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COUNTRY COOKING LIVE THE DREAM

69 BRILLIANT

Beautiful recipes from a country kitchen

RECIPES

A YEAR OF IDEAS FOR EVERY SEASON

Plus essential know-how to make you a better cook

SPRING

SUMMER

AUTUMN

ISSUE 4 ONLY £5.99

WINTER


WELCOME

The joy of cooking the seasons I’ve spent a lifetime working in food, often behind the scenes on the recipe books of some famous faces in the food world. Someone asked me the other day what’s motivated me in my work over the years. At the risk of stating the obvious, I love eating. It’s one of life’s greatest pleasures. I also love to cook, for myself and for others: beautiful fresh food, simply prepared. This collection of recipes reflects that love. Seasonality is at the heart of all good food. I’m a keen gardener and there’s nothing like having an allotment to make you aware of the changing seasons. You prepare the ground, you plant, then you have to be patient, but what ends up on your plate is second to none when it comes to flavour. That’s why this Essential Guide To... is organised with the changing seasons at its core. I’m also passionate (some would say obsessive) about seeking out good produce to cook with, and good places to eat. I’ll go out of my way to discover the best of whatever there is, wherever I am (I even keep an annotated road map in the car). And that sums up what’s so special about seasonal country cooking. Britain has some amazing produce and I hope this collection will highlight that array and how best to cook it, in tune with the seasons, country-style.

A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR… Debbie Major is one of Britain’s most respected recipe writers and is a regular contributor to delicious. Her much-loved seasonal column, which began in 2009, is the inspiration behind us asking her to pull together this collection of outstanding recipes that celebrate seasonal countrystyle cooking. JEN BEDLOE, ACTING FOOD EDITOR, delicious.

DEBBIE MAJOR

T HE delicious. M AGA ZINE PROMISE delicious. is an award-winning food magazine, full of great recipes, from simple to more challenging, illustrated with stunning photographs. In this Essential Guide To..., as in the magazine, you have these guarantees:

RECIPES THAT WORK Every one has been rigorously tested by our food team, using state-of-the-art Fisher & Paykel ovens and hobs, so you can be confident they work every time.

NO-FUSS INGREDIENTS We aim to use easy-to-find ingredients. We’ll tell you where to find any unusual items and/or what to substitute them with.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Recipes are analysed for nutritional content by an expert nutritionist. They are calculated with precision but may vary, depending on the ingredients you use. Calculations include only listed ingredients, not serving suggestions.

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6 MENU PLANNER Whether you’re planning a Sunday lunch, family barbecue or a smart supper for friends, we’ve helped you choose what to cook. Follow our suggestions for recipes from this collection that team up brilliantly

Spring 8-33

8 SPRING 10 What’s in season 12 Spring recipes to make the heart soar, including asparagus and gruyère soufflés, poached chicken with spring vegetables and Italian ricotta tart

34 SUMMER 36 What’s in season 38 Summer recipes for outdoors eating and warmer days, including sticky marmalade ribs, tomato tartlets and cherry ripple ice cream

64 AUTUMN 66 What’s in season 68 Autumn recipes to make the most of the harvest, including Dorset pork and cider casserole, squash parmigiana, and pear and ginger eve’s pud

90 WINTER 92 What’s in season 94 Winter recipes that warm and comfort, including smoked bacon, leek and butter bean chowder, winter fish pie, and marmalade and coconut bakewell tart

115 RECIPE INDEX Browse what’s in this collection by category

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Summer 34-62


EYE TO EYE MEDIA LTD, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT Subscription enquiries 01795 414857 delicious@servicehelpline.co.uk Editorial enquiries 020 7803 4100 Fax 020 7803 4101 Email info@deliciousmagazine.co.uk Web deliciousmagazine.co.uk Recipes All by Debbie Major, tested in the delicious. test kitchen by the delicious. food team All food photographs Andrew Montgomery Aditional seasonal photography Getty Images

for delicious. magazine

Autumn 64-88 Winter 90-113

KEY Indicates a vegetarian recipe. Indicates a vegan recipe. This

KNOW- symbol HOW

indicates useful extra information about the recipe. This symbol means you’ll find an option to freeze or chill part or all of the recipe in advance.

Editor in Chief Karen Barnes Editor Jen Bedloe Deputy editor Susan Low Editorial and features assistant Phoebe Stone Food editor Rebecca Woollard Acting food lifestyle editor Lottie Covell Cookery assistant Ella Tarn Art director Jocelyn Bowerman Art editor Martine Tinney Designer Abigail Dodd Managing editor Les Dunn Deputy chief sub editor Hugh Thompson Senior sub editor Rebecca Almond Sub editor Sara Norman Food consultant Debbie Major Digital editor Rebecca Brett Digital producer Isabella Bradford Digital producer Isabeau Brimeau Marketing director Julia Rich

MAKE AHEAD

Indicates you can freeze the recipe. Unless stated, freeze the finished dish for up to 3 months. Defrost and reheat until piping hot.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Recipes are analysed for nutritional content by an expert nutritionist. They’re calculated with precision but may vary, depending on the ingredients used. Calculations include only listed ingredients.

With thanks to Holly Apted, Stella Dalzell

Managing director Seamus Geoghegan 020 7803 4123 seamus.geoghegan@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Publishing director Adrienne Moyce 020 7803 4111 adrienne.moyce@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Consultant editorial director Jo Sandilands Advertising director Jason Elson 020 7150 5397 Circulation director Owen Arnot 020 7803 4121 Production director Jake Hopkins 020 7803 4110 Finance director Gary Pickett gary.pickett@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Finance manager Martin Cherry 01733 373132 martin.cherry@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk

The Essential Guide To... is published by Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT. Printed in the UK by Southernprint. Colour origination by Rhapsody. Copyright Eye to Eye Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without permission. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in advertisements, articles, photographs or illustrations. Eye to Eye Media Ltd is a registered data user whose entries in the Data Protection Register contain descriptions of sources and disclosures of personal data. This paper is manufactured using pulp taken from well managed, certified forests.

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Six brilliant menus for Sunday lunch

Easter menu for 8

Vegetarian lunch

No-fuss crowdpleasers that everyone will love to eat

For the best weekend feasting with family and friends

A wonderful meat-free feast for 6-8 people

Manchego rarebits (make mini ones), p98

Wild garlic and potato soup, p16

Sage and white bean polpettine, p12

Roast chicken with chard and Italian sausage stuffing, p99

Roast leg of lamb with wild garlic and feta stuffing, p13

Blue cheese and sweet onion tart, p19

Beer-laced sticky toffee and ginger pudding, p112

Slow roast rhubarb with pistachio cake, p26

Roast beetroot, egg and caper salad, p39

And for tea‌ Florentine shorbread fingers, p25

And for tea‌ Whisky and pistachio simnel cake, p30

Lemon verbena ice cream & seasonal poached fruit, p59

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PLANNER

special occasions Family barbecue

Smart supper for 4

Picnic lunch

Keep the vibe relaxed with simple fuss-free recipes

Big on flavours, these great ideas are excellent choices for friends

Summer days deserve the best outdoor feasts you can rustle up

Buffalo chicken wings with blue cheese dip, p52

Asparagus tempura with green herb sauce, p22

Vietnamese-style chicken salad with herbs, p42

Cumberland sausage hot dogs with beery onions, p47

Mussels with cider, tarragon and crème fraÎche, p18

Tomato, saffron and parmesan tartlets, p48

Cretan dakos, p44

Cider-braised chicken with pearl barley and bacon, p17

Nectarine, fig and blue cheese salad, p51

American shortcake with lemon curd and cream, p58

Blackberry, lemon and almond bars, p88

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Cherry ripple ice cream bars, p60

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8 deliciousmagazine.co.uk


Spring As the days start to lengthen,

warming the earth and rousing it from its winter slumber, crops sprout and blossom appears on the trees to gladden hearts. It’s an exciting season for cooks as new

green things start to appear on market stalls and grocers’ shelves – aromatic wild garlic, waxy new potatoes, asparagus shoots and more. Amid this rebirth there’s renewed zeal for feasting and baking over the bank holidays


This season, enjoy…

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MUSSELS • BROAD BEANS • RHUBARB


• WILD GARLIC • ASPARAGUS • LAMB • WATERCRESS • JERSEY ROYALS

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Wild garlic and potato soup with garlic butter croutons SERVES 4, HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 20 MIN, OVEN TIME 12 MIN

Harvest your wild garlic while the flowers are out and use the flowers as a pretty garnish for your soup. Make the soup up to MAKE 24 hours in advance, then AHEAD cool, cover and keep in the fridge until ready to reheat. Freeze the soup for up to 3 months. It will lose a little of its bright green colour but will still taste good. • 50g butter • 2 medium onions, finely chopped • 500g floury potatoes, such as maris piper, cut into chunks • 1.2 litres vegetable stock or water 12 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 200g wild garlic leaves (or 200g mature spinach leaves and 1-2 fat garlic cloves, chopped), thick stalks already removed • 4 tbsp double cream, plus extra to serve FOR THE CROUTONS

• 15g butter • 1 garlic clove, crushed • 1 tsp olive oil • 50g slightly stale, crustless, white country-style bread 1 For the soup, melt the butter in a large pan, add the onions, cover and cook gently for 10 minutes or until very soft but not brown. (If using spinach, add the chopped garlic cloves and cook for 2 minutes more). Add the potatoes and stock or water, bring to the boil, then cover. Simmer for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are very soft. 2 Meanwhile, for the croutons, heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/

gas 6. Melt the butter in a small pan. Add the garlic and olive oil and take off the heat. Tear the bread into little pieces, put in a bowl and toss with the garlic butter mix. Spread them out on a baking sheet and bake for 10-12 minutes or until crisp and golden. Remove, sprinkle lightly with salt, then leave to cool. 3 Roughly chop the wild garlic (or spinach), then add to the hot soup pan for 2 minutes or until wilted and softened. Cool slightly, then liquidise the soup in batches until smooth. Return to the pan and bring back to a gentle simmer. Stir in the 4 tbsp cream and some salt and ground white pepper to taste. Ladle into warmed bowls, swirl in a little more cream, then serve scattered with the garlic butter croutons and flowers if you wish. PER SERVING 373kcals, 23.8g fat (13.7g saturated), 8.2g protein, 31.7g carbs (4.8g sugars), 0.6g salt, 4.9g fibre


SPRING Cider-braised chicken thighs with pearl barley, bacon, carrots and peas SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 40 MIN

Make up to 24 hours in MAKE advance. Keep covered in AHEAD the fridge until ready to eat. Reheat until piping hot. • 8 British free-range, skin-on chicken thighs • ½ tbsp olive oil • 125g British free-range streaky bacon, rind removed, chopped • 4 fat garlic cloves, finely chopped • 200g pearl barley • 300ml dry cider, plus an extra splash • 300ml fresh chicken stock

• 250g small carrots, such as chantenay • 25g butter • 250g small leeks, sliced • 250g frozen peas • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley • Lemon, for squeezing over 1 Trim and discard the excess skin from each chicken thigh, then season. Heat the olive oil in a wide shallow frying pan or sauté pan with a lid, put the thighs in the pan skin-side down, then leave to brown for 5 minutes. Flip them over and brown lightly on the other side, then lift onto a plate and drain away any excess fat, leaving just a little in the pan. 2 Fry the bacon until lightly golden. Add the garlic and stir briefly, then stir in the pearl barley, cider and chicken stock

and bring to the boil. Return the chicken thighs to the pan, skinside up, cover, lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the carrots, cover and cook for 10 minutes more. Meanwhile, melt the butter in another pan. Add the leeks and cook for 2-3 minutes. 3 Uncover the chicken, stir in the leeks and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Add the peas and simmer for another 5 minutes until the chicken, pearl barley and vegetables are tender and the liquid has reduced nicely. Add a splash of cider, taste and add a little more if needed. Scatter over the parsley, squeeze over the lemon and serve. PER SERVING 663kcals, 23.8g fat (8.7g saturated), 48.9g protein, 54.4g carbs (10.5g sugars), 1.7g salt, 7.8g fibre

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ROOT CAUSE

Home-grown or fresh from a farm shop, you can’t beat early-season new potatoes. Charlotte are the best all-rounders. Waxy when young, they’re great roasted or sliced into creamy gratins.

