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THE AWESOME SCIENCE MAGAZINE FOR KIDS!

g n i h c a e t e l p Sam resources

Award-winning magazines

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Find out how to use Whizz Pop Bang in schools

Downloadable lessons and comprehensions

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n i n r a e l n o d e h Switc

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Contents

Teaching resource samples

Get ready to transform science in your school.................................. 1

Year 4 Reading: Question and answer sheets.................................. 14

How much does it cost?............................................................................................ 3

Year 5 Lesson pack: Forces investigation........................................... 16

What’s inside a resource pack?........................................................................ 4

Year 5 Reading: Biography text.................................................................... 17

Year 2 Lesson pack: Plants investigation.............................................. 6

Year 5 Reading: Question and answer sheets.................................. 18

Year 2 Reading: Non-chronological report text................................. 7

Year 6 Lesson pack: Electricity activity & experiment...... 20

Year 2 Reading: Question and answer sheets..................................... 8

Year 6 Reading: Interview text...................................................................... 21

Year 3 Lesson pack: Animals inc. humans activity.................... 9

Year 6 Reading: Question and answer sheets................................. 22

Year 3 Reading: Biography text.................................................................... 10

Year 6 Debate................................................................................................................. 24

Year 3 Reading: Question and answer sheets.................................. 11

Quick 10 minute science discussions...................................................... 25

Year 4 Lesson pack: Sound investigation............................................12

FAQs about the resources................................................................................... 26

Year 4 Reading: Explanation text............................................................... 13


Differentiated reading comprehensions

One word log-ins

New resources added each month

Non-fiction reading texts

 Written by teachers and science writers

Get ready to transform science in your school with Whizz Pop Bang!

Interviews with real scientists

STEM debates

L ots of ideas and content for science and eco clubs  Linked to the science and reading curricula



Science Week ideas

How things work

Hands-on experiments and investigations

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• Brilliant value • Saves time • Reliable, trustworthy science n! fu d an , sy ea ng hi ac te e nc ie sc es ak M • um ul ic rr cu e th ss ro ac e nc ie sc es at gr • Inte

Using Whizz Pop Bang has revitalised our science teaching. The quality of the resources is first class, supporting cross curricular links through the reading comprehension activities. In addition, the planning offers exciting practical ideas, particularly useful to teachers who are not scientific specialists. The children absolutely love carrying out the real-life experiments. Sally Cowell, Head teacher at Shaw Ridge School, Swindon

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How much does it cost?

1 magazine subscription + resources

✔ 1 magazine each month ✔ Access to teaching resources

4 magazine subscriptions + resources

✔ 4 magazines each month ✔ Access to teaching resources

8 magazine subscriptions + resources

✔ 8 magazines each month ✔ Access to teaching resources

Annual cost per pupil 63p*

£190

per year

Annual cost per pupil £1*

£300

per year

Annual cost per pupil £1.47*

£440 per year

*Packages above are based on standard-sized schools with 300 pupils. To calculate the price per pupil for your school, use our online pricing tool at whizzpopbang.com/schools. We also have packages for smaller schools with under 110 pupils.

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Inside our ‘Sky High Science’ resource pack! Curriculum links, learning objectives and working scientifically links

Comprehension Q & A linked to the reading curriculum

Differentiated lesson plans

Interactive PowerPoints to guide the lessons

Simple investigations using household items

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Cross-curricular guided reading texts


Year 2 sample lesson pack Grow your own pet Grow your own pet Y2

Teacher input Before the lesson, you will need to soak the grass seed overnight in water. This will speed up germination. Ask the children how they think plants grow. What do plants need? Collect the children’s ideas and write them down so that they can be revisited at the end of the sessions. Share with the children the PowerPoint about how a seed grows. As children are working with a partner, this would be a good opportunity to model how the perfect partnership works. Choose one of the children or your teaching assistant to work with you as you demonstrate following the instructions to make a grass pet. Share the Perfect Partnership Rules: Get along Respect others’ ideas On task Use quiet voices Participate Stay in your group

Resources Session 1 • • • • • • •

Grass seed Soil or compost Nylon tights Plant pots, yoghurt pots or bowls Elastic bands Googly eyes or felt Glue

Session 2 • PowerPoint • Pet grass heads from Session 1 • Question sheet

Plants

I’m a pet

40 mins

National curriculum links Teacher input • Observe and describe how seeds and

The seco bulbs grow plants. Find out ndinto actimature vity needs to take place oncdescribe and plants need water, e the grashow s has started to grow . Hopand efullyathe light suitable temperature toced children will have noti cha nge s ove grow and stay healthy. r the course of a week. Star t the less Learning objective on by asking them what they have noticed about thei r • To observe how grow and know grass pets? Whyseeds do they think that has what they need in order to survive. happened?

Working links Encourascientifically ge the child

ren to think scientifically when they closely, structurusing e theirsimple • Observing answers, for example: ‘I thin k the gras s head that was equipment. Using their observations placed by the radiator didn ’t grow as well as and ideas to suggest answers the one in the window becaus to questions. e it was too hot and didn’t have enough ligh t.’

Y2

investigation

20 mins

National curriculum links

• Observe and describe how seed s and bulbs grow into mature plants. Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.

