PUBLIC REALM

M.SHOWER 50 SQ.M

KARAOKE BOX (SM) 100 SQ.M

HOTEL ROOMS 100 SQ.M

SENTO MALE LOCKER 400 SQ.M

KARAOKE BOX (LG) 100 SQ.M

SENTO MALE OPEN 200 SQ.M

SENTO RECEPTION UNIV. LOCKER 200 SQ.M

CORE

SENTO FEMALE LOCKER 400 SQ.M

MANGA CAPSULES 100 SQ.M

KARAOKE BOX (LG) 100 SQ.M

MANGA CAFE 100 SQ.M

SENTO FEMALE OPEN 200 SQ.M

SENTO FEMALE CLOSED 100 SQ.M

SENTO FEMALE CLOSED 100 SQ.M

F.SHOWER 50 SQ.M

M.SHOWER 50 SQ.M

KARAOKE BOX (SM) 100 SQ.M

HOTEL ROOMS 100 SQ.M

SENTO UNIVERSAL OPEN 200 SQ.M

INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMS TO PUBLIC REALM

SENTO MALE CLOSED 100 SQ.M

MANGA CAPSULES 100 SQ.M NOOK 50 SQ.M

SENTO MALE LOCKER 400 SQ.M

SENTO RECEPTION UNIV. LOCKER 200 SQ.M

2

1

KARAOKE BOX (SM) 100 SQ.M YAKATORI BAR 100 SQ.M HOTEL ROOMS 100 SQ.M

NOOK 50 SQ.M

KARAOKE BOX (LG) 100 SQ.M

SENTO MALE OPEN 200 SQ.M

GENERAL RECEPTION 100 SQ.M

RETAIL SPECIAL 100 SQ.M

SENTO MANGA FEMALE CAPSULES CLOSED 100 SQ.M 100 SQ.M RETAIL SENTO FEMALE LOCKERSPECIAL NOOK 400 SQ.M 100 SQ.M 50 SQ.M F.SHOWER 50 SQ.M

RETAIL GENERAL 100 SQ.M

CORE

MANGA CAFE 100 SQ.M

CORE

3 KARAOKE CAFE BOX (LG) FOOD 200 SQ.M 100 SQ.M

RETAIL GENERAL 100 SQ.M

MILK BAR 100 SQ.M SENTO FEMALE OPEN 200 SQ.M

KARAOKE BOX (SM) 100 SQ.M

STANDARD CIRCULATION

1

NOOK 50 SQ.M

EXITING + EGRESS

HOTEL ROOMS 100 SQ.M

MAIN CORES

SENTO UNIVERSAL OPEN 200 SQ.M

2 PRIMARY PROGRAMS HYDRAULIC ELEVATORS

UPPER PLAN

TRANSPARENT PROGRAMS TO FACE WATER SIDE

LEVEL NINE CORE

3 SECONDARY PROGRAMS MOVING SIDEWALKS

4 INTERIOR CIRCULATIONS STAIRS + SOCIAL PLATFORMS

CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

SENTO + POOLS

PRIMARY PROGRAMS

Program logic through push + pull

SECONDARY PROGRAMS

COLLISIONS

Circulation + connection

INTERMEDIATE PLAN

PROCESS

LEVEL FIVE

Circulation and connections were designed with sequential pathways between primary programs if one’s journey is standardly prescribed. In contrast, an atypical circulation with the integration of the secondary programs allows for users to interact with as many programs as possible while approaching their destination. There are four types of circulation methods: cores for egress, hydraulic elevators in between primary programs, moving sidewalks between secondary programs, and stairs as internal circulation. LOWER PLAN

The design sequence clarifies bringing the program, circulation, and LEVEL ONE form together: first are cores for structure and exiting; panes of glass to emulate ants being on display; the platonic shapes are suspended in this box, housing the combinations of primary programs; connected by vertical elevators; dispersing our secondary programs throughout; and finally connecting through pathways. In axo, each of these layers can be pushed together to create a complex series of maze like elements where users are taken on an adventure, this creates a spectacle to entice passerby to participate. SINGING LOVING BROWSING BATHING


The three case study collisions were created based on integrating senses with the mixed programs to develop architectural elements:

COLLISIONS + HYBRIDS

GROUNDING VIRTUAL

DN

NOOK WASHROOM

DN

CATERED VIE

WASHROOM

UP

LIGHT WELL

NOOK below

ATRIUM SPACE

STAIR A

DN

Glimpses to the natural world outside ground those living in the virtual world of the manga cafes. Allowing chances for different layers of connection through views (to spaces below), passing by interaction (with social nooks), or even shared spaces with social gathering and communal amenities (in the common reading area, if the user so desires). By creating a cut through buildings and light wells, allowed the formation of atrium space to bring in lots of light, and create views to nature for users.

Hybrid plan of browsing and light

0

2.5

5

DN

MUSICAL MOVEMENT UP

Tunes from the karaoke rooms seep through grated walls into the sento showers allowing others to sing along. This form is particularly porous, being one of the most normative programs, yet, teases people’s desires to be seen. Tunes from the karaoke rooms seep through grated walls into the sento below allowing others to sing along, as one-way mirrored windows allow dancers to enjoy jamming while bathers observe.

DN

TO CHA NGE RO OM

0

Hybrid section of bathing, and singing (sound)

2.5

5

NUDE ILLUSIONS STAIR B UP

DN

DN

TO YA K

UP

DN

STAIR A

UP

A translucent wall at sento allows for love hotel users to get a glimpse of naked bodies. Typical room layouts are broken up by angled walls and within the rooms themselves there are moments with direct views into the sentos. The mix between love hotels and the larger sento pools create an integrated sharing of the atrium space where love hotel goers can look on to the pool below.

FILTERED LIGHT

MECHANICAL SP

0

Hybrid plan of bathing and loving (sight)

5

10


FROM CAFE TO KARAOKE BAR

EWS TO NATURE

LS

INTERIOR STAIRS

HYDRAULIC ELEVATOR

0

2.5

5

RI BAR

TO YAKATO

GRATE FOR SOUND EXTERIOR VIEWS FILTERED VIEWS

HEY, I JUST MET YOU AND THIS IS CRAZY BUT HERE'S MY NUMBER SO CALL ME MAYBE

MS

KATO RI

FILTERED LIGHT VIEWS TO EXTERIOR

WATER DISTRIBUTION FROM CORE

MECHANICAL SPACE

FROM SENTO

0

2.5

5

LIGHT WELL TO POOL

VIEWS TO EXTERIOR

BAR

TO KARAOKE BAR

PACE

0

2.5

5


WHICH WHICH ADVENTURE ADVENTURE


EE WILL WILL YOU YOU CHOOSE? CHOOSE?


ARCHITECTURE AS WHOLE SYSTEMS CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS One project which aims to understand comprehensive building systems and technologies through architecture as whole system.


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CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - STUDIO IV: COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO WINTER 2018 - STUDIO PROFESSOR: ALAN COLLYER Done in partners, comprehensive studio focused on whole building philosophies and technologies through the concentrated lens in designing an institute for human rights, values, and vision. The proposal of a 2000m2 institute located in Olympic Plaza in the heart of downtown Calgary, is required to generate relationships between architectural form, its tectonic and material articulation, its cultural resonance and its environmental impacts. The design, and its systems, including interrelationships with context (site, climate, regulatory structures, customs, etc), are explored through the comprehensive development of spatial, structural, enclosure, and environmental systems.

--

Our centre for Environmental Human Rights seeks to communicate the links between human rights and the environment through the exploration of trans-boundary issues, and commonalities that bind us together. This project explores a contemporary Human Rights issue that connects human freedoms to the protection of the environment. We are all connected through environmental commonalities, and the abuse of the environment around the world affects our basic human rights and freedoms. My role: graphic representations, renders, landscape design, detail drawings, glazing strategies and development, shared concept design, shared 3d and physical modeling. My partner (Sara Sparks) focused on 3D + physical modeling, mechanical and structural strategies.


