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R E  N  D  E  Z  V  O  U  Z     THE  POETICS  OF  THE  CITY  ARCHIVE  OF  AMSTERDAM      

  B  Y    M  Y  L  A  I  N  E    R  O  E  L  O  F  S    &    L  A  U  R  A    V  A  N    R  I  J  S   MARCH  2014  

  Mylaine  Roelofs       mylaine.roelofs@gmail.com   Student  ID:  S1216341    

   

   

   

   

Laura van  Rijs   mail@lauravanrijs.nl   Student  ID:  S1457470  


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Place of  a  homeless  one  by  the  Overzichtweg,  near  Amstel  Station,  2003  -­‐  Nico  Bick   Collection:  photo-­‐documentary  assignments  

                         

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T A  B  L  E    OF    C  O  N  T  E  N  T  S    

1.  I  N  T  R  O  D  U  C  T  I  O  N    &    M  O  T  I  V  A  T  I  O  N         2.  B  A  C  K  G  R  O  U  N  D                 3.  E  X  H  I  B  I  T  I  O  N                   4.  W  E  B  S  I  T  E                     5.  S  I  D  E    P  R  O  G  R  A  M                 6.  C  O  M  M  U  N  I  C  A  T  I  O  N    &    M  A  R  K  E  T  I  N  G         7.  P  A  R  T  N  E  R  S    &    C  O  O  P  E  R  A  T  I  N  G    P  A  R  T  I  E  S       8.  F  I  N  A  N  C  E  S                        

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Soccer game  in  the  Ajax  stadium  in  the  Watergraafsmeer  neighbourhood,  1930  –  Vereenigde  Fotobureaux  N.V.   Collection:  photo  prints  

                 

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1. I  N  T  R  O  D  U  C  T  I  O  N    &    M  O  T  I  V  A  T  I  O  N   In  1992  journalist  Ursula  den  Tex  wrote  the  introduction  to  the  publication  Foto’s  voor  de   Stad,  a  recurrent  retrospective  catalogue  of  the  documentary  photo-­‐assignments  for  the   Visual  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam.1  Since  1972,  together  with  the  Amsterdam  Fund  of  the   Arts  (AFK),  they  yearly  provide  an  assignment  to  document  the  city  on  an  artistic  level.   Directing  herself  towards  the  future  researchers,  who  might  throw  themselves  onto  the   thrilling  challenge  of  investigating  the  possibilities  of  these  visual  archives,  Den  Tex  stresses   the  beauty  and  strengths  of  these  assignment-­‐photographs,  and  warns  for  temptation  to  get   lost  in  this  immense  visual  pleasure.     Now,  after  more  than  twenty  years,  as  the  contemporary  researchers  Den  Tex  was  speaking   to,  we  feel  the  same  enthusiasm  Den  Tex  expressed  in  her  plea,  when  confronted  with  the   treasures  of  the  Visual  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam.  As  specialists  in  the  field  of  photography   we  were  familiar  with  the  archive  and  the  commissions  they  set  out,  but  even  then,  we  were   surprised  to  find  such  a  rich  collection  of  images:  (unknown)  imagery  from  well-­‐known   photographers  that  were  the  result  of  the  documentary  photo-­‐assignments  alongside   unique  photographs  by  anonymous  creators  as  well.  Striking  is  the  fact  that  these  visual   documents  are  absorbed  in  a  quite  non-­‐visual  oriented  online  archive.  They  are  ‘buried’   under  the  mass.  The  question  then  arises:  are  people  really  aware  of  the  highly  qualitative   photography  that  is  housed  in  this  archive  and  its  potential  as  a  huge  visual  playground?     Because,  that  is  how  we  perceive  this  archive.  Through  all  its  aesthetically  different  faces,   portraying  different  times  and  artistic  visions,  we  see  the  beauty  of  the  forms,  the  colours,   and  the  atmospheres:  togetherness,  loneliness,  love,  hurt,  fear,  happiness,  melancholy,   beauty,  and  ugliness.  Here  we  see  an  alternative  way  of  historical  storytelling:  not  by  the   means  of  a  historical  language,  but  a  purely  visual,  associative,  intuitive  language.  This   seems  to  be  quite  a  unique  perception  though.  Previous  curators  primarily  chose  a   traditional  historical  angle  of  incidence,  focussing  on  linear  progress  and  a  chronological   timeframe.  This  led  to  quite  conservative,  straightforward  exhibitions,  concerning  a  certain   period  of  time,  place  or  author.  This  was  for  instance  the  case  with  the  recurrent  overview   exhibition  Foto’s  voor  de  stad,  held  in  the  former  Museum  Fodor.  Even  the  last  retrospective   exhibition,  curated  by  Wim  de  Bell  in  2003  in  the  Amsterdam  Historical  Museum  (now   Amsterdam  Museum),  had  the  similar  conventional  approach.  In  our  opinion  these  curators   have  not  yet  ceased  the  opportunity  to  really  look  at  the  archive  as  a  visual  source,  purely   considering  form,  aesthetics,  spheres  and  impressions  and  thereby  presenting  a  different   notion  of  the  archive  and  the  history  of  the  city.  They  fail  to  stress  the  visual  ligature   between  these  images  of  different  times,  auteurs  and  styles.  The  poetic  approach  provides  a   new  structure  for  the  archive  that  will  open  up  doors  to  the  many  alternative  story  of   Amsterdam.                                                                                                                                 1

Den  Tex,  U.  (1992).  Fotografie    en  verslaggeving.  Pleidooi  voor  een  oude  verstandhouding.  In  (Van  Veen,  A.  Ed.)  Foto’s  voor  de  

Ursula den  Tex  is  working  for  the  Anna  Cornelis  Fund,  founded  in  1991.  The  Anna  Cornelis  Fund  is  a  foundation  for  the  support   and  stimulation  of  documentary  photography  in  the  Netherlands.  

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Left: Children  with  braided  hair,  2004  –  Judith  van  Ijken   Collection:  photo-­‐documentary  assignments     Right:  Aerial  photograph,  Bijlmer  East,  1973  -­‐  Photographer  unknown   Collection:  archives  of  Spatial  Planning  

                 

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As a  reaction  to  this  absence  of  approach  we  feel  the  need  and  responsibility  to  make  visible   these  hidden  treasures,  and  to  show  their  visual  strength.  With  a  contemporary  view  on  the   archive  we  are  dusting  of  the  conservative  image  of  the  photo  archive.  With  launching  an   exhibition  with  the  emphasis  on  a  visual  and  aesthetic  narrative,  rather  than  the  previously   traditional  historical  presentations,  our  aim  is  to  highlight  the  potential  of  this  special   collection.  We  are  opening  up  this  immense  treasure  house  to  a  broader  public,  giving  it  the   daylight  it  deserves.   Next  to  showing  the  quality  and  beauty  of  the  image  archive,  the  exhibition  will  also   inexplicitly  expose  its  structure;  the  convergence  of  different  photographic  collections  and   the  additional  documents  from  the  documentary  photo-­‐assignment.  As  Den  Tex  warns  her   reader  for  the  alluring  beauty  of  the  images  she  also  lightly  touches  upon  a  dichotomy   concerning  these  documentary  photo-­‐assignments:  the  division  between  autonomous   artistic  freedom  on  the  one  hand  and  producing  a  social-­‐historical  document  on  the  other   hand.  Here  she  hits  upon  a  debate,  alive  ever  since  the  emergence  of  the  documentary   photography-­‐assignments  in  the  1970s  in  the  Netherlands.  The  challenge  for  the   photographer  was  to  meet  the  demands  of  the  client  (the  archive  or  a  collection)  to  create  a   veracious  reproduction  of  reality  while  at  the  same  time  securing  a  personal  artistic  vision.     For  further  investigation,  this  paradox  will  be  given  its  own  platform  to  be  discussed  upon.   Together  with  experts  in  the  field  we  will  discuss  and  look  more  closely  at  the  contemporary   as  well  as  the  future  state  of  photo-­‐documentary  assignments,  during  a  specialised   symposium  discussed  later  on  in  this  report.     In  the  photo-­‐documentary  assignment  policy  of  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam,  this  paradox   described  above,  is  clearly  present.  Here  we  see  a  clear  assembly  of  a  topographically   oriented  archive  (City  Archive  of  Amsterdam)  and  an  art(ist)  driven  institute  (AFK).  This   translates  into  imagery  of  the  city,  its  people  and  urban  phenomena,  characterized  by  the   artistry  of  the  creator.  Consequently,  this  raises  important  questions  about  the  assignment   and  the  role  of  archives  and  collecting;  does  the  author’s  vision  contribute  to  the  story  of  a   certain  time  or  is  it  merely  a  personal  storiette?  Can  author-­‐driven  photography  be  seen  as   an  added  value  for  a  topographical  archive?  Is  the  author  creator  or  subject?  And  thus,   looking  back  at  more  than  thirty  years:  how  meaningful  have  photo-­‐documentary   commissions  been  regarding  the  representation  of  a  city  in  a  certain  time?  Questions  that   have  certainly  been  raised  through  the  years,  but  the  answers  are  seemingly  still  floating   somewhere  in  the  air.  These  questions  are  certainly  not  only  relevant  for  the  City  Archive  of   Amsterdam;  they  are  related  to  Dutch  photo-­‐documentary  assignments  in  general.  We  feel   it  is  time  to  set  out  the  markers.  Has  giving  photo-­‐documentary  assignments  been  a   success?  Or  should  we  revise  strategies?              