Learning objective

• To observe how seeds grow and know what they need in order to surv ive.

Working scientifically links

• Observing closely using simp le equipment. Using their observa tions and ideas to suggest answers to questions.

Activity and Differentiation Activity and Differentiation 1: Activity Session Activity Session 2:

All children will make their own pet during the first session. There are examples of The child ren should have a discussion with different pets they could make included in their part ners , looking at all the different pet the PowerPoint. gras s heads in the classroom. This could be Asset they planting their seeds, discuss up are in diffe rent way s: why they need to put the seeds at the top of 1. Part their pet. ners can walk around the classroom ingthe at grass the gras s hea Oncelook all of pets areds. planted and decorated, children should decide 2. Put the grasthe s hea ds on tabl es, complete where to labe place them the classroom. with ls to showithin w where they were kept. Encourage children to choose different 3. Collate the pets on tables acco rding to places and then make predictions about how they will have growand n. why. how well well the pets grow As the The grass pet you have made during child ren walk arou nd with theiyour r partners, they will demonstration would perfect to havbe e a list of queplace stions they will need to ans in a dark cupboard tower show oralwhat ly: happens when there isn’t any light. • Has the grass grown? If• evidence is needed for the children’s Is the gras s green? If it isn’t, why? science books, take photos of their grass pets and where they have situated them.

• Was the grass pet in the ligh t? • Was it somewhere warm?

• Did it have air?

• Was it watered?

• Was there soil for the seeds to get nutrients from? Lower ability readers should be supported by their partners. As the children are working with their partners, target the children who need help to structure their responses. Rew ard good explanations or questions. If evid ence is needed for the children’s science books, you could take a photo of the children discussing their ideas with thei r partners and glue them into their books, along with a description of the lesson.

Plenar y Differentiation

Share the Pow erPoin intmixed slide that Children can work ability pairs. sho ws the end result of the experim ent. Which pet do the children think was on a wind ow sill? Why? How do they kno w?

KIT LIST l

Soil or compost

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Tights

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Plenary ISSUE 33 Cross curricular link s

As a class, make predictions about how Rea relating seed s: Dow nloadable harvest mice pdf wellding the pets will to grow their ‘fur’. Reading Ask which pets the children grow relating to pets: Issuthink e 33 –will Interview with Dr Nicola Roo first.ney Why? who works with dogs, pages 22-2 3; How stuff works – pet mic rochips, Example: ‘I pag think dog’s ‘fur’ esthe 24-2 5; Anim al will antigrow cs – hamsters, pages 14-15. the fastest because it’s on the window sill. Seeds light and warmth to grow.’ whiz zponeed pba ng.c om/

scho ols

Two tablespoons of grass seeds

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A plant pot or bowl

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Elastic bands

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Googly eyes, felt or beads

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Glue

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Year 2 reading

6

Non-chronological report text

Magnifying glass indicates differentiation

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Year 2 reading

Question and answer sheets

Name ...................................................................................................................................................................

Year 2

Year 2

Interview with Nicola Rooney, a dog trainer ANSWERS

Interview with Nicola Rooney, a dog trainer Q1. What is Nicola Rooney’s job?

These questions can be given to the children as an independent task or

____________________________________________________________

alternatively, you may want to use them for discussion.

Q1. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

What is Nicola Rooney’s job?

Q2. Circle the jobs dogs used to do in the past. Guarding

Playing

A1. She investigates how we can train dogs and how we can care for animals to make

Carrying loads

sure they live happy and healthy lives.

Q2. Answering questions.

Q3. List three jobs dogs do today.

Circle the jobs dogs used to do in the past.

A2.

____________________________________________________________

Guarding

Playing

Carrying loads

____________________________________________________________

Q3. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

Q4. What tip is given to dog owners?

List three jobs dogs do today.

A3. Three from this list;

____________________________________________________________

Detecting drugs and explosives, guiding blind people, protecting livestock and

____________________________________________________________

wildlife and medical help for example detecting blood sugar levels.

Q5. What do dogs do to signal they are playing?

Q4. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

What tip is given to dog owners?

A4. To play with them.

____________________________________________________________

Q5. Answering questions.

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A5. A play bow.

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

What do dogs do to signal they are playing?

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Year 2 reading

Question and answer sheets

Name ....................................................................................................................................................................

Year 2

Year 2

Interview with Nicola Rooney, a dog trainer

Interview with Nicola Rooney, a dog trainer ANSWERS

Q1. What is Nicola Rooney’s job? ____________________________________________________________

These questions can be given to the children as an independent task or alternatively, you may want to use them for discussion.

____________________________________________________________

Q1. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

What is Nicola Rooney’s job?

Q2. Circle the jobs dogs used to do in the past. Guarding

Playing

A1. She investigates how we can train dogs and how we can care for animals to make sure they live happy and healthy lives.

Carrying loads

Q2. Answering questions.

Circle the jobs dogs used to do in the past.

Q3. List three jobs dogs do today.

A2.

Guarding

Playing

Carrying loads

____________________________________________________________

Q3. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

List three jobs dogs do today.

____________________________________________________________

A3. Three from this list;

Q4. What tip is given to dog owners?

Detecting drugs and explosives, guiding blind people, protecting livestock and wildlife, medical help; for example, detecting blood sugar levels.

