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SUMMER 2015 PORTFOLIO


Emil Ruder, a Swiss typographer and graphic designer, and one of his books, Typographie, were the inspirations for this portfolio. Design is many things; to me, it is a language and a way of thinking. Since I have started studying architecture, it has become my passion to learn more from the other fields—such as graphic communications and industrial design—so in my pursuit of becoming a great architect I will also realize my goal in becoming a great designer. Thank you for your time in reviewing my portfolio.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

4 OUT OF FAILURE: DISASTER RELIEF AND DIGITAL FABRICATION

48 AARP: AGING IN PLACE KITCHEN COMPETITION

16 CINCINNATI BOUTIQUE HOTEL

54 CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER

28 INSTITUTE FOR FASHION, CULINARY ARTS AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS

64 WORK EXAMPLES

36 MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER

68 PERSONAL WORK


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OUT OF FAILURE DI SAST E R R E L I E F A N D DI G I TA L FA BR I CAT I O N PROFESSOR STEPHEN SLAUGHTER PROFESSOR BRIAN DAVIES PROGRESSIVE STUDIO PROJECT

OUT OF FAILURE: OVERVIEW

The techniques of digital description and information technology in architecture have begun to shift the basis by which architecture is analyzed and evaluated. Concerns of form following function have been displaced by the idea that form is a product of technique at the service of affect, primarily pictorial, sculptural and phenomenal. Unlike engineering, which uses computing technology to optimize and modulate, the inherent exuberance in this new trajectory of architectural investigation gives occasion for the architect to finally “show off.”

CORE 77 ARTICLE

The increase in extreme weather events due to climate change, in the effectiveness of FEMA to offer sustainable solutions for disaster relief, and the critique that prevailing digital practice in architecture, both in academia and the profession, fail to make use of the infinite potential of computing power and technology to address real human need were the motivating factors for this capstone studio titled “Out of Failure.”

SPRING SEMESTER 2014


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THE CONDITION OF FAILURE Human history is rife with mass exodus or displacement due to natural and man-made catastrophes. In response to such devastating circumstances, and in accordance with the University of Cincinnati’s mission to balance research with practical experience, Professors Stephen Slaughter and Brian Davies initiated a series of seminars and studios entitled “Out of Failure” to investigate the application of digital design and rapid prototyping in the construction of shelters for disaster relief. Failure can be defined in many ways. We have come to understand it as something that causes injustice and indecency for people in times of chaos and need. It was our goal throughout the entire design process to have empathy for culture and place, to create informed spaces where people can feel safe, comfortable and dignified. We performed extensive research in typology precedents, physical ergonomics, construction techniques, and cost analysis to better inform our approach to the design and fabrication of structures for various scenarios. It is our hope that our capstone investigation and resulting full-scale prototype will foster discourse and innovation that will result in a scalable accommodation of displaced persons.


OUT OF FAILURE

6

CHOSEN INVESTIGATION: HAITI Building a full-scale prototype of one of our shelters required that all of our studio members focus their energies into one scenario. After deliberation with professors, local experts and a round of internal voting, we decided that the shelter addressing the displacement in Haiti from the 2010 earthquake was the most viable option. This design aims to provide a safe, culturally sensitive, and comfortable environment for recovery, as well as resources for future construction. The components of these shelters can be dismantled and recycled for integration with more permanent housing at the end of their lifecycles. Specifically,the modules of the roof trusses can be reconfigured to create both longer spans for typical roof construction and shorter spans for smaller outdoor canopies. Additionally, elements of the interior furniture system can be reused to outfit new homes, while the larger can be utilized in any type of plywood construction.


PLAN AND SECTION

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OUT OF FAILURE

8

ISOMETRIC VIEW OF OUTER SKIN

ISOMETRIC VIEW OF RIBS


IMAGES

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The design of this shelter is easily constructible, culturally sensitive and economical. Futher development of the design minimized mechanical connections without compromising structural integrity. To combat the effects of material deterioration the shelter’s envelope, furniture sets and structural ribs are easily replaceable. At the end of its life, the shelter can either be broken down and shipped to another site, or incorporate into the construction of a more permanent resident for disaster victims.

INTERIOR RENDER

SCALED MODEL OF FINAL DESIGN


OUT OF FAILURE

10

The shelter’s frame is a series of repeated elements so pieces can be easily replaced in the event of failure or damage.


DETAIL IMAGES AND DIAGRAMS

DETAIL RENDERINGS

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FURNITURE ASSEMBLY DIAGRAMS


OUT OF FAILURE

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INTERIOR RENDERINGS Flexible work space and outdoor connection. Often times, 3 or more generations of a family will share the same home, limiting space and requiring highly efficient and flexible layouts. The shelter can sleep 4 comfortably, accommodating the average Haitian household size of 4.2


BED ASSEMBLY DIAGRAMS

The bed can be hung on the wall when not in use for spatial efficiency.

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OUT OF FAILURE

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person fill control points working

person fill control points working

storage

storage

resting

opacity 30% 3 ffor zoni zoning ing colors

resting

opacity 30% 3 ffor zoni zoning ing colors

Person Fill

////////////////////////////////

GRAPHIC STANDARDS

Storage Space

Resting

body copy - 12 pt

body copy - 12 pt

captions - 10 pt

.5 stroke for lines Arrow: option 7 Dashes: 4 pt dash, 2 gap 2 pt dash, 1 gap

Working Space

.5 stroke for lines Arrow: option 7 Dashes: 4 pt dash, 2 gap 2 pt dash, 1 gap

59 in math cm

This has a white box behind the text. Leading for text is 12 for 12 pt.

opacity 25% opacity 50%

Typeface: Gill Sans

TITLES - 18 pt

math¡

captions - 10 pt

Control Points

This has a white box behind the text. Leading for text is 12 for 12 pt.

opacity 25% opacity 50%

Space Typeface: Gill Sans

TITLES - 18 pt

Creating a graphic standard for all of our ergonomics research allowed us to shift easily throughout each case study and quickly grab necessary information. We looked specifically at work surfaces, resting zones, and storage elements, with respect to their relationships to the human body and to each other.

math¡

59 in Graphic Standards math cm Clarity + Organization

////////////////////// 4’ 7 1/4” 140 cm

8” 20 cm

8” 20 cm 18

18

19 2’ 1” 64 cm

16

2’ 2” 66 cm 3’ 7” 109 cm

1’ 30 cm

10

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15

7

1’ 7 1/4” 49 cm

3’ 1 1/2” 95 cm

1’ 6 3/4” 48 cm

1’ 6” 46 cm

13

11

3’ 91 cm

1’ 11” 58 cm

6’ 2 3/4” 190 cm

2’ 9” 84 cm

9” 23 cm 3” 8 cm

10’ 4 3/4” 317 cm

2”, 5 cm

Frankfurt Kitchen Ultra-efficient workspace

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48 in 122 cm

Researching a case study that had to be designed with the added factor of zero gravity forced us to look carefully at every surface as usable and valuable. The design of the International Space Station aimed to find the sweet spot between maximizing the benefit of no gravity constraints and creating spaces that were familiar and comfortable for the astronauts.