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Maria Antonia  (Mies)  Merkelbach  (1904-­‐1985).  Photographer,  1935  -­‐  Photographed  presumably  by  her  later  husband  Bobby   Rosenboom,  also  employed  by  photographic  Atelier  J.  Merkelbach.     Collection:  studio  J.  Merkelbach        

   

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2. B  A  C  K  G  R  O  U  N  D       History   The  City  Archive  Amsterdam  is  a  centre  for  historical  documentation  of  the  city  of   Amsterdam.  It  consists  of  more  than  35  kilometres  of  archives;  a  historic-­‐topographical   collection  with  millions  of  maps,  drawings  and  prints;  a  library  and  extensive  sound,  film,   and  photo  archives.  In  addition  to  archiving  existing  material,  the  City  Archive  organises  the   above-­‐mentioned  yearly  photo-­‐documentary  assignments  in  the  field  of  visual  arts  and   photography.  Since  1972  the  City  Archive  and  the  AFK  have  consistently  given  the   opportunity  to  Dutch  photographers  to  document  the  city  and  its  urban  environment  on  an   artistic  level.   Traditionally  the  archive  is  collecting  historical  documents  of  subjects  concerning   Amsterdam.  Although  the  collection  of  the  City  Archive  contains  an  important  (historical  and   art-­‐historical)  selection  of  photographs  of  known  and  lesser-­‐known  photographers,  a  real   tradition  in  collecting  photography  didn’t  exist  until  the  sixties.2  It  was  only  until  then  that   parts  of,  or  complete  inheritances  of  interesting  photographers  like  Jacob  Merkelbach  or   Jacob  Olie,  were  added  to  the  collection  of  the  City  Archive.  It  was  Wim  Vroom  who  caused   an  upheaval  in  the  collection  policy.  As  conservator  of  the  time  he  was  the  first  to  purchase   works  from  contemporary  photographers  and  to  give  photography  the  same  treatment  that   only  prints  and  drawings  had  been  given  until  then.3   Of  course  this  change  was  parallel  to  the  mainstream  acceptance  of  photography  as  an  art   form  around  the  sixties.  The  photo-­‐assignment,  still  existing  today,  followed  from  the   archive’s  practice  to  yearly  set  out  an  assignment  for  artists  to  document  Amsterdam  and  its   surroundings.  For  photography  such  a  policy  was  missing.  It  was  the  GKf,  the  Dutch   professional  photographers  organization,  who  proposed  the  idea  of  an  assignment.  They   argued  that  the  city’s  archival  collection  would  gain  value  if  they  would  expand  their  factual   documentation  with  photographic  images  by  Amsterdam  based  photographers,  as  they   were  able  to  combine  imagery  that  would  provide  a  realistic  and  truthful  representation   together  with  a  contemporary  view.4  Furthermore  it  was  the  organization’s  intention  to   stimulate  Dutch  photography  by  financial  support  and  specified  policy.     The  plan  was  received  positively  and  the  assignment  was  realised.  In  1975  the  department   of  Dutch  History  of  the  Rijksmuseum  followed  the  example  of  The  City  Archive  of   Amsterdam.  They  initiated  a  photo  assignment  funded  by  the  government  that,  likewise,  is   still  standing  strong.  Yearly  the  Rijksmuseum  asks  two  or  more  photographers  to  make   documentaries  about  subjects  that  may  be  of  later  importance  in  Dutch  history.5  Together,   the  Rijksmuseum  and  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam  have  build  up  a  versatile  archive.  Being   the  pioneers,  these  both  Amsterdam-­‐based  institutes  functioned  as  a  role  model  for  other   Dutch  municipalities.  City’s  like  Utrecht  or  Groningen  also  began  to  develop  a  structural                                                                                                                             2

Perspektief,  june  1987,  No.  28/29,  p.  54.    Perspektief,  june  1987,  No.  28/29,  p.  54.   4  Perspektief,  june  1987,  No.  28/29,  p.  52.   5  Perspektief,  june  1987,  No.  28/29,  p.  18.   3

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assignment policy  regarding  photography,  causing  a  flourishing  photography  assignment   climate  in  the  Netherlands.     To  create  a  complete  image  of  Amsterdam,  the  assignment  by  the  City  Archive  of   Amsterdam  was  made  three  folded:  a  documentary  approach,  a  free  expressional  approach   and  a  historical  approach.  These  commissions  were  seen  as  of  great  importance  for  the   development  of  Dutch  photography.  In  the  preceding  years  there  had  not  been  such  an   incentive.  With  the  historical  approach  older  photographers  were  asked  to  make  a  unique   selection  from  their  oeuvre,  selecting  negatives  they  had  never  developed  before,  with   regard  to  the  City  Archive,  thereby  retroactively  giving  them  the  recognition  and  support.   This  historical  approach  was  ended  in  1989  due  to  the  fact  that  the  AFK  only  wanted  to   stimulate  new  art.       The  present  day   Today,  the  Photography  Archive  of  the  City  of  Amsterdam  is  a  blend  of  very  different   collections.  The  archive  houses  the  archives  of  the  Maria  Austria  Institute,  which  is  a  rich   collection  of  more  than  fifty  important  Dutch  photographers  like  for  example  Eva  Besnyö,   Kees  Scherer  and  Paul  Huf,  collections  from  Amsterdam-­‐based  companies,  and  of  the   municipality,  like  that  of  Urban  Planning,  the  Municipal  Housing  Department  and  that  of   Preservation.  Next  to  this,  ‘amateur’  photographers  are  encouraged  to  contribute  to  the   extensive  (online)  archive  by  posting  their  own  pictures  of  Amsterdam  to  online   photography  channels  like  Flickr.  Though,  by  far  the  most  pictures,  about  one  third,  come   from  their  own  photo  service  that  has  been  around  since  1946.  Every  year  two   neighbourhoods  are  selected  which  are  carefully  captured;  streets,  streetlife,  houses  and   details.  Alongside,  there  is  a  special  focus  on  locations  that  are  subject  to  change,  for   example  by  demolition,  renovation,  new  construction  works  or  the  changing  functions  of   buildings.  These  images  have  a  more  registrational,  objective  character.     All  these  varying  types  of  photographs  are  complemented  with  the  assignment  photography   existing  since  its  start  in  1972.  This  collection  consists  of  more  than  6000  photographs  of   many  important  contemporary  Dutch  photographers.  With  more  than  hundred   photographers  represented,  the  collection  provides  a  unique  overview  of  Dutch   documentary  photography.  Some  of  the  photographers  whose  work  is  included  in  the   collection  are  Koen  Wessing,  Oscar  van  Alphen,  Ed  van  der  Elsken,  Laura  Samson  Rous,  Hans   Aarsman,  Viviane  Sassen,  Andrea  Stultiëns,  Raimond  Wouda,  Ad  Nuis,  Nico  Bick,  Dana   Lixenberg,  Julika  Rudelius,  Petra  Noordkamp,  and  Petra  Stavast.   The  City  Archive  makes  use  of  the  artistic  viewpoint  of  the  artists  to  document  the  city,  its   inhabitants  and  urban  phenomena;  photography  as  a  meaningful  social  medium  to  record   the  era  and  to  preserve  it  for  future  generations.  From  the  start,  yearly  five  photographers   were  assigned  with  a  commission.  Since  1986  it  became  three  projects  that  are  subsidized,   each  with  approximately  €  10,000  euros,  for  which  about  twenty  pictures  are  printed.  More   than  5,000  of  the  assignment  photographs  are  digitized  and  made  accesible  by  means  of  an   online  image  library.       In  principal,  the  subject  and  its  elaboration  were  and  still  are  often  a  completely  free  choice   for  the  photographers,  although  a  list  of  possible  topics  is  provided.  It  did  occur  that  some    

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Nastya for  AnOther  Magazine,  2012  –  Blommers-­‐Schumm   Collectiion:  photo-­‐documentary  assignments            

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photographers are  asked  to  respond  to  a  certain  topic  or  to  a  specific  body  of  work  within   the  archive.  Like  the  commission  of  2012,  where  photographers  Erwin  Olaf,  Petra  Stavast   and  the  duo  Blommers  &  Schumm  were  asked  to  reflect  on  the  portrait  photography  of   Jacob  Merkelbach.     The  development  within  documentary  photography  is  clearly  visible  through  the  years.  In   the  early  years  of  the  existence  of  the  assignment,  the  photographs  are  characterized  by  a   strong  social-­‐political  engagement  with  topics  like  misuse;  abolish  prejudices,  or  the  multi-­‐ cultural  society.  But  the  classic  black  and  white  documentary  photography  gave  way  for   more  color,  bigger  camera’s  and  a  less  unanimity  regarding  style  or  approach.  In  fact,   looking  back  at  the  assignment  from  2012  with  photographers  duo  Blommers  &  Schumm,   whose  visual  language  is  more  directed  to  the  field  of  fashion  rather  than  to  documentary.   However  this  could  also  tell  us  something  about  the  zeitgeist  of  the  time.        