____________________________________________________________

Q4. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

What tip is given to dog owners?

Q5. What do dogs do to signal they are playing?

A4. To play with them. Q5. Answering questions.

____________________________________________________________

What do dogs do to signal they are playing?

____________________________________________________________

A5. A play bow. Q6. Answering questions.

Q6. Can dogs read our emotions?

Can dogs read our emotions?

____________________________________________________________

Q7. What does imitate mean? Draw a circle around the correct answer. Play

Copy

A6. Yes. Q7. Discuss and clarify the meaning of words.

Guess

What does imitate mean? Draw a circle around the correct answer.

Q8. Can you think of a question you would like to ask Nicola Rooney? ____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018

____________________________________________________________

Copy

Guess

Can you think of a question you would like to ask Nicola Rooney?

A8. Any question related to her job would be correct.

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Play A7. Q8. Ask questions.

____________________________________________________________


Year 3 sample lesson pack

Animals inc. humans

MAKE A Bendy Backbone MAKE A Bendy Backbo Year 3

Teacher input Ask the children if they know where their backbone is? Can they point to a partner’s backbone? Why do we have one? How does it work? Use the image of a skeleton in the resources pack, share on an interactive board and ask the children to label each part (also available in resources to print out). Share the PowerPoint available in the resources pack.

40 mins

ne

Year 3

Activity

40 mins

National curriculum links Activity and Differentiation • Ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquiries to Actanswer ivity Tw o: them. • Identify that humans and some animals 1. have Remove the stra w and cut skeleton muscles foritsupport, into four equ al piecesand (roumovement. ghly 3 cm long). protection 2. Wrap a blob of sticky tack around the Learning objective wire and alternate lengths of stra w • and Findstick out yhow backbone works. tackyour as show n below.

Working scientifically links

• Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them. Explain that the children are going to find out if their knowledge is correct by making their own model backbone using straws, paperclips and sticky tack.

• Setting up simple practical enquiries. • Using results to draw simple conclusions.

Resources

Activity and Differentiation

• • • •

Depending on your class, you could set this up in several ways:

5 cm paperclips Straws Sticky tack Scissors

Plenary

1. Lead it step-by-step from the front.

What has changed? Is this how our backbones work? What do the children think the sticky tack repr esents? Share Y’s explanation of the bac kbone from the speech bubble below. Let the children read it and see if that helps with an explanation. Bring the children’s observation s together. What did they find out?

2. Give pairs instructions for the activities so that they can work at their own speed. The instructions (available in the resources pack) can be cut in half for the two parts of the lesson. 3. Lead a lower ability group while the more able children follow instructions.

Give the children the names of the parts of the backbone – vertebra e and cartilage. Finish with a clear diag ram of the backbone.

The backbone is more flex ible when you cut the straw into Activity One: shorter lengths. This explains why your Give all of the children a 5 cm paperclip back bone consists of shorter bones called and a drinking straw. The children could vert ebra e. Cartilage between the vertebrae measure the straws themselves to link prevents them from rubbing, much like the to maths and measurement. sticky tack stops the sections of straw 1. Straighten the paperclip. from rubbing together. 2. Thread the straw through the paperclip.

ISSUE 27 Cross curricular link s Ask: the children to try bending it. What Reading Skeleton Secrets, pages 12-13; happens? Do they think this is howinte ourrview with an orthopaedic vet, pages 8-9; Sensati onal Scie t – Marie Curie, pages 28-29; how backbones work? Whyntis not? stuff works – X-ray mac

KIT LIST l

A 5cm paperclip

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A drinking straw

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Scissors

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A ruler

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Sticky tack or Plasticine

hines, pages 22-23; make a skel

eton craft, pages 17-20.

whiz zpo pban g.co m/sc hoo ls

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Year 3 reading

Biography text

Sensational Scientists

CURIE Marie was the youngest of five brothers and sisters. They all loved learning, but at that time Polish girls were not allowed to go to university. So Marie had to move to France to study physics and maths.

After many years, they managed to extract not one but TWO new elements from the pitchblende.

Marie Curie was born in Poland on the 7th of November 1867

Science has great beauty. A scientist in her laboratory is a child placed before natural phenomena which impress her like a fairy tale.

In 1896, Marie read about the strange properties of a metal called uranium. It gave out invisible rays that could pass through solid objects and even make air conduct electricity! Marie asked a question that would change her life:

First, Marie tested every element that had ever been discovered. She had no luck, but she didn’t give up. Next, she tested minerals, including pitchblende – a rock that contains small amounts of uranium. This time the results were amazing. Pitchblende gave out rays MUCH STRONGER than those given out by pure uranium! This is very remarkable and led us to believe that these minerals may contain a much more active element than uranium itself!

I wonder if any other materials give out these rays?

Marie was the first person in the world to win TWO Nobel Prizes, for her work on radioactivity. She became a science superstar – her fans included Albert Einstein! She could have made a fortune but she decided to share her knowledge for free.

Radium was not to enrich anyone. Radium is an element. It belongs to all people.

For the rest of her life, Marie carried on researching radiation and how it could be used to help people. During the First World War, she designed mobile X-ray trucks known as ‘little Curies’. She and her 17-year-old daughter Irène worked as drivers, X-raying casualties near battlefields.