6 in 15 cm

90¡

56 in 142 cm

24 in 61 cm

170 in 50 in 127 cm 432 cm

12 in 30 cm

110¡

40 in 102 cm

110

14 in 35 cm 26 in 66 cm

80 in 203 cm

ERGONOMIC RESEARCH

170¡ 100¡ F

60 in 152 cm

F

r = 12 in 31cm

in motion. Our documentation took into account present-day averages for both male and female body types at four primary age ranges: children (5-18), young adults (19-30), adults (31-60) and the elderly (60+) in addition to body types that were above or below the averages. These studies aided us in later generating spaces and surfaces that were both flexible and efficient. It became apparent that all of this information was specific to its place in history, specific environments and different societal and cultural normalities.

International Space Station Live-work environment

26 in 66 cm

42 in/107 cm 48 in/122 cm

40 in 101 cm

NAKAGIN CAPSULE TOWER //////////////////////////////

To better understand the accommodations of space and how human bodies interact within a given environment we began documenting and examining the ergonomic efficiencies of notoriously compact live-work spatial typologies. Case studies included The Nakagin Capsule Tower, the Sleepbox, F-22 fighter jet cockpits, The International Space Station, The Frankfurt Kitchen, The Redbull Stratos Capsule and more. Our investigations focused on how the human body interacted within these spaces both at rest and

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6 2’ 6” 76 cm

2’ 6” 76 cm

5 1/2” 14 cm

9 8

3’ 9” 114 cm

8 6

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION //////////////////////////////

17 1’ 8” 51 cm

9 11

5

12

1’ 30 cm

1’ 9” 53 cm 7

The research that led to the layout of this kitchen was a milestone in fitted design that could boast both efficiency and feasibility. Studying typical kitchen workflow allowed Austrian designer Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky to create specified storage units, user-friendly garbage units, and multi-functional work surfaces, all contributing to an easier and more efficient kitchen experience.

8’ 244 cm

8’ 244 cm

17 4

FRANKFURT KITCHEN

TV

Designed in 1972, these small scale living units provided Japanese workers spending a few nights in town with the absolute minimum amenities and space required. All furniture, storage, and work surfaces are built into the walls, making circulation more direct and simple. Capsules could also be paired with other capsules to create spaces for families or larger groups.

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91 in 232 cm

11 in 28 cm

45°

Bed

24 in 60 cm

70°

68 in 173 cm

47 in 120 cm

Music Player

24 in 60 cm

52 in 132 cm

Desk

Bed

20 in 51 cm 33 in 83 cm

Desk

34 in 87 cm Seat

150 in 382 cm

17 in 43 cm

19 in 48 cm

45 in 114 cm 27 in 69 cm

100°

Toilet

66 in 168 cm

Sink

84 in 213 cm

9 in 23 cm 12 in 30 cm

26 in 65 cm

Desk

Bed

20 in 51 cm

Shower

20 in 51 cm

Seat

15 in 38 cm

30 in 76 cm 43 in 109 cm

32 in 81 cm

Nakagin Capsule Tower Compact hotel room units

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SLEEPBOX Used in airports, train stations, hospitals, and hotels, the Sleepbox provides citizens in need of temporary accommodations with a comfortable space to sleep and work. Foldout work surfaces allow the bed to be used for both rest and work, keeping with the design goal of maximizing profit per square foot.

Sleepbox Sleeping Capsules

////////////////////// Seat Back Tilt 6” 15.2 cm

20” 50.8 cm

Min. 6” 15.2 cm Min. Clearance 1” 2.5cm

Min. 70”

Min. Width 24” 61cm

177.8 cm

Typ. 10” 25.4 cm

Min. Clearance 1” 2.5cm

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Min. Elbow Room 16” 40.6 cm

F-22 FIGHTER JET

Line

Fighter jet cockpits are designed to provide the pilot with a clear line of sight and physical access to the numerous controls while also providing a level of comfort to the human body. Biomechanical measurements account for the kinetic forces to which a pilot might be subjected during a sixteen hour trip. The cockpits must also be adjustable, accommodating pilots from both the 5th and 95th height percentile.

Fuel Capacity May Have to Be Reduced

15º

Of

Headrest Becomes Essential

30º

Sight

Requires Larger Canopy

Reduced Frontal Area

Line Of Sight Contoured Seat

Side Mounted Control Stick Reduced Foot Room

F-22 Fighter Jet Cockpit

Foot Angle Change May Affect Brake Application

62’ 1” 1892.3 cm

Max. 155º Increased Cockpit Space Requirement

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RED BULL STRATOS This capsule was designed for the one purpose of safely transporting pilot Felix Baumgartner 120,000 ft into the air. The capsule is perfectly designed for the human body, keeping the pilot in a relaxed position during the ascent and then positioning him at the departure door before the jump.

Red Bull Stratos Ergonomic Seat Capsule

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HAITI This design begins to look at how the shelter fits within the timeline of disaster relief. The furniture and structural truss system are movable and adaptable to permanent housing. Extra attention was also given to the construction details, making them more intuitive and cost effective.

Port-au-Prince, Haiti Scenario: Earthquake Doughty, Riazzi, Rieck, Riley, Soria, Van Duesen

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SECONDARY INVESTIGATIONS

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NEW ORLEANS SUPERDOME

exploration for the shelter envelope. At this stage, we also looked into the timelines and design life of our projects, figuring out exactly when and how the shelters fit into the already existing infrastructure of disaster relief response. It was important to us to design shelters that could withstand the effects of time and the elements, but could also be easily salvaged for further use when the inhabitants needed to begin rebuilding their homes and communities.

Creating a smaller footprint and incorporating moveable furniture allowed this shelter to adapt more easily to various stadium layouts. Additionally, further structural investigations helped influence the sturdier design of the feet and positioning of the plywood rib system. It is the goal of this shelter to provide security to displaced citizens both psychologically and physically.