                         

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3. E  X  H  I  B  I  T  I  O  N     Mission   It  has  been  more  then  ten  years  since  there  has  been  a  retrospective  exhibition  of  the   documentary  photography  assignments  of  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam.  As  mentioned  in   the  introduction,  in  the  past,  all  previous  overview  exhibitions  showed  the  works  of   important  photographers  that  are  incorporated  in  the  archive.  However  this  is  always  done   in  quite  traditional  exhibition  designs:  always  carefully  directed  towards  the  authors;  the   photographers,  or  by  giving  a  historical  overview  and  placing  the  photo  series  in  a  certain   timeframe.  Although  the  artistic  value  is  visible  through  it,  it  was  not  of  most  importance   here.  When  looking  back  at  these  ways  of  showing  the  works  that  are  housed  by  the  archive,   we  feel  a  sense  of  disappointment.  It  is  regrettable  that  until  today,  there  has  never  been  an   exhibition  that  truly  showed  the  visual  potential  of  the  archive,  which  lays  the  emphasis  on   the  visual  and  the  artistic  rather  than  on  a  chronological  history.  Next  to  the  fact  that  after   ten  years  it  is  again  time  for  a  retrospective,  we  feel  that  the  character  of  the  commission   has  changed  quickly  in  the  last  few  years.  In  comparison  to  the  early  years,  dominated  by   social-­‐historical  engagement,  the  outcomes  of  the  assignments  today,  seem  to  lean  more   and  more  towards  artistic  expression.  This  changing  fact  can  hardly  be  overlooked  and  a   retrospective  is  therefore  more  suitable  than  ever.  Moreover,  we  feel  that  with  the  changing   character  of  the  assignments,  a  different  approach  towards  exhibiting  is  more  than   appropriate.       Our  exhibition  proposal  is  all  but  linear.  Briefly  the  exhibition  has  the  intention  to  take  the   archive  as  main-­‐subject  itself.  Commissioned  work  is  being  complemented  with  all  the  other   photographic  material  that  is  housed  in  the  archive.  Going  against  the  grain,  images  are   selected  on  a  more  associative  way  by  means  of  words,  form,  color,  sphere  and  aspirations.   Not  being  led  by  events  but  by  emotions,  not  by  facts  but  by  poetics,  together  these  pictures   show  an  alternative  and  refreshing  history  of  Amsterdam.  There  is  not  just  one  history,  there   is  only  a  multitude  of  experiences.     By  using  the  image  archive  as  a  whole,  drawing  from  all  different  projects  that  were  included   in  the  photo-­‐archive  in  the  last  decades,  we  create  a  new  visual  storytelling  of  Amsterdam.   Through  combining  all  these  subsets,  all  made  with  very  different  intentions,  the  exhibition   will  also  include  real  nuggets  that  were  made  without  artistic  merit  but  that  dó  have  cultural   value;  from  anonymous  aerial  photos  to  portraits  by  famous  photographers  and  everything   in  between.  A  seemingly  boring  picture  suddenly  takes  on  meaning  when  juxtaposed  with  a   careful  artistic  image.  The  individual  works  from  the  various  collections  are  as  it  were   separate  building  blocks  that  together  make  up  and  shape  the  image  of  Amsterdam.  Instead   of  seeing  the  collection  and  the  different  type  of  imagery  as  separate  and  isolated  sources,   the  exhibition  clearly  shows  how  valuable  it  is  to  make  cross  overs  within  the  collections.   The  exhibition  is  a  rendezvous  of  images  that  are  carefully  stored  in  their  own  collection  but     never  come  together  with  each  other.      

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Foam_Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam

Exhibition rooms 1st floor

 

0,79

4,55

2,26

2,45

(1,05)

   

Exhibition room 3 21,00 m 37,94 m2 4,75

3,40 Entresol 18,15 m 31,73 m2 (1.00)

3,00 1,70 0,92

3,00

Storage 12,20

4,48 Exhibition room 2 18,75 m 39,00 m2

5,85

1,50

 

2,90

3,00 1,70

3,30

8,80

(2,47)

 

Exhibition room 1 30,74 m 90,25 m2

(2,37)

13,80

 

Total running metres: 78,19 m Total square metres: 191,98 m2

The walls are approximately 4 metres high

scale 1 : 100

Floor  plan  Fodorzalen  Foam  &  Sketch  of  wall  in  room  1  

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Venue: Foam   The  Exhibition  will  be  held  in  Foam,  on  the  first  floor  in  the  Fodorzalen.  The  choice  for  this   venue  was  motivated  by  Foam’s  broad  character  of  interest  (from  documentary  to  fashion,   from  contemporary  to  historical,  and  from  world  famous  photographers  to  young  talents),   and  thereby  its  popularity  with  a  wide  audience  of  photography  lovers.  Foam  has  a  young,   fresh  and  trendy  character,  with  amongst  its  visitors  the  new  young  cultural  elite.  We   considered  this  of  importance,  for  we  wanted  to  shake  off  the  conservative  image  of  archival   documents  and  exhibitions,  and  really  bring  forward  the  aesthetic  beauty  of  the   photographs,  giving  the  poetic  voice  the  space  it  needs.   Design   So  how  can  we  propose  this  atlas  of  images?  It  might  better  be  called  an  atlas  of  properties   of  things  by  establishing  an  incredible  variety  through  images  and  bringing  multiple  stories   together.  The  exhibition  will  consist  of  both  vintage  prints  that  are  housed  in  the  archive,  as   well  as  new  printed  images.  This  design,  with  combinations  of  different  materials  and  sizes,   represents  the  variety  of  images  and  its  uses,  but  also  corresponds  with  the  city’s   multiplicity.       To  create  a  hold,  the  more  than  300  selected  images  are  grouped  under  five  sub-­‐topics.  We   have  selected  very  different  terms;  SHELTER,  GREY,  LOVE,  RICH,  TIME.  Instead  of  factually   describing  what  can  be  seen,  these  terms  will  work  in  an  associative  and  wide  interpretative   way,  operating  beyond  the  standard  terminology  of  archiving.  A  deserted  self-­‐build   residence  of  a  homeless  one  fits  under  SHELTER,  but  the  same  goes  for  a  turtle’s  shield.   In  this  way,  several  topics  are  addressed.  The  themes  can  establish  connections  between  the   actual  works,  but  could  also  draw  comparisons  with  images  from  sometimes  distant  fields   and  periods  in  time.  Next  to  our  immediate  surroundings,  also  abstract  qualities  will  be   brought  forward.  The  in  fact  rational  archive  emerges  in  a  poetic  world  with  no  beginning  or   end.  This  takes  the  visitor  from  the  general  to  the  particular,  from  rules  to  exceptions  and   conversely. Each  image  can  stand  on  its  own,  though  the  combinatorial  montage  makes   them  also  part  of  a  larger  whole.  The  assemblage  of  all  these  visions  ranges  far  and  wide  but   ultimately  time  and  space  collapse  into  one  huge  universal  world.6         Due  to  the  fact  that  we  want  the  exhibition  to  be  primarily  visual,  texts  in  the  exhibition  will   be  scarce.  Only  an  introduction  text  will  provide  the  viewer  with  the  context  of  the   exhibition:  the  occasion  and  motive  together  with  the  aim  of  the  exhibition.  Although  the   exhibition  does  not  want  to  emphasize  the  accessory  archival  information,  it  will  certainly   not  be  withheld  for  the  viewer.  Through  a  colored  bar  on  the  base  of  each  wall,  titles,  dates,   photographers  and  their  corresponding  collections  will  be  provided.  In  this  way  the  focus   will  be  on  the  visual  storytelling  instead  of  the  historic  side  that  goes  together  with  these   images,  but  if  wanted,  the  visitor  can  turn  to  the  information  down  at  the  bottom.  This   presentational  mode  makes  the  exhibition  very  open  and  accessible.  The  images  can  be   approached  by  younger  and  older  people  as  well  as  by  educated  and  uneducated  visitors.   Weather  you  are  a  scholar,  an  anthropologist,  a  photography  enthusiast  or  Amsterdam                                                                                                                             6

As  inspirational  sources,  think  of  the  Atlasses  of  Aby  Warburg:  http://warburg.library.cornell.edu/,     and  Gerhard  Richter:    http://www.diaart.org/exhibitions/introduction/54.  