The only way to prove it was to get the mystery new substance out of the pitchblende. Marie’s husband Pierre gave up his own research to help.

Marie’s research often made her feel sick and exhausted, but people didn’t realise how dangerous radioactive substances were until the 1930s. Over time, Marie’s work had damaged the cells in her bones. Marie died aged 66, but she lived to see Irène and her husband Frederic win a Nobel Prize of their own, for producing artificial radioactivity.

It was killing work to carry the containers, to pour off the liquids, and to stir, for hours at a time, the boiling material in a cast-iron basin.

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer.

MARIE

Isabel Thomas traces the discovery of two extraordinary elements that made Marie Curie one of the world’s most famous scientists.

The rays given out by polonium and radium were so strong, they made X-rays look weak and weedy. They could pass through almost ANYTHING. I invented the word ‘radioactive’ to describe this amazing property.

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WPB027 P.28-29 History.indd 1

22/09/2017 22:39

WPB027 P.28-29 History.indd 2

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22/09/2017 22:39


Year 3 reading

Question and answer sheets

Name ............................................................................................................................................................

Year 3

Year 3

Sensational Scientist - Marie Curie

Sensational Scientist - Marie Curie Answers

Q1. Why did the author choose to use speech and thought bubbles in the presentation?

Q1. Objective: Structure and presentation contribute to meaning. Why did the author choose to use speech and thought bubbles in the presentation?

____________________________________________________________

A1. They make what Marie said and thought stand out for the reader, bringing it to life.

Q2. Objective: Retrieve and record information.

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

What did polonium and radium make X-rays look like?

Q2. What did polonium and radium make X-rays look like?

A2. Weak and weedy. Q3. Objective: Justifying inferences with evidence.

____________________________________________________________

How do you know that Marie spent her whole lifetime researching radiation and

____________________________________________________________

how it could help people? Write more than one answer.

____________________________________________________________

A3. Answers can relate to time, e.g.

Q3. How do you know that Marie spent her whole lifetime researching radiation and

It says ‘for the rest of her life’.

how it could help people? Write more than one answer.

It says ‘after many years’.

____________________________________________________________

She was born in 1867 and she was reading about strange properties of

____________________________________________________________

uranium in 1896.

____________________________________________________________

Her 17-year-old daughter helped her drive the ‘Little Curies’ (work was still going on).

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

____________________________________________________________

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Year 4 sample lesson pack Pin Strummer investigation Teacher input Share the PowerPoint presentation entitled ‘A mash-up of musical science’. It explains the science behind how different musical instruments work. From the PowerPoint, share the instructions for how to make a pin strummer. Make one with the class, then ask these questions: What would happen to the sound if I pushed harder on the pins? Would the sound change if I attached the pins to a different material?

Resources • Hair pins • A variety of containers made from different materials, e.g. glass jar, plastic bottle, wooden block, metal lid, etc • Sticky tape

Year 4

Sound

50-60 mins

National curriculum links • Find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it.

Learning objective • I can investigate how the volume of a sound is altered.

Working scientifically links • Asking relevant questions. • Setting up simple practical enquiries and fair tests.

Differentiation Encourage able children to extend the investigation themselves by thinking of a question they would like to find the answer to. If possible give them the opportunity to investigate and report their findings to the rest of the class.

KIT LIST

Plenary

Activity The children should work in pairs to carry out the experiment. They should test what happens when they vary how hard they press down on the pins, and should also decide on another variable to change, for example: •

The angle of the pins

The size of the container

The material the pins are attached to

The pupils should experiment by making three different hair pin strummers.

Investigation

Choose pairs of children who have chosen different variables to share their findings. As a class, discuss why the sound changed. What was different to make it change?

When you press down on a pin, you transfer energy from your hand to the pin. The harder you press, the more energy is transferred. More energy means a bigger vibration and a louder sound. Less energy means a softer sound. More rigid objects vibrate more quickly, so they make higher-pitched sounds.

l

Hair pins

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Sticky tape

l

A variety of different containers made from different materials

ISSUE 41 Cross-curricular links Reading: Interview with a solo percussionist who can’t hear, pages 8-9; How stuff works – pianos, page 16; Incredible inventions - the microphone, pages 28-29.

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

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Year 4 reading

PIANO

HOW STUFF

WORKS 4

3

Explanation text The piano has the widest range of notes of any instrument, covering more than seven octaves (each with eight notes).

5

Some of the most amazing music in the world is played on a piano – but how does pressing a few black and white keys create such a range of beautiful sounds?

Sitting on top of the strings are dampers, which stop the strings from vibrating. When the hammer rises to hit the string, the damper on that string lifts off to allow the string to vibrate before falling back down to stop the sound when the player stops pressing the key.

6

When a key is pressed, a wooden hammer covered in felt strikes the strings, which vibrate to create the sound.

The vibrating strings don’t create much sound on their own as they are very thin, so pianos use a large flat piece of wood called a soundboard to amplify the sound by creating much larger sound waves in the air.

Vibrations from the strings are transmitted to the soundboard via a wooden bar called the bridge.

7

2

There are around 230

strings in a piano, with each

key playing two or three strings tuned to the same note. The strings are made of superstrong steel, which is stretched incredibly tightly.

