Issuu on Google+


SEMPLE MAGAZINE THE BEST ISSUE DONE Words by Sophie Maguire

London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt. Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because


SEMPLE MAGAZINE THE BEST ISSUE DONE Words by Sophie Maguire

London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt. Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain

London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt. Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain


BABY MAYBE London and target high end brands who SOPHIE MAGUIRE

Four

London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt. Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain


London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt. Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain

“the benefits of using fur for fashion are far outweighed by accusations of cruelty” societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival.

London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt. Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival. However, fur also features prominently s this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain Four

London and target high end brands who design clothes with fur, whilst the Inuit culture in Alaska will continue with their daily routines free from feelings of guilt.

“the benefits of using fur for fashion are far outweighed by accusations of cruelty” Why should this be? The answer is clear. There is a cultural divide between the acceptance and non-acceptance of the fur trade. However, when we take a closer look, the divide is not as clear cut as it may first appear. Fur is renowned for being one of the first materials used by humans as a form of clothing. It guaranteed warmth and protection and for some, it was their only option. Now, fur has evolved into traditional dress that represents a culture and a way of life, as well as its association with glamour and high end fashion. In many countries, due to the surplus of supplies, fur is still a predominant form of clothing for indigenous people and certain societies. In Russia, for example, the Ushanka is a traditional winter fur hat, which is worn mainly by the police force. Yes, it keeps them warm in their frosty climate, but does this mean those who kill the animals for their skins are justified in doing so? Again, the line cannot be easily drawn because certain cultures have adapted to the climates in which they live by using fur as a means of survival.


Test 2