18 in 46 cm

18 in 46 cm

96 in 244 cm

36 in 91 cm 90˚

90˚

96 in 244 cm

21.5 in 55 cm

21.5 in 55 cm

42 in 107 cm

18 in 46 cm

42 in 107 cm

42 in 107 cm

19 in 48 cm

19 in 48 cm

12 in 30 cm

12 in 30 cm 19 in 48 cm

18 in 46 cm

30 in 76 cm

156 in 396 cm

30 in 76 cm

180˚

42 in 107 cm 12 in 30 cm 18 in 46 cm

19 in 48 cm

New Orleans, USA Scenario: Hurricane Begin, Dromer, Hansman Maragos, Waters, Witte

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After multiple iterations and reviews, we combined our efforts into furthering three of the six scenarios: Zataari Refugee Camp in Jordan, Port au Prince earthquake relief in Haiti, and Superdome shelters in New Orleans. By doubling the team size, we were able to dive even deeper into the design of the shelter. Teams looked closely at the details of the shelters, maximizing their efficiency and reducing construction complications by reducing mechanical connections, while other team members looked into material

ZA’ATARI REFUGEE CAMP In addition to further refining the space planning to better reflect typical Syrian homes, the team began to explore envelope materials as well as constructibility. Finally, the team explored the opportunity of swapping out furniture packs to turn the residential shelter into medical outposts, storefronts, and schools. All beds, desks, chairs, tables, and shelves can be folded back into the wall, allowing Zaatari’s residents to fully customize their living experience.

Za’atari Camp, Jordan Scenario: Syrian Civil War Baum, Hanlon, Honneywell, Lamm, Rush, Serizay

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ICFF PRESENTATION BOARDS

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FAST FACTS FAST FACTS STUDIO

TECHNOLOGY

PRODUCT

STUDIO TECHNOLOGY Unit Area: 190 sq. ft. PRODUCT Institution: University of Cincinnati Primary Software: Program: B.S. Architecture Rhinoceros 5 Rough Cost per Unit: 2,500 USD Institution: University of Cincinnati Primary Software: Unit Area: 190 sq. ft. Course: Senior Capstone Studio AutoCAD Assembly Time: 6-8 hours Program: B.S. Architecture Adobe CS Rhinoceros 5 Team: 18 students + 2 professors Assembly Team: 3 people recommendedRough Cost per Unit: 2,500 USD Studio AutoCAD Assembly Time: 6-8 hours Project Duration: Jan 2014 - Present Course: Senior Capstone Prototyping Technology: Estimated Unit Lifespan: 18 months Team: 18 students + 2 professors Assembly Team: 3 people recommended Design Problem: Disaster relief housing Computer Numerical Control (CNC) MillAdobe CS Project Duration: Jan 2014 - Present Prototyping Technology: Estimated Unit Lifespan: 18 months Coffee Consumed: 240 oz daily Laser-cut modelling Design Problem: Disaster relief housing Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Mill Countries Represented: 16 USA 2 France Basic sewing + fastening Coffee Consumed: 240 oz daily Laser-cut modelling Countries Represented: 16 USA 2 France Basic sewing + fastening

“UNIT

It is not enough that we do our best;

sometimes we must UNIT ASSEMBLY do what is required. ASSEMBLY

FAST FACTS STUDIO

TECHNOLOGY

PRODUCT

Institution: University of Cincinnati Program: B.S. Architecture Course: Senior Capstone Studio Team: 18 students + 2 professors Project Duration: Jan 2014 - Present Design Problem: Disaster relief housing Coffee Consumed: 240 oz daily Countries Represented: 16 USA 2 France

Primary Software: Rhinoceros 5 AutoCAD Adobe CS Prototyping Technology: Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Mill Laser-cut modelling Basic sewing + fastening

Unit Area: 190 sq. ft. Rough Cost per Unit: 2,500 USD Assembly Time: 6-8 hours Assembly Team: 3 people recommended Estimated Unit Lifespan: 18 months

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Image of completed side support ribs

10

9

FAST FACTS

UNIT 11 ASSEMBLY

Insert (2) roof ribs into side support ribs

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Image of constructed roof ribs

TECHNOLOGY

PRODUCT

Primary Software: Rhinoceros 5 AutoCAD Adobe CS Prototyping Technology: Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Mill Laser-cut modelling Basic sewing + fastening

Unit Area: 190 sq. ft. Rough Cost per Unit: 2,500 USD Assembly Time: 6-8 hours Assembly Team: 3 people recommended Estimated Unit Lifespan: 18 months

Insert (4) vertical side support ribs on top of side support ribs.

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Image of constructed side supports

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Slot shelf and bench boards into x-ribs

15

10

Insert (2) roof ribs into side support ribs

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support ribs

10

2

16

Layout (6) roof truss pieces on ground

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Combine (6) roof truss pieces on ground using bolts provided

Image of completed side support ribs

1

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roof ribs

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Construct the x-ribs by combining corresponding (3) pieces

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Place (3) completed roof trusses into slots provided on side support ribs

10

Insert (2) roof ribs into side support ribs

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Place (3) completed roof trusses into slots provided on side support ribs

Lay out (6) skid pieces in area where shelter will be constructed

2

19

11

PRODUCT Unit Area: 190 sq. ft. Rough Cost per Unit: 2,500 USD Assembly Time: 6-8 hours Assembly Team: 3 people recommended Estimated Unit Lifespan: 18 months

5 constructed side supports Image of

Slot (8) completed x-ribs into the slots

12

14 6

Image of completed skids and x-ribs

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13

Insert (4) vertical side support ribs on top of side support ribs.

7

Slot (4) floorboards onto the pegs

Slotprovided shelf and bench boards into x-ribs on x-ribs and skids

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Image of constructed side supports

8

Image of completed floorboards

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Image of completed bench and shelf

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Slot shelf and bench boards into x-ribs

Slot in (6) side support ribs and (3) Layout (6) back ribs into slots provided in x-ribs

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Insert (4) vertical side support ribs on top of side support ribs.

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THE TEAM addressing this global issue with your support. We are honored to present our research for a second time at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair at the Javits Center in New York City. As a staple of New York’s Design Week, the ICFF convention will place our research in front of over 30,000 internationally renowned designers, manufacturers, distributors, and public figures, as well as the general public, providing a forum to both share and vet the proposals developed during our capstone studio.