1

8

There are usually 88 keys on a piano: 52 white keys, which play the major notes (A, B, C, D, E, F, G), and 36 black keys for the sharps and flats in between.

9 As well as grand pianos like this one, there are also upright pianos which work in the same way, but the strings run up and down instead of horizontally.

A super-strong frame made from cast iron holds the strings tight.

Each string is wound around a metal tuning pin that can be turned to tighten or loosen the tension and change the pitch of the note. The tighter the string, the higher the note it produces when the hammer hits it.

There are usually two or three pedals on a piano. The right-hand pedal lifts all the dampers off the strings, so the notes carry on sounding after they have been played. The left-hand one shifts the hammer to one side, which makes the notes sound softer.

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Year 4 reading

Question sheets

Name ......................................................................................................

Q6. What are the notes A-G known as?

Year 4

How Stuff Works - Pianos

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

Q7. If I tightened the tuning pin what would happen?

Q1. How many strings are struck when a key is pressed?

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Q8. Which pedal would I need to push if I wanted my piece of music to sound softer?

Q2. Which notes are produced by the 36 black keys?

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Q9. Can the vibrating strings alone produce sound?

Q3. How are grand pianos different from upright pianos?

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Q4. In your own words, explain how the damper works.

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Q10. How many octaves can be produced by a full-size piano?

___________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Q5. On the left are some main ideas about pianos. Draw a line to the detail on the right that goes with each of them. One has been done for you.

Strings

Dampers

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These are stretched tightly and they are made of strong steel. There are 88 of these on a full-size piano. When a key is pressed, these lift off to allow the strings to vibrate.

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2019, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

Hammer

This is usually made of wood and is covered with felt.

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2019, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

Keys


Year 4 reading

Answer sheets Year 4

Year 4

How Stuff Works - Piano ANSWERS

Q6. Retrieve and record information. What are the notes A-G known as?

Q1. Retrieve and record information.

A6. The major notes.

How many strings are struck when a key is pressed?

Q7. Justifying inferences with evidence.

A1. Two or three strings are struck. They are tuned to the same note and this note is produced when the key is pressed.

If I tightened the tuning pin what would happen?

Q2. Retrieve and record information.

A7. The pitch of the sound produced by that string would be higher (higher pitch).

Which notes are produced by the 36 black keys?

Q8. Retrieve and record information.

A2. The 36 black keys produce the sharp and flat notes.

Which pedal would I need to push if I wanted my piece of music to sound softer?

Q3. Retrieve and record information.

A8. The left pedal (it shifts the hammer to one side and the notes sound softer when

How are grand pianos different from upright pianos?

the piano is played).

A3. The grand piano’s strings run horizontally but the strings in an upright piano run up

Q9. Justifying inferences with evidence.

and down (vertically).

Can the vibrating strings alone produce sound?

Q4. Justifying inferences with evidence.

A9. Yes, but not much. Pianos use a soundboard to produce larger sound waves and

In your own words, explain how the damper works.

make the sound louder.

A4. Plausible answers which explain that the damper stops the strings vibrating and

Q10. Retrieve and record information.

this in turn stops the sound when a key is lifted.

How many octaves can be produced by a full-size piano?

Q5. Using details to support the main idea.

A10. More than 7 octaves, each octave contains 8 notes.

On the left are some main ideas about pianos. Draw a line to the detail on the right that goes with each of them. One has been done for you.

Hammer

Strings

Dampers

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This is usually made of wood and is covered with felt. These are stretched tightly and they are made of strong steel. There are 88 of these on a full-size piano. When a key is pressed, these lift off to allow the strings to vibrate.

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Keys

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2019, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

A5.

15


Year 5 sample lesson pack Rollercoaster Investigation Teacher input Start by asking who has been on a rollercoaster? How does it work? What causes it to move? Share the PowerPoint available to download in the resources pack. Ask some ‘what would happen if…’ questions, for example: What would happen if there were fewer loops? What would happen if there wasn’t a steep climb at the beginning? Explain to the class that they are going to make their own rollercoasters. Ask them what they would like to find out? Take suggestions from the children and write these up for the class to refer to. Ask how they will make their investigations a fair test? Share the materials they will have.

Resources

Investigation

60 mins

National curriculum links • Identify the effects of air resistance and friction.

Learning objective • I can plan an investigation to answer the question ‘what affects the speed of a rollercoaster?

Working scientifically links • Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary. • Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions.

, it worked!

Differentiation

Marbles

Insulation piping (cut in half lengthways)

Masking tape

Activity Ask the children to plan their investigations. Give them these headings as a starting point and ask them to write notes for each one: We want to find out the answer to… We are keeping it a fair test by… We will measure by… We will record our results by… There is a planning sheet available to download in the resources pack. The groups carry out their investigations. Make sure each group has a clear focus and knows how to measure and record their results. Initially the rollercoasters may not work; this is good as it will encourage a scientific discussion.

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Year 5

Forces

Split the class into groups of three or four. These could be mixed ability or ability groupings. Lower ability children will need some guidance during the planning stage from a teacher or teaching assistant. Challenge more able children to add another loop to their rollercoasters.

