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2015 - 16 AR

F R O M Z E R O TO T H I R T Y A N D W H AT ’ S N E X T


BOARD CHAIR NORM BOLEN ON NSI’S UNIQUE ROLE IN THE INDUSTRY You’ve talked about the role NSI plays in the industry – can you expand on how NSI is a model for organic industry growth? NSI supports organic growth of the industry by identifying emerging talent and ensuring that courses are provided that help individuals learn the skills they need to advance their careers. Participants develop real projects that actually get made. Courses involve a lot of teamwork across projects. This results in the development of lifelong friendships and networks that build industry solidarity and result in ongoing collaboration. How do you see NSI’s role in the Canadian screen landscape evolving over the next five or so years? NSI will continue to evolve to meet the needs of a rapidly changing industry. Two key areas are digital production and productions by Indigenous storytellers. The entire industry is putting an increasing focus on distributing content on digital platforms and also on making specific content for those platforms. NSI will be at the forefront of ensuring that talent is developed to meet the challenges of these increasingly important content creation and distribution models. Developing more Indigenous participants and projects in the industry is an important priority across the board for funding agencies, governments, broadcasters and distributors. NSI has been training and developing Indigenous talent for over 13 years and will continue to design and deliver courses the community identifies as important. What does NSI offer that’s unique to the industry? What’s really unique about NSI is the way it involves successful industry professionals in the development and delivery of its programs. The people who do the training are people who already work in the industry and, in many cases, are leaders in their fields. This approach ensures that the training is rooted in the real world. It also builds links between course participants and people who are in a position to advance their careers through ongoing mentorship and support.


CEO JOHN GILL ON FIVE YEARS HEADING NSI You’ve been heading NSI’s staff for five years now. What’s changed between then and now? Almost everything, and yet fundamentally we do the same things. We still develop talented people and their projects, offering valuable training that people who work in screen-based media can benefit from. We find the best mentors and industry professionals to develop our students and their projects. And we continue to partner with great organizations and people. What’s changed is our attitude towards the business of what we do. We’ve become more bottom line focused and conscious of maintaining our industry relevance, whether in film, TV or digital media. NSI has national reach but is headquartered in Winnipeg. What are the benefits of NSI’s structure? The people who started NSI 30 years ago had a vision for a training organization without walls and that vision continues to serve us well. The notion that we train people where it makes logistical sense is a smart way of doing what we do. NSI is in a culturally vibrant city that accommodates the organization’s – and our participants’ – needs. Winnipeg also plays an important and growing role as a centre for Indigenous culture in the country. It’s great to be part of that and to play a pivotal role in developing emerging Indigenous talent. I believe that NSI is one of those special little organizations that has both significant cultural impact nationally and strong economic performance locally. How do NSI’s board and staff members strengthen the organization? On the board, there’s a level of experience, intellect and leadership that, personally, I find reassuring to know I can tap into. The staff, many of whom have been here for a long time or have returned to the organization, are not only dedicated but are extremely knowledgeable. We’ve come a long way in the last five years. It’s cliché to say it, but the best is yet to come.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

NSI STAFF & FACULTY

ASSOCIATE FACULTY

Norm Bolen Chair Media and Broadcasting Consultant

John Gill CEO

Susan Alexander Corus Entertainment

Prem Gill Vice-Chair CEO, Creative BC Kim Guise Director of Local and Original Programming, TELUS Vera Houle Director of Community Relations Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) Marlene Kendall Finance Chair Director, Internal Audit & Corporate Compliance, Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries Corporation Jean LaRose CEO, Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) Michael A. Levine Chairman, Westwood Creative Artists Brad Pelman CEO, The Fremantle Corporation Virginia Thompson President, VĂŠritĂŠ Films Carole Vivier CEO & Film Commissioner Manitoba Film & Music NSI welcomes Kim Guise to the board and thanks Ron Suter, Marcia Martin and Christine Shipton for their longstanding commitment and support.