Image of constructed side supports

14

Slot shelf and bench boards into x-ribs

15

Image of completed bench and shelf

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Layout (6) roof truss pieces on ground

17

Combine (6) roof truss pieces on ground using bolts provided

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roof truss pieces on ground

1

16

Image of completed bench and shelf

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Combine (6) roof truss p using bolts provided

Lay out (6) skid pieces in area where shelter will be constructed Layout (6) roof truss pieces

on ground

//////////////////////

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Image of constructed roof ribs

3

Construct the x-ribs by combining corresponding (3) pieces

Place (3) ridge beam pieces into slots provided on roof trusses

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21

Completed ridge beam assembly

4

22

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Image of constructed side supports

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Completed ridge beam assembly

Insert (4) vertical side support ribs on top of side support ribs.Slot (8) completed x-ribs into the slots provided on (2) skids

5

Place final (2) roof trusses into slots provided on ridge beams

Image of completed skids and x-ribs

14

23

Slot shelf and bench boards into x-ribs

6

Slot (4) floorboards onto the pegs provided on x-ribs and skids

Image of completed roof assembly

15

7

Image of completed shelter assembly

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Image of completed bench and shelf Image of completed floorboards

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Layout (6) roof truss pieces on ground

8

Image of completed roof trusses

20

Place (3) ridge beam pieces into slots provided on roof trusses

David Rieck Joyce Hanlon Evan Baum Nora Begin Nick Hansman

Katie Honneywell Phil Riazzi Matthew Lamm Rebecca Doughty Andrew Maragos

MIchelle Rush Spencer Ban Deusen Paul Serizay Keegan Riley Laura Soria

Gabriel Dromer Becca Waters Lydia Witte Stephen Slaughter Brian Davies

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Place final (2) roof trusses into slots provided on ridge beams

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Image of completed roof assembly

24

17

Slot in (6) side support ribs and (3) back ribs into slots provided in x-ribs

INCLUDED COMPONENTS

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INCLUDED COMPONENTS

//////////////////////

INCLUDED COMPONENTS

Image of completed roof trusses

Combine (6) skid pieces into (2) complete skids using bolts provided.

TECHNOLOGY Primary Software: Rhinoceros 5 AutoCAD Adobe CS Prototyping Technology: Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Mill Laser-cut modelling Basic sewing + fastening

4 support Insert (4) vertical side ribs on provided on (2) skids top of side support ribs.

Image of constructed roof ribs

furniture pieces milled from fifteen sheets of 1” thick plywood and a single piece of waterproof fabric building wrap. It is designed to be flatpacked and quickly deployed to the disaster site. A team of 2-3 is recommended for the construction, which requires between six and eight hours on average. The following images depict the step-by-step assembly process.

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Image of completed bench and shelf

UNIT Winston Churchill3 11 ASSEMBLY

Combine (6) skid pieces into (2) Image of constructed complete skids using bolts provided.

Insert (2) roof ribs The intoshelter side support ribs is constructed of framing and

////////////////////// STUDIO Institution: University of Cincinnati Program: B.S. Architecture Course: Senior Capstone Studio Team: 18 students + 2 professors Project Duration: Jan 2014 - Present Design Problem: Disaster relief housing Coffee Consumed: 240 oz daily Countries Represented: 16 USA 2 France

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Image of constructed roof ribs

Human displacement, as a result of natural and political catastrophe, requires immediate action from all available advocates. As recent college graduates, we are committed to using our skills and education to make what difference we can towards the pressing issue of disaster relief. We believe our design solution is economically feasible, culturally sensitive, and easily implemented. Your support in this monumental endeavor would open new doors for us, allowing our research to reach a larger audience. Please join us in

Lay out (6) skid pieces in area where Insert (2) roof ribs into side shelter will be constructed

Image of completed side support ribs

INCLUDED COMPONENTS

9

ICFF We were honored to have the opportunity to present our research-based capstone project at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York City from May 17-20. Image of completed side support ribs

110

Image of completed side support ribs

9

STUDIO Institution: University of Cincinnati Program: B.S. Architecture Course: Senior Capstone Studio Team: 18 students + 2 professors Project Duration: Jan 2014 - Present Design Problem: Disaster relief housing Coffee Consumed: 240 oz daily Countries Represented: 16 USA 2 France

The shelter is constructed of framing and furniture pieces milled from fifteen sheets of 1” thick plywood and a single piece of waterproof fabric building wrap. It is designed to be flatpacked and quickly deployed to the disaster site. A team of 2-3 is recommended for the construction, which requires between six and eight hours on average. The following images depict the step-by-step assembly process.

9

It is not enough that we do our best; sometimes we must do what is required. /////

The shelter is constructed of framing and furniture pieces milled from fifteen sheets of 1” thick plywood and a single piece of waterproof fabric building wrap. It is designed to be flatpacked and quickly deployed to the disaster site. A team of 2-3 is recommended for the construction, which requires between six and eight hours on average. The following images depict the step-by-step assembly process.

INCLUDED COMPONENTS

FAST FACTS

UNIT ASSEMBLY

It is no that we sometim 1 do wha

La sh

The shelter is constructed of framing and furniture pieces milled from fifteen sheets///// of 1”Winston Churchill thick plywood and a single piece of waterproof fabric building wrap. It is designed The to beshelter flat- is constructed of framing and packed and quickly deployed to thefurniture disaster pieces milled from fifteen sheets of 1” plywood and a single piece of waterproof site. A team of 2-3 is recommendedthick for the fabric building wrap. It is designed to be flatconstruction, which requires between six and packed and quickly deployed to the disaster eight hours on average. The following images site. A team of 2-3 is recommended for the depict the step-by-step assembly process. construction, which requires between six and eight hours on average. The following images depict the step-by-step assembly process.

Image of completed shelter assembly

Combine (6) roof truss pieces on ground using bolts provided

18

Place (3) com slots provide


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150 WEST 5TH STREET, CINCINNATI OH 45202

CENTRAL & VINE PROFESSOR JEFFERY TILLMAN PARTNERS SYDNEY BROWN AND ERIN KLINE This hotel is located on the pivotal corner of Central and Vine Streets in Cincinnati, Ohio. It’s here where the eclectic, artsy and urban community known as Over-the-Rhine transitions into downtown Cincinnati proper. The building, named after its location, was designed collaboratively over several weeks to become a gateway into Over-theRhine while speaking to the artistic contribution of Cincinnati to the American Midwest and the world as a whole. During the years 1880 and 1915 the city’s art carved interiors and Rookwood Pottery were among the very finest expressions of decorative art. The City continues to have a thriving decorative arts community, and this building suggests that the best years may still be ahead.