67


East Elevation

South Elevation

West Elevation

Site + Landscape Plan

North Elevation

East Winter Ext


PROCESS + SITE The Centre for Environmental Rights is sited in Calgary’s Olympic Plaza, located in the downtown commercial core. Taking inspiration from iceberg health and its direct connection to Environmental Human Rights, our formal development was influenced by simulating calving. The landscape contains transect paths and varying terraces that connect various important adjacencies of social, political, cultural and economic which play an integral role in environmental rights. These transects intersect through our landscape and building; connecting through environmental commonalities. As seen in elevation, the glazing pattern was developed through geometric formations of icebergs and has three levels of translucency.

AVE

SE

Form concept

6TH

Bow River

MACL

MACL

EOD

SE

SE

SE

AVE

AVE

7TH

7TH

ET S

10 - 15 km/h [10m] 15 - 20 km/h [10m]

RIV

MACL

1ST

SE

20 - 25 km/h [10m]

STRE

ET SE

AVE

Elbow River

TRAIL

SE

25 - 30 km/h [10m]

AVE

SE

RE STRE

ET S

CENT

RE STRE

AVE

ET S

30 - 35 km/h [10m]

8TH

Glenmore Reservoir

AVE

8TH

AVE 8TH RE STRE

5 - 10 km/h [10m]

ER

BOW

7TH

Snow Jan. 2017 - 2018

CENT

CENT

0 - 5 km/h [10m]

SE AVE

ET SE

9TH

ET SE

STRE

9TH

STRE

FLOODWAY FLOOD FRINGE OVERLAND FLOOD BOW RIVER

EOD

SE

1ST

AVE

1ST

TRAIL

9TH

TRAIL

SE

EOD

35 - 40 km/h [10m]

Rain Jan. 2017 - 2018

Site Context - Snow Fall and Rainfall Analysis

terior Perspective

40 - 45 km/h [10m]

Flood Analysis

Wind Analysis


Interior views - The Cafe

02

01

03

01 04

10

14

03

DN

UP DN

DN

UP

08

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO ABOVE

02 09

UP

DN DN

UP

13 05

06

07

08

02

08

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO ABOVE 08 08

09

04

05

10

06 08

Street Level Plan 0

5

10 m

11

07

12

01 AUDITORIUM 02 WOMEN’S RESTROOMS 03 MEN’S RESTROOMS 04 STORAGE DESK 05 RECEPTION & INFORMATION 06 CAFE & BAR 07 COAT CHECK 08 GALLERY WALK 09 INTERACTIVE LEARNING SPACE

10 MEN’S RESTROOM 11 WOMEN’S RESTROOM 12 BREAKOUT SPACE STAIRS 13 PARKING EXIT/ENTRANCE 14 CORE (TO PARKING)

Plaza Level Plan

Interior views - Interac


ctive Learning Space

PROGRAM The concept continues to be expressed through the programming of our Centre, as the notion of varying perspectives and perceptions on the treatment of the environment is expressed through intentionally crafting sight lines. This is achieved by varying the heights of walls, pulling back floors to create openings to above and below, sinking or raising programmed spaces. The majority of spaces are intentionally wall-less and key-less, thus creating connections from space to space and evoking a feeling of openness. The varying wall profiles and floor heights also act as separations in programming, yet, aim to connect occupants and guide them through an experience of the space. The circulation paths intentionally connect the occupants to an education story - the gallery story wall in the Cafe area.


Interior views - Auditorium Level 1 0

Level 0 -7000

Auditorium gallery wall elevation

3 - GALLERY W 3 ELEVATION 1 : 100

185

1850

Level 1 0

5150

982 684

Auditorium acrylic feature wall elevation

Level 0 -7000

Auditorium entrance elevation

Auditorium presentation wall elevation

KEY ROOM - AUDITORIUM + ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS The auditorium is located on the plaza level and is designed to be used as an informal area for not only presentations, but also for lunch time yoga and evening music performances. Aiming to create a communal environment, the treads are intentionally deep to allow for various activities and seating styles.

The ceiling is expressive of the ice berg glazing pattern, and the walls which enclose the space are varying profiles of ice chunks, which align to the concept of connectivity and binding. The design intent produced a separated dedicated HVAC system for this space because of its variation in occupancy needs. The HVAC is located above the space due to the dropped ceiling.