Laura Friesen Manager, Communications & Alumni Relations Angela Heck Director, Digital & Strategic Initiatives Liz Hover Director, NSI Online Ursula Lawson Manager, Programs & Development Joy Loewen Interim Manager, Programs & Development David Pollock Director, Finance Shelly Quade Manager, Programs & Development Brendon Sawatzky Director, Programming Elise Swerhone Manager, Programs & Development Chris Vajcner Director, Communications & Revenue Development Kaya Wheeler Aboriginal Programs & Administrative Assistant Julie Di Cresce NSI Totally Television Program Advisor Gail Harvey Corus Diverse TV Director Program Advisor Lisa Jackson NSI Aboriginal Documentary Director Advisor Shereen Jerrett Movie Central Script to Screen Program Co-Manager Melissa Kajpust NSI Features First Program Advisor Lisa Meeches Aboriginal Training Programs Advisor Brigitte Sachse NSI Business for Producers Program Advisor Tactica Interactive Creative and Technical Partner Doowah Design Inc. Creative and Technical Partner

David Barlow Writer/producer Shane Belcourt Writer/director Garry Campbell Writer Mark Farrell Screenwriter Mike Fly Director/producer Sturla Gunnarsson Filmmaker Ava Karvonen Director/producer Karen Lam Filmmaker Dan Lyon Telefilm Gary Marcuse Writer/producer Gigi Morin Duncan Moran LLP Alanis Obomsawin Filmmaker Linda Seger Script consultant Tim Southam Directors Guild of Canada Rudy Thauberger Screenwriter Kim Todd Producer, Original Pictures

Visit nsi-canada.ca for a full list of associate faculty.


N S I G R A D A N D C U R R E N T S TA F F MEMBER ELISE SWERHONE ON 30 YEARS OF NSI AND SUPPORTING EMERGING FILMMAKERS As a grad from early in NSI’s history to a staff member and program manager currently, what have you seen change over the last decades working with NSI? An enormous amount has changed, but at the same time not very much has changed. Technology evolves constantly – in 1986 we were shooting on film, and now we shoot digitally. In 1986, we made short films that were 25 minutes – a TV half-hour – and now shorts are 10 minutes or less. The principles of telling a good story haven’t changed, but the technology around it has. Stories have the same structure – beginning, middle and end – but we tell them faster now and on different platforms. Why is NSI a good place for emerging filmmakers to develop their projects? NSI teaches the principles of good storytelling. Filmmakers need to be allowed to express themselves without fear of failure – they need a safe space to make mistakes and learn. NSI supports its filmmakers and allows them to learn by doing. NSI provides mentorship and training from faculty who are all active filmmakers – they teach from a practical perspective, not necessarily an academic one. What’s the best part of being a program manager at NSI? I love passing on my skills and seeing students learn. It’s fun to be part of the filmmaking process indirectly – I give students advice and see it evolve and enhance their films. I particularly enjoy the NSI Aboriginal Documentary students. They teach me so much. And it’s rewarding to see emerging filmmakers come in and deliver a unique film, from a unique viewpoint, by the course’s end. When those films screen at festivals and win awards, it’s like icing on the cake. Elise also manages Corus Diverse TV Director, a course for participants with film directing experience who are interested in directing scripted television series.


THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS, PARTNERS, SUPPORTERS & TRAINERS