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Sketch foor  exhibition  in  Fodorzaal  1  

                                         

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lover; anyone  can  relate  to  the  visual  language  of  the  exhibition.       This  unity  and  poetic  sphere  will  be  increased  by  an  open  sound  design  that  is  produced  by   sound  artist  Nathalie  Bruys  (1975)  who  studied  Audio  Visuals  at  the  Rietveld  Academy  in   Amsterdam.  She  will  create  sound  art  that  is  especially  made  for  the  exhibition  related  to   the  incorporated  themes.  By  walking  trough  the  exhibition  the  spectator  will  not  only  see   but  also  feel  and  hear  the  city.  Bruys’s  philosophy  matches  well  with  ideas  of  the  exhibition:   she  believes  in  the  power  of  sound  to  free  the  listener  from  time  and  space  and  to  take  him   or  her  into  a  world  where  there  is  no  resistance  and  where  everything  is  infinite.7       Downstairs  in  the  ‘Lichthof’  passage,  five  computers  will  run  the  renewed  visual  library  of   the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam.  In  this  way,  in  a  relative  short  period,  a  vast  amount  of   visitors  will  be  made  familiar  with  the  online  possibilities  of  the  website.  After  the  closing  of   the  exhibition,  the  website  will  function  as  the  long-­‐term  platform  where  visitors  can  see,   discover  and  take  part  in  this  visual  playground.    Above  the  computers  on  the  wall  the   website  address  will  be  put  on  the  wall  in  a  huge  font,  so  that  it  can’t  escape  the  visitor’s   attention.       For  the  graphic  design  of  the  exhibition,  we  asked  Van  Onna,  Verwoerd.  They  will  take  care   of  the  entire  branding  of  our  project.  We  feel  Van  Onna,  Verwoerd  is  an  ideal  fitting  partner.   Their  communication  is  clear,  fresh  elementary  and  straightforward.  They  have  worked  for  a   variety  of  cultural  institutions  among  others  the  Stimuleringsfonds  (Dutch  Creative   Industries  Fund),  for  which  they  designed  a  fresh  looking  visual  identity.  We  feel  Van  Onna,   Verwoerd  is  the  right  match,  to  help  us  create  and  communicate  a  new  identity  for  the   photo-­‐archive.      

   

                                                                                                                                7

For  an  example  of  her  sound  design,  fitting  our  concept:  http://vimeo.com/23145319  

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4. W  E  B  S  I  T  E     Current  state   The  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam  already  has  a  website.  One  of  the  components  of  this   website  is  an  online  visual  archive.  Here  the  visitor  can  search  for  various  visual  materials   regarding  Amsterdam;  ranging  from  city  maps,  postcards  to  the  photo  documentary   assignments.  The  development  of  this  online  archive  clearly  has  been  done  with  a  lot  of  care   and  attention.  However,  in  extension  to  the  exhibitions  attempt  to  reframe  the  character   and  possibilities  regarding  this  visual  archive,  we  feel  it  is  necessary  to  improve  the  character   of  the  website  as  well.       While  the  concept  of  a  website,  to  find,  collect  and  share  a  collection  of  images,  is  very   much  of  today,  the  style  and  design  of  the  visual  archive  of  the  City  Archive  is  fairly  out-­‐ dated.  As  the  content  is  too  much  data-­‐based  -­‐  with  the  icons  and  texts  in  small  size,  and   quite  some  options  with  little  overview  -­‐  you  could  say  that  the  websites  lay-­‐out  and   structure  is  still  a  very  traditional  and  conservative  archival  website.  In  order  to  really  give   ground  to  the  new  interpretation  and  potentials  of  the  visual  City  Archive,  we  are   recommending  a  renewal  of  the  websites  ‘outer  shell’.  In  the  current  state,  the  visual   archive  provides  quite  some  possibilities  but  is  still  very  user-­‐unfriendly.  With  its  traditional   format,  searching  in  the  archive  is  tough.  Its  design  is  not  complementing  its  own  content,   allowing  its  visitors  to  miss  opportunities  and  leaving  special  imagery  out  of  sight.     Concept     The  first  impression  is  everything.  We  live  in  a  society  nowadays  that  we  process   information  in  a  completely  different  way  then  only  a  few  decades  ago.  We  are  confronted   with  images  every  day;  we  browse  and  select  quickly  what  to  take  in  or  not.  The  internet  has   created  a  new  way  of  going  through  information,  jumping  from  one  page  to  the  other,   hopping  from  one  image  to  another,  bringing  us  randomly  to  places  we  never  would  have   found  through  traditional  informational  services.      

Next to  the  traditional  function  of  the  archive  as  an  informational  source  we  would  like  the   visual  archive  to  become  known  as  an  autonomous  platform  for  photography  where  one  can   search,  explore  and  be  surprised  by  the  richness  that  is  to  be  found.  Therefor  we  are   recommending  a  new  design  that  will  be  recognisable,  that  is  young  and  inviting  and  that   will  increase  the  usability  of  the  website.  Text  should  be  less  prominent,  allowing  the  visual   content  to  be  the  emphasis.     Already  the  current  website  has  implemented  the  possibility  to  share  images  on  social   media,  to  implement  the  images  on  your  website,  to  select  favourites  in  a  folder,  to  filter   images  or  in  some  cases  to  buy  a  print.  These  are  already  modern  tools  of  which  we  are  glad   they  are  implemented.     However,  the  design  should  bring  these  possibilities  more  to  the  foreground;  making  it  a   quickly,  visually  more  attractive  and  popular  to  want  to  share  these  documents.     Furthermore  we  would  like  to  propose  to  make  use  of  a  tag-­‐cloud.  A  tag-­‐cloud  is  a  way  to   make  the  content  visual  via  words  related  to  the  images.  The  tags  will  alert  the  visitor  to    

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Example of  Tag  Cloud  

                 

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more search  options  and  tags  that  are  used  more  often  will  be  displayed  greater  for   example.  We  realise  this  is  a  more  difficult  tool  to  implement,  because  it  has  to  be  related  to   all  the  documents.  However  we  wish  to  propose  to  implement  this  anyway.  This  is  a  long-­‐ term  project  that  can  be  formed  over  time.       In  order  to  provide  a  more  intuitive  and  fluid  search  tool,  we’d  like  to  implement  a  tag  cloud   with  more  associative  terms,  such  as  love,  sadness,  red,  dream,  busy,  strong,  etc.  These   associative  terms  will  approach  the  documents  in  a  more  abstract  manner.  With  picking   ‘red’  for  example,  visitors  will  not  only  be  surprised  by  images  that  have  red  elements  in   them.  ‘Red’,  in  this  way,  can  also  be  related  content  wise  or  in  a  descriptive  way.  In  the  same   way  as  the  exhibition,  an  alternative  history  of  Amsterdam  is  presented.  Visitors  are   triggered  to  immediately  start  a  spontaneous  journey  while  browsing  through  the  archive.  In   our  opinion  this  would  be  an  ideal  way  to  create  an  alternative  search  approach  to  the   documents.      

Design For  the  website’s  redesigning  we  would  like  to  cooperate  with  Van  Onna,  Verwoerd,  who   will  also  do  the  graphic  design  for  the  exhibition.  In  this  way  we  would  like  to  create  a  clear   coherence  between  the  different  platforms,  creating  a  certain  branding  for  the  project.  Of   course  the  City  Archive  and  the  municipality  will  be  consulted;  making  sure  their  interests   will  be  met.  Though  we  have  some  ideas  of  what  we  would  like  to  with  the  design  of  the   website,  we  will  not  provide  sketches  of  the  design  in  this  proposal,  for  we  are  not  the  actual   designers.  There  are  a  few  websites  and  examples  we  will  use  as  a  reference  during  the   development  stage.  What  we  are  aiming  for  is  that  the  image  becomes  the  central  focus   point.  The  websites  below  are  online  image  archives,  archiving  visual  documents,  and  it’s   immediately  clear  at  first  sight,  the  image  is  their  central  focus  point.  First  comes  the  image,   then  come  the  data.  You’re  immediately  tempted  to  browse  through  the  images.       http://www.luerzersarchive.net   http://www.thisiscolossal.com/visual-­‐archive   http://www.visualarchive.hk/     Also  Time  Magazine  has  an  inspiring  approach  as  they  present  their  former  issues  in  relation   to  the  present.  Instead  of  specifically  searching  for  an  issue  from  a  certain  year,  month  or   week,  they  chose  for  a  visual  approach,  by  using  their  covers  as  a  main  reference.   Furthermore  They  take  their  current  time  and  the  current  week,  going  back  in  periods  of  5,   10,  20,  30,  40,  up  to  80  years  ago,  presenting  the  covers  of  the  publications  of  those  years  in   the  exact  same  week.  In  this  way  the  old  publications  take  in  their  place,  their  relevance,  in   relation  to  the  present.  Though  we  do  not  want  to  literally  implement  this  system,  we  do   like  the  alternative  approach  to  historical  documents,  it  is  an  inspiring  source.      