Upper level pipping UPPER LEVEL PIPING

Plaza level pipping Air intake Air exhaust Cooling Hex 250 PLAZA LEVEL PIPING

AIR INTAKE

AIR EXHAUST

COOLING HEX 250

Mechanical room Utilidor Parking L1 air exhaust room MECHANICAL ROOM

UTILIDOR

PARKING L1 AIR EXHAUST ROOM

Level 1 0

Parking L1 air supply room PARKING L1 AIR SUPPLY ROOM

Water meter room Mechanical room Utilidor Parking L2 air exhaust room WATER METER ROOM MECHANICAL ROOM

District heating (ENMAX)

DISTRICT HEATING (ENMAX)

UTILIDOR

PARKING L2 AIR EXHAUST ROOM

Level 0 -7000

Parking L2 air supply room PARKING L2 AIR SUPPLY ROOM

WALL Level 1 0

Parking L3 air exhaust room PARKING L3 AIR EXHAUST ROOM

Parking L3 air supply room PARKING L3 AIR SUPPLY ROOM

Level 0 -7000

Environmental Systems

The Centre for Environmental Rights plans to buy heating from Enmax District Energy. This heat will enable radiant floor heating with JAGA diffusers. Air ventilation systems are implemented overhead and underfloor diffusers. A cooling tower has been incorporated with a chiller system to produce cold medium for the radiant floors and perimeter diffusers.

The HVAC supply air and exhaust air pipping is ranged from 5ft to 3ft in diameter, as the piping tapers down in size as it gets farther away from the mechanical room and lessens in volume demands. Both the air intake and exhaust are located and camouflaged within the landscape columns.


Operable window

OPERABLE WINDOW

Perimeter beams PERIMETER BEAMS 914MM OPEN WEBweb STEEL JOISTS 914mm open steel joists 1397MM TRUSS 1397mm truss

914mm open web steel joist

914MM OPEN WEB STEEL JOIST

1397mm steel truss

1397MM STEEL TRUSS

Spandrel panel 19381

SPANDREL PANEL

Secondary perimeter beam

SECONDARY PERIMETER BEAM

SECONDARY PERIMETER Secondary perimeter BEAM beams

Curtain wall anchor to column

CURTAIN WALL ANCHOR TO COLUMN

PERIMETER GIRTS Perimeter girts

Stabilizing cables + struts Perimeter girts 150mm 55" curtain wall TRUSS 406mm x 406mm column Column socket + anchor Angle iron Concrete topping Radiant floor tubing Composite slab + Q decking Open web steel joist Steel joist 36" JOIST Steel truss 914mm diameter air supply duct Hanging wire 500mm type 4 rigid insulation Water proofing membrane 600mm foundation wall/transfer Auditorium seating 200mm slab Radiant floor tubing STABILIZING CABLES & STRUTS

PERIMETER GIRTS

150MM CURTAIN WALL

406MM X 406MM COLUMN

406MM X 406MM COLUMNS 406mm x 406mm columns CABLE & STRUT Cable and strutSUPPORTS supports 200MM COMPOSITE SLABslab 200mm composite CORE Core

COLUMN SOCKET & ANCHOR BOLTS ANGLE IRON

CONCRETE TOPPING

Level 1

25.4MM RADIANT FLOOR TUBING 200MM COMPOSITE SLAB Q DECKING

0

914MM OPEN WEB STEEL JOIST

1397MM STEEL TRUSS

914MM DIAMETER AIR SUPPLY DUCT

HANGING WIRE

7000

50MM GYPSUM BOARD CEILING PANELS

Secondary core

50MM TYPE 4 RIGID INSULATION

SECONDARY CORE

WATER PROOFING MEMBRANE

600MM FOUNDATION WALL/TRANSFER BEAM WALL

CORE Core STRUCTURALwalls WALLS Structural

Level 0

AUDITORIUM SEATING

- 7000

200MM SLAB

25.4MM RADIANT FLOOR TUBING

200MM SLAB 200mm slab 406MM x 406MM COLUMNS 406mm x 406mm columns

Parking Level 01 -11550

STRUCTURAL WALLS Structural walls

300MM SLAB 300mm slab

Parking Level 02

300MM SLAB 300mm slab 750MM TRANSFER BEAM COLUMNS 750mm transfer beam columns 750MM PILES 750mm piles