FALL SEMESTER 2013


TITLE

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BOUTIQUE HOTEL

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Guests have access to a Breakfast Room, which seats 50 guests at one time and includes a small serving space for coffee and a pantry.

The Breakfast room doubles as a bar in the evening where on Friday and Saturday evenings space is allocated for music and dancing.

The guest rooms of the hotel come in a variety of configurations: Single King, Double-Double, and Queen-Twin.

Five standard rooms and two suites are sized and fully equipped to accommodate guests who use a wheelchair.


PROGRAM SUMMARY

The retail and lobby area are adjacent and the design of the exterior carries through into the interior and unifies the area.

The public accommodations include three function rooms of varying sizes. These rooms open up into one another to accommodate varying sizes of groups.

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BOUTIQUE HOTEL

FULL BUILDING SECTION CUT FACING NORTH

20

FULL BUILDING SECTION CUT FACING SOUTH


FULL BUILDING SECTIONS AND PLANS

SEVENTH FLOOR BREAKFAST AND BAR SIXTH FLOOR HOTEL ROOMS FIFTH FLOOR HOTEL ROOMS FOURTH FLOOR HOTEL ROOMS THIRD FLOOR HOTEL ROOMS SECOND FLOOR HOTEL ROOMS

FIRST FLOOR FUNCTION MEZZANINE RETAIL GROUND FLOOR RETAIL AND HOTEL LOBBY

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BOUTIQUE HOTEL

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This project was the first where we were able to get deeply involved with the interior architecture of our design. Although we had creative differences, throughout the seven weeks we spent designing this building we worked tirelessly to

unite our visions to create a singular voice for our boutique hotel. Starting with charette we came together and brought inspiring images to establish a visual foundation which evolved as we progressed through the design process.


MATERIALS AND COLOR PALETTE

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KNOLL TUTOR

OOK CARPET TILE

BLACK LOCUST END GRAIN

INDUSTRIAL BLACK PINE END GRAIN

WALNUT END GRAIN

KNOLL ALLEGORY

HARADE CARPET TILE

KNOLL MONARCH IN BL

WALNUT EDGE GRAIN

MAPLE EDGE GRAIN

FUMED OAK EDGE GRAIN

KNOLL MONARCH IN PIN

LOBBY FROM MAIN ENTRANCE MATERIALS Dark lumber, leather, fabric, stone, glass and metal. ZODIAQ CLOUD WHITE QUARTZ

PALETTE Inspired by our materials, we chose mostly warm BACKED IN HUSK (WALL) neutrals with green ALIAS as an accent color

ALIAS BACKED IN ICE

CARPET TILE

ZODIAQ SAGE

TOSCANA: ZODIAQ MOSSY GREEN

CARBONDALE

THUNDERCLOUD

OLD CARBONDALE

BRIMSTONE

TRUFFLE

ATENESS CARPET TILE

MADE YOU LOOK CARPET TILE ZODIAQ MYSTIC BLACK

BLACK LOCUST END GRAIN CARNIVAL:

INDUSTRIAL BLACK PINE END GRAIN

WALNUT END GRAIN


BOUTIQUE HOTEL

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NORTH ELEVATION OF LOBBY I was responsible for the translation of our initial drawings to a digital model where I then focused on the development of the hotel room floors and the function level in addition to the further development of the lobby and retail spaces. The design of the facade came from the desire of flexibility in material use and to add to the evolving landscape of Overthe-Rhine.

FLOOR PLAN OF LOBBY


LOBBY DRAWINGS

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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BOUTIQUE HOTEL

WEST FACING SECTION

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EAST WEST SECTION

TYPICAL SECTION FACING EAST


RETAIL AND ROOM DRAWINGS

MEZZANINE FLOOR PLAN

TYPICAL HOTEL ROOM FLOOR PLAN

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150 WEST 5TH STREET, CINCINNATI OH 45202

CINCINNATI INSTITUTE O F FA S H I O N , C U LI N A RY A R T S A N D C G I PROFESSOR RENEE MARTIN

This project was a study in tectonics, spatial composition and the development of a architectural language within an abstract and dense city-like field. The objective of this studio was to design an extension of a two-year college. This school would house a program that the University wanted to be exposed to the public. Their desire is that the program will have an immediate draw to the public, enhancing public life and nightlife within the central city. These programs will enhance the awareness of the University and will draw future students and connections with the public.

WINTER QUARTER 2012


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CINCINNATI INSTITUTE

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ORGANIZATIONAL MATRIX; CONSTRUCTED FIELD This exercise entailed the construction of a system for organizing spatial elements. This organizational matrix is a 2D plan that is a tectonic interpretation of the site. Focusing on the organization principals of zones, alignments, formal arrangements, and the arrangement of spatial territories, this abstracted site plan is a formal composition that aided the anticipation of built form. Darker tones indicate taller elements. Dashed lines indicate variations at the ground plane, possible circulation vectors or alignments.


PROCESS

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PROCESS The process of the architectural language of this project was developed and expressed throughout the creation of many models. Rhythm was explored as a way to differentiate between the different programmatic areas withing the building in addition to providing the landscape for a unified design.


CINCINNATI INSTITUTE

THIS PROGRAM IS AN EXTENSION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI. IT HOUSES THREE COLLEGES: FASHION, CULINARY ARTS, COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION. EACH HAS A SPACE DEDICATED TO RECEIVE THE PUBLIC.

CULINARY • Restaurant, including bar and tapas bar. • Four teaching kitchens; visible, but not accessible to the public. • Cold and dry storage; loading dock adjacent to the street. CGI • Screening room • Two sound stages for green screen filming and motioncapture. • Four editing rooms • Two computer labs; sound stages, editing rooms and labs are all visible, but not accessible, to general public. FASHION • Boutique shop • Runway and seating • Six studios. Visible, but not accessible to general public. • Storage

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SECTIONS

33

LEFT: SECTION FACING EAST

RIGHT: SECTION FACING WEST


CINCINNATI INSTITUTE

SECTION FACING NORTH

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SECTION AND MODEL IMAGES

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36

962 MT ADAMS CIR, CINCINNATI, OH 45202

MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER A DA M S C U LI N A RY S C H O O L AND THE MOUNT PROFESSOR ROBERT BURNHAM

This studio asks the student to design a twobuilding project in an iconic and unique urban site. The Mount Adams Gastronomic Center (MAGC) consists of two related facilities: The Adams Culinary School and The Mount, a dinner-theater and banquet facility. The dinner theater offers two to three shows each year and is reservable for events. The programs have complementary schedules; the school will operate primarily during daytime hours on weekdays while The Mount will be open primarily in the evenings and weekends.