Target groups   The  website  is  directed  towards  two  target  groups:  the  wider  audience,  and  researchers.     The  wide  audience  can  exists  out  of  inhabitants  of  Amsterdam,  curious  about  visual  material      

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Example of  Time  Magazine  

                               

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of their  environment,  public  that  is  curious  for  image  material  related  to  the  genealogy  of     their  relatives,  but  also  photography  lovers  from  all  over  the  world  who  are  interested  in  the   work  of  photographers  such  as  Ata  Kando,  Ed  van  der  Elsken  or  Viviane  Sassen.     Next  to  a  wider  audience  we  have  the  researchers,  specifically  using  the  archive  for   informational  purposes.  This  group  of  researchers  is  formed  by  for  example  scholars,   historicists,  archaeologists  or  students.  Where  we  feel  that  researchers  will  find  there  way  to   the  visual  archive,  the  wider  audience  might  need  to  get  familiar  with  it  first.     Therefor  we  are  proposing  an  editorial  element  to  the  website.  At  least  one  editor  should  be   related  to  the  website.  We  want  the  editor  to  set  out  ‘assignments’  to  Dutch  celebrities  as   guest  editors  such  as  Silvia  Witteman,  Mathijs  van  Nieuwkerk,  Arie  Boomsma,  Kluun,  Carice   van  Houten  &  Halina  Reijn,  Youp  van  het  Hek,  etc.  They  can  make  their  own  personal   selection  complemented  with  a  small  background  story.  In  this  way  the  celebrities  will   represent  the  City  Archive  and  promote  the  online  website  to  a  broader  audience.  People   will  be  attracted  by  for  example  Robin  van  Persie  to  go  and  see  his  selection  and  get  to  know   the  existence  of  the  visual  archive.       For  both  target  groups  it  is  of  great  importance  that  the  base  of  the  image  archive  is  indeed   visually  orientated.  By  an  excellent  usability  and  attractive  design,  both  target  groups  should   become  stimulated  to  go  out  and  explore  the  archive  and  to  make  their  search  more   sufficient,  fun,  touching  and  surprising.                                              

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Natura Artis  Magistra,  Plantage  Middenlaan  40,  polar  bears  in  their  new  stay,    1976  -­‐  Frank  H.M.  van  der  Heul   Collection:  photo-­‐prints  

                           

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5. S  I  D  E    P  R  O  G  R  A  M      

S Y  M  P  O  S  I  U  M     What  is  the  importance  of  photography  assignments  today?  How  valuable  is  the  notion  of  an   author  for  the  creation  of  a  social-­‐historical  document?  And  looking  back  at  the  past;  does   the  assignment  photography  in  the  Netherlands  contribute  to  the  historiography  of  a  city  in   a  certain  time?     These  are  important  issues  that  will  be  addressed  in  the  Symposium  Taking  Pictures  for  the   Future:  Discussing  visions  on  documentary  photography  assignments.  The  symposium  is   organized  together  with  Amsterdam-­‐based  debate  centre  De  Balie  and  its  main  goal  is  to   breath  new  live  into  the  discussion  on  the  photography  assignment  policy  in  the  Netherlands   and  therefor  visual  archiving  in  general  as  well.  The  symposium  is  aimed  at  the  professionals   who  are  dealing  with  these  issues,  but  the  program  will  also  be  open  to  artists,   photographers  and  photography  lovers  who  are  interested.   The  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam  will  be  set  as  an  example,  but  functions  hereby  mainly  as  a   starting  point  towards  an  exploration  of  the  entire  Dutch  field  of  documentary  assignments.   The  pressing  questions  lingering  in  the  field  of  visual  archiving  and  photography   assignments,  that  have  been  left  unanswered  for  too  long,  will  now  be  thrown  into  the   arena,  open  for  debate.  The  idea  is  to  review  the  current  policies  and  to  determine  whether   they  have  been  successful,  to  take  on  a  critical  view  towards  their  current  state  and  whether   we  should  revise  strategies.     First  focus  will  be  on  the  goals  and  intentions  of  the  archive  or  collection  in  relation  to  the   documentary  photography  assignment  policy  that  is  set  out  by  the  institutes.  Central   question  that  will  be  discussed  here  are:      

Content -­‐  What  should  an  archive  collect  today  in  order  to  generate  a  complete  representation  of  the   city?     -­‐  What  is  the  importance  of  the  photography  assignments?  (Relevance,  construction  of   policy)   -­‐  In  what  way  do  the  artistic  assignments  contribute  to  the  imaging  of  a  city?     -­‐  How  should  be  dealt  with  the  paradox  of  autonomous  artistic  freedom  on  the  one  hand   and  the  need  for  a  social-­‐historical  document  on  the  other?   -­‐  Are  we  speaking  here  of  registration  or  imagination?     -­‐  Does  the  author’s  vision  contribute  to  the  story  of  a  certain  time  or  is  it  merely  a  personal   storiette?     -­‐  Can  author-­‐driven  photography  be  seen  as  an  added  value  for  a  topographical  archive?   -­‐  Is  the  author  creator  or  subject?     -­‐  And  thus,  looking  back  at  more  than  thirty  years:  how  meaningful  have  these  commissions   been  regarding  the  representation  of  a  city  in  a  certain  time?      

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J.J.Viottastraat 36,  home  with  jewish-­‐historical    interior,  2008  –  Martin  Alberts   Collection:  own  photo-­‐service  

                                       

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-­‐ Has  giving  photo-­‐documentary  assignments  been  a  success?  Or  should  we  revise   strategies?   -­‐Is  the  current  museum  climate,  in  which  visitor  statistics  and  priority  goals  tend  to  become   more  important  than  the  actual  collecting,  causing  neglect  towards  the  collections?       Presentation   -­‐How  should  the  archive  preserve  and  present  the  collected  visual  documents?  (The   presentation  platform  of  the  future:  presentation  and  registration  systems:  visual  interfaces,   tagging  systems,  user  generated  content,  etc.  Example  of  the  Rijksmuseum  and  the  Arab   image  foundation))   -­‐  How  should  we  deal  with  the  clash  between  the  concept  of  today  (photography)  and  the   style  and  form  of  yesterday  (the  archive).     -­‐  How  should  the  collections  be  treated  in  future  exhibitions?     -­‐How  can  we  get  the  most  out  of  these  collections?  (out  of  the  box  thinking  for  user   purposes.       Next  to  that,  a  closer  look  should  be  taken  at  the  general  policy,  created  to  stimulate  Dutch   photography,  with  a  close  look  at  the  substantive  guidance  of  the  photographer  and  the   general  question  whether  the  original  intent  (the  stimulation  of  the  Dutch  photography)  is   still  valid.  If  so,  is  the  contemporary  notion  of  incentive  still  the  same  or  should  it  be   reframed?  At  what  point  becomes  the  assignment  a  subsidy  for  a  personal  project  rather   than  an  encouraging  stimulant?  And,  How  is  the  substantive  guidance  currently  set  up,  and   is  this  effective?  A  close  look  will  be  given  to  examples  of  international  initiatives,  such  as   the  Swedish  organisation  Samdok,  and  the  Arab  Image  Foundation.     Samdok  is  founded  in  1977  by  the  Nordic  Museum  and  the  Musuem  of  Cultural  History,  who   wished  to  cooperate  on  the  collection  of  material,  geared  to  the  present  day.  Their  initiative   to  systematically  collect  a  visual  document  of  the  Swedish  Society  could  be  seen  as  a  leading   example.  They  previously  organized  an  international  conference  on  the  topic  in  2007.     The  Arab  Image  Foundation  is  a  non-­‐profit  organization  established  in  Beirut  in  1997.  Its   mission  is  to  collect,  preserve  and  study  photographs  from  the  Middle  East,  North  Africa  and   the  Arab  diaspora.  The  AIF’s  expanding  collection  is  generated  through  artist  and  scholar-­‐led   projects.  The  Foundation  makes  its  collection  accessible  to  the  public  through  a  wide   spectrum  of  activities,  including  exhibitions,  publications,  videos,  a  website  and  an  online   image  database.     Selected  Guest  Speakers  are:     Wim  Vroom   Wim  Vroom  is  former  director  of  the  Department  of  Dutch  History  at  the  Rijksmuseum  in   Amsterdam  and  former  chief  Atlas  at  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam.  He  stood  at  the  base  of   the  assignments  of  the  City  Archive  in  the  first  part  of  the  70s,  and  transferred  to  the   Rijksmuseum  in  1975,  where  he  realised  a  similar  assignment  policy.    In  1995  Wim  Vroom   left  the  Rijksmuseum.        