Limoges-style potato pie SERVES 6-8 HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, OVEN TIME 40-45 MIN, PLUS CHILLING AND COOLING

When I was 16 and still at school, I won a cookery competition, and one of my prizes was a copy of Anne Willan’s French Regional Cooking. In it, I came across a recipe for a pâte aux pommes de terre, a puff pastry pie formed on a flat baking sheet, very much like a pithivier but filled with thinly sliced new potatoes, garlic, herbs and cream. Ever since, it’s been one of my very favourite things to make with the first of the new season potatoes. Here is my version of that pie… • 2 x 375g packs ready-to-roll puff pastry • Butter for greasing • 85ml double cream • 85ml single cream • 750g waxy new potatoes, such as charlotte, scraped clean or peeled • 75g (2 large) shallots, finely chopped • 3 garlic cloves, very finely chopped • ½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg • 1 tsp salt • 3 medium free-range egg yolks • 1 tbsp mixed chopped fresh parsley, chives and tarragon

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1 Unroll both sheets of pastry and cut out a 25cm disc from one piece and a 28cm disc from the other, rolling the pastry out a little more if necessary. Place the smaller disc of pastry on a lightly greased non-stick baking sheet. Mix the creams together and set aside. 2 Bring a large pan of well salted water (1 tsp per 600ml) to the boil. Thinly slice the potatoes, ideally on a mandoline. Drop them into the boiling water and simmer for 3 minutes, until just tender when pierced with a small sharp knife. Drain and refresh under running cold water. Drain once more, spread the slices out on a clean tea towel, then pat dry thoroughly. 3 Tip the potatoes into a large mixing bowl and gently stir in half the cream mixture, the chopped shallot, garlic, nutmeg, ¾ tsp salt and a little pepper. Arrange the potato slices in an overlapping pattern in the centre of the smaller circle of pastry, leaving a 2.5cm border clear around the edge. 4 Beat one of the egg yolks with 1 tsp cold water. Brush a little of the mixture around the edge of the pastry, lay the second larger circle of pastry over the top of the filling and press the edges together well to seal, pressing out any trapped air as you do so. Crimp the edges between your thumb and forefinger to give an attractive finish, then chill the pie for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 220°C/ 200°C fan/gas 7. 5 Brush the top of the pie with the remaining glaze, then, with the

tip of a sharp knife, score the pastry lightly into portion-sized sections and score a 2.5cm-wide circle in the centre of the lid. Bake in the centre of the oven for 20-25 minutes until puffed up and richly golden, then lower the temperature to 180°C/160°C fan/ gas 4. Cover the pie with a loose sheet of foil if it seems brown enough, then continue to bake for 10 minutes or until the potatoes feel tender when you pierce the centre of the pie with a skewer. 6 Gently warm the remaining cream in a small pan, remove from the heat and mix in the remaining egg yolks, the mixed herbs and ¼ tsp of salt. Take the pie out of the oven and turn the temperature back up to 220°C fan/200°C/gas 7. Cut out the scored circle from the centre of the pie and gently make a small gap between the potatoes and the underside of the pastry lid, using the handle of a teaspoon if necessary. Very slowly pour in the egg and herb cream, tilting the tray backwards and forwards to encourage the cream to filter into the filling. Do this slowly and carefully, as it might not all fit in. Replace the pastry circle. 7 Return the pie to the oven, cover with foil if you think it’s browning too quickly, then bake for a further 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, leave to cool for 5 minutes, then slice into wedges to serve. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 516kcals, 32.1g fat (16g saturated), 8.8g protein, 51.5g carbs, 3.6g sugar, 0.8g salt, 1.6g fibre


SPRING

GREAT FOR A CROWD

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Sage and white bean polpettine with cherry tomato sauce SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 1 HOUR 20 MIN, PLUS COOLING, CHILLING AND OVERNIGHT SOAKING

I cook my beans from scratch as I think they have a better flavour, but if you’re short on time use drained and rinsed tinned ones and skip step 1. You’ll need 600g, which is about 3 x 400g cans, drained. I like to serve the polpettine with steamed spinach. To make these patties vegetarian, leave out the pancetta and use a vegetarian alternative to pecorino. If you’re using tinned beans, boil them for 5 minutes. We liked this topped with a dollop of creamy, rindless goat’s cheese. FOOD TEAM’S TIPS

• 300g dried cannellini beans, soaked overnight (or see Debbie’s introduction and food team’s tips) • 5 tbsp olive oil • 1 small bunch fresh sage, plus 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh sage • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole, plus 2 large garlic cloves, crushed • 12 whole black peppercorns 16 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 40g thinly sliced pancetta, chopped (see food team’s tips) • 75g finely chopped shallots • 40g pecorino cheese, finely grated (see food team’s tips) • 1 tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley • Large pinch freshly grated nutmeg • 200g dried white breadcrumbs • 1 medium free-range egg, beaten • Steamed spinach to serve FOR THE CHERRY TOMATO SAUCE

• 2 x 400g tins peeled Italian cherry tomatoes • 4 tbsp good-quality olive oil • 8 large fresh sage leaves, finely shredded • 4 large garlic cloves, crushed 1 Drain the beans, tip into a pan and cover with 1.5 litres cold water. Add 2 tbsp of the olive oil, the bunch of sage, whole garlic cloves and black peppercorns. Bring to the boil, then leave to simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour until tender. Drain well, then discard the sage and black peppercorns, and season the beans to taste with a little salt. Leave to go cold. You can prepare these a few hours ahead of time. Or, if using drained and rinsed tinned beans (see Debbie’s intro and tip), continue as below. 2 Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a small

pan, then add the pancetta and fry gently until golden. Scoop out with a slotted spoon onto a plate. Add the shallots and crushed garlic to the pan and fry for 3-4 minutes, stirring now and then, until soft and lightly golden. Leave to go cold. 3 Put the cooked beans in a bowl and crush with a potato masher into a coarse paste. (You could also do this in a food processor using the pulse button if you wish, just don’t make the mixture too smooth.) Add the pancetta, shallot and garlic mixture, the cheese, parsley, chopped sage, nutmeg, 2 tbsp of the breadcrumbs and enough beaten egg to bind the mixture together (take care not to make the mixture too wet). Season to taste. 4 Divide the mixture into 12 pieces (about 70g each), roll each one into a ball, then flatten slightly into a 5cm wide patty. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with baking paper, cover with cling film and chill in the fridge for 2 hours or until firm. 5 To make the sauce, pour the tinned tomatoes into a sieve set over a bowl so the cherry tomatoes separate from the juice. Put the 4 tbsp good-quality olive oil, the sage leaves and garlic in a pan and set over a medium heat. As soon as it starts to sizzle, add the tomato juice and simmer, stirring now and then, until thickened (15-20 minutes). Stir in the tomatoes and simmer for 2 minutes or until heated through. Taste and season; keep hot. 6 Put the remaining breadcrumbs on a plate and coat the patties with them on both sides, pressing them on gently with your hands. Heat the remaining 2 tbsp olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Fry the patties for 3 minutes on each side or until crisp, golden and heated through. You may need to cook them in 2 batches, keeping the cooked ones warm in the oven while you fry the others. Serve with the tomato sauce and steamed spinach. PER SERVING 400kcals, 23.1g fat (4.9g saturated), 15.6g protein, 28.1g carbs (5.8g sugars), 0.6g salt, 8.9g fibre


SPRING Roast leg of lamb with wild garlic, feta and mint stuffing SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 45 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR 10-30 MIN, PLUS RESTING

I serve this with chunky potatoes roasted with garlic, lemon halves and dried oregano, and a greek salad, minus the feta. Tunnel-boning a leg of KNOW- lamb removes the main HOW bone while keeping the meat intact and leaves a hole that you can stuff. Leaving the shank bone in at the top of the joint means the stuffed leg keeps its shape and is easier to carve. Ask your butcher to tunnel-bone it for you. Fill the lamb leg with as FOOD TEAM’S much stuffing as you can TIP while still managing to secure the opening. Heat leftover stuffing to serve alongside, or use in a lasagne or to stuff ravioli.

for 2 minutes or until softened. 3 Meanwhile, finely slice the wild garlic or spinach leaves. Add them to the pan over a medium heat, a large handful at a time, wilting one lot before adding the next. When all the wild garlic/spinach has been wilted, cook for 1 minute, then tip into a colander and press out any excess liquid. Tip into a bowl, season and leave to cool. Stir in the dried oregano, chopped mint, feta and olive oil. 4 Stuff the lamb with the wild garlic and feta mix, then secure with 4 tiny skewers (or cocktail sticks) and string. With a sharp knife, make little slits all over. Slice the remaining garlic clove and poke 1-2 slices into each slit. Rub with olive oil and season well.

5 Put the joint in a roasting tin and roast for 20 minutes. Lower the oven temperature to 200°C/ 180°C fan/gas 6 for the rest of the cooking time. 6 Remove the lamb to a board, cover loosely with foil and leave to rest for 15 minutes. Drain the excess fat from the roasting tin, then put the tin over a medium heat and add the chicken stock. Simmer, scraping up any caramelised bits from the tin, until reduced and well flavoured. Season to taste if necessary. Carve the lamb and serve with the pan juices. PER SERVING 475kcals, 28.7g fat (13.1g saturated), 51.2g protein, 3.2g carbs (2.1g sugars), 1.6g salt, 2.1g fibre

• 2-2.5kg leg of British lamb, tunnel-boned, shank left in place (see Know-how) • 25g butter • 4 garlic cloves (plus 2 extra cloves if using spinach), crushed, plus 1 whole clove • 1 tsp fennel seeds, lightly crushed • 1 bunch spring onions, thinly sliced • 500g wild garlic leaves (or 500g mature spinach leaves), thick stalks already removed • 1 tsp dried oregano • 4 tbsp chopped fresh mint • 200g feta, crumbled • 1 tbsp olive oil, plus extra • 200ml good quality chicken stock 1 Heat the oven to 230°C/ 210°C fan/gas 8. Weigh the boned lamb leg and calculate the cooking time, allowing 18 minutes per 500g. This is for lamb that’s still slightly pink in the centre. 2 Melt the butter in a large pan over a low heat, add the crushed garlic and fennel seeds, then leave to sizzle for a few seconds. Add the spring onions, then cook

IMPRESSIVE LUNCH DISH

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Mussels with cider, tarragon and crème fraîche SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 5-8 MIN

Go for rope-grown mussels. They’re fat and juicy with clean shells, and all about the same size, so they’ll open at the same time. To clean mussels, scrub under cold running water. Remove any string-like ‘beards’ and discard any mussels that don’t close firmly when tapped. FOOD TEAM’S TIP

• 60g butter • 100g (about 5 large) finely chopped shallots • 2 garlic cloves, crushed

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• 1.75kg fresh mussels (see food team's tip), cleaned • 400ml dry cider • 200ml crème fraîche • Small bunch fresh tarragon, chopped, plus a few extra leaves • Crusty french bread to serve 1 Melt the butter in a very large pan with a lid over a low-medium heat. Add the shallots and garlic, cover and cook gently for 10 minutes until soft but not browned. 2 Turn up the heat to high, add the mussels and cider, then cover with the lid. Cook over a high heat for 4-5 minutes, shaking the pan every now and then or until all the mussels have opened (discard any that stay closed). 3 Lift the mussels out of the cooking liquid with a slotted spoon

and divide among 4 warmed serving bowls. Still over a high heat, boil the cooking liquid for 1-2 minutes (taste to check it first – if it’s salty and strongly flavoured, skip this step). 4 Stir in the crème fraîche, chopped tarragon and some seasoning to taste (you may not need any salt). Spoon all but the last few spoonfuls of the sauce back over the bowls of mussels – discard the remaining liquid as it often contains grit from the opened mussels. Garnish the bowls with the whole tarragon leaves and serve with plenty of crusty French bread. PER SERVING 506kcals, 40.1g fat (25.2g saturated), 24g protein, 5.4g carbs (4.6g sugars), 1.2g salt, 0.5g fibre


SPRING Blue cheese and sweet onion tart with watercress and walnuts SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 25 MIN, OVEN TIME 30 MIN, PLUS CHILLING

This tart is ideal for an early summer lunch with a chilled glass of white. • Plain flour for dusting • 320g sheet ready-to-roll all-butter puff pastry • Butter for greasing • 3 tbsp olive oil • 4 large onions, finely sliced • ½ tsp salt • 1 tsp granulated sugar • 200g creamy vegetarian-friendly blue cheese, thinly sliced • 30g watercress • 30g walnut pieces, lightly toasted 1 On a lightly floured surface, roll the pastry into a thin 30cm x 38cm rectangle. Carefully lift it onto a lightly buttered baking sheet, then prick all over with a fork. Chill in the fridge for at least 20 minutes. 2 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat, then add the onions and salt. Fry gently for 10 minutes, stirring now and then. Sprinkle over the sugar, then continue to cook, stirring as they become softer, allowing them to catch slightly on the base of the pan, until they are caramelised. Season to taste, then set aside. 3 Bake the pastry for 20 minutes. Remove, carefully flip, then bake for a further 5 minutes. Remove the tray from the oven, flip the pastry back over and set it aside for a few minutes until it deflates. 4 Spread the pastry base with the onions, leaving a 2-3cm border around the edges. Top with the cheese, then bake for 5 minutes until the cheese has just melted. 5 Remove the tart from the oven and slide it onto a wooden board. Scatter over the watercress and toasted walnuts, then slice the tart and serve straightaway, while the pastry is still warm and crisp. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 532kcals, 35g fat (17g saturated), 13.9g protein, 40.1g carbs (9.1g sugars), 2.4g salt, 2.9g fibre

GREAT FOR A CROWD

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SPEAR GENIUS

Although the UK asparagus season is short, you can usually find British asparagus from mid April and it really hits its stride in May, depending on the weather of course...