SPRING SEMESTER 2012


37


MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER

SITE PLANNING Both programs have outdoor spaces which aided in the design of the site. The Adams Culinary School has a variety of related outdoor spaces including herb and vegetable gardens where the students learn how to grow food for use in the school. The Mount

uses the grounds for events such as weddings and weekend farmers markets. Working with the naturally strong axis that runs east to west on this site, I placed the similarly formed buildings at the highest point. This decision made the design of the vehicular circulation simpler

38

and less intrusive on the side. Stairs which extend from the north connect the metro stop to the building allowing for more accessible access for students and visitors not being dropped off in front. Raised garden beds occupy the majority of the open space between parking and

a pedestrian route that follows the curve of the site and leads to a roofed gazebo to be used for wedding photos and for viewing the Cincinnati landscape.


SITE PLAN

39


MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER

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THE MOUNT PROGRAM DINING TERRACE

primary circulation

STORAGE

TRASH AREA

secondary circulation - indirect adjacency

RECIEVING AREA

direct adjacency KITCHEN

daylighting

GREEN ROOM

DINING AREA

N

daylighting - northern exposure

S

daylighting - southern exposure

DRESSING ROOM DRESSING ROOM

BATHROOMS

ADMIN. OFFICE

visual accessibility LOBBY

STAGE

ASSEMBLY AREA

COAT ROOM

ARRIVAL/DEPARTURE

THE ADAMS CULINARY SCHOOL PROGRAM ADJUNCT FACTULTY OFF.

WINE LAB

STUDENT LOUNGE

PROGRAM DIAGRAMS Diagramming the spaces needed for the two programs aided the design by narrowing the focus to circulation and accessibility. Stepping back and separating the spaces by user necessity helped simplify the design by then being able to identify proper adjacencies and thereby ensuring an efficient and user-friendly design. PASTRY

TRASH

FT FACT. OFFICE N

FT FACT. OFFICE FT FACT. OFFICE

TEACHING KITCHEN

CLASSROOM

STUDENT LOUNGE

REFERENCE LIBRARY & COMPUTER CENTER

DEMONSTRATION KITCHEN/ LECTURE HALL

FT FACT. OFFICE FT FACT. OFFICE

STAFF

PROP STORAGE


S

DRESSING ROOM

BATHROOMS

daylighting - southern exposure

PROGRAM DIAGRAMS

ADMIN. OFFICE

visual accessibility LOBBY

STAGE

ASSEMBLY AREA

COAT ROOM

ARRIVAL/DEPARTURE

THE ADAMS CULINARY SCHOOL PROGRAM ADJUNCT FACTULTY OFF.

FT FACT. OFFICE N

FT FACT. OFFICE

WINE LAB

STUDENT LOUNGE

FT FACT. OFFICE

PASTRY TEACHING KITCHEN CLASSROOM

STUDENT LOUNGE

REFERENCE LIBRARY & COMPUTER CENTER

FT FACT. OFFICE

DEMONSTRATION KITCHEN/ LECTURE HALL

FT FACT. OFFICE

STAFF LOUNGE

TRASH

BATHROOMS

CLASSROOM RECEIVING/ ASSEMBLY AREA

LOBBY

GENERAL TEACHING KITCHENS

GENERAL TEACHING KITCHENS

GENERAL TEACHING KITCHENS

main entrance

CAREER SERVICES OFFICE

ADMISSION’S OFFICE

DIRECTOR’S SUITE

PROP STORAGE

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MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER

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FLOOR PLANS

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MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER

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THE JOURNEY My inspiration for the design for both the culinary institute and the banquet center drew from the concept of a journey. For the greenhorn chef putting on her white coat for the first time, only hard work and perseverance will push her to success of her goal of becoming a fully realized chef. This journey is symbolized by the placement of the demonstration kitchen, a kitchen where only established and experienced chefs operate. The demonstration kitchen is clearly in view when arriving to the institute and purposefully at the opposite end of the entrance to reinforce the concept. At The Mount stories come alive on stage and progress through the lives of characters and affect the viewing audience. The long ramp on the southern side of The Mount serves as the symbol of voyage; small platforms extend out from the ramp to view the landscape and remind visitors that the goal is not merely the end, but also about the journey there.


CULINARY SCHOOL DRAWINGS

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SECTION CUT FACING NORTH

NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

SECTION CUT FACING WEST


MOUNT ADAMS GASTRONOMIC CENTER

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SECTION CUT FACING NORTH

NORTH ELEVATION

SECTION CUT FACING EAST

SOUTH ELEVATION


BANQUET CENTER DRAWINGS

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48

AGING IN PLACE

AARP KITCHEN COMPETITION

How can a kitchen improve the quality of life and “age in place” with its user? By Utilizing universal design principals, this competition prompted investigation in how a fully planned kitchen can modify a space into a safe, comfortable, and livable environment for all generations.

SPRING QUARTER 2012


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AXON VIEWS OF KITCHEN


AGING IN PLACE

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INSPIRATION In addition to being a basic necessity of life, food is also an important element of culture. In America, food is a central feature at gatherings and celebrations such as birthdays, holidays and weddings. Food brings people together, and that is what I kept in mind while designing this kitchen layout. Cooking with my dad gives me an opportunity to help him directly—I definitely am not able to help with paying the bills. It can be difficult for younger children to help out in the kitchen and that is

why the open countertop corner in this kitchen is central to my design. While mom or dad cooks, the child can sit by the action, maybe learn something by observing, and still gain valuable bonding time without the worry of dodging hot pans or sharp knifes. Additionally, the open corner also allows visitors to have the same connection and so that architectural feature transforms what commonly is a solitary task into an interactive and bonding activity.

trash, compost, recycle

store leftovers

clean shop

traditional workflow

unpack from store

eat pot on the cooktop; pan in oven

microwave cook prepare

remove ingredients from fridge/freezer

sink for washing

work surface for prep


FLOOR PLANS: BEFORE AND AFTER

BEDROOM

BEFORE

LIVING ROOM

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TRAFFIC JAM In the original plans of this apartment the kitchen was open directly from the entry and thus created opportunities for obstruction for the chef.