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NSI DRAMA PRIZE GRAD AND WEREWOLF DIRECTOR ASHLEY MCKENZIE ON STORYTELLING A N D F E AT U R E F I L M M A K I N G Since you received Telefilm Micro-Budget funding, how did Werewolf come together? I spent many months scouting for cast and locations in Cape Breton, where I live. I auditioned quite extensively four young women, nonactors, for the role of Nessa before coming across a 19-year-old theatre actress, Bhreagh MacNeil, on Twitter. We messaged her to come for an audition a month before shooting, then did a series of screen tests with her and Andrew Gillis, who was cast as Blaise. We cast Bhreagh two weeks before our shoot, which consisted of 25 shooting days. We came out of that with 102 hours of footage, which took a month for myself and an assistant editor to watch back and compile 200 pages of notes. Then we cut the film for six months, after which I went to Cineground in Montreal and completed sound design, colour and mix over two to three months. There’s a distinctive feel and voice to your films. What kinds of stories are you drawn to telling? I’m very interested in humans – people I meet in Tim Horton’s, the local library, or see walk down my street every day. Ordinary people and locations around my hometown captivate me. When that happens I’ll start to mine that material for more details and see where it takes me. I see a lot of cinematic potential in my everyday environments. I’m specifically drawn to marginalized, misfit characters – outliers who are often overlooked by others intrigue me. Fast forward to 2021 – where do you want to be in your career in five years? I haven’t looked that far ahead yet. But generally speaking I want to grow as a filmmaker each time I set out to make a film. I have a second feature film I’m excited about getting on the go very soon. I’m setting the bar high for that in terms of character, story and aesthetic impact. I want to create really strong work. NSI nominated Werewolf for the Telefilm Canada Micro-Budget Production Program in 2015.


NSI GRADS AMANDA STRONG AND BRACKEN HANUSE CORLETT O N T H E I R AWA R D - W I N N I N G N S I ABORIGINAL DOC SHORT MIA‘ Since Mia’ premiered at TIFF last year, how has the film been received? Mia’ is still in circulation in festivals and we recently installed the sets, a projection of the film and the Mia puppet at Gallery2 in Grand Forks, BC. It’s been on CBC and is currently on two separate programs in Air Canada’s inflight entertainment channel. We are currently making plans to screen Mia’ in France. A cool thing for us is being able to make connections in different communities. We realized that while our story comes from a specific place, land and culture are universal. When you initially applied to NSI Aboriginal Documentary, how did you hope the course would help you realize your vision? I don’t think we had any specific expectations coming in. We both hoped to learn more about producing a film and I think we gained a better understanding of the layers and levels involved in getting a film to completion. How did the film’s style of animation develop? I (Amanda) have been working in stop-motion animation for about five years and I had a background as an illustrator. I (Bracken) had previous experience in visual art and had training in Northwest Coast formline design. With our combined aesthetics and backgrounds, and with the help of a small team of talented artists, we were able to pull it all together. Congrats on the completion of your latest film, Four Faces of the Moon. What’s next for you? We are thrilled that Four Faces of the Moon premiered at TIFF this year. Its sets and puppets have also been exhibited at Grunt Gallery in Vancouver and there are plans to turn the piece into a 100-page graphic novel. Our new project is called Ghosts, with Sasquatch as a central character. As artists, we both maintain individual practices as well and are continuing collaborations in mixed disciplines.


CODED WEB SERIES C O - C R E AT O R J O E LY C O L L I N S ON TELUS STORYHIVE AND D I G I TA L S TO R Y T E L L I N G Coded has been scooping up awards around the world. How did the series get its start? About a year and a half ago, I met with writer/creator Steve Neufeld to discuss a series he was developing called Coded. He had written a half-hour pilot script, which I loved. The story had a lot of heart, well-fleshed out characters and a unique perspective. This wasn’t a stereotypical high school drama because the story is really about Shae and the struggles he faces as a teacher – a character that’s loosely based on Steve’s experiences as a teacher in Alberta for seven years. Although we discussed Coded as a TV project, we thought the opportunity to create a digital series would be a great way to get our story made, especially with more and more people consuming content online. When you submitted Coded to TELUS STORYHIVE, what was your intention for the project? After we submitted Coded to TELUS STORYHIVE, our intention was to win! We knew we wanted to showcase Coded on the festival circuit, which has been a large part of the series success. Also, producing six eight-minute episodes has given us essentially a one-hour TV pilot, in case we decide to make the series into a longer format. How has support from TELUS and training from NSI enhanced Coded? It was helpful to have support from TELUS and NSI throughout this process because we were working with quite a tight deadline and they wanted to make sure everyone was properly prepped. Filmmaking is all about prep, and when you’re working in the digital space, there are different things you need to factor in right from the beginning, like how you intend to build your audience. You have to think about how the content you’re making would best serve the medium you’re working in. It’s also great to have someone championing you along the way. What’s next for you? More web series? Or storytelling in a different format? I’m moving into the director’s chair! I’m currently producing a short film and I’m looking at the possibilities for a second season of Coded.