Asparagus and gruyère soufflés MAKES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 20-25 MIN

These soufflés are also

DEBBIE’S great made with a fresh, TIP

soft goat’s cheese, topped with grated hard goat’s cheese. • 50g butter • 100g rindless gruyère, or vegetarian alternative, finely grated • 500g thin asparagus spears • 200ml whole milk • 25g plain flour • 3 medium free-range eggs, separated YOU WILL ALSO NEED

• 6 x 250-300ml oval or round ovenproof baking dishes 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. Melt the butter in a small pan and use a little of it to brush inside 6 x 250-300ml ovenproof baking dishes. Sprinkle a little of the grated cheese into each dish and tip on its side, turning them to coat the insides with the cheese. Put the coated 20 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

dishes in a baking tray. 2 Cut or snap off (and discard) the woody ends from each asparagus spear – you should be left with about 300g. Cut the remainder into 5cm lengths, keeping the tips separate from the stalks. Drop the stalks into a pan of boiling salted water and cook for 6-8 minutes until tender. Remove with a slotted spoon and refresh under cold water. Drop the tips into the boiling water and cook for 2-3 minutes until just tender, then drain and refresh. Dry all the asparagus on kitchen paper, then whizz the stalks only in a food processor into a smooth purée. Season lightly, and set aside. 3 Warm the milk in a small pan until just above blood temperature. Reheat the rest of the melted butter and when it is bubbling hot, stir in the flour and leave it to cook gently for about 30 seconds. Take the pan off the heat and gradually beat in the warm milk with a wooden spoon (or a whisk) until the mixture is smooth. Return the pan to the heat and bring to the boil, stirring constantly. Lower the heat and simmer gently for 3-4 minutes,

stirring frequently. 4 Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the egg yolks, followed by three quarters of the remaining grated cheese and the asparagus purée. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 5 In a large, clean and dry mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites to soft peaks (as you lift out the beaters, you’ll create peaks that will droop over to one side at the very top). Vigorously stir a large spoonful of the beaten egg white into the sauce to loosen it slightly, then very gently fold in the remainder with a metal spoon or balloon whisk, using a figure of eight motion. When mixed, spoon the mixture equally into the prepared dishes, filling them to within 2.5cm of the top, then push the reserved asparagus tips gently into the top of the mixture. Sprinkle lightly with the remaining grated cheese. 6 Bake for 20-25 minutes until puffed up, golden and just cooked through. Serve straightaway. PER SERVING 231kcals, 17.6g fat (9.6g saturated), 12.3g protein, 6.1g carbs (3g sugars), 0.6g salt, 2.1g fibre


SPRING

SMART FOR A CROWD

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Asparagus tempura with green herb and garlic sauce SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN

These make a fantastic springtime starter or light lunch dish. FOR THE TEMPURA BATTER

• 2 litres flavourless oil (such as sunflower) for deep-frying • 50g plain flour • 50g cornflour • 175ml ice-cold fresh soda water • 800g thin asparagus spears FOR THE GREEN HERB AND GARLIC SAUCE

• 2 tbsp soured cream or crème fraîche • 4 tbsp good-quality olive oil mayonnaise • 2 tbsp full-fat natural yogurt or Greek yogurt • 1-2 small garlic cloves, crushed

• 25g mixed fresh herbs such as tarragon, chives, basil and parsley, plus extra chopped fresh herbs to serve • 1 tsp lemon juice YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• Digital probe thermometer 1 For the green herb and garlic sauce, whizz all the ingredients in a mini food processor or jug with a stick blender. Taste and season, then spoon into one large bowl or 4 small bowls and chill. 2 For the tempura batter, in a large pan heat the oil for deepfrying to 190°C, using the digital probe thermometer to test. Make the batter by sifting the flour, cornflour and a small pinch of salt into a mixing bowl. Scoop 3 tbsp into a small bowl. Quickly stir the soda water into the remainder, with a fork or chopsticks, until

only just mixed in but still a bit lumpy, then sprinkle the reserved flour on top. This will create a few extra lumps in the batter as you dip, which helps give a light, crisp batter. 3 Cut or snap off and discard the woody ends from each asparagus spear, then cut the spears in half lengthways. Drop the spears into the batter, about 5 at a time, (don’t worry if one or two touch and stick together, but don’t let them all stick together in one lump). Lift them out using 2 forks, then quickly drop them into the hot oil. Deep-fry for 1½ minutes until crisp and very lightly golden, then remove the spears with a slotted spoon and drain briefly on plenty of kitchen paper. 4 Pile the asparagus onto warm plates, sprinkle with the chopped herbs and lemon juice and serve straightaway, with the green herb and garlic sauce for dipping. PER SERVING 414kcals, 31.1g fat (5g saturated), 8.1g protein, 25.6g carbs (4.8g sugars), 0.5g salt, 5.1g fibre

Poached chicken with spring vegetables and pistou SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 1½ HOURS

This is a beautifully light spring dish. Serve with crusty fresh bread if you wish. Make to the end of step 2. MAKE Let the stock and chicken AHEAD cool. Cover and chill overnight. Reheat until piping hot, then continue from step 3. • 2kg British free-range chicken • 1 large carrot, sliced • 1 leek, sliced • 1 large celery stick, sliced • Bouquet garni (fresh bay leaves, thyme and parsley, tied together) • 75g broken spaghetti or small soup-size pasta shapes • 400g tin haricot or cannellini beans, drained and rinsed FOR THE SPRING VEGETABLES

• 500g baby new potatoes • 150g baby fennel, trimmed and halved lengthways 22 deliciousmagazine.co.uk


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• 150g baby carrots, trimmed • 150g celery, cut into 10cm lengths • 150g baby leeks, trimmed • 150g asparagus tips • 150g shelled baby peas FOR THE PISTOU

• 50g fresh basil leaves • 2-3 fat garlic cloves, crushed • 1 semi-dried tomato, finely chopped (use a fresh tomato when in season ) • 75g finely grated parmesan, plus extra to serve • 80ml good-quality olive oil 1 Remove any giblets from the chicken and freeze for stock. Put the chicken into a deep pan. Cover with cold water and add the carrot, leek, celery, bouquet garni and

1 tsp salt. Bring to the boil and skim off any scum on the surface, then cover and simmer gently for 40 minutes, turning the chicken halfway through. Turn off the heat and leave to cool. 2 Lift the chicken onto a plate. Strain the stock, discard the flavourings, then return the stock to the pan. Boil for 10-20 minutes until the stock has reduced to about 1.5 litres. 3 Meanwhile, remove the skin from the chicken (discard) and cut it neatly into 8 joints (don’t worry if it falls apart a little). Cover with cling film and set aside. For the pistou, put the basil, garlic, tomato and the grated parmesan into a food processor and whizz, then, with the motor running, slowly add the oil to make a pesto-like

mixture. Scoop into a bowl and season with salt and pepper. 4 Add the new potatoes to the stock and simmer for 5 minutes, then add the pasta and white beans and simmer for 2 minutes more. Add the fennel, carrots and celery for 5 minutes, then the leeks for 3 minutes, then the asparagus and peas for 2-3 minutes. 5 Return the chicken pieces to the pan and leave for 3-4 minutes to heat through. Stir in half the pistou, then ladle the chicken and vegetables into warmed shallow bowls. Serve with the remaining pistou dolloped on top, with extra grated parmesan. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 566kcals, 19.6g fat (5.5g saturated), 62.3g protein, 35.7g carbs (6g sugars), 0.8g salt, 10g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 23


Warm broad bean and crisp bacon salad SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN

This salad makes a lovely summertime starter. Serve with hunks of crusty bread if you like. • 500g podded broad beans • 150g rindless, smoked, dry-cured streaky bacon • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus 1 tsp and extra to serve • 1 fat garlic clove, finely chopped • 50g (1-2) shallots, finely chopped • 1 tbsp lemon juice

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• 2 tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley or mint • Sea salt flakes 1 Drop the beans into a pan of well-salted boiling water and cook for 5 minutes or until just tender. Drain and, when cool enough to handle, nick the skin of each one with your fingernail and pop out the bright green beans. 2 Cut the bacon rashers across into thin strips (about 2cm). Heat the 1 tsp of oil in a large frying pan, add the bacon and stir-fry over a high heat for about 3 minutes until crisp and golden. Tip onto a plate lined with kitchen paper and set aside.

3 Add the 3 tbsp oil and the garlic to the pan and put over a medium heat. As soon as the garlic is sizzling (but not browned), turn down the heat, add the shallots, and soften for 3-4 minutes. Add the beans, stirring, for 2 minutes. 4 Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the lemon juice, most of the crisp bacon, the parsley or mint and some seasoning to taste. Spoon onto a serving plate, drizzle over a little more oil, then scatter over the remaining bacon and a few sea salt flakes to serve. PER SERVING 275kcals, 20.2g fat (4.6g saturated), 13.5g protein, 10.4g carbs (2.4g sugars), 1.2g salt, 10.9g fibre


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CLASSIC WITH A TWIST

Florentine shortbread fingers MAKES 12 BISCUITS. HANDS-ON TIME 25 MIN, OVEN TIME 55 MIN

These buttery shortbreads have a fruity, nutty, slightly chewy florentine topping. The shortbread will keep MAKE for up to 1 week, stored in AHEAD a sealed container. If you don’t like candied FOOD TEAM’S peel, substitute very finely TIP chopped dried apricots. FOR THE SHORTBREAD

• 200g plain flour • 100g semolina • 100g caster sugar • 200g unsalted butter, cut into small pieces FOR THE FLORENTINE TOPPING

• 25g unsalted butter

• 75g golden caster sugar • 30g liquid glucose syrup (such as Dr Oetker, from the baking section of supermarkets) • 4 tbsp double cream • 1 tbsp plain flour • Finely grated zest 1 large orange • 100g flaked almonds, toasted • 50g dried cranberries • 50g chopped candied peel YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 20cm square cake tin lined with non-stick baking paper 1 Heat the oven to 160°C/140°C fan/gas 3. For the shortbread, put the flour, semolina and caster sugar into a food processor and whizz briefly. Add the butter and process until the ingredients start to stick together. 2 Tip the shortbread mixture into the prepared tin and press it down with the back of a spoon. Prick with

a fork, then bake for 35 minutes or until a pale biscuit colour. Remove from the oven, then turn the oven up to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. 3 For the florentine topping, put the butter, sugar, glucose syrup and cream into a medium heavy-based pan and stir over a low heat until the sugar has melted. Bring to the boil, cook for 1 minute, then remove from the heat and stir in the flour, a pinch of salt, the orange zest, almonds, cranberries and peel. Pour the mixture on top of the shortbread and spread it out evenly. Bake for 20 minutes or until the topping is golden brown and bubbling. 4 Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Remove the shortbread and cut into 12 thin fingers. PER BISCUIT 405kcals, 23.2g fat (12g saturated), 5.1g protein, 43.3g carbs (20.8g sugars), 0.1g salt, 1.4g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 25


IN THE PINK

The slender stalks of young field rhubarb signal the imminent arrival of spring. This delicate crop has a superior flavour to the tougher stalks in season later in the year.

Slow-roast rhubarb with pistachio cake SERVES 10-12. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, OVEN TIME 2 HOURS 30 MIN, PLUS COOLING

What a magical way of cooking rhubarb… The pieces stay beautifully intact instead of disintegrating into mush and the pink colour becomes gorgeously enhanced. You can serve the cake and the roasted rhubarb warm if you like, or leave them to cool first. If serving warm, gently heat the rhubarb in the hot oven just before serving. Make the pistachio cake MAKE up to 2 days in advance AHEAD and keep well wrapped somewhere cool, or freeze for up to 1 month, well wrapped in cling film and foil. If you’re short on time, you FOOD TEAM’S can add the pistachios TIP without boiling and skinning them. This means you’ll have a slightly more textured but equally wonderful cake. You can also find nibbed pistachios, which are already skinned, in some Middle Eastern shops. They’re bright green and make beautiful decorations for cakes and other desserts. They freeze well so it’s worth stocking up. FOR THE SLOW-ROASTED RHUBARB

• 800g rhubarb (untrimmed weight) • 1 large orange • 250g caster sugar 26 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

FOR THE CAKE

• 200g shelled unsalted pistachios • 100g plain flour • 1 tsp baking powder • 100g ground almonds • 3 large free-range eggs • 250g caster sugar • Finely grated zest 1 large orange • ½-1 tsp rosewater • 125ml extra-virgin olive oil • 100g lightly salted butter, melted and cooled • Icing sugar for dusting TO SERVE