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Hripsime Visser   Since  1990,  Hripsimé  Visser  has  been  the  photo  curator  of  Stedelijk  Museum  Amsterdam.   She  studied  art  history,  with  a  specialisation  in  photography,  at  the  university  of  Leiden.   Before  Visser  started  working  for  Stedelijk  Museum,  she  worked  for  Perspektief:  a  former,   centre  for  photography  in  Rotterdam,  that  has  played  an  important  role  in  the  development   of  Dutch,  Rotterdam  based,  photography  in  the  80’s  and  early  90’s.     Visser  has  published  many  books  on  photography,  gives  lectures  and  is  member  on  several   boards  and  advisory  committees  related  to  photography.   She  wrote  several  texts  on  the  photography  commission  climate  in  the  Netherlands,   amongst  others  for  former  photography  journal  Perspektief  and  the  introduction  to   Zeventien  Visies  op  Noord-­‐Holland:  Fotodocumentaire  opdrachten  1991-­‐1995.  (1996)     Anneke  van  Veen   Anneke  van  Veen  is  the  current  curator  of  photographs  at  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam.   She  is  closely  involved  with  the  assignments  and  has  edited  several  exhibitions  of  the   assignments.  She  is  an  expert  in  the  field  and  has  written  a  lot  about  the  subject.       Joep  Neefjes   Joep  Neefjes  is  a  visual  artist/photographer,  and  is  known  for  his  ‘fictional’  press  agency   Loodwicks  Press  Images,  a  sort  of  pseudonym  that  he  uses  to  excite.  He  likes  to  put  people   on  the  wrong  track  with  his  work.  He  regularly  works  with  archival  material.  Only  recently,  at   the  end  of  2013,  he  curated  the  jubilee  exhibition  Unintended  Photography,  in  the  Dutch   Photo  Museum  in  Rotterdam,  composed  by  images  from  their  archive.     As  an  artist,  who  regularly  works  with  archival  material,  and  who  plays  with  the  concept  of   fiction  and  reality  and  the  notion  of  history,  and  because  of  his  thought  provoking  ideas,   Neefjes  might  bring  a  n  interesting  alternative  view  to  the  debate.         Christina  Mattson   Christina  Mattson  is  director  of  the  Nordic  Museum  and  chair  of  the  Samdok  Council.   Samdok  is  a  shared  resource  for  museums  in  Sweden,  and  its  aim  is  to  create  an   international  forum  for  dialogue  and  collaboration  on  collection  matters.  Mattson  argues   that  international  cooperation  is  necessary,  particular  in  times  when  resources  are  scarce.       Akram  Zaatari   Akram  Zaatari  is  a  filmmaker,  photographer,  archival  artist  and  curator,  based  in  Beirut.  He  is   also  founding  member  of  the  Arab  Image  Foundation.  Zaatari  is  interested  in  the  notion  of   collecting  as  an  art  practice.  He  focused  on  studying  and  archiving  the  photographic  work  of   the  Saida-­‐based  photographer  Hashem  el  Madani  (1928),  as  a  register  of  social  relationships   and  photographic  practices.  Zaatari  would  be  an  interesting  guest  speaker  since  he  has  roots   in  archiving  and  collecting  from  an  artist  perspective  combined  with  an  archival  background.            

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Drag disco/costume  party  La  Night  aux  Folles  in  disco  Flora  Palace,  Amstelstraat  24   The    yields  of  the  party  will  go  to  the  research  on  AIDS,  1983  –  Erwin  Olaf   Collection:  photo-­‐prints  

                                         

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Wim Vroom,  Hripsime  Visser  en  Anneke  van  Veen,  are  well  known  names  in  the  debate.   They  have  been  and  are  closely  related  to  the  photo  documentary  assignment  and  the   presentation  of  these  collections,  and  have  written  a  lot  about  the  commission  policy.  It  is   important  to  invite  these  people,  involved  from  the  beginnings.  However,  to  bring  in  fresh,   and  perhaps  alternative  views  to  the  discussion,  we  feel  that  Joep  Neefjes,  Christina   Mattson  and  Akram  Zaatari  can  add  some  serious  value  to  the  debate.    

G  U  I  D  E  D    T  O  U  R  S   Guided  Tours  by  well  known  Amsterdam  locals  will  attract  visitors  who  would  like  to  view   the  exhibition  from  a  different  perspective.  Each  Guide  will  provide  his  or  her  own  fresh   perspective  on  the  exhibition.  Among  others:   *  Well-­‐known  fashion  designer  Bas  Kosters  (1977)  will  guide  the  public  through  the   exhibition  while  his  focus  will  be  on  fashion,  colour,  form,  and  shaping  identity.   *  Fidan  Ekiz  (1976)  is  a  Dutch  journalist  and  documentary  maker  from  Turkish  descent.  In   her  tour  she  will  put  the  emphasis  on  social  relationships  and  the  variety  of  Amsterdam   people.     *  Vincent  Robert  Bijlo  (1965)  is  a  Dutch  comedian  and  writer.  Bijlo  is  also  blind  since  his   birth  and  so  his  tour  will  be  targeted  towards  blind  and  visually  impaired  people.  

                   

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Visual Identity  of  the  Stimuleringsfonds  by  Van  Onna,  Verwoerd  

               

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6. C  O  M  M  U  N  I  C  A  T  I  O  N    &    M  A  R  K  E  T  I  N  G        

The media  campaign  entails  three  parts:  one  part  is  generating  (free)  publicity  for  the   exhibition  with  the  goal  to  attract  as  many  visitors  as  possible.  Part  two  is  directed  towards   the  launch  of  the  revised  website,  with  the  aim  to  generate  wide  public  awareness  of  the   new  image  of  the  Visual  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam  and  its  true  value.  The  last  part  is  aimed   at  the  possible  prospective  audience  for  the  symposium.       Since  we  are  exhibiting  in  Foam,  they  will  take  care  of  a  great  part  of  the  publicity  for  the   exhibition,  using  their  own  communication  team,  channels  and  press  file,  aiming  at   maximum  visibility  in  press,  radio  and  tv,  digital  channels,  etc.  However,  next  to  that  we’d   like  to  include  a  media  partner  who  will  contribute  to  the  promotion  and  visibility  of  the   exhibition,  website  and  side  programming.  Possible  partner  is  nrc.next,  the  tabloid  edition  of   NRC  Handelsblad,  targeted  at  a  younger  audience.  They  daily  place  an  image  in  the  printed   version  under  the  rubric  In  beeld,  a  spread  dedicated  to  photos  that  are  meant  to  surprise   and  intrigue.    Furthermore  they  have  an  online  rubric  dedicated  to  photography.  This  would   be  an  ideal  partner,  for  their  shared  interest  in  photography  and  culture  in  general,  their   young  target  group  and  the  possibility  to  include  parts  of  the  planned  publications  in  their   tabloid.      

T A  R  G  E  T    G  R  O  U  P  S     Target  Groups  of  the  Exhibition  (Including  guided  tours)   For  the  exhibition  we  hope  to  reach  a  wide  audience.  Important  focus  point  though  is  to   attract  the  young  urban  culture  lovers  (16-­‐35).  The  target  groups  we  will  further  be  aiming   at  are:   -­‐  photography  lovers   -­‐  art  and  culture  lovers   -­‐  young  urban  townsmen  (20-­‐50)   -­‐  the  Amsterdam  inhabitant.  (Of  all  ages)     -­‐  the  professionally  involved,  such  as  professionals  out  of  the  field  of  photography,  those   who  worked  in  the  field  of  photo-­‐assignments  and  visual  archiving,  art  critics,  as  well  as   those  who  work  in  the  field  of  history  for  example.         -­‐  tourists  of  Amsterdam     Target  Groups  of  the  Website   The  website  aims  at  a  wide  audience  as  well.  The  idea  is  that  the  website  will  function  as  a   long-­‐term  platform  for  photography.  We  would  like  to  involve  a  younger  audience  to  visit   the  website  regularly.  Therefore  the  website  is  again  aimed  at  similar  target  groups  of  the   exhibition,  except  for  the  tourists.  Furthermore  the  website  of  course  still  functions  as  the   city  archive  through  which  professional  researchers,  historians  and  students  can  easily   browse  and  collect,  as  well  as  amateur  researchers  and  Amsterdam  citizens  who  would  like    

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to consult  the  website  for  example  out  of  genealogical  interest.       Target  Groups  of  the  Symposium   Though  the  symposium  is  open  to  all,  it  clearly  has  a  different  target  group  than  the  other   platforms.  The  discussion  will  be  held  at  a  professional  level,  therefore  we  expect  the   audience  to  have  certain  background  knowledge.  The  target  groups  are:    -­‐  (Prospective)  Professionals  in  the  field  of  photography,  commissioning,  archiving  and   history.     -­‐  Amateur  connaiseurs.        

C O  M  M  U  N  I  C  A  T  I  O  N    P  L  A  N   Most  communication  will  have  to  be  generated  through  free  publicity,  word  of  mouth,  viral   marketing,  barter  deals  and  joint  promotion.  The  opening  of  the  exhibition  and  symposium   will  play  an  important  part  in  the  launching  of  the  word  of  mouth  communication.  During   the  duration  of  the  exhibition,  actualities  will  keep  the  interest  for  RENDEZVOUS  animated.     Important  is  to  communicate  the  aesthetic,  poetic  playfulness  of  the  exhibition;  the  new,   fresh,  visual  approach  to  the  history  of  Amsterdam  and  to  the  visual  archive.       Principles  and  objectives  for  communication  of  Foam   Foam  is  striving  within  her  campaign  to:   -­‐  generate  constant  visibility  around  all  RENDEZVOUS  products  with  the  correct  target   groups.     -­‐  To  increase  brand  awareness  of  the  museum  with  the  young  public.     -­‐  To  increase  and  secure  brand  awareness  of  the  museum  in  general.      