NSI ABORIGINAL YOUTH PILOT PROJEC T GRAD MELANIE NEPINAK HADLEY ON GROWING HER CAREER Can you give us a short summary of your career since you completed the NSI Aboriginal Youth Pilot Project (now NSI New Voices) in 2005? After an internship at CBC and some freelance stints, I landed a position at APTN as a new media programming officer. Eventually, I ended up getting absorbed into AnimikiSee Digital Production. The best part about being a production officer at Animiki was the stability and the safety to try new things. I directed some short vignettes, I dabbled in post-production, and I assisted with business affairs. Recognizing that that was my strong suit made it easier to see which opportunities would feed into that. My next position as programming coordinator at APTN spoke to the organizational skills I honed in production and the desire I had to review creative material. I knew from that point I wanted to be a production executive or work in a senior capacity overseeing a network’s programming strategy. I went from programming coordinator to programming manager and that led me to where I am now: executive in charge of production (for drama specifically) at CBC. How did NSI help you get started in the industry? It was a tasting menu for available jobs in the industry, and from the first day it was made clear to me that I could have any of those jobs. I’ve maintained personal and professional relationships with almost all of the NSI faculty I met then. NSI crafted a perfect curriculum and sourced excellent talent to teach it: people passionate about encouraging students to pursue a position in this field. The relationships that began at NSI were an endless resource of support. Fast forward to 2021 – where do you want to be in your career in five years? I want to continue working in the programming department of a TV or non-linear broadcast network. I want to continue to foster new, diverse talents and advantageous partnerships that support a programming strategy that investigates all the unique perspectives our country has to offer. And I want to be part of initiatives that give the underrepresented more opportunity.


F I N A N C I A L S T A T E M E N T S March 31, 2016


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT To the Directors of National Screen Institute - Canada: We have audited the accompanying financial statements of National Screen Institute - Canada, which comprise the statement of financial position as at March 31, 2016, and the statements of operations, changes in net assets and cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditors’ Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of National Screen Institute - Canada as at March 31, 2016 and the results of its operations, changes in net assets and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations. Winnipeg, Manitoba June 29, 2016

Chartered Professional Accountants


S TAT E M E N T O F F I N A N C I A L P O S I T I O N AS AT MARCH 31, 2016

Assets

2016

2015

43,008

65,685

366,000

229,510

Investments (Note 4)

88,502

332,914

Prepaid expenses

45,569

41,684

543,079

669,793

21,739

22,353

202,062

175,770

766,880

867,916

Accounts payable and accruals

87,065

242,811

Deferred contributions (Note 7)

456,014

426,982

543,079

669,793

21,739

22,353

202,062

175,770

223,801

198,123

766,880

867,916

Current Cash Accounts receivable (Note 3)

Capital assets (Note 5) Internally restricted funds (Note 6)

Liabilities Current

Net Assets Invested in capital assets Internally restricted (Note 6)

Approved on behalf of the Board

Marlene Kendall, Finance Chair NSI Board of Directors

Norm Bolen, Chair NSI Board of Directors


S TAT E M E N T O F O P E R AT I O N S FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2016

Revenues

2016

2015

Telefilm

279,759

232,261

Provincial government

176,700

176,700

Provincial agencies

48,000

110,000

Municipal agencies

26,250

25,000

1,145,570

858,817

Private sector Foundations and trusts Project revenue Interest

35,396

33,263

102,704

81,248

1,879

3,872

1,816,258

1,521,161

1,626,518

1,380,827

164,062

168,777

1,790,580

1,549,604

25,678

(28,443)

Expenses Program delivery Administration Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenses

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


S TAT E M E N T O F C H A N G E S I N N E T A S S E T S FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2016 Invested in Capital Assets

Net assets, beginning of year Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenses

22,353

Unrestricted

2016

2015

175,770 -

198,123

226,566

25,678

(28,443)