• Good-quality pistachio ice cream YOU'LL ALSO NEED…

• 23cm loose-bottomed cake tin lined with non-stick baking paper 1 For the slow-roasted rhubarb, heat the oven to 110°C/90°C fan/ gas ¼. Wipe the rhubarb stalks clean, trim off the ends and cut into 5cm long pieces. Peel 3 wide strips of zest from the orange and cut them across into pine needlelike shreds, then squeeze the juice from the orange. 2 Arrange the rhubarb pieces in a large shallow roasting tray and scatter over the orange zest and sugar. Pour over the orange juice. Cover the tin tightly with foil and bake for 1½ hours. Remove from the oven, uncover and carefully pour the released juices into a pan. Boil rapidly for 5-6 minutes until slightly reduced. Cool, then pour back over the rhubarb. Chill

if you wish (see Debbie's intro). 3 For the cake, turn up the oven to 160°C/140°C fan/gas 3. Put the pistachios into a pan of boiling water and simmer for 8 minutes. Drain, then wrap in a clean tea towel and rub to loosen the skins. Pick out the pistachios, picking off any stubborn pieces of skin. Spread on a baking tray and bake for 10-12 minutes until dry but not browned. Cool, then grind in a food processor until quite fine. Add the flour and baking powder and grind to an even finer mixture. Stir in the ground almonds. 4 Put the eggs and sugar in a large bowl and whisk with an electric mixer for 5-7 minutes until thick and moussey. Whisk in the orange zest and rosewater. Reduce the speed and slowly drizzle in the oil, then the melted butter, around the edge of the mixture, waiting for each addition to be mixed in before adding the next. Retain as much volume as you can in the mix. 5 Gently fold in the ground pistachio mixture with a metal spoon, then pour into the prepared tin and lightly level the top. Bake for 50 minutes or until a skewer pushed into the middle comes out clean. Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then remove and leave to cool on a wire rack if you wish (see introduction). Dust lightly with icing sugar, cut into slices and serve with the rhubarb and scoops of pistachio ice cream. PER SERVING (FOR 12) 427kcals, 28.9g fat (7.3g saturated), 9g protein, 30.6g carbs (24.2g sugars), 0.3g salt, 1.6g fibre


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Pan-fried dover sole with caper, lemon and parsley butter sauce, p48

GREAT FOR A CROWD

Jaffa cake tea loaf SERVES 10-12. HANDS-ON TIME 25 MIN, OVEN TIME 55-65 MIN, PLUS COOLING

This loaf has that wonderful combination of sponge, dark chocolate and orange. The loaf will keep well MAKE for 3-4 days in a sealed AHEAD container. Wrap in cling film and foil, then freeze for up to 1 month. Defrost to serve. To stop the loaf browning DEBBIE’S too much, wrap 2-3 TIPS sheets of folded newspaper around the outside of the tin to form a raised collar in step 1. Secure with string. For extra orangey loveliness, heat 3 tbsp marmalade with 1 tbsp orange juice and brush over the top of the warm loaf after baking. 28 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 175g lightly salted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing • 175g caster sugar • Finely grated zest 1 large orange • 3 large free-range eggs • 200g self-raising flour • 50g ground almonds • 3 tbsp thick-cut marmalade • 50g dark chocolate chips YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 11cm x 21cm loaf tin, greased and lined with non-stick baking paper, then wrapped in newspaper (see Debbie's tips) 1 Heat the oven to 170°C/150°C fan/gas 3. Beat the butter and sugar with an electric mixer for 5 minutes (or with a wooden spoon) until light and fluffy.

2 Beat in the orange zest, then beat in the eggs one at a time, adding 1 tbsp flour with the last egg. Sift over and fold in the rest of the flour, a pinch of salt, almonds, marmalade and chocolate chips using a metal spoon. 3 Spoon the mixture into the prepared loaf tin and level the top. Bake for 40-45 minutes until nicely browned, then cover loosely with a sheet of foil and bake for another 15-20 minutes until a skewer pushed into the centre comes out clean. 4 Leave in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack. Peel off the baking paper. Leave to cool before slicing. PER SERVING (FOR 12) 303kcals, 17.7g fat (9.3g saturated), 4.8g protein, 31.9g carbs (19.9g sugars), 0.3g salt, 0.8g fibre


SPRING Cinnamon, fruit and almond cruffins MAKES 12. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, OVEN TIME 17-20 MIN

Created in San Francisco at the famous Mr Holmes Bakehouse, a cruffin is a muffin made with croissant dough. I’ve used a readymade croissant dough for ease, and filled the cruffins with an almond frangipane and mixed dried fruit. Use any dried fruit you fancy – apricots, soft figs, candied peel, sour cherries, blueberries, sultanas, currants or raisins – as long as you cut them into sultana-size pieces. A few chopped walnuts or pecans stirred in would also be good.

lightly floured surface. Ignore the diagonal lines and cut each strip of dough along the horizontal perforated lines, to make 3 rectangles from each piece of croissant dough (6 in total). 3 Divide the frangipane evenly among the pieces of dough and spread it out, leaving a 1cm border around the edges. Sprinkle over the dried fruit and lightly dust with the ground cinnamon. 4 Take one rectangle of dough and, starting with a long edge, tightly roll it up as you would a swiss roll. Cut each roll of dough lengthways in half and put each piece cut-side up on the work surface. Take one end and roll it

up into a rose-shaped spiral, keeping it cut-side up, then put into the muffin tin. Repeat with the remaining dough, then brush the tops with the apricot jam. 5 When all of the cruffins have been shaped, bake for 17-20 minutes until richly golden and puffed. If they look as though they’re browning too fast, cover them loosely with a double sheet of non-stick baking paper. 6 Put the cruffins on a wire rack to cool slightly. Brush with a little more apricot jam and serve warm. PER CRUFFIN 477kcals, 24.9g fat (11.6g saturated), 8.5g protein, 53g carbs (34.9g sugars), 1g salt, 3.2g fibre

Shape the cruffins the MAKE night before, if you wish. AHEAD Slide the muffin tray into a large plastic bag (or wrap in cling film) and chill overnight. Bake the next day from step 5. For an orangey flavour, NEXT swap the apricot jam for TIME no-peel marmalade. • 100g softened unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing • 100g icing sugar • 1 large free-range egg, beaten • 100g ground almonds • 25g plain flour, plus extra to dust • 2 x 350g packs fresh croissant dough (I used Jus-Rol ReadyTo-Bake Croissants • 200g dried apricots, chopped • 100g raisins • 1 tsp ground cinnamon • 150g apricot jam • 1 tbsp icing sugar for dusting YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 12-hole muffin tin 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Lightly grease a 12-hole muffin tin with butter. For the frangipane, beat the butter and icing sugar together in a mixing bowl until pale and creamy, then gradually beat in the egg. Fold in the almonds and flour. Set aside. 2 Break open the 2 tubes of croissant dough and unroll onto a deliciousmagazine.co.uk 29


Whisky and pistachio simnel cake SERVES 14. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR, OVEN TIME 2¼-2½ HOURS, PLUS OVERNIGHT SOAKING AND COOLING

In days gone by, girls who worked in service in big wealthy households gave simnel cakes to their mothers on Mothering Sunday. The cake is usually decorated with 11 marzipan balls, which represent Jesus’s faithful disciples (there’s no Judas Iscariot – the betrayer). Sometimes cakes would also have a marzipan ball in the centre to represent Jesus. Make the marzipan up to a MAKE week ahead and store, AHEAD wrapped in cling film, until needed. Make the cake up to a week ahead and keep in a sealed container. Decorate with the marzipan up to 24 hours before serving. To ensure that the layer of DEBBIE’S marzipan runs through TIP the centre of the cake, weigh the finished cake mixture first, then spoon exactly half of it into the base of the prepared cake tin at step 5. Use the best pistachios FOOD TEAM’S you can get, such as TIPS Iranian green skinless pistachios from souschef.co.uk or ottolenghi.co.uk. If using shopbought shelled pistachios, you need to blanch and dry them first. Heat the oven to 150°C/130°C fan/ gas 2. Simmer the pistachios in boiling water for 8 minutes. Drain, tip onto a clean tea towel and rub to remove the skins. Pick off any stubborn pieces of skin, then dry in the oven on a baking tray for 10 minutes (don’t let them brown). • 400g mixed dried fruits (such as sultanas, raisins and currants) • 50g mixed chopped candied peel • 125g natural coloured glacé cherries, quartered • Finely grated zest 1 large orange • Finely grated zest 1 lemon • 100ml whisky • 225g self-raising flour • 2 tsp ground mixed spice 30 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 200g unsalted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing • 225g light muscovado sugar • 4 medium free-range eggs • 3 tbsp whole milk • 2 tbsp no-peel marmalade, warmed • Caster sugar to sprinkle FOR THE MARZIPAN

• 400g skinless pistachios (see food team's tips) • 300g icing sugar, sifted, plus extra to dust • 2 medium free-range egg whites YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• Deep 20cm loose-bottomed round cake tin, greased and lined with non-stick baking paper; a ribbon (optional) 1 The day before, put the mixed dried fruits, candied peel, glacé cherries, both zests and whisky into a bowl. Stir to mix, then cover with cling film and set aside somewhere cool overnight. 2 The next day, heat the oven to 150°C/130°C fan/gas 2. Put a folded newspaper or piece of non-stick baking paper onto a baking sheet. Tie a thick band of paper around the outside of the tin and sit it on top of the paper on the tray. (This will help to prevent the outside of the cake from overbrowning.) 3 To make the marzipan, put the pistachios into a food processor and whizz until finely ground. Add the icing sugar and whizz once more, then tip into a mixing bowl. Lightly whisk one of the egg whites with a fork, stir it into the ground pistachios, then knead the mixture using your hands until it comes together in a ball. If it’s crumbly, whisk the second egg white and add more, a little at a time, until the marzipan binds and is malleable. Turn out onto a surface lightly dusted with icing sugar and knead until smooth. Divide into 3 even pieces and wrap each in cling film. 4 For the cake, sift the flour, mixed spice and a pinch of fine salt into a mixing bowl. Using an electric hand whisk, cream the butter and sugar for 5 minutes until it

becomes lighter in colour and texture. Beat in 2 of the eggs, one at a time, beating for about 1 minute between each addition. Beat in the remaining eggs, one at a time, along with 1 tbsp of the sifted flour mixture to stop curdling. Gently fold in the remaining flour mixture, followed by the whisky-soaked fruit and the milk. 5 Spoon half the cake mixture into the cake tin (see Debbie's tip) and level the surface with the back of a spoon. Using a rolling pin lightly dusted with icing sugar, roll out one piece of the marzipan into a 20cm disc (use another 20cm tin base as a guide and trim to fit). Lay it on top of the cake mixture. Press down gently, then pour over the rest of the cake mixture. Lightly level the top, then make a shallow dip in the centre (to help to give the cake a flatter top). 6 Bake for 2¼-2½ hours, covering with a loose folded sheet of non-stick baking paper once the cake has browned. The cake is done when a skewer pushed into the centre comes out clean. Leave the cake to cool in the tin for 1 hour, then remove and leave on a wire rack to cool. 7 To decorate, invert the cake onto a serving plate or cake stand. Roll out another of the marzipan pieces and use the cake tin as a template to cut out a 20cm disc. Brush the top of the cake with some warmed marmalade, then lay the marzipan on top. Using the edge of a cleaned ruler, indent the top of the marzipan with parallel lines spaced 1cm apart, going one way, then the other, slightly on an angle, to produce a diamond grid. Sprinkle with caster sugar. 8 Shape the remaining marzipan into 12 small, even-size balls, then roll them in some caster sugar. Dot the underside of each one with a little more marmalade. Space 11 of the balls evenly around the outside of the cake and put one into the centre. 9 To finish the cake, tie a ribbon around the outside, if you like. PER SERVING 624kcals, 27.3g fat (9.9g saturated), 11.1g protein, 78.8g carbs (59.1g sugars), 0.3g salt, 1.8g fibre


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CLASSIC EASTER BAKE

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CHEESE CAKE

Traditional ricotta (Italian for ‘re-cooked’) is made by reheating the whey left over from making cheese with a little citric acid, which turns the protein into small clumps.