Plenary Ask the children to draw a conclusion by answering the questions they outlined at the start. They could do this in writing or they could present their investigations and rollercoasters to the whole class. They should include: 1. The question they were trying to find the answer to; 2. How they made their investigations a fair test; 3. How they measured and recorded their results; 4. Their conclusions.

KIT LIST

If iPads are available, the children may want to video their experiments and share them with the class.

The greater the height that your marble starts at, the faster it will travel. Smooth joints from one pipe to the next will reduce friction.

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Marbles

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Insulation piping

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Masking tape

©Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

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Year 5 reading

Biography text

Sensational Scientists

Wright Brothers

The

Isabel Thomas soars through the remarkable story of the team behind the world’s first powered flight. Wilbur and Orville Wright grew up in the late 1800s, during the Industrial Revolution. When the boys were 12 and 7, their father gave them a toy helicopter powered by rubber bands. They decided to build copies they could experiment with. Why not use the sketch below to try making one yourself?

Their new aircraft used the controls they had perfected in their gliders, but had much bigger wings to lift the extra weight of the engine and propellers. By December 1903, the Wright Flyer was ready. The brothers took the plane to the wide, windy beach at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, USA, where they had tested their gliders. After tossing a coin to see who would fly first, Orville took off…

conds! r just 12 se

yed up fo

… and sta

But it was

art.

a great st

In 1969, a piece of wood and fabric from the Wright Flyer was taken to the Moon by the crew of Apollo 11.

Rubber band helicopter

Tip: Use a pipe cleaner to push the elastic paperclip hook band through rotates against the straw beads Hook taped to bamboo skewer

tape slips of paper to bamboo skewer

For some years, I have believed that flight is possible for humans.

rubber band inside straw

paperclip anchors rubber band

bamboo taped to tube

Angle the rotating top wings so that they are at opposite angles to the fixed bottom wings. Twist the top wings anticlockwise to power up the band ready for flight.

size of wings not critical

This rotor is fixed to the straw

From the time we were little, Orville and I shared all our toys and talked about our thoughts and dreams. Nearly everything we did and invented was the result of discussions (and sometimes scraps!).

We were lucky enough to grow up in an environment where children were always encouraged a lot to pursue intellectual interests; to investigate whatever aroused curiosity.

Both brothers loved building and fixing things. In their 20s, they opened a bicycle shop. They even built 300 of their own bicycles – five of which are still around today. The brothers combined hands-on tinkering with scientific skill. When they decided to try and build a flying machine, they read everything they could about flight before carrying out their own experiments.

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Wilbur and Orville built their first glider in 1900. For the next three years, they improved their designs. They built a wind tunnel and tested up to 200 different wing shapes before they were happy! Once they had the perfect glider, they were ready for the next step: powered flight.

The Wright brothers decided to use a petrol engine to power their plane. No one else could build them an engine light enough to get off the ground, so the brothers designed and built their own. They used the lightweight metal aluminium, which is still the main material used to build aircraft today.

They made three other flights that day. On the fourth attempt, Wilbur piloted the plane for 59 seconds, travelling 260 metres! As they talked about the successful flight, disaster struck. A gust of wind tipped the Flyer over and rolled it across the sand. The plane never flew again, but it had done its job.

The Wright brothers had finally unlocked the secret of mechanical flight. The brothers travelled to Europe to demonstrate their invention. Interest in powered flight exploded and they returned to the USA as celebrities. In 1906, their patent was finally granted, and they began selling planes to customers, including the US military.

We packed our goods and returned home, knowing that the age of the flying machine had come at last.

In 1912, Wilbur died suddenly from typhoid. Orville sold their company and stopped flying in 1915, but he spent the next 33 years championing the development of flight. He even helped to design the world’s first guided missile during World War 1. He watched as aeroplanes changed the world and made sure that the Wright brothers’ contribution to the world was never forgotten.

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

To see all our resources visit whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

17


Year 5 reading

Question sheets

Name ...............................................................................................................................................................

Year 5

Q5. What do you think the word ‘championing’ means in the final paragraph?

Sensational Scientists - The Wright Brothers

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

Q1. In what period of history were the Wright brothers born? (Not the date!)

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

Q6. Why were the Wright brothers classed as celebrities? Give your answer using

Q2. How old were they when they became interested in ‘flight’?

evidence from the text.

____________________________________________________________

Q3. What does the word ‘scraps’ mean?

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Q4. Complete the grid below using information from the whole text. Either write a

____________________________________________________________

question or an answer depending on which section is missing. The first one has

____________________________________________________________

been done for you.

____________________________________________________________

Question

Answer

How old were the Wright brothers when they owned a bicycle shop?

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

In their 20s.

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

Q7. Which phrase in the text means experimenting and trying things out for

What tragedy happened in 1912?

themselves? Look in the section about when they were in their 20s. A piece of wood and fabric from

____________________________________________________________

the Wright Flyer. ____________________________________________________________

Their patent was finally granted in which year?

Where was the Wright Flyer tested?

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018

Up to 200.

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

____________________________________________________________


Year 5 reading

Answer sheets Year 5

Q6. Make inferences from the text/explain and justify inferences with evidence from

Sensational Scientists - The Wright Brothers ANSWERS

the text. Why were the Wright brothers classed as celebrities? Give your answer using

Q1. Retrieve and record information/identify key details from fiction and non-fiction.

evidence from the text.