E X  H  I  B  I  T  I  O  N     Young  Culture  Lovers   In  order  to  clearly  communicate  the  artistic,  trendy,  visual  character  of  the  exhibition   towards  the  young  culture  lovers,  next  to  the  communication  of  Foam  and  nrc.next.  we  will   emphasize  the  publicity  in  specific  media  with  a  young  cultural  audience:   New  Dawn,  Glamcult,  Hard/hoofd.nl,  Amsterdam  Curated,  Vogue,  CultuurBewust.nl,  Blend   Magazine,  Subbacultcha!,  and  CJP  magazine.  Next  to  that  we  will  also  place  banners  on  the   websites  of  the  abovementioned  channels.         Photography  lovers/art  and  culture  lovers/  young  urban  townsmen  (20-­‐50)/The   Amsterdam  inhabitant  (Of  all  ages)     For  these  target  groups  we  will  aim  at  more  general  culture  platforms.  Hopefully  we  can   generate  free  publicity  within  television  shows  as  De  Wereld  Draait  Door,  Opium  TV,    

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Example for  website  campaign  together  with  Heijdens  Karwij  

   

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Kunststof TV  and  Radio.  Of  course  Foam  has  a  wide  press  file  with  a  very  broad  range  of   communication  channels.  Their  posters  are  an  important  communication  tool.     The  communication  tools  used  for  this  exhibition  are:   -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐

The printed  invitation  for  the  opening  of  the  exhibition   Event  page  on  Facebook  for  the  opening   General  attention  through  the  Foam  Facebookpage  and  Twitter  Account,  urging   people  to  come  through  teasers   A  billboard-­‐campaign  of  Foam,  spreaded  throughout  the  Netherlands     Mentioning  of  the  exhibition  in  online  agenda  on  Foam  Website   Mentioning  of  the  exhibition  in  digital  newsletter  of  Foam  (more  than  5000   subscribers  /  sent  every  two  weeks)   Mentioning  of  the  exhibition  in  Foam  Magazine   Pushing  notifications  on  the  exhibition  through  the  website,  Facebook  and  Twitter   accounts  of  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam,  urging  people  to  come  through  teasers.  

During  the  Opening  there  will  be  a  poetry  performance  by  the  city  poet  of  2014:  Anna   Enquist  (1945).  This  will  draw  not  only  photography  lovers  but  also  people  interested  in   other  fields.  Of  course  we  will  invite  important  people  within  the  field:  photography  critics,   bloggers,  celebrities,  which  will  hopefully  generate  word  of  mouth  and  free  publicity   through  blogs  and  the  twitter  accounts  of  the  celebrities.      

W E  B  S  I  T  E   The  website  is  another  story.  The  website  is  not  just  meant  as  an  informational  source  to   back  up  the  exhibition,  but  is  meant  to  become  accepted  as  an  alternative  autonomous   photography  platform,  worth  paying  a  visit,  next  to  the  informational  function  of  the   archive,  also  for  pure  pleasure.  Therefore  it  is  important  to  create  a  strong  brand  awareness   with  the  audience,  communicating  the  fresh,  trendy,  visual  character  of  the  revised  website.   This  will  not  be  done  by  Foam,  but  through  the  visual  identity  designed  by  Van  Onna,   Verwoerd,  in  cooperation  with  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam,  and  hopefully  with  the  help   of  IAmsterdam.       In  order  to  do  so  we  work  in  two  stages.  First  the  exhibition  will  bring  (new)  attention  to  the   City  Archive,  which  will  have  a  positive  effect  on  the  visitor’s  perception  of  the  archive.  As   said  before,  during  the  exhibition  there  will  be  computers  available  to  consult  the  website,   and  the  web  address  will  clearly  be  communicated.     After  the  exhibition  we  will  launch  a  special  campaign  to  promote  the  website.  Within   Amsterdam  we  will  do  this  with  a  special  campaign  in  association  with  Heijdens  Karwij  and   nrc.next.  In  2007  these  two  already  cooperated  on  an  outdoor  exhibition  during  the  photo   festival  in  Naarden.  nrc.next.  exhibited  a  selection  of  their  In  beeld  spreads,  designed  by   Heijdens  Karwij.  They  designed  an  outdoor  exhibition  using  a  special  material  that  can  be   glued  to  the  pavement.  The  effect  was  such  that  it  appeared  as  if  someone  had  lost  a    

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newspaper, sheet  by  sheet.  The  blown  up  photographs  were  pasted  on  footpaths   throughout  Naarden.8     This  same  concept  we  would  like  to  apply  to  the  website,  showing  different  images  from  the   image  archive  at  random  locations  through  Amsterdam.  With  the  images  a  QR-­‐code  will  be   added.  If  the  people  follow  the  QR-­‐code,  they  will  be  redirected  to  the  website.       Other  than  that  we  will  use  Boomerang  cards,  that  will  be  spread  Nationwide,  and  will   advertise  on  several  of  the  before  mentioned  websites  and  will  turn  again  to  the  free  papers   such  as  New  Dawn  and  Glamcult.    Furthermore  there  will  be  created  a  new  Facebookpage,   related  to  the  website,  through  which  there  will  be  a  constant  communication,  about  for   example  articles  by  guest  editors,  etc.                                                                                                                                                                 8

http://www.heijdenskarwei.com/portfolio/nrc-­‐next-­‐in-­‐beeld/  

 

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S Y  M  P  O  S  I  U  M       The  side  program  will  also  create  its  own  publicity,  in  cooperation  with  the  City  Archive  and   De  Balie.     The  communication  tools  used  for  this  symposium  are:   -­‐ -­‐

The printed  invitation  for  the  symposium   General  attention  through  the  Foam  Facebookpage  and  Twitter  Account,  urging   people  to  come  through  teasers.   -­‐ Mentioning  of  the  symposium  in  online  agenda  on  Foam  Website   -­‐ Mentioning  of  the  exhibition  in  digital  newsletter  of  Foam  (more  than  5000   subscribers  /  sent  every  two  weeks     -­‐ Pushing  notifications  on  the  exhibition  through  the  website,  Facebook  and  Twitter   accounts  of  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam,  urging  people  to  come  through  teasers.   -­‐ The  website,  twitter  and  Facebook  account  and  other  communication  tools  of  De   Balie   -­‐ The  social  networks  of  several  professional  platforms  related  to  the  field  of   photography,  museums,  and  archiving,  such  as  YdocAgenda,  PhotoQ,  and  Foam   Magazine.         Visitors  with  an  entrance  ticket  of  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam  can  get  free  entrance  to   Foam  and  vice  versa.  This  will  encourage  the  different  target  groups  of  the  museums  to  visit   both  institutes.              

     

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Aerial photograph  from  the  Amsterdam  forest,  1970  –  photographer  unknown   Collection:  urban  and  spatial  planning  

     

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7. P  A  R  T  N  E  R  S     &    C  O  O  P  E  R  A  T  I  N  G    P  A  R  T  I  E  S     Laura  van  Rijs(1988)  curated  her  first  group  exhibition  All  The  Things  You  Are  during  her   studies  Documentary  Photography  at  the  Art  Acadamy  of  Utrecht,  with  work  of  Jaap   Scheeren,  Sara  Blokland,  Maria  Dabrowski  en  Milou  Abel,    in  the  Academiegalerie  in  Utrecht   (2011).  After  her  studies  she  decided  to  gain  more  experience  as  a  curator  and  did  amongst   others  an  Internship  at  Foam.  Here  she  assisted  the  curator  and  assistant-­‐curator  with  their   daily  tasks  and  was  responsible  for  the  project  management  of  several  exhibitions.  Since   September  2013  she’s  studying  her  master  in  Film  and  Photographic  Studies  at  Leiden   University.  May  2014  the  group  exhibition  Staged  City  will  be  opening,  in  the  artist  society   Arti  et  Amicitiae  in  Amsterdam.  This  exhibition  she  developed  together  will  photographer   and  filmmaker  Petra  Noordkamp.   Mylaine  Roelofs  (1986)  started  as  a  student  at  the  Amsterdam  Fashion  Institute  at  the   department  Design  and  Styling  (2004).  Here  she  was  introduced  to  the  great  photographers   in  the  field  of  fashion.  She  then  realised  that  she  was  actually  more  passionate  about   photography,  rather  than  the  fashion  in  the  images.  She  then  switched  studies  to  Editing   and  Media  Production  (2005-­‐2009).  Here  she  was  trained  as  an  image  editor  for  the   publishing  field.  During  and  after  her  studies  she  did  several  internships,  amongst  others  at   publishing  houses  De  Bezige  Bij  and  Amstel  Uitgevers,  and  KLIK!  Amsterdam  Animation  Film   Festival,  where  she  gained  experience  as  an  assistant  to  the  Rights  Manager(BB),  and   foremost  in  traffic  management  of  publications(Amstel  and  KLIK!).    In  2009  she  went  to   Portsmouth  England,  where  she  studied  a  year  of  English  Film  and  Literature  Studies  at  the   University  of  Portsmouth.  Since  2012  she’s  studying  a  master  in  Film  and  Photographic   Studies  at  Leiden  University,  where  she’s  specializing  in  editorial  and  curatorial  work,  under   the  guidance  of  Bas  Vroege.       Het  Stadsarchief     Het  Stadsarchief  (City  Archive  of  Amsterdam)  is  the  historical  documentation  centre  of   Amsterdam  with  35  kilometer  of  archives,  a  historical-­‐topographical  collection  with  million’s   of  maps,  drawings  and  prints,  a  library  and  a  broad  collection  of  film,  sounds  and   photography  archives.  For  more  information  see  the  introduction  and  background  chapters   of  this  application.     Foam     Foam  (Photography  Museum  Amsterdam)  opened  its  doors  in  2001.  The  institution,  located   on  the  Keizersgracht  in  the  former,  now  finely  renovated  Museum  Fodor,  focuses  on  the   presentation  of  photography  in  the  broadest  sense  of  the  term,  to  a  wide  audience.     De  Balie   De  Balie  is  a  platform  for  the  freedom  of  speech,  contemporary  art,  debate  and  culture,    