BEDROOM

KITCHEN

BATHROOM

ENTRY BUSINESS AS BETTER Extending the entry wall and implementing an open bar-height countertop gained the kitchen valuable counterspace. Additionally, it also gives guests and family members another way to interact with someone in the kitchen without having to worry about dodging the chef.

AFTER


AGING IN PLACE

52

SECTION CUTS

SECTION CUT SECTION FACING CUT NORTH FACING SOUTH

SECTIO

bar: counterspace sink

dishwasher

fridge

pantry

oven/ stove

CHALLENGE: CREATE A USER-FRIENDLY AND INTEGRATIVE WORK TRIANGLE WORK TRIANGLE METHOD The classic “work triangle” method dates from the 1950s and involves optimizing the triangle formed by three main kitchen appliances: sink, range and refrigerator. The u-shaped layout of this kitchen offers an efficient work triangle with an opening to the adjacent living area offering an engaging experience for both resident and visitor—regardless of who is cooking!


SECTIONS AND MATERIAL

USING COLOR AND MATERIAL TO EFFECT THE ENVIRONMENT. CABINETS Popular for its durability and shock resistance, maple is a medium-tohard wood with a straight, wavy or curly grain. It has a light and uniform appearance and produces a smooth clean look when stained. Rollout shelves were added to lower cabinets for easy access to pots and pans. COUNTERTOPS Soapstone is a very dense and nonporous stone, more so than slate, marble and granite. Soapstone does not stain because it is impenetrable. Additionally, it is not harmed by hot pots, citrus, wines, acids or chemicals, and cleaning can be done with any common household cleaner. These countertops provide a contrast against the light cabinets as well as the flooring. FLOORING Cork replaces the previously installed vinyl flooring. Cork is a sustainable, natural product and is soft, warm and quiet underfoot. HARDWARE Warm nickel handles installed on the cabinets complement the other materials in addition to providing improved user accessibility.

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54

276 LUDLOW AVENUE, CINCINNATI OH 45220

CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER PROFESSOR GERALD LARSON

The Clifton Literary Center (CLC) aims to be an engaging part of the Cincinnati Community; to tie the surrounding communities into one integrative whole. The CLC will expand the University of Cincinnati’s role in the community as an institution for reading, the advanced study of writing, performances, and workshops. This building will also house specific book collections and exhibits serving as a place for the public to experience and further interact with the craft of writing and access the work of visiting scholars, writers and artists.

FALL QUARTER 2012


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CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER

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CONCEPT: DAYDREAMING A place for the daydreamer. Sheltered from outside forces, outside stresses. Designed for the individual experience while maintaining a holistic feeling of protection, comfort, and the nuances of thought associated with daydreaming. The center is a place for the community, artists, and writers. This center is a place of its own.


PROCESS

CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVE COLLAGE OF THE ENTRANCE TO THE LITERARY CENTER

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CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER

CONCEPTUAL SECTION CUT COLLAGE

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INITIAL DIAGRAMS AND CONCEPT SKETCHES EXPLORING FORM AND CIRCULATION


PROCESS

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EARLY MODELS EXPLORING FORM, INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE, PASSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES AND THE BLURRING OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR SPACES.

ITERATIONS OF THE LITERARY CENTER

PROCESS During the course of this studio one of the most valuable concepts I learned was the importance of iteration. Our professor instilled in us a value to never be satisfied with the first idea and to work through design problems, thereby continually improving and refining rather than settling.


CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER

CIRCULATION Similar to the meandering mind, the circulation of the CLC aims to gently guide whomever may come with a sinuous path. The grain of the wood acts as an unseen hand, guiding the visitor through the building.

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

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elevator

elevator

STAIRS

STAIRS

doors doors elevator

elevator doors

STAIRS

STAIRS doors

doors

doors

doors

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

doors doors


FLOOR PLANS AND CIRCULATION

VIEW TO THE SECOND FLOOR

SECTION OF EAST BUILDING, FACING EAST

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CAFE


CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER

LIBRARY STACKS AND READING ROOM

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PERSPECTIVE RENDERS

STUDY AREA ON THE FIRST FLOOR

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150 WEST 5TH STREET, CINCINNATI OH 45202

SELECT WORK EXAMPLES EXAMPLES OF WORK FROM PREVIOUS INTERNSHIPS.

FALL SEMESTER 2013


101 HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO

65

RENDERING OF A MIXED-USE CONDOMINIUM

Costa Brown Architecture 1620 Montgomery Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, CA 94111 Tel: 415 986 0101

101 HYDE STREET


101 HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO

66

RENDERING OF ROOF DECK WORK DONE IN SELECTED EXAMPLES • Rendered roof deck wand exterior facade of building. • Created custom 3D families for furniture layout options. • Calculated project summaries for permit package submittal. • Created a parametric parking family in revit so it could be counted in the schedules.

Costa Brown Architecture 1620 Montgomery Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, CA 94111 Tel: 415 986 0101

101 HYDE STREET 101 Hyde Street San Francisco, CA 94102 11130

Job Number:

B

A

C

D

E ADJACENT STRUCTURE

No. 1 2 3

G

F

Issue Site Permit Progress Review Review for Planning

Date 04/07/2013 02/20/2014 05/01/2015

1 A-4.2

137' - 6" PROPERTY LINE

P L

1

P L

P L P L PROPERTY LINE

OPEN TO BELOW COMMON OPEN SPACE - DECK 1764 SQ. FT.

3' - 0"

3 ELEV.

ELEV.

MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ELEVATOR LOBBY

UP

DN

PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

CANOPY ABOVE

ROOF LEVEL COMMON OPEN SPACE 3946 SF

LIGHTWELL MATCHING ADJACENT PROPERTY

5

1 A-4.1 CANOPY ABOVE

PROPERTY LINE

LOUV ER

P L

P L

LI C A L E B

C 25678 ___

A

REN.

T

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GOLDEN GATE AVENUE

I A

No.

ST

101 HYDE STREET

A RC ED H S I N CO RT E

T EC TA S

1620 Montgomery Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, CA 94111 Tel: 415 986 0101

P L

T

Costa Brown Architecture

PROPERTY LINE

N

P L

R

6

HYDE STREET

RESIDENT GARDEN

ADJACENT STRUCTURE

4

DN

79' - 1 1/2"

UP

F

CA L

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F

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All drawings and written material appearing herein constitute original and unpublished work of Costa Brown Architecture, Inc. and may not be duplicated without the prior written consent of Costa Brown Architecture, Inc. © 2015.