A6. They had ‘finally unlocked the secret of mechanical flight’. They had done something

In what period of history were the Wright brothers born? (Not the date!)

A1. The Industrial Revolution.

no-one else had done. ‘Interest in powered flight exploded’ means that people

Q2. Retrieve and record information/identify key details from fiction and non-fiction.

thought it was an amazing discovery, they were very excited by it. Everyone wanted to know the brothers and were interested in their work and their discoveries.

How old were they when they became interested in ‘flight’?

Q7. Give/explain the meaning of words in context.

A2. 12 and 7

Q3. Give/explain the meaning of words in context.

Which phrase in the text means experimenting and trying things out for themselves? Look in the section about when they were in their 20s.

What does the word ‘scraps’ mean?

A7. ‘Hands-on tinkering’.

A3. They used to fight or argue about things. Q4. Summarise main ideas from more than one paragraph.

Q8. Make inferences from the text/explain and justify inferences with evidence from the text.

Complete the grid below using information from the whole text. Write either a

Using evidence from the text, in your opinion what helped to make the two brothers

question or an answer depending on which section is missing. The first one has

so successful? Find two reasons.

been done for you.

A8. • They grew up at a time of discovery and invention; the Industrial Revolution. Answer

How old were the Wright brothers when they owned a bicycle shop? What tragedy happened in 1912? What was taken to the Moon in 1969? Their patent was finally granted in which year? How many different wing shapes did they test before they were happy? Where was the Wright Flyer tested?

• They talked about their thoughts and dreams from when they were little. • They were encouraged to pursue ideas; to investigate whatever aroused their

In their 20s.

curiosity. • They persevered and kept on testing and improving designs, including trying over

Wilbur died suddenly from typhoid.

200 different wing shapes.

A piece of wood and fabric from

• They unlocked the secret of mechanical flight, something no-one else had done.

Q9. Retrieve and record information/identify key details from fiction and non-fiction.

the Wright Flyer.

What is the main material used to build aircraft today?

1906

A9. Aluminium Q10. Make inferences from the text/explain and justify inferences with evidence from the

Up to 200.

text.

At Kitty Hawk, North Carolina,

Why didn’t it matter that the plane flew only 260 metres? Use evidence from the

USA.

text to explain your answer.

A10. People were very excited that they had made the plane fly. It didn’t matter that it

What do you think the word ‘championing’ means in the final paragraph?

A5. Promoting, developing, talking about flight and flying, trying to ensure that people continued to work on and think about flight. whizzpopbang.com

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018

Q5. Give/explain the meaning of words in context.

flew only a short way. The point is that it lifted off the ground and flew. The phrase ‘it had done its job’ means that it had done enough to make people interested and to prove that it could be done.

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018

A4. Question

19


Year 6 sample lesson pack Electricity Electric Art Teacher input

Electric Art

Year 6

Activity & Experiment

10-20 mins Year 6

Teacher input

60 mins

Part 2

National curriculum National curriculum links links Share Emmi’s Eco Clu This lesson should be done in two parts, b pa • ge As ab soc ou iat t e • Use recognised symbols when the bri gh tness of a lamp or the first part is much shorter and it electric art (included in the PowerPo int).circuit in a the volume of a buzzer with representing a simple the number should be done as one activity whilstAsk the children how the bulb could be an d voltage of cells use made brighter ordiagram. d in a circuit. the buzzer louder? Wh some children are creating the dough at would need to be inc Learning objective Learning objective used for the electric art. reased ? Give the children the chance to discuss the answer. • I can explain how the brightness of • I can use recognised symbols when a lamp or the volum e of a buzzer is using drawn circuits. Resources Part 1 changed. Working scientifica How is a circuit drawn? There is an The recipe below will make lly links enough dough for five pairs example on the PowerPoint (also of children, so you • Planning different Differentiation typ wil es of scientific available in the resources pack) that l need to make enough ba enquiries to answer tches for qu estions, including ability children shows the symbols for a battery, a the whole claLower ss. recognising and con trolling variables light and a switch, and explains what• 160 g of flocan ur use the set when necessary. 165 ml of wa of ter instructions electricity is made of. It also includes• the • 3 tbsp of sal t includes that instructions for the game, so you can amcircuit the read them through with the children• if 2 tbsp of cre of tartar Activity continued • 2 tbsp of veg etable oil diagram (in the you feel it’s necessary. The children’s art sho uld light up brighter resources pack). or buzz louder than Equipment needed: Emmi’s, so they Challenge more • Tablespoons should explain how the y will do this in able children to • Measuring jug their plan (use more than two batteries, build the circuit • Scales increasing the voltag e). Their plans should using the set • Pan include a diagram, usi ng the symbols. In of instructions • Wooden spoon the resources pack the re is a suggested without the • Access to a hob guide, showing all the symbols for the diagram. • Cookie cutters (op circuit they would ne ed to draw. tional) • Foil – at least 20 cm long & 3 cm wide • Batteries Plenary Part 2 • LEDs or buzze rs Give the children the opportunity to presen t The salt dough should be madethe while ir elesome ctric art design. Encou Activity rage them to children are playing the game. exp They will lain house w it works. Challeng e the more Explain to the their the symbolsab when they le think ers to explain, using class knowledge that salt doof the correct ug h has the texture of plan ter their electric art. mi no logy. All the children modelling dough. should try to explain how they kn ow their light or buzze Encourage them to cho r ose a shape will be brighter or lou der than Emmi’s. to cut in half, like the example on Sh are Y’s explanation be the PowerPoint. low… Resources In pairs, children sho uld first The dough conducts create a simple plan • Board games and pieces of their ele ctric art. Remind the ele ctr icity, so you per pair (included in the m they will need to leave a ga Remember, whenever to replace the wir can use it resources pack) p for the es electricity to flow thr ough the you are working with circuits. The more in simple • Dice LED or the buzzer. Exp voltage you lain LEDbatteries, always disconnect bulbs have a negativ ad d to the cir cui t the e and a brighter • Scissors positive. The longer pin is positive.them after use, as the the bulb or the louder the