-

14500

300MM SLAB 300mm slab

Parking Level 03 17450

Drainage gravel DRAINAGE GRAVEL 150MM SLAB ON GRADE 150mm slab on grade PERIMETER FOOTING Perimeter footing WEEPING TILE Weeping tile COMPACTED FILL Compacted fill

600

-

150MM STRUCTURAL 150mm structuralSLAB slab

Structural Systems Axonometric

Wall Section

STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS 10 - AXO - EXPLODED STRUCTURE AND FACADE

Due to the height of the building, 16” x 16” columns are required with 55” deepWALL SECTION The wall section identifies how the curtain wall and structural glass are a - SCALE 1:50 truss system for the long spans. The columns are braced with a strut and cable sloped roof glazing with a panel systems of 2x4 meters, which anchors into the suspension system. The vertical curtain walls required a girt bracing system along steel column. An operable window enables solar gains and natural ventilation with primary and secondary perimeter means connected column to column. 36” in the peak of the building solar tower. Surrounding drainage sits within our joists are spaced every 4m perpendicular to the trusses. Transfer beams and concrete pavers along the exterior of the building allows for the curtain wall to structural walls in the parkade are aligned to the structure above. appear flush with the landscaping.


Building Section Longitudinal

EXPRESSIVE STRUCTURE In the section, interesting sight lines become prominent due to the differential wall profiles and heights, as well as the openings to above and below. Sinking and raising programmed spaces, provide natural wayfinding and enable connections between the outside and interior walkable spaces. The interior lobby perspective showcases how the structure is expressed through the truss joist patterns throughout the building.

Interior Lobby Views - Flex Space


DECEMBER 9:00 AM

1ST

SEPTEMBER 5:00 PM

10%

ET SE

STRE

DECEMBER 5:00 PM

50%

MARCH 9:00 AM H 7T E AV SE

70%- 50%

90% - 70% MARCH 5:00PM

LEOD

Solar tower

JUNE 9:00 AM

L SE

TRAI

MAC

JUNE 5:00 PM

SEPTEMBER 9:00 AM

Solar analysis for glazing considerations

1

MACLEOD TRAIL ELEVATION

CURTAIN WALL 406MM X 406MM COLUMN 150 MM MULLION ANCHOR TO COLUMN

Opaque Translucent

ANCHOR DETAIL

Transparent

Glazing Strategies identified through the solar analysis of the site, formed a glazing system of three layers of translucency, which is optimized through five iterative panel selections.

Glazing pattern concept

90%

Curtain wall glazing panel CURTAIN WALL GLAZING PANEL

Curtain wall face CURTAIN WALL FACE

1.0 WALL SECTION CALL OUT - CURTAIN WALL CONNECTION DETAIL

Approach from 8th Ave SW exterior perspective

70%

50%

30%

10%


SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES low maintenance landscape

low flow fixtures reduce potable water demand + reduce consumption with dual flush toilets Pervious concrete pavers Increased surface water management use of native plantings + reduced need for irrigation rain water collection + canal water collection from run off + provides drainage, water supply + irrigation bioswales reduce silt + pollution in run off

Water management

Approach from 7th Ave SW exterior perspective

The landscape design was implemented through sustainable design strategies by the concept of a low maintenance landscape, allowing for water management. Pervious concrete pavers increase the surface water management, while the use of native plantings species help reduce the need for irrigation. Rain water collection in the lower plaza accumulates from the building’s run off. The solar tower provides a reduction in heating through the solar heat capture (thermal mass storage) through the south solar chimney and operable window, where the glazing pattern is optimized to facilitate this process.


Sectional model of glazing system + structure 1:75


Landscape + building model 1:200


WORK EXPERIENCE URBAN LAND INSTITUTE LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX TRENT UNIVERSITY BATA RESEARCH + INNOVATION CENTRE WEST EAU CLAIRE PARK + PUBLIC REALM Four selected projects from working before and during the Masters of Architecture program.