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Sandra, Oudezijds  Voorburgwal,  1992  –  Bart  Sorgedrager   Collection:  Documentary  Photo-­‐Assignment  

                     

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located at  the  Leidseplein  in  Amsterdam.  In  thirty  years  De  Balie  has  florished  into   phenomenon  ot  een  fenomeen  op  het  gebied  van  spraakmakende  debatten  en   (kunst)projecten   nrc.next   In  2006  NRC  launched  this  tabloid  version  of  the  NRC.  The  newspaper  is  innovative  and   focused  on  the  future.  Not  established,  but  rather  continuously  developing.  Their  target   group  is  young  (and  old,  but  mostly  directed  at  a  younger  public),  unprejudiced,  and  open   minded.  They  see  it  as  their  task  to  help  their  readers  with  their  products  and  services  to   know  better,  to  think  better  and  to  do  better.  They  have  a  photography  rubric,  both  in  the   printed  version  as  well  as  on  their  website,  called  In  beeld.   Amsterdam  marketing  /  I  Amsterdam   This  is  the  city  marketing  organisation  of  the  Amsterdam  Metropolitan  Area,  active  in  the   fields  of  promotion,  information,  research  and  services.  Their  ambition  is  to  put  this  region   on  the  map  as  one  of  the  five  most  attractive  metropolitan  areas  in  Europe  for  its  residents,   visitors,  businesses  and  influential  groups.  Under  the  motto  ‘I  amsterdam’,  they  present  the   region  as  a  dynamic  place  to  live  and  work,  an  attractive  travel  destination  and  a  test  market   for  innovation.  This  not  only  has  a  positive  influence  on  the  city’s  public  image   internationally  but  also  for  local  residents,  boosting  their  sense  of  civic  pride  and   appreciation.  To  achieve  this,  they  work  together  with  public  and  private  organisations,   cultural  institutions  and  universities.     Van  Onna,  Verwoerd     This  small  design  studio  (start-­‐up  2012)  run  by  Niki  and  Johannes  (surnames  unknown),   creates  communication  for  all  kinds  of  media.  They  work  for  clients  in  different  segments  of   the  market.  Johannes  and  Nikki  go  back  a  long  way.  They  joined  forces  after  two  projects   they  did  together.  In  the  past  Nikki  worked  for  't  Brandt  Weer,  NLXL  and  Studio  Dumbar.   Johannes  worked  for  Frame  Publishers  and  received  the  startstipendia  two  rows  running   from  the  Mondriaan  Fund.   Nathalie  Bruys  (1975)  is  specialized  in  sound  art  and  makes  soundtracks,  compositions,   performances,  installations,  drawings/collage,  animation,  videos,  costumes,  stage  objects,   sound  walks,  vinyl  and  cd’s.  Is  sound  art  curator  and  performs  as  a  DJ.  She  explores  the   possibilities  of  sound  as  a  medium  within  the  context  of  the  visual  arts.  She  believes  that  the   intrinsic  power  of  sound  can  completely  transcend  the  listener  from  time  and  place  into  an   eternal  world.   She  is  specialized  in  sound  art  and  makes  soundtracks,  music,  radio,  performances,   installations,  videos,  vinyl  and  cds.  She  also  performs  as  a  DJ.  Bruys  focuses  on  the   interaction  and  resonating  relationship  between  invisible  sound  and  the  visual  manifestation   of  it,  preferably  creating  and  overall  experience  in  the  form  of  spacious,  multi-­‐layered   installations.  She  investigates  the  transcending  power  of  sound  and  the  sonic  dimension.  It  is   important  to  her  that  the  audience  develops  an  awareness  of  sound  and  a  conscious   experience  of  it  in  her  work.  By  relating  sound  to  other  tactile  domains,  Bruys  extends  the   complex  tangible  dimension  of  sound.

 

49


Interior of  the  City  Archive  of  Amsterdam,  2003  –  Petra  Noordkamp   Collection:  photo-­‐documentary  assignments  

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Nickel van  Duijvenboden  (1981)  was  educated  as  a  photographer,  but  turned  to  writing   after  his  studies.  He  investigates  forms  of  writings  that  border  on  visual  art.  In  2003  he   published  a  collection  of  essays,  The  Grand  Absence,  and  graduated  as  a  'photographer   without  photographs'  at  the  Royal  Academy  of  Art,  The  Hague  (NL).  He  teaches  at  the  Photo   Department  of  the  Gerrit  Rietveld  Academie  in  Amsterdam  and  supervised  the  second  year's   photography  students  taking  part  in  the  What's  Next?  project  initiated  by  Foam.   Heijdens  Karwij     This  design  agency,  run  by  Sandra  van  der  Doelen  and  Teun  van  der  Heijden,    is  specialized  in   publications  on  photography.  They  have  won  many  design  awards,  and  have  previously   cooperated  with  nrc.next.   Vandejong   Vandejong  is  a  creative  agency  based  in  Amsterdam.  On  April  1st  2014,  Vandejong  will  have   existed  for  25  years.  They  are  a  long  term  partner  of  Foam  in  their  communication  strategy,   and  they  also  design  Foam  Magazine.  They  develop  new  formats  for  an  ever-­‐changing   world.  With  their  interdisciplinary  team  of  creative  strategists,  business  experts,  graphic  and   online  designers,  copywriters,  and  researchers,  they  help  organizations  to  transform  and   reconnect  with  their  community.  They  develop  challenging  ideas  which  we  translate  into   economically  sustainable  formats.  These  formats  enable  organizations  to  establish   meaningful  relationships  with  their  public.  They  can  take  on  different  forms  and  can  consist   of  concepts,  brands,  campaigns  or  strategies.

                 

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Gaper in  de  Weert,  1993  –  photographer  unknown   Collection:  plagues,  reproductions  and  images    

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F I  N  A  N  C  E  S     A  project  like  this  has  a  bigger  chance  at  succeeding  when  a  collective  of  partners  carry  the   load.  Foam  brings  in  an  important  part  of  the  finances.  With  their  expertise  and  track   records,  they  furthermore  support  the  funding  application  process.  The  Prins  Bernhard   Cultuurfonds,  Amsterdams  Fonds  voor  de  Kunsten  and  the  Mondriaanfonds  are  being   adressed  with  the  request  for  financial  support.   With  the  potential  of  our  project  subject  to  attract  a  wide  audience,  and  a  special  link  to   Amsterdam,  we  have  been  able  to  arrange  cooperation  with  the  nrc.next.  and  IAmsterdam   to  help  with  further  support.  nrc.next  has  a  great  interest  in  photography,  and  art  in  general,   and  our  target  groups  are  amongst  their  readers.  IAmsterdam  is  there  to  support  and   promote  cultural  activities  in  and  about  Amsterdam.  Furthermore  the  Amsterdam  City   Archive  itself  has  agreed  to  support  anywhere  possible,  within  the  reach  of  their  (financial)   power.     With  the  support  of  the  funding  institutions,  with  the  help  of  the  concerned  parties,  a  media   partner  and  several  sponsors,  we  strive  towards  a  project  of  high  quality,  which  will   hopefully  eventually  lead  to  the  general  acceptance  of  a  new  approach  towards  archive   exhibitions  (or  at  least  breath  in  new  live  to  the  debate),  to  a  new  fresh  image  of  the  (online)   Amsterdam  City  Archive,  and  to  a  wide  spread  awareness  of  the  website  as  a  long  term   autonomous  platform  for  photography  lovers.                                                  

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Mondriaan project mylaine & laura def  
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