circuit can get hot and cause fire.

Activity

ISSUE 34 Cross curri cular links In pairs, the children can follow the Reading instructions to play the circuit game. If : Sensational Scientist Mi chael Faraday, page erview s 28-29; evidence is needed, the circuits int could be with Nikita Hari, an electr ical engineer whose thi ng s up job it is to blow , pa ges 22-23; How Stuff stuck into the children’s science books Works – once the game is completed. ‘How green is our electricity?’, pages 6-7 plugs, pages 24-25;

KIT LIST l

160g of flour

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165 ml of water

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Measuring jug

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3 tbsp of salt

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Scales

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2 tbsp of cream of tartar

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Pan

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2 tbsp of vegetable oil

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Wooden spoon

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Access to a hob

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Cookie cutters (optional)

buzzer.

.

wh izz po pba ng .co m/ sch

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oo ls

EQUIPMENT NEEDED l Tablespooons

© Launchpad Publish ing Ltd 2018, illustrat ions © Clive Goodye r

To see all our resources visit whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

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 oil - at least 20cm long F & 3cm wide

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Batteries

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LEDs or buzzers


Year 6 reading

Interview text

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018, illustrations © Clive Goodyer

To see all our resources visit whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

21


Year 6 reading

22

Question sheets

To see all our resources visit whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources


Year 6 reading

Answer sheets

To see all our resources visit whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

23


Year 6 Debate

Would you use technology to remember your beloved pet?

How to remember your pet debate

I would I wouldn’t

How to remember your pet debate

Cut out the cards and decide as a group if you would or wouldn’t remember your pet in the way it describes. Give a reason for your choice and remember, there is no right or wrong answer – it’s your opinion.

Cryogenically freeze your pet in the hope of bringing it back to life in the future. © Shutterstock

Freeze dry your pet in a life-like pose, using a vacuum chamber. © Shutterstock

© Shutterstock

© Shutterstock

Have jewellery made from your pet’s fur. © Shutterstock

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Turn the carbon from your pet’s hair or ashes into a diamond. © Shutterstock

Ask a taxidermist to stuff and mount the skin of your dead pet. © Shutterstock

Clone your pet using small samples of its DNA. whizzpopbang.com

© Shutterstock

Have hair from your pet spun and knitted into a jumper or a pair of socks.

Stuff your pet and turn it into a drone.

© Shutterstock

Embed your pet’s ashes in a vinyl record of its favourite song.

Mummify your pet, just like the ancient Egyptians did. © Shutterstock

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© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018

To see all our resources visit whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

© Launchpad Publishing Ltd 2018


Quick 10 minute 1 science discussions This ten-minute activity, linking to speaking and listening, is ideal for use at the beginning of the day or during transition times. Pupils will be challenged to guess what the image is by answering the questions shown on the first slide of the PowerPoint. Once pupils have finished, click through to the next slide to reveal the answers. Our teaching resources include a variety of science discussions, linking to all areas of the science curriculum.

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FAQs 1

Are the resources available without a subscription to the magazine? No, we’ve tested the resources in schools and the feedback is that the children love reading the magazines and therefore the best results come from having both magazines and resources together.

2

Do you offer resources for Reception and Year 1? Not currently, however we hope to in the future.

3

How can we explain the resources to all our staff? Once you sign up you’ll receive a Whizz Pop Bang welcome pack in the post, along with a PowerPoint for science co-ordinators to share with other teachers. Please ensure you sign up with the correct email address in order to receive information from us.

4

When will our first issue arrive? As soon as we’ve received payment we’ll send out your welcome pack, and your magazines will start arriving the following month.

5

When will the online resources be available to download? As soon as you’ve paid, an email will be sent to the nominated person, who will then be able to set up further members of staff (logins are unlimited).

If you have any questions please email us at hello@whizzpopbang.com or call our office 0330 2233790 We’d love to hear your feedback and any suggestions you have for Whizz Pop Bang!


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Whizz Pop Bang sample teaching resources  

Browse this document to discover how Whizz Pop Bang can transform science teaching and learning in your school. Inside you will find example...

Whizz Pop Bang sample teaching resources  

Browse this document to discover how Whizz Pop Bang can transform science teaching and learning in your school. Inside you will find example...

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