Italian sultana and ricotta torte SERVES 12. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR 35 MIN, PLUS COOLING

This lemony torte, studded with plump, juicy sultanas, is best served warm or at room temperature rather than chilled from the fridge. Make the torte up to 24 MAKE hours in advance. Keep AHEAD covered in the fridge; bring up to room temperature to serve. For a more decadent DEBBIE’S torte, soak the sultanas TIP in warmed marsala, madeira, vin santo or sweet sherry (step 1). FOR THE BASE

• 175g plain flour, plus extra to dust • 75g semolina • 175g chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces, plus extra for greasing • 75g caster sugar FOR THE RICOTTA TOPPING

• 100g good quality sultanas • 225g caster sugar • 90g unsalted butter, at room temperature • 4 large free-range eggs, at room temperature • 4½ tbsp cornflour • Scant 1 tsp baking powder 32 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• ¼ tsp salt • 750g fresh ricotta • Finely grated zest 1 large unwaxed lemon • 15g flaked almonds • Icing sugar to dust YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 23cm springform cake tin, lightly greased with butter 1 For the ricotta topping, put the sultanas in a small, heatproof bowl, cover with boiling water, then set aside to soak (see tip). 2 Meanwhile make the base. Heat the oven to 160°C/140°C fan/ gas 3. Put the flour and semolina in a food processor, add the butter and process briefly until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Add the 75g sugar and blend using the pulse button until the mixture starts to stick together in small clumps. 3 Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead lightly until smooth. Shape into a ball, then roll out into a 23cm disc. Put the disc in the greased tin and prick here and there with a fork. Bake for about 35 minutes until a pale biscuit-brown. Remove and set aside to cool slightly. Turn up the oven to 180°C/ 160°C fan/gas 4. 4 For the topping, drain the sultanas and spread out to dry on kitchen paper. Spoon out 3 tbsp of the 225g caster sugar into a bowl. In another mixing bowl, beat the

butter and remaining caster sugar with an electric mixer until combined. It won’t go pale and fluffy because of the high proportion of sugar. Crack in one of the eggs and beat once more until the mixture is light, pale and creamy. Beat in 2 more of the eggs. Separate the last egg and beat in the egg yolk. Reserve the egg white. 5 Sift over the cornflour, baking powder and salt, then fold in using a large metal spoon along with the ricotta, lemon zest and sultanas. Finally, whisk the egg white to soft peaks in a mixing bowl, then gently fold in using a large metal spoon. 6 Grease the sides of the tin with a little more butter and coat them with the reserved 3 tbsp caster sugar. Pour the ricotta topping mixture on top of the base in the tin, then scatter over the flaked almonds. Bake for 1 hour until the torte has puffed up, is firm to the touch and has started to shrink away from the sides of the tin. Remove from the oven and leave to cool in the tin. 7 Carefully remove the torte from the tin. To serve, lightly dust the top with icing sugar. Serve warm or at room temperature, cut into slices. PER SERVING 514kcals, 28.2g fat (16.6g saturated), 11.6g protein, 52.8g carbs (32g sugars), 0.4g salt, 1g fibre


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Summer Sunny days (and heavy showers!) bring a surfeit of brilliant produce:

sunburst tomatoes, salad leaves, sweetcorn, courgettes‌ Fresh herbs, sprinkled like fairy dust, make everyday food taste magical. Picnics and meaty barbecues are planned with salads that brim with

kaleidoscope flavours. The best of British berries and cherries, warmed by the sun, refresh and delight in desserts and cakes


This season, enjoy…

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GOOSEBERRIES • TOMATOES • BLUEBERRIES


RASPBERRIES • STRAWBERRIES • SUMMER HERBS • CHERRIES • COURGETTES

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Barbecued fillet of beef with horseradish butter and chunky potato gratin SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR 25 MIN, BARBECUE TIME 10-30 MIN (DEPENDING ON FINISH), PLUS MARINATING AND RESTING

Roast beef and horseradish is a classic combo. Serve this with a simple tomato, red onion and mixed leaf salad. It’s perfect summer fare. If the weather is bad you DEBBIE’S can cook the fillet in the TIPS oven. Sear it in step 6 on the hob in a heavy-based frying pan with a little vegetable oil, then transfer to an oven heated to 38 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

200°C/180°C fan/gas 6 and cook for 25 minutes (for medium-rare). • 1.2kg British beef fillet, cut from the fatter end of the fillet • 1 tsp sea salt flakes • 1 tsp coarsely ground black pepper • 1 tsp dried thyme • ½ tsp dried sage • Olive oil for coating

FOR THE CHUNKY POTATO GRATIN

• Butter for greasing • 1kg evenly sized floury potatoes such as king edward • 300ml whole milk • 300ml double cream • 1 tbsp picked fresh thyme leaves • 100g mature cheddar, grated ALSO USEFUL

• Digital probe thermometer FOR THE HORSERADISH BUTTER

• 50g lightly salted butter, at room temperature • 1 small garlic clove, crushed • 1 tbsp finely grated fresh horseradish • 2 tsp finely chopped fresh chives

1 Trim and discard any fat and sinew from the fillet. If your fillet is thinner at one end, neatly fold the end under itself to form an even thickness, then tie up with kitchen string at 3cm intervals. 2 In a bowl, mix the salt, pepper


SUMMER

and dried herbs together. Lightly coat the fillet in olive oil, then rub it all over with the herb mix. Set aside at room temperature for 30-60 minutes. 3 For the horseradish butter, beat the butter in a bowl until soft, then mix in the garlic, horseradish, chives and seasoning. Spoon into a bowl and set aside somewhere cool, but not in the fridge. 4 Heat the barbecue to a high heat: 30-40 minutes in advance for charcoal, 10 minutes for gas. 5 Meanwhile, prepare the gratin. Butter a 2 litre baking dish and heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/ gas 4. Cut the potatoes into ½cm slices. Bring the milk and cream to the boil in a large saucepan and season to taste before it gets too hot. Stir in the thyme leaves and potatoes, then simmer gently for around 10 minutes, carefully turning now and then, until just tender when pierced with the point of a knife. Tip into the dish, shake to level, then sprinkle with the cheese. Bake the gratin for 30-35 minutes until richly golden and bubbling hot. 6 Put the beef fillet on the barbecue directly over a high heat and sear for 15 minutes, turning every 3-4 minutes, or until browned all over. Re-arrange the coals/turn off the middle gas burner and lower the gas heat to medium. 7 Put the fillet over the indirect heat, cover with the barbecue lid, then cook, turning once halfway through, until it reaches your desired finish: 10-15 minutes for medium-rare (the internal temperature should be 52-55°C when tested with a thermometer); 25-30 minutes for medium to well done (60-65°C). 8 Put the beef on a carving board, cover loosely with foil, then leave to rest for 5-10 minutes. Remove the gratin and leave to rest also. 9 Uncover the beef fillet, then snip and remove the string. Carve the meat into 1cm-thick slices, then serve with small spoons of the horseradish butter, the chunky potato gratin and salads. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 661kcals, 43.5g fat (24.3g saturated), 39.6g protein, 26.2g carbs (3.4g sugars), 1.2g salt, 3.1g fibre

Roast beetroot, egg and caper salad with dill and horseradish vinaigrette SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 25 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR, PLUS COOLING

Vegetable salads, flavoured with dill and garnished with hardboiled eggs, are popular all over Scandinavia. Prepare up to 2 hours MAKE ahead and keep, covered, AHEAD in the fridge until needed. This salad would work FOOD TEAM’S well served with oily fish TIP such as grilled mackerel. • 1kg medium-size fresh beetroot, peeled and cut into 2cm dice • 1 tbsp olive oil • 1 tbsp small capers, rinsed and drained, plus extra to garnish • ½ small bunch fresh dill, roughly chopped, plus extra to garnish • 4 tsp red wine vinegar

• 1-2 tbsp finely grated fresh horseradish, to taste • ¼ tsp caster sugar • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • 3 hardboiled eggs, chopped into 1cm pieces 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. Toss together the diced beetroot, olive oil and seasoning in a roasting tin, cover with foil, then roast for 1 hour or until tender. Remove and leave to cool. 2 Put the cooked beetroot into a bowl with the rinsed capers and chopped dill, then toss together. 3 Whisk the red wine vinegar, grated horseradish, sugar, extravirgin olive oil and seasoning together. Stir into the beetroot. Add the chopped eggs, mix gently, then set aside if you are not eating straightaway (see Make Ahead). 4 Spoon the beetroot salad onto a serving plate, then sprinkle with the capers and dill to serve. PER SERVING 149kcals, 6.8g fat (1.4g saturated), 7.3g protein, 12.5g carbs (11.4g sugars), 0.4g salt, 4.4g fibre

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Heritage tomato salad with air-dried ham, melon and mozzarella SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 15 MIN

FOR THE DRESSING

• 1 tbsp lemon juice • Pinch caster sugar • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

Pizza bianca with goat’s cheese, courgettes and black olives MAKES 2 LARGE PIZZAS (SERVES 4-6). HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR 30 MIN,

This is a sublime mix of contrasting tastes and textures: salty, sweet, sharp, smooth, crunchy and soft. • 450g mixed heritage-style tomatoes (red, yellow, green and striped) • ½ ripe orange-fleshed melon, such as charentais or canteloupe • ½ cucumber, peeled, halved lengthways and thickly sliced • Small bunch fresh mint, shredded • 2 x 125g buffalo mozzarella balls, drained well, torn into small pieces • 12 thin slices air-dried Cumbrian ham, torn into strips (or use prosciutto or serrano ham) • 30g rocket

1 In a small bowl, whisk together the ingredients for the dressing with salt and pepper to taste. 2 Cut the tomatoes into wedges (or halves if small) and put in a mixing bowl. Cut the melon into 4 wedges, then scoop out the seeds with a spoon and discard. Remove the melon flesh and slice thinly. Add to the tomatoes with the cucumber, mint, 8 tsp of the dressing and a little more seasoning to taste. 3 Spoon the tomato mixture onto a serving platter or individual plates and tuck in the mozzarella pieces and ham strips. Scatter over the rocket, drizzle with the remaining dressing, then serve. PER SERVING 346kcals, 25.3g fat (11.2g saturated), 21.7g protein, 8g carbs (7.7g sugars), 2.2g salt, 3g fibre

OVEN TIME 40 MIN

Pizza bianca, or white pizza, is made without tomato sauce. In my version the base is spread with a creamy cheese mixture. I’ve used a smooth goat’s cheese, topped with ribbons of seasonal courgettes and black olives, which both go well with melted slices of Ticklemore Harbourne Blue. Other vegetables such as cooked artichoke hearts, spinach or asparagus would work well too. Scoop the leftover pesto

DEBBIE’S into a small sterilised TIP

glass jar, float a thin layer of olive oil on top and seal. It will keep in the fridge for a week or two. Otherwise, freeze in ice cube trays. Leave the pizzas to cool FOOD TEAM’S slightly when you remove TIP them from the oven. The base will firm up slightly and be easier to slice. FOR THE PIZZA DOUGH

• 275g strong plain white flour, plus extra for dusting • ½ tsp salt • 2 tsp easy blend yeast or 7g sachet fast-action yeast • 180-190ml warm water • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for brushing FOR THE PESTO

• 40g fresh basil leaves • 25g pine nuts • 1 garlic clove, crushed • 4 tbsp olive oil • 25g finely grated parmesan, or vegetarian alternative FOR THE TOPPING

• 2 medium red onions • 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • 200g soft, fresh rindless goat’s cheese • 1 garlic clove, crushed • 50g finely grated parmesan, or vegetarian alternative 40 deliciousmagazine.co.uk


SUMMER

• About 2 tbsp whole milk • 2 medium courgettes • 2 sprigs fresh oregano, leaves picked and finely chopped • 150g Harbourne Blue cheese, cut into thin slices • 20 good quality black olives, pitted 1 For the pizza dough, put the flour, salt and yeast in a mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre, add 180ml of the warm water and the olive oil and mix to a smooth dough, adding the rest of the water if the mixture seems a bit dry. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 5 minutes. (You can also make and knead the dough in 10 minutes in a stand mixer with a dough hook.) Place in a clean bowl (or leave in the stand mixer bowl), cover with cling film and leave in a warm place to rise for 1 hour or until doubled in size. 2 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Peel the onions, leaving the root end intact. Slice each through the root into thin wedges. Put into a small roasting tin and toss with 2 tbsp of the extra-virgin olive oil and some salt and pepper. Spread out and roast for 20 minutes until tender and browntinged. Remove and turn the oven up to 250°C/230°C fan/gas 9½, or as high as it will go. 3 For the pesto, put the basil, pine nuts, garlic and olive oil in a food processor, then whizz to a coarse paste. Scoop into a bowl, stir in the 25g parmesan, then season to taste. 4 Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface, knock it back, then knead once more until smooth. Halve the dough, shape each piece into a ball, then roll each into a 20cm x 30cm oval. Leave to rest for 10 minutes, then, using a rolling pin, carefully transfer to 2 lightly oiled baking sheets. Push/pull them back into shape, brush with a little oil, then bake for 5 minutes. This will stop the base becoming soggy after you add the topping. Meanwhile, in a bowl, mix the soft goat’s cheese with the garlic, half the 50g parmesan, 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil and enough milk to make

GREAT FOR A CROWD

a thick but spreadable paste. Season to taste. 5 Top and tail the courgettes, then cut them lengthways into ribbons using a vegetable peeler. Drop them into a bowl and toss with the rest of the extra-virgin olive oil, the chopped oregano and some pepper. Don’t add salt until just before you use them, otherwise they’ll wilt and go floppy. 6 Remove the bases from the oven and spread each with half the goat’s cheese mixture, to within 2.5cm of the edge. Dot here and there with a little pesto. Top with

the roasted onion wedges and twists of courgette ribbons. Tuck thin slices of the blue cheese in among the ingredients, then scatter with the olives and finally the rest of the parmesan. 7 Bake for 12-15 minutes, turning the pizzas around halfway through so they cook evenly, until the crust is crisp and golden. Slide them onto a wooden board, cut into thick slices or squares and serve. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 670kcals, 46.9g fat (17.7g saturated), 24.7g protein, 38.9g carbs (3.9g sugars), 1.8g salt, 3.1g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 41


HERB GARDEN

Fresh herbs transform any dish into a feast by adding colour and enhancing ingredients. Grow your own on a patio or windowsill for zingy summer flavours.