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PERKINS + WILL SELECTED WORKS ULI LEADERSHIP PROGRAM, MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX + BRIC GRAPHIC FILM SUMMER 2018


83


URBAN LAND INSTITUTE LEADERSHIP PROGRAM Leaders in the ULI Leadership Program had the opportunity to collaborate with top industry peers from various real estate disciplines, to engage in solving real land use challenges within a defined region of Toronto District, specifically the area of Main and Danforth, involving key stakeholders from the private, public, and non-profit community sectors. https://toronto.uli.org/team-presentations-2/

Main and Danforth Team 1 looked to provide a comprehensive understanding of the area and generated a vision and framework plan which has been informed by interactive sessions with community members, City staff, and various experts in land-based professions. Their Framework Plan seeks to push the boundaries of the possible, proposing a bold vision for the future of this area that is still rooted in practical recommendations for quick wins, partnership development, as well as long-term, community- focused change. Cited from Main and Danforth Team 1 Report

My role: involved assisting Melissa in graphic representation of her team’s findings and research. I contributed to 3D Modeling, site diagrams, existing opportunities and constraints, as well as the displayed two illustrative renderings.


POOL + CHANGE ROOMS REFRIGERATION NEW PARKING + DROP OFF

NEW PARKING + DROP OFF

NEW PARKING

NEW PARKING

FITNESS ABOVE

RINK

RINK

OPEN TO BELOW NEW ARENA

NEW ARENA

LOBBY

LOBBY

GYM

2

2,449m ICE PIT ADMIN

SKATE

ICE PIT ADMIN

CHANGE

SKATE

CHANGE

WELCOME/CONTROL ZAMBONI

ZAMBONI

MULTIPURPOSE ROOMS

SERVICES

SERVICES

TO EMILY STREET

744.9m

TO EMILY STREET

BOILER

2

BOILER

GALLERY

221.3m

REFRIGERATION

233.8m

2

LOBBY

PHASE 2 - NEW BUILD

2

REFRIGERATION

2

1058m

TO EMILY STREET

NEW PARKING

NEW PARKING

NORTH ARENA

PHASE 1 - RELOCATE PARKING

NORTH ARENA

OPEN TO BELOW

PHASE 1 - RELOCATE PARKING 42.1m

2

2

295.9m SOUTH ARENA

PHASE 3 - DEMOLISH + RELANDSCAPE

SOUTH ARENA

OPTION B2 - NEW ARENA + DEMOLISH SOUTH ARENA, ADD NEW GYM + FITNESS

POOL AREA

OPTION B1/B2 LEVEL 2 LEGEND

POOL AREA

LEGEND TO BE RENOVATED

TO BE RENOVATED

TO BE DEMOLISHED

OPEN TO BELOW

TO BE DEMOLISHED

OPEN TO BELOW

NEW ADDITIONS FITNESS

GYM

NEW ADDITIONS FITNESS

NEW RINK SLAB

GYM

OPTION C - TOTAL NEW BUILD

NEW RINK SLAB

NEW PARKING + DROP OFF

LEGEND

NEW PARKING + DROP OFF

TO BE RELOCATED

2

761.2m

2

194.4m

ENTRY 0

5

10

ENTRY 15

20m

0

5

10

TO BE DEMOLISHED

15

MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX

NEW REC CENTRE

20m

SCALE: 1:200

SCALE: 1:200

MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX

07/04/2018

ENTRY

07/04/2018

0

5

10

15

20m SCALE: 1:200

MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX

07/04/2018

2

1,360m

380m

2

POOL

MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX NORTH ARENA

LOWER LEVEL FITNESS

Mooretown required concept plan drawings for an addition and renovation of their current sports complex. Design options as well as costing was provided to the client.

2

3,040m

42.1m

2

OPTION A - RENO + UPGRADE POOL

LEGEND

SOUTH ARENA

EXTENSIVE RENOVATIONS INCLUDING STRUCTURAL + MECHANICAL UPGRADES SELECTIVE UPGRADES TO MAKE AODA COMPLIANT

0

5

10

15

20m SCALE: 1:200

MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX

07/04/2018

NEW PARKING + DROP OFF

NEW PARKING

NEW ARENA LOBBY 2

2,449m ICE PIT ADMIN

SKATE

CHANGE

ZAMBONI

My role: involved assisting Phil through designing these graphical representation of the schematic plans for the costing proposal.