PRINT DATE: 5/1/2015 4:49:01 PM N

Scale: 1/8" = 1'-0" Description:

ROOF PLAN ROOF PLAN 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

Sheet Number:

A-2.10


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665 THIRD STREET, SAN FRANCISCO

DESIGN OPTIONS FOR CONFERENCE ROOMS A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

WORK DONE IN SELECTED EXAMPLES • Detailed interior elevations for construction documents. • Verified in-field conditions and modeled mechanical systems for 3D model. • Designed various options for conference room layouts.

1

2

3

FN-1 (E) SPRINKLER SYSTEM

FN-1

FN-1

H

6

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC PANEL, GC TO INSTALL

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

7

(E) SPRINKLER SYSTEM

(N) AIR SUPPLY GRILLE

Costa Brown Architecture

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC PANEL, GC TO INSTALL

L-1

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

SUTHERLAND FELT (FN-1); INSTALLED BY GC ADD BASEBOARD ON EXISTING WALL, PAINT TO MATCH NEW, TYP.

4

1620 Montgomery Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, CA 94111 Tel: 415 986 0101

RALLY HEALTH HQ SF

RECLAIMED WOOD

665 3rd Street, Suite 320 San Francisco, California 14050.2

Job Number: ADD BASEBOARD ON EXISTING WALL, PAINT TO MATCH NEW (PT-1), TYP.

No. 1 2 3

5

Issue Permit Set Construction Set Revision 3

Date 04/01/2015 04/20/2015 04/22/2015

PT-1

PT-1

0' - 6"

PT-1 8 (E) SPRINKLER SYSTEM

(E) SPRINKLER SYSTEM

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC PANEL, GC TO INSTALL

SUTHERLAND FELT; INSTALLED BY GC

7

(N) AIR RETURN GRILLE

H

QUIET ROOM ELEV. - N 1/2" = 1'-0"

7

9

6

FN-1

0' - 6"

3' - 0"

QUIET ROOM ELEV. - E 1/2" = 1'-0" (E) SPRINKLER SYSTEM

6

6

QUIET ROOM ELEV. - S 1/2" = 1'-0"

10

11

GENERAL NOTES: CONTRACTOR TO NOTIFY ARCHITECT IF ANY BOTTOM OF BEAM, OR BOTTOM OF COLUMN CROWN CAP, OR PIPE, OR EXISTING STRUCTURE ARE DIFFERENT THEN SHOWN IN THE ELEVATION AND WILL AFFECT NEW CONSTRUCTION

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC PANEL, GC TO INSTALL

SOUTHERLAND FELT (FN-1); INSTALLED BY GC.

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

(N) LINE OF SUSPENSION LIGHTING. GC TO INSTALL

7 (E) STRUCTURE, REPAINT PT-2, TYP.

(E) STRUCTURE, REPAINT PT-2, TYP.

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

(N) LINE OF SUSPENSION LIGHTING. GC TO INSTALL

ADD BASEBOARD ON EXISTING WALL, PAINT TO MATCH NEW, TYP.

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

(E) CONC. COL. SANDBLAST. EXPOSED, TYP.

8

PT-1

5

E

CE-1

CE-1

QUIET ROOM ELEV. - W 1/2" = 1'-0" EXHAUST GRILLE

4

F

10

F

CE-1

CE-1

KITCHEN SEATING. - E 1/2" = 1'-0"

E

CE-1

PRINT DATE: 4/22/2015 11:48:10 AM

10' - 7"

1620 Montgomery Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, CA 94111 Tel: 415 986 0101

101 HYDE STREET

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F

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All drawings and written material appearing herein constitute original and unpublished work of Costa Brown Architecture, Inc. and may not be duplicated without the prior written consent of Costa Brown Architecture, Inc. © 2015.

Date: 04.01.2015

(E) SPRINKLER SYSTEM

Description:

(E) SUPPLY DUCT Sheet Number:

A-200.00 3

OFFICE INT. ELEV. - N 1/2" = 1'-0"

2

OFFICE INT. ELEV. - E 1/2" = 1'-0"

10

DETAIL ELEVATIONS CONC. WALL, PT-1 FINISH TYP.

PT-1

E

Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"

(E) FIRE STAIR, REPAINT COLOR: PT-2

PT-1

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Costa Brown Architecture

(E) FIRE STAIR, REPAINT COLOR: PT-2

PT-1

(N) CLEAR TEMPERED GLASS

(E) STRUCTURE

C 25678 ___

REN.

A

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(N) CLEAR TEMPERED GLASS

No.

ST

STRUCTURAL SEALANT AS REQUIRED. TYP.

(N) CLEAR TEMPERED GLASS

(E) WINDOW TO REMAIN. REPAINT FRAME COLOR: PT-2

T EC TA S

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2

(N) CLEAR TEMPERED GLASS

9

A RC ED H S I N CO RT E

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC CLOUD PANEL; GC TO INSTALL

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC CLOUD PANEL; GC TO INSTALL

T

SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC CLOUD PANEL; GC TO INSTALL

PT-1

1

11

OFFICE INT. ELEV. - S 1/2" = 1'-0"

1

EXISTING REFLECTED CEILING PLAN 1/8" = 1'-0"

Email me for more examples.


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PERSONAL WORK

SKETCHES, DRAWINGS, ETC.

RIGHT: GRAPHITE


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PAINTINGS/DRAWINGS

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COLORED PENCIL

OIL ON CANVAS

OIL ON CANVAS

WATERCOLOR AND OIL ON PAPER


TRAVEL SKETCHES

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PRAGUE SKETCH

RED HOUSE IN ENGLAND

ZWINGER IN DRESDEN, GERMANY

WINDOW AT THE MAK IN VIENNA, AUSTRIA


TRAVEL SKETCHES

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PLAZA IN NANCY

CATACOMBS IN PARIS

MUSEE DE L’ECOLE DE NANCY IN FRANCE

MAISON CARRE IN NIMES

SAGRADA FAMILIA IN BARCELONA


TRAVEL SKETCHES

PARIS SKETCHES

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FIGURES IN MUSEE D’ORSAY IN PARIS


TRAVEL VIDEOS

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VIENNA: OTTO WAGNER CHURCH

BARCELONA: LA BOQUERIA MARKET

TRAVELING TO VIENNA

BARCELONA: PARK GÜELL & GAUDI

Thank you.

Laura Soria Portfolio  

Portfolio of Laura A Soria, a Master of Architecture student at the University of Cincinnati.