Vietnamese-style chicken salad with mint, coriander and basil SERVES 3-4. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 30 MIN

Poach the chicken and MAKE AHEAD shred it up to 48 hours ahead, then cover and chill. Bring to room temperature to serve. Make the salad 1 hour ahead, but add the herbs and dressing just before serving or the salad will wilt. If you’re short on time, DEBBIE’S buy ready-roasted British TIPS chicken breasts and shred the meat. Look to buy Asian herbs (vietnamese mint and coriander, and asian basil). If you can’t find them, use ordinary herbs. The salad will still taste great. I like the colour that British radishes bring, even though mooli radish would be more authentic. • 3 x 250g free-range chicken breasts • 1 tsp salt • 1 pointed spring cabbage, such as hispi • 250g large carrots, coarsely grated

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• 100g fresh beansprouts, rinsed and dried well • 75g radishes, shredded • Large bunch fresh mint leaves, shredded (see tips) • Large bunch fresh coriander leaves, roughly chopped (see tips) • Small bunch fresh basil, leaves picked and torn (see tips) • 75g unsalted roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped FOR THE DRESSING

• 3 tbsp rice wine vinegar • 2½ tsp caster sugar • 100g banana shallots • 4-5 tbsp lime juice • 4 tbsp Thai fish sauce • 2 small garlic cloves, very finely chopped • 2 red birds’ eye chillies, thinly sliced, or 1 medium-hot red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped 1 Put the chicken breasts into a large pan, pour over cold water to cover, add the salt and bring to the boil. Turn the heat down, simmer gently for 30 minutes, then leave to cool in the cooking liquid. Lift the chicken onto a plate, then finely shred the meat, discarding

the skin. You should have about 450g meat. Cover and set aside. Chill or freeze the liquid to use in another dish. 2 To make the dressing, combine the vinegar and sugar in a bowl. Slice the shallots into thin rounds, separate into rings, add to the bowl and toss together. Set aside for 15 minutes or until softened slightly. Stir in the lime juice, Thai fish sauce, garlic and chillies. 3 Halve the cabbage lengthways, cut away the hard central core, then cut the cabbage across into very thin slices. A mandoline will do this quickly, but you can do it by hand if you don’t have one. Mix in a large bowl with the carrots, beansprouts, radishes, most of the herbs and the shredded chicken. Pour over two-thirds of the dressing, or to taste, then toss well. Pour the rest of the dressing into a small bowl. 4 Pile the salad onto a large serving dish or 4 serving plates, scatter over the remaining herbs and the chopped peanuts. Serve with the extra dressing on the side. PER SERVING (FOR 4) 412kcals, 11.8g fat (2.4g saturated), 55.6g protein, 20.8g carbs (17.2g sugars), 3.6g salt, 7.3g fibre


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Cretan dakos SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN

I discovered this dish on holiday in Crete. It’s the Greek version of panzanella, made with dry bread rusks moistened with tomatoes, then seasoned with red wine vinegar, olive oil and herbs, and sprinkled with crumbled local mizithra cheese. Feta is the closest equivalent. • 1.5kg (about 6) beef tomatoes, such as jack hawkins • 4 tbsp red wine vinegar

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• 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • 1 tsp dried oregano • 6 small fresh oregano or marjoram sprigs, leaves picked and chopped • 300g wholegrain krisprolls (such as Pagen, widely available) or Greek barley rusks • 200g feta, crumbled • 2 small handfuls black olives, such as kalamata, pitted 1 Cut the tomatoes in half widthways. Stand a box grater in a large shallow dish and, starting with the cut side – and taking care

not to grate your fingers – coarsely grate each tomato until you get down to the skin (discard the skin). Put into a bowl and mix with the vinegar, 2 tbsp of the olive oil, the dried and fresh herbs and seasoning to taste. 2 Coarsely crumble the krisprolls/rusks into bowls or onto plates, then spoon over the tomato mix. Sprinkle with the feta and olives, drizzle with the remaining oil, then serve. PER SERVING 539kcals, 24.5g fat (9g saturated), 17.7g protein, 63.3g carbs (14.2g sugars), 2.6g salt, 5g fibre


SUMMER

Roast pork ribs with sticky marmalade glaze SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR 40 MINUTES, PLUS RESTING

Barbecue with the lid on,

DEBBIE’S over an indirect medium TIP

heat for 30 minutes each side, then uncover and cook for 30 minutes more, turning and basting. • Oil for greasing • 2 x 1-1.25kg racks meaty free-range British pork ribs FOR THE MARMALADE GLAZE

• 225g marmalade

• 3 fat garlic cloves, crushed • ½ tsp cayenne pepper • 2 tsp finely chopped rosemary • 1½ tbsp dijon mustard • 3 tbsp tomato purée • 3 tbsp orange or lemon juice • ¾ tsp each salt and black pepper 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. Lay the rib racks in an oiled, foil-lined roasting tin (or 2 small tins) and roast for 60 minutes, turning once. Meanwhile, mix together all the ingredients for the marmalade glaze. 2 When the ribs are cooked, pour any fatty juices away from the tin(s). Brush one side of the ribs

generously with the glaze and return them to the oven for 10 minutes. Turn, brush with more glaze and cook for 10 minutes more, then brush all over with the glaze, turn again and cook for 10 minutes two more times until the ribs are sticky, brown and tender. 3 Brush the ribs with the leftover glaze. Cover with foil and leave somewhere warm to rest for 5-10 minutes. To serve, slice between the bones to separate the ribs and pile onto a board or serving dish. PER SERVING 377kcals, 15.9g fat (5.4g saturated), 31.6g protein, 27.4g carbs (26.8g sugars), 0.7g salt, 0.5g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 45


Butterflied leg of lamb with rosemary salt and slow-roasted tomato salad SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 35 MIN, OVEN TIME 2 HOURS, PLUS 24 HOURS MARINATING

Marinate the lamb up to MAKE 24 hours ahead. SlowAHEAD roast the tomatoes 24 hours ahead – chill, then bring to room temperature before serving. • 2 large garlic cloves, crushed • 1 medium-hot red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped • 2 fresh rosemary sprigs, leaves picked, finely chopped • 6 thyme sprigs, leaves picked • ½ tsp fennel seeds, crushed • 1 small lemon, plus coarsely

46 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

grated zest and juice ½ lemon • 2 tsp sea salt flakes • ½ tsp ground black pepper • 6 tbsp olive oil • 2.5kg British lamb leg, butterflied (ask your butcher to do this for you) • Shoestring chips or potato wedges to serve (optional) FOR THE SLOW-ROASTED TOMATO SALAD

• 500g vine-ripened tomatoes • Extra-virgin olive oil for greasing, plus extra to serve • Sea salt flakes for sprinkling • 75g wild rocket • 50g pitted black olives • 150g chargrilled artichokes in olive oil, well drained • ½ medium-hot red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped • 1 tbsp capers, drained and rinsed

• 2 tsp balsamic vinegar FOR THE ROSEMARY SALT

• 2 fresh rosemary sprigs, leaves picked and chopped • 3 tbsp sea salt flakes ALSO USEFUL

• Digital probe thermometer 1 Mix the garlic, chilli, rosemary, thyme, fennel seeds, lemon zest, lemon juice, salt, pepper and olive oil in a shallow, non-metallic dish large enough to hold the lamb. Add the lamb, turn to coat well in the marinade, then cover and leave in the fridge for up to 24 hours, turning now and then. 2 For the slow-roasted tomatoes, heat the oven to its highest setting. Cut the tomatoes in half and lay them cut-face up in a lightly oiled shallow roasting tin. Sprinkle each tomato with sea salt flakes and ground black pepper, then roast for 15 minutes. Lower the oven temperature to 150°C/ 130°C fan/gas 2 and roast for 1¼-1½ hours more (this depends on the size of your tomatoes) until shrivelled and lightly browned but still juicy. Remove and set aside. 3 When you’re ready to cook the lamb, heat the oven to 200¡C/ 180°C fan/gas 6. For the rosemary salt, put the chopped rosemary into a mortar and bruise it with the pestle. Stir in the sea salt. 4 Lift the lamb out of its marinade and shake off the excess. Season the meat with a little rosemary salt and some pepper. Heat a griddle pan over a high heat until smoking hot. Add the lamb and sear over a medium-high heat for 5 minutes on each side until nicely browned. Transfer the meat to a roasting tin and roast for 20-25 minutes (depending on how you like it and how thinly it has been butterflied), or until it registers 55-60°C at its thickest part on a digital probe thermometer. 5 Lift the lamb onto a carving board, wrap loosely in foil and leave it to rest for 5 minutes. Put the tomatoes back into the oven to warm through. 6 Arrange the rocket, roasted tomatoes, olives, artichokes, chilli and capers in a salad bowl.


SUMMER

Drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. 7 Uncover the lamb, slice and arrange on a serving platter. Sprinkle the meat with a little more rosemary salt, then serve with the tomato salad with the remaining rosemary salt on the side, with shoestring chips or potato wedges, if you like . PER SERVING (FOR 8) 753kcals, 47.3g fat (15.6g saturated), 76.2g protein, 4.2g carbs (3.3g sugars), 4.7g salt, 3g fibre

Cumberland sausage hot dogs with beery onions SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 45 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR

For me, hot dogs are synonymous with barbecues and camping trips, but I also like to serve these beauties for a lazy Friday TV night. Make the garlic butter and MAKE AHEAD beery onions up to 4 days in advance, then chill, covered. Bring the butter to room temperature and gently heat the onions to serve. Freeze leftover roasted FOOD TEAM’S garlic butter, rolled up TIP in baking paper, for up to 3 months, then slice frozen as needed. It’s fantastic melted over steak or steamed veg. • Vegetable oil for rubbing • 500g Cumberland sausage ring, twisted and cut into 4 • 1 fresh large French baguette • Mustard to serve (optional) FOR THE ROASTED GARLIC BUTTER

• 1 garlic bulb with fat cloves • 1 tsp olive oil • ½ tsp sea salt flakes • 175g soft, unsalted butter FOR THE BEERY ONIONS

• 3 tbsp olive oil • 750g (about 3 large) onions, halved and thinly sliced • 150ml rich dark ale or stout • Knob of butter (about 15g) • 3 tbsp caster sugar • 4 tsp red wine vinegar • Handful watercress 1 For the roasted garlic butter,

GREAT FOR A CROWD

heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/ gas 6. Remove the outer papery layer of skin from the garlic bulb to reveal the cloves, then cut a 1cm thick slice off the top to expose a bit of each clove. Put the garlic bulb in the middle of a large square of foil, then drizzle with the 1 tsp oil and sprinkle with a little of the salt. Pull the foil up to form a parcel, then transfer to a baking tray and roast for 1 hour or until the garlic feels soft. Remove from the oven then, when cool enough to handle, unwrap and squeeze out the garlic from each clove into a small bowl. Add the soft butter and the remaining sea salt and mix together well. 2 Meanwhile, make the beery onions. Heat the 3 tbsp olive oil in a large, heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat (use a pan that conducts heat really well). Add the onions and cook, stirring now and then, for 30 minutes or until they’re very soft and richly browned. Add the ale and simmer

until well reduced. Add the butter, sugar and vinegar and continue to cook for about 5 minutes, stirring regularly, until thick and sticky – be careful not to let them burn. Season to taste and keep warm. 3 Rub a griddle pan or non-stick frying pan with a little vegetable oil and cook the sausages for 8-10 minutes, turning now and then as they colour, until nicely browned and cooked through. Keep hot. 4 Cut the ends off the baguette, then slice it across evenly into 4 pieces. Slit open each piece along one side and open them out. Warm for a minute or two in the oven or under the grill. Spread the cut sides of the bread with some of the roasted garlic butter, then add a sausage and spoon in some of the beery onions. Add some watercress, then serve with mustard on the side, if you like. PER SERVING 869kcals, 45.3g fat (17.3g saturated), 28.4g protein, 86.8g carbs (26.9g sugars), 4.2g salt, 6.9g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 47


RAINBOW BRIGHT

Forget the bland British tomatoes of the past – these days we grow some amazingly tasty heritage varieties. Many, like these above, hail from the Isle of Wight.

Tomato, saffron and parmesan tartlets MAKES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 1 HOUR, OVEN TIME 45 MIN, PLUS CHILLING

Make the pastry the day MAKE before and chill overnight. AHEAD Continue from step 4. Make this vegetarian by FOOD TEAM’S using a veggie alternative TIP to parmesan and the same quantity of butter instead of lard. • 2 tbsp olive oil • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped • 800g plum tomatoes, skinned and chopped • 1 tsp caster sugar • 6 small fresh bay leaves, scrunched up a bit • 12 fresh basil leaves, torn into pieces, plus few extra leaves • Small pinch saffron strands • 150ml double cream • 2 large free-range eggs, plus 1 large egg yolk • 25g parmesan, or vegetarian alternative, finely grated, plus extra for sprinkling • 250g (about 30) small, mixed yellow and red cherry tomatoes FOR THE PASTRY CASES

• 225g plain flour, plus extra to dust • ½ tsp salt 48 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 65g chilled butter, cut into small pieces, plus extra for greasing • 65g chilled lard, cut into small pieces (or butter, see tip) • 25g parmesan, or vegetarian alternative, finely grated • 2 tbsp cold water YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 6 x 10cm tartlet tins, 3cm deep 1 Make the filling. Put the olive oil and garlic in a medium pan over a medium heat. As soon as the garlic begins to sizzle, add the tomatoes, sugar and bay leaves. Simmer very gently for about 1 hour, stirring frequently, until well reduced and thickened. It mustn’t be at all wet or sloppy. When it’s just about to start catching on the base of the pan, it’s ready. Remove and discard the bay leaves, stir in the basil and season to taste. 2 Meanwhile, for the pastry cases, sift the flour and ½ tsp salt into a food processor, add the butter and lard, if using, then whizz until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Stir in the parmesan, then add the water and whizz briefly until the mixture comes together in a ball. Tip out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly until smooth, then divide into six. Roll out into 15cm discs, then use to line 6 lightly buttered tartlet tins.

Prick the bases with a fork and chill for 20 minutes. 3 Heat a frying pan, then add the saffron strands and toss for a few seconds. Tip into a mortar and leave to cool and go brittle. Warm 2 tbsp of the cream in a small pan. Grind the saffron to a fine powder with the pestle, then add to the cream and set aside. 4 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6 with a baking sheet inside. Line the pastry cases with small squares of foil and fill with baking beans. Put on the hot baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes until the edges are biscuit-coloured. Remove the foil and beans, then return the cases to the oven for 5-7 minutes until the bases are golden. Remove from the oven and lower the heat to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. 5. Beat the eggs, egg yolk, saffron mixture and remaining cream in a jug, then stir in the 25g parmesan and salt to taste. Divide the sauce among the cases, top each with about 5 tomatoes, then pour in the saffron mixture. Bake on the baking sheet for 20 minutes until set and golden. Serve garnished with extra basil and parmesan. PER SERVING 576kcals, 43.7g fat (21.7g saturated), 11.8g protein, 34.8g carbs (7.2g sugars), 0.8g salt, 4g fibre


SUMMER

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Bouillabaisse with fennel and bay

To make fresh fish stock,

DEBBIE’S ask your fishmonger for TIPS

Don’t be put off by the list of ingredients. Bouillabaisse was never meant to be complicated. It was a rustic fishermen’s stew, made using unsold fish from the day’s catch. The broth is traditionally served first as a soup, with croûtons, rouille (a spiced mayonnaise) and a sprinkling of cheese, followed by the fish. I serve it in one go with a little rouille stirred in.

the bones from your fish, plus a few extras. You’ll need about 1kg altogether. Put 1 sliced onion, 1 sliced fennel bulb, 1 sliced carrot, 1 sliced celery stick, 1 fresh thyme sprig and 6 bay leaves into a pan with 2.5 litres of water. Simmer uncovered for 20 minutes, then add the bones and simmer for another 20 minutes. Strain, then simmer a little longer until reduced to about 1 litre. If you can’t find fennel herb, use 1 tsp crushed fennel seeds in the stew and garnish with the feathery fronds from the fennel bulb.

Make the rouille up to MAKE 48 hours ahead, cover and AHEAD chill. Bring to room temperature to serve. Make the stew up to the end of step 2 up to 48 hours ahead and chill, covered, so the flavours can fully develop.

• 3 tbsp olive oil • 1 medium onion, chopped • 1 large leek, thinly sliced • 1 large fennel bulb, halved and thinly sliced (see Debbie’s tips) • 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced • 2 strips pared orange zest

SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 30-35 MIN

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• 450g vine-ripened tomatoes, skinned and roughly chopped • 2 tsp tomato purée • ½ tsp chilli flakes • ½ tsp saffron strands • 8 small bay leaves • 1 large fresh thyme sprig, leaves picked • 1 litre fresh fish stock (see Debbie’s tips) • 450g small floury potatoes, such as maris piper, thickly sliced • 250g monkfish fillet • 250g red mullet or gurnard fillet • 8-12 cooked Mediterranean crevettes (head-on king prawns) • 600g rope-grown mussels, cleaned and debearded • 2 tbsp pastis, such as Pernod • 3 tbsp chopped fresh fennel herb (see Debbie’s tips) FOR THE ROUILLE

• 15g day-old white breadcrumbs


SUMMER

• 1 large free-range egg yolk • 2 tsp lemon juice • 30g roasted red pepper, skinned (from a jar) • 1 fat garlic clove, crushed • 2 tsp harissa paste • ½ tsp tomato purée • ¼ tsp paprika • 150ml olive oil • Grated parmesan (optional) and baguette, sliced, to serve 1 For the rouille, put all the ingredients except the olive oil, cheese and baguette into a food processor and blend until smooth. With the motor still running, slowly trickle in the olive oil until it has a thick, mayonnaise-like texture. (You can do this in a pestle and mortar, but it will take much longer.) Taste and adjust the seasoning, adding plenty of salt. Scoop into a small serving bowl, cover and chill until needed. 2 For the stew, heat the olive oil in a large flameproof casserole. Add the onion, leek, fennel and garlic, then cook gently for 5-6 minutes until soft but not coloured. Add the orange zest, tomatoes, tomato purée, chilli flakes, saffron, bay leaves and thyme, then cook for 2-3 minutes. Add the fish stock and sliced potatoes, bring to the boil, then simmer for about 15 minutes until the potatoes are tender. 3 Meanwhile, slice the monkfish and red mullet/gurnard into thick slices, drop them into the stew and simmer for 2 minutes. Add the cooked crevettes and the mussels, then cover and simmer for 2 minutes more or until the mussels have opened (discard any that don’t open) and the fish is cooked. 4 Stir in the pastis and most of the fennel herb, or all the crushed fennel seeds (see Debbie’s tips), then season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with the rest of the fennel herb or fronds and serve in large warmed soup plates with the rouille (which I like to swirl into the stew), and hunks of baguette sprinkled with parmesan, if you like. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 451kcals, 28.2g fat (4g saturated), 25.4g protein, 21.3g carbs (5.4g sugars), 2.3g salt, 4.6g fibre

Nectarine, fig and blue cheese salad SERVES 2. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN,

• 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • 1 tbsp lemon juice • ½ tsp clear honey

OVEN TIME 6-8 MIN

You can also make this salad with apples and firm ripe pears when they’re in season. Instead of chicory you could use radicchio or castelfranco, a bitter Italian salad leaf, pale green in colour and flecked with pink. It would look beautiful in this salad if you can find it. • 30g skinned and blanched hazelnuts • 1 ripe nectarine or peach • 2-3 ripe figs • 50g red-tipped little gem lettuce, torn into pieces • 1 red chicory, leaves separated (see Debbie’s intro) • 20g watercress sprigs or rocket • 100g Beenleigh Blue cheese (or any crumbly blue cheese), thinly sliced

1 Heat the oven to 200°C/ 180°C fan/gas 6. Spread the hazelnuts on a baking tray and roast for 6-8 minutes until golden. Leave to cool, then roughly chop. 2 Halve the nectarine or peach, remove and discard the stone, then cut into wedges. Cut the figs into wedges. 3 Mix the salad leaves with the watercress or rocket, then scatter over 2 large plates. Arrange the wedges of fruit and slices of cheese in among the leaves. 4 Whisk the extra-virgin olive oil, lemon juice and honey together in a bowl with salt and pepper. Drizzle over each plate, then scatter over the roasted hazelnuts and serve. PER SERVING 475kcals, 38.6g fat (13.9g saturated), 16.8g protein, 16.2g carbs (15.2g sugars), 1g salt, 4.7g fibre

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Buffalo chicken wings with celery sticks and blue cheese dip SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR, PLUS 1 HOUR

Chicken wings are fatty enough to stay moist when cooked for a long time. For best results, space out in the tray or spread over 2 trays. FOOD TEAM’S TIP

MARINATING

These wings are also great cooked on the barbecue, which gives a smoky taste that suits the blue cheese. Thread them onto pairs of long metal skewers, so they look like the rungs of a ladder, then brush with a little oil, season and cook over a medium heat for 8-10 minutes on each side or until cooked through.

• 20-24 large free-range chicken wings • 4-6 tsp Tabasco Chipotle Sauce (depending on your taste) • Olive oil for drizzling and oiling • 100g unsalted butter • 4 tsp cider vinegar • 2 tsp Dijon mustard • 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce • 1 tbsp chilli sauce – not Thai – I used Lingham’s Chilli Sauce (widely available)

• 2 tbsp tomato ketchup • 2 small celery hearts, each cut lengthways into chunky wedges • 4 little gem lettuce hearts, quartered lengthways, to serve FOR THE BLUE CHEESE DIP

• 75g Devon Blue cheese, or any good-quality blue cheese • 4 tbsp good-quality mayonnaise • 1 small garlic clove, crushed • 1½ tsp lemon juice • 4 tbsp soured cream • 1 banana shallot, finely chopped • 1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley • 1 tbsp whole milk (optional) 1 Cut the pointy tips off each chicken wing and discard. Make a slit in the skin on the underside of each wing, then add a drop of Tabasco sauce and rub it into the slit. Put the wings in a bowl with a little more Tabasco sauce and mix well. Chill in the fridge, covered, for at least 1 hour. 2 For the blue cheese dip, coarsely grate or crumble the cheese into a bowl, add 2 tbsp of the mayonnaise and the garlic, then mash with the back of a spoon until almost smooth. Stir in the rest of the mayo, lemon juice, soured cream, shallot and parsley. Stir in the milk if it’s still a little stiff. Spoon into 4 small pots or ramekins, cover and chill. 3 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Drizzle the wings with a little olive oil and spread out over a lightly oiled baking tray (see tip). Season well and roast for 20-30 minutes, then turn the wings and roast for a further 20-30 minutes until golden brown and tender. 4 Just before the wings are ready, melt the butter in a large deep frying pan. Stir in the rest of the Tabasco (depending on how hot you like things), vinegar, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, chilli sauce, tomato ketchup and salt to taste. Drop the chicken wings into the sauce and mix to coat well. Serve at the table with the celery, lettuce wedges and blue cheese pots for dipping. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 510kcals, 42.9g fat (18.3g saturated), 26.6g protein, 4.5g carbs (4.2g sugars), 1g salt, 0.8g fibre

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SUMMER Lemon, thyme and yogurt cake SERVES 12. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 50-55 MIN, PLUS COOLING

This cake is wonderful drizzled with its syrup, served with summer berries and extra yogurt on the side. Make the recipe up to 24 MAKE AHEAD hours in advance. Keep the cake in a sealed container out of the fridge. Keep the syrup, covered, in the fridge. If you don’t have a 24cm DEBBIE’S (3 litre) bundt tin or TIP ring-shaped cake tin, use a 25cm round cake tin instead. • 175g butter, softened, plus extra for greasing • 350g caster sugar • Finely grated zest 2 large lemons • 3 large free-range eggs • 350g plain flour • 200g natural goat’s milk yogurt • 1 tbsp baking powder • 2 tbsp fresh thyme leaves, roughly chopped FOR THE ICING

• 175g icing sugar • 1 tbsp lemon juice • 2 tsp boiling hot water • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves FOR THE LEMON SYRUP

• 4 tbsp lemon juice • 3 tbsp caster sugar YOU’LL ALSO NEED

• 24cm non-stick bundt tin or ring-shaped cake tin (see tip) 1 Heat the oven to 160°C/140°C fan/gas 3. Grease a 24cm nonstick bundt tin or ring-shaped cake tin with butter. Cream the butter and sugar together in a bowl for 5 minutes until pale and fluffy. Beat in the lemon zest, then beat in the eggs, one at a time, adding a tablespoon of the flour with the second and third egg. 2 Spoon half the natural goat’s milk yogurt onto the mixture, sift over the baking powder with a pinch of salt and half the remaining flour, then fold in. Fold in the remaining yogurt and flour

and the chopped thyme leaves. 3 Spoon the mixture into the tin, then bake for 50-55 minutes until risen and golden brown, and a skewer pushed into the thickest part of the cake comes away clean. Leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes, then carefully turn out onto a cooling rack over a large baking tray. 4 For the icing, sift the icing sugar into a bowl, add the lemon juice, pour in the hot water and mix until smooth. While the cake is still slightly warm, spoon over the

icing, letting a little run down the sides. Sprinkle with the thyme leaves and leave to set. 5 For the syrup, mix the lemon juice and sugar in a small bowl or jug until the sugar has dissolved. Cut the cake into slices, then drizzle each slice with a little of the lemon syrup to serve. Serve with summer berries and extra yogurt if you wish. PER SERVING 406kcals, 14.9g fat (8.9g saturated), 4.9g protein, 64.2g carbs (48.3g sugars), 0.4g salt, 0.9g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 53


SING THE BLUES

Twenty years ago, blueberries were virtually unknown in the UK, but now we can’t get enough of them. Varieties differ in sweetness and acidity and the British season extends from June to September.

Scandinavian blueberry and soured cream tart SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 25 MIN, OVEN TIME 45 MIN, PLUS CHILLING

In Scandinavia, bilberries (the wild European version of blueberries) are plentiful in the wild and find their way into lots of cakes and desserts. Make the pastry 1 day MAKE ahead and chill in the AHEAD fridge. Remove 5-10 minutes before rolling. • 300g fresh blueberries • 150ml soured cream or crème fraîche • 75ml double cream • 1 large free-range egg, plus 1 extra yolk, beaten • 2 tbsp plain flour • 75g caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste or extract • 3-4 tsp schnapps or kirsch FOR THE PASTRY

• 175g plain flour, plus extra to dust 54 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 50g icing sugar • 100g chilled butter, cut into small pieces, plus extra for greasing • 1 medium free-range egg yolk • ½ tsp vanilla bean paste or extract • 2-3 tsp cold water YOU’LL ALSO NEED...

23cm loose-bottomed tart tin, 5cm deep 1 For the pastry, put the flour, a pinch of salt and the icing sugar into a food processor. Add the butter and whizz briefly until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. In a small bowl, beat the egg yolk with the vanilla, add it to the food processor, then pulse briefly, adding just enough of the cold water to make the pastry start to clump together. Turn out onto a floured surface and knead together quickly until smooth, then chill for 15-20 minutes. 2 Roll out the chilled dough to the thickness of a £1 coin, then use to line a lightly buttered 23cm x 5cm deep loose-bottomed tart tin. Prick the base all over with a fork,

then chill for 20 minutes more. 3 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6 with a baking sheet inside. Line the tart case with crumpled baking paper and baking beans, then bake for 15 minutes until the pastry edges are biscuit-coloured. Remove the paper and beans, protect the browned edges with strips of foil, then bake for a further 5-6 minutes until the base is crisp and golden. Set aside. 4 Scatter the blueberries over the base of the pastry case (depending on their size you might need more or less to get an even layer). Mix the soured cream/ crème fraîche, double cream, egg and egg yolk, flour, sugar, vanilla and schnapps/kirsch in a bowl until smooth. Pour the mixture over the berries, then bake the tart for about 25 minutes until the filling has set and the top is golden. Sprinkle with a little more caster sugar and serve warm or at room temperature. PER SERVING 425kcals, 27.7g fat (16.8g saturated), 5.1g protein, 37.6g carbs (18.8g sugars), 0.3g salt, 1.3g fibre


SUMMER

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• 1 medium free-range egg yolk • 4 tsp cold water

Silky chocolate and raspberry tart SERVES 10-12. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 50 MIN, PLUS CHILLING

This tart is very rich,

DEBBIE’S so a small slice goes a TIPS

long way. Serve with some fresh raspberries on the side – and a little extra cream if you can’t resist. • 150ml whole milk • 500ml double cream • 65g golden caster sugar 56 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 300g good-quality dark chocolate (ideally 70 per cent cocoa solids), broken into pieces • 2 medium free-range eggs • 1 tsp vanilla extract • 200g fresh raspberries, plus extra to serve (optional) FOR THE CRISP CHOCOLATE PASTRY

• 175g plain flour, plus extra for dusting • 25g good-quality cocoa powder • 50g icing sugar • 100g chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

1 For the pastry, sift the flour, cocoa powder, icing sugar and a pinch of salt into a food processor. Add the butter and whizz until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. 2 In a small bowl, beat the egg yolk briefly with the water. Add to the food processor and whizz until the mixture starts to stick together. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly until smooth. Shape into a flat disc, wrap in cling film, then chill in the fridge for 15 minutes. 3 Remove the pastry from the fridge and roll it out thinly on a flour-dusted surface. Use it to line a 25cm, 4cm deep, loosebottomed tart tin. Trim the pastry edges, then chill in the fridge for 20 minutes. 4 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6 with a baking sheet on the middle shelf. Line the pastry case with a sheet of crumpled baking paper and a thin layer of baking beans or rice, then blind bake on the heated baking tray for 15 minutes. Remove the paper and beans/rice and blind bake for a further 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave to cool and crisp up. Turn the oven down to 170°C/150°C fan/gas 3½. 5 For the filling, put the milk, cream and sugar into a pan and slowly bring to the boil, stirring gently. Take off the heat, add the broken chocolate pieces and stir until melted and smooth. Allow to cool slightly, add the eggs and vanilla extract, then mix together well. 6 Scatter the raspberries in the tart case. Pour over the filling, carefully slide the tart back onto the baking sheet in the oven, then bake for 20-30 minutes or until the filling is cooked but still slightly wobbly. It will continue firming up as it cools. Remove and leave to cool somewhere cold (but not in the fridge) until set. Serve cut into thin slices. PER SERVING (FOR 12) 508kcals, 39g fat (23.7g saturated), 5.9g protein, 35.6g carbs (22.5g sugars), 0.2g salt, 2.4g fibre


SUMMER Sponge drops with strawberry curd and chantilly cream MAKES 24 SPONGE DROPS AND 3 X 200ML JARS OF STRAWBERRY CURD HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 8-10 MIN, PLUS COOLING

Make the curd well in MAKE advance, and keep, chilled AHEAD in sterilised jars for up to 2 months. The redder your DEBBIE’S strawberries, the better TIP the colour of your curd will be. If you really need to, stir in a few drops of red food colouring. • 4 medium free-range eggs • 100g caster sugar • 1 tsp vanilla extract • 150g self-raising flour • 350g fresh strawberries, hulled and thinly sliced, to serve • Icing sugar for dusting

cover with a tea towel and set aside to cool. Once completely cool, press a waxed disc onto the surface of each jar of curd, seal with the lids and keep in the fridge for up to 2 months. 3 To make the sponge drops, heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4 and line 3 large baking sheets with baking paper. Put the eggs, sugar and vanilla extract into a large bowl and whisk with an electric handwhisk for 7 minutes until the mixture has tripled in volume and is very pale and thick. When you lift the whisk out, it should leave a trail over the surface. Sift in the flour and gently fold it into the mixture with a metal spoon. 4 Drop exact tablespoons of the

mixture onto the baking sheets, leaving a 3cm gap between each one. Bake for 8-10 minutes until puffed up, lightly crisp and richly golden. Leave to cool on the sheets, then peel away from the paper to a wire rack. 5 Make the chantilly cream. Whip the cream with the icing sugar and vanilla extract into soft peaks. Spread a sponge drop with curd and top with a few strawberry slices. Spread another drop with cream, sandwich together, dust with icing sugar and serve straightaway, before the sponge drops go too soft. PER FILLED SPONGE DROP 173kcals, 7.9g fat (4.5g saturated), 3.4g protein, 21.4g carbs, 16.7g sugar, 0.1g salt, 1.1g fibre

FOR THE STRAWBERRY CURD

• 200g bright red, fresh ripe strawberries, hulled • 4 large free-range eggs • Finely grated zest 2 large lemons, juice 1 • 250g caster sugar • 100g unsalted butter • Few drops red food colouring (see Debbie’s tips) FOR THE CHANTILLY CREAM

• 150ml double cream • 1 tbsp (or to taste) icing sugar, sifted • ½ tsp vanilla extract 1 To make the strawberry curd, purée the strawberries in a food processor, then push them through a sieve into a large heatproof bowl to remove the seeds. Beat the eggs and add to the bowl, then add the lemon juice and zest, sugar and butter. Place the bowl over a pan containing about 5cm of simmering water, making sure the bowl doesn’t touch the water. Cook, stirring gently, for 30-35 minutes until the mixture thickens and your spoon leaves a trail for a couple of seconds when moved through it. Make sure it doesn’t get too hot or it may curdle. 2 Pour the strawberry curd into 3 x 200ml warm, sterilised jars, deliciousmagazine.co.uk 57


American shortcake with lemon curd and clotted cream SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 45 MIN, OVEN TIME 15 MIN, PLUS COOLING

American shortcake is soft in texture. Works well with other curds too: try lime, passion fruit or grapefruit…

• 300g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting • 2½ tsp baking powder • 100g chilled unsalted butter, diced, plus extra to grease • 60g caster sugar • 85g free-range egg, beaten (1-2 large eggs) • About 2 tbsp whole milk FOR THE LEMON CURD

The curd recipe will MAKE AHEAD make more than you need for this dessert. Keep the remainder, chilled, in sterilised jars for up to 3 weeks.

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• 3 large free-range eggs • 1 large free-range egg yolk • Zest and juice 2 large unwaxed lemons (you’ll need 150ml juice) • 115g caster sugar

• 75g unsalted butter • 2 tsp cornflour TO SERVE

• 300g clotted cream • Icing sugar to dust 1 For the lemon curd, beat the whole eggs and the yolk together in a bowl, then place into a medium heatproof bowl. Stir in the lemon juice, zest, caster sugar, butter and cornflour. Rest the bowl over a pan of just simmering water and cook gently, stirring frequently, for 15-20 minutes until very thick, taking care not to let the mixture get too hot or it will curdle. Transfer to another bowl and cool slightly, then cover with cling film and leave to cool completely. 2 For the shortcake, heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Sift the flour, baking powder and a pinch of salt into a food processor. Add the chilled butter and whizz briefly until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Transfer to a mixing bowl, then stir in the sugar. 3 Beat the egg with 1½ tbsp of the milk. Add to the bowl and stir with a fork until the mixture starts to clump slightly. If it seems too dry, add the rest of the milk. Gather the dough together into a ball, turn out onto a floured surface and knead, briefly and very gently, until smooth. Gently roll out the dough into a disc 1cm thick and 23cm across. Lift it onto a lightly buttered baking sheet, then bake for 15 minutes or until golden and a skewer pushed into the centre comes out clean. 4 Cool on a wire rack, then carefully halve the shortcake horizontally using a serrated knife. Lift the top piece onto a board and cut into 8 wedges. Put the base of the shortcake on a flat serving plate. Spread with the clotted cream, then spoon a third of the lemon curd over (or more if you’d like your shortcake more lemony) and swirl with a knife. Top with the shortcake wedges, then dust with icing sugar. PER SERVING 594kcals, 42.2g fat (25.2g saturated), 8.2g protein, 46.6g carbs (19g sugars), 0.9g salt, 1.6g fibre


SUMMER Lemon verbena ice cream with poached peaches SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 15 MIN, PLUS RESTING, OVERNIGHT CHILLING AND FREEZING

This dessert is great served with buttery madeleines. I poach apricots and peaches when they’re in season, and both go well with the lemonscented ice cream. If you’re using apricots, go for about 1kg. There’s no need to skin them, and they’ll take only 4-5 minutes to poach. Make the ice cream up to MAKE AHEAD 1 month ahead and keep in a sealed container. Prepare the poached peaches up to 48 hours in advance and either keep in a sealed container in the fridge, or freeze for up to 1 month. Lemon verbena is a DEBBIE’S lesser-known herb with TIPS pretty, bright green leaves and the most amazing lemony scent and flavour. The plants are available at good garden centres and make a great addition to a garden. If you don’t have lemon verbena, flavour the cream with 2 lightly crushed lemongrass stalks and the pared zest of 1 unwaxed lemon instead. FOR THE POACHED PEACHES

• 350g caster sugar • 1 vanilla pod, slit open lengthways • Pared zest 2 lemons, juice 1 • 8 firm but ripe yellow peaches (or see Debbie’s introduction) • Bowl iced water for cooling FOR THE LEMON VERBENA ICE CREAM

• 500ml whole milk • 15g fresh lemon verbena leaves, shredded (see Debbie’s tips for alternatives), plus sprigs to decorate • 6 large free-range egg yolks • 200g caster sugar • 500ml double cream 1 For the ice cream, put the milk into a pan and bring just up to the boil. Take off the heat, stir in the shredded lemon verbena leaves, cover, and set aside for 1 hour.

2 Beat the egg yolks and sugar together in a heatproof bowl until pale and thick. Bring the milk back up to just boiling, then gradually strain the milk over the egg yolk mixture. Stir well, return to the pan and cook over a low heat, stirring, until the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon or spatula. Take care not to let it boil. Pour into a bowl, cool slightly, then stir in the cream. Cover and chill overnight. 3 The next day churn the mixture in an ice cream maker, then transfer to a container and put in the freezer. (Alternatively, pour the mixture into a shallow freezerproof container and freeze until almost firm. Scoop into a food processor and whizz until smooth. Return the mixture to the container, cover and freeze once more. Repeat 2-3 times until the mixture is very smooth, then freeze completely.) 4 For the peaches, put 600ml water, the sugar, vanilla pod and lemon zest into a pan and slowly

bring to the boil, stirring. To skin the peaches, put them in a large heatproof bowl or deep pan, cover with freshly boiled water and leave for 30 seconds. Transfer to a bowl of iced water with a slotted spoon. When cold, the skins should peel away easily. Add the skinned peaches to the syrup. Cover and simmer, carefully turning them now and then, until just tender and they can be pierced easily through to the stone with a cocktail stick. This will take 10-15 minutes, depending on their ripeness. 5 Using a slotted spoon lift the peaches into a serving bowl. Return the pan of syrup to the heat and boil rapidly until reduced by half. Add the lemon juice, then strain back over the peaches and serve warm or chill until needed. Serve with the ice cream and sprigs of lemon verbena. PER SERVING 707kcals, 40.2g fat (23.5g saturated), 6.3g protein, 81.3g carbs (81.3g sugars), 0.2g salt, 2.8g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 59


CHERRY BABY

The great British cherry is undergoing a renaissance. Hunt the fruit out in July and add them to a host of desserts to make the most of their short season. Using a cherry stoner makes the job a lot easier (£7.99, Lakeland).

Cherry ripple ice cream bars SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 30 MIN, PLUS COOLING, CHURNING, OVERNIGHT FREEZING AND SOFTENING

You can use the egg

DEBBIE’S whites left after making TIP

this recipe to make a meringue base for a pavlova. Alternatively, freeze in a sealed container for 3