SERVICES TO EMILY STREET

BOILER

2

221.3m

REFRIGERATION 2

1058m

NEW PARKING

NORTH ARENA

42.1m

2

2

295.9m SOUTH ARENA

OPTION B2 - NEW ARENA + DEMOLISH SOUTH ARENA, ADD NEW GYM + FITNESS

POOL AREA

LEGEND TO BE RENOVATED TO BE DEMOLISHED NEW ADDITIONS FITNESS

GYM

NEW RINK SLAB NEW PARKING + DROP OFF

2

194.4m

2

761.2m

ENTRY 0

5

10

15

20m SCALE: 1:200

MOORETOWN SPORTS COMPLEX

07/04/2018


3725 EQ

EQ

EQ

2285

EQ

348.2A

GROUP ROOM 10

2285

FILM 2

348.2A

GROUP ROOM 10 DOGWOOD

FILM 2

FILM 2

P + W SUGGESTION FOR GRAPH

1000

FILM 2

LEVEL 03 37.795

TRENT UNIVERSITY BATA RESEARCH + INNOVATION CENTRE WETLAND REEDS A graphic film was required to provide as privacy screens for the

entrepreneurship centre, group GRAPHIC rooms and research FILM #2 P +newly W renovated SUGGESTION FOR centre spaces. The intent is to apply the screen where privacy and clusters are high and where window shades have not been provided. The concept of the graphic film was inspiration from surrounding vegetation of the campus and community.


My role: image manipulation of the photographed native vegetation to produce a graphic film that would enable enough privacy and transparency. I developed the files for mock ups as photographed here.

HIC FILM #1

EQ

FILM 2

FILM 2

P + W SUGGESTION FOR GRAPHIC FILM #3

EQ

FILM 2

EQ

FILM 2

CATTAILS (BULRUSHES) ALTERNATE #3

FILM 2

LEVEL 03 37.795

LEVEL 03 37.795

CATTAILS (BULRUSHES) ALTERNATE #2

EQ

EQ

GROUP ROOM 10

348.2A

1000

LEVEL 03 37.795

SUMAC

FILM 2

FILM 2

3725

EQ

GROUP ROOM 10

348.2A

1000

FILM 2

2285

GROUP ROOM 10

348.2A

EQ

EQ

FILM 2

FILM 2 1000

EQ

1000

EQ

2285 FILM 2

3725

3725

EQ

2285

3725

LEVEL 37.


02 PLANNING + DESIGN SELECTED WORKS WEST EAU CLAIRE PARK + PUBLIC REALM PLAN 2014


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WEST EAU CLAIRE PARK + PUBLIC REALM PLAN West Eau Claire Park + Public Realm Plan is designed to reappoint the public spaces along the riverfront that create places enticing people to linger and stay. By creating these opportunities, the Plan’s key aspect alleviates pressures and unsafe conditions of the current pathways. My role: involved assisting the design team in generating alternative pathway sections and developing a circulation diagram to present to the public and stakeholders during the concept design phase.

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM LEGEND Heavy Pedestrian Use Medium Pedestrian Use Light Pedestrian Use Heavy Bicycle Use Medium Bicycle Use Light Bicycle Use Intersection


MIXED PEDESTRIAN /CYCLIST PROMENADE

MULTI-FUNCTIONAL VEGETATED BUFFER 6M

INTEGRATED PEDESTRIAN PROMENADE

INTEGRATED BIKE LANE

VEGETATED BUFFER 3M

EXISTING PEDESTRIAN PROMENADE

VEGETATED BUFFER 3M

SEPARATED BIKE LANE


TRAVELOGRAPHY SELECTED TRAVEL PHOTOS JAPAN, NAMIBIA, CAMBODIA, MEXICO CITY, HONG KONG, SEOUL, TAIWAN + KULALA LUMPUR Snapshots from around the globe that expanding my passion, understanding and knowledge of the world.


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Profile for Laura Whittingham

Portfolio  

Selected works from my professional experience, and Master of Architecture degree.

Portfolio  

Selected works from my professional experience, and Master of Architecture degree.