Restricted

- -

25,678

Capital asset purchases

8,094 -

(8,094) - -

Amortization

(8,708) -

8,708 - -

Transfers (Note 6)

-

Net assets, end of year

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

21,739

26,292

(26,292) - -

202,062 -

223,801

198,123


S TAT E M E N T O F C A S H F LO W S FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2016

Cash provided by (used for) the following activities

2016

2015

25,678

(28,443)

8,708

10,628

34,386

(17,815)

(136,490)

2,625

Operating Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenses Amortization Changes in working capital accounts Accounts receivable Prepaid expenses

(3,885)

(16,570)

(155,746)

(31,432)

29,032

(100,472)

(232,703)

(163,664)

(26,292)

26,983

(8,094)

(9,168)

(34,386)

17,815

(267,089)

(145,849)

Cash resources, beginning of year

398,599

544,448

Cash resources, end of year

131,510

398,599

Cash

43,008

65,685

Investments

88,502

332,914

131,510

398,599

Accounts payable and accruals Deferred contributions Investing Advances (repayment) of restricted funds Purchase of capital assets Decrease in cash resources

Cash resources are composed of:


N O T E S T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2016

1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS The National Screen Institute - Canada ("NSI") was incorporated on April 7, 1986, under Part II of the Canada Corporations Act as a corporation without share capital. Vision of NSI: "Excellence in Storytelling." Mission of NSI: "NSl's mission is to be the leader in developing award-winning content creators. We will always deliver training that is current, relevant and of the highest standard." NSI has its head office in Winnipeg, Manitoba. NSI is a not for profit charitable organization registered under the Income Tax Act, and as such, is exempt from income taxes and is able to issue donation receipts for income tax purposes. 2. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations and include the following significant accounting policies: Revenue recognition NSI follows the deferral method of accounting for contributions. Restricted contributions are recognized in the year when the related expenses are incurred or as receivable if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated and the collection is reasonably assured. Unrestricted contributions are recognized when received or the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated and the collection is reasonably assured. Contribution of goods and services NSI records contributions of donated goods and services as both revenue and expenses at estimated fair market value of advertising, travel, and production and technical expenses. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents include balances with banks and short-term investments with original maturities of three months or less. Cash subject to restrictions that prevent its use for current purposes is included in internally restricted funds. Capital assets Capital assets are recorded at cost. Amortization is provided using the straight-line method at rates intended to amortize the cost of assets over their estimated useful lives. Rate Computer equipment

20%

Computer software

20%

Furniture and fixtures

12.5%

Office equipment

20%

Leasehold improvements

20%

Program equipment

20%


Long-lived assets Long-lived assets consist of capital assets with finite useful lives. Long-lived assets held for use are measured and amortized as described in the applicable accounting policies. NSI performs impairment testing on long lived assets held for use whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset, or group of assets, may not be recoverable. Impairment losses are recognized when discounted future cash flows from its use and disposal are less than the asset's carrying amount. Impairment is measured as the amount by which the asset's carrying value exceeds its fair value. Any impairment is included in operations for the year. Financial instruments NSI recognizes its financial instruments when NSI becomes party to the contractual provisions of the financial instrument. All financial instruments are initially recorded at their fair value. NSI subsequently measures investments in equity instruments quoted in an active market at fair market value. Fair value is determined by published prices. Investments in equity instruments not quoted in an active market are subsequently measured at cost less impairment. With the exception of those instruments designated at fair value, all other financial assets and liabilities are subsequently measured at amortized cost. Transaction costs and financing fees directly attributable to the origination, acquisition, issuance or assumption of financial instruments subsequently measured at fair value are immediately recognized in the excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenses for the current period. Conversely, transaction costs and financing fees are added to the carrying amount for those financial instruments subsequently measured at amortized cost or cost. Measurement uncertainty The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Accounts receivable are stated after evaluation as to their collectability. NSI currently has no allowance for doubtful accounts. Provision is made for amortization of capital assets based on an estimate of their useful lives. These estimates and assumptions are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are reported in income in the periods in which they become known.

3. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

Trade receivables GST receivable

2016

2015

356,806

222,295

9,194

7,215

366,000

229,510


N O T E S T O T H E F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2016 4. INVESTMENTS Investments are held in a money market mutual fund reported at fair market value. The rate of interest earned is floating based on the mutual fund performance. 5. CAPITAL ASSETS

Cost

Accumulated amortization

2016 Net book value

Computer equipment

71,101

53,821

17,280

Computer software

11,183

9,814

1,369

Furniture and fixtures

43,132

42,713

419

Office equipment

45,602

42,931

2,671

Leasehold improvements

14,371

14,371

-

Program equipment

11,725

11,725

-

197,114

175,375

21,739

Cost

Accumulated amortization

2015 Net book value

Computer equipment

64,639

47,574

17,065

Computer software

10,965

8,991

1,974

Furniture and fixtures

43,132

42,226

906

Office equipment

44,188

41,780

2,408

Leasehold improvements

14,371

14,371

-

Program equipment

11,725

11,725

-

189,020

166,667

22,353

Total amortization expense for the year amounted to $8,708 (2015 – $10,628). 6. INTERNALLY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS Funds of $202,062 (2015 – $175,770) are internally restricted by NS l's Board of Directors to provide for the estimated costs in the event of winding up the operations of NSI. Transfers of $26,292 (2015 – $26,983) were approved by the Board of Directors for the purpose of increasing (2015 – decreasing) the interally restricted cash balance.


7. DEFERRED CONTRIBUTIONS 2016

2015

426,982

527,454

Amount received during the year

1,796,707

1,380,299

Less: Amount recognized as revenue during the year

(1,767,675)

(1,480,771)

456,014

426,982

Balance, beginning of year

Balance, end of year 8. CREDIT FACILITY

NSI has negotiated a $275,000 credit facility with RBC available at the borrower's option, a $85,000 corporate Visa account for miscellaneous travel and other expenses, and a $200,000 demand operating and/or overdraft loan secured by accounts receivable. No amount was drawn on the credit facility as at March 31, 2016 (2015 – nil). Interest on amounts due are payable at prime plus 1.25%. Security is a general security agreement registered in Manitoba. Notwithstanding compliance with covenants of the credit facility, borrowings are repayable on demand. 9. COMMITMENTS NSI has two years remaining on an office lease for 4,056 square feet at 400 -141 Bannatyne Avenue which commenced January 2015. Minimum annual rent is $78,210. NSI has fifty-six months remaining on a lease agreement for office equipment. Minimum annual payments are $3,973. 10. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS NSI as part of its operations carries a number of financial instruments. It is management's opinion that the NSI is not exposed to significant interest, currency or credit risks arising from these financial instruments except as otherwise disclosed. Credit concentration Financial instruments that potentially subject NSI to concentrations of credit risk consist mainly of accounts receivable from private funders and government bodies. 11. ECONOMIC DEPENDENCE A major portion of NSl's revenue is derived from donations and funding grants. As a result, any reduction in funding may affect the NSl's ability to continue future operations.


400-141 Bannatyne Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3B 0R3 800.952.9307 NSI COURSES NSI New Voices For Aboriginal adults aged 18 to 35 interested in a career in film, television and digital media. NSI Aboriginal Documentary For Aboriginal director/producer teams ready to produce a short doc. NSI Totally Television For writer/producer teams ready to get their TV series made.

NSI Business for Producers For content producers running small and mid-sized enterprises who wish to grow their companies. TELUS STORYHIVE Web Series and Digital Shorts Community-powered programs that allow community members to influence which projects receive TELUS funding.

TELUS Optik™ Local Training workshops NSI Features First For writer/producer teams presented to content creators in Alberta looking to produce their first or second and British Columbia. feature with strong commercial appeal. NSI Online Short Film Festival Year-round Movie Central Script to Screen fest offering more than $4K in cash prizes. $50,000 feature film development fund for screenwriters. Corus Diverse TV Director For participants with film directing experience interested in directing scripted television series.

For more info go to nsi-canada.ca

Š National Screen Institute - Canada (NSI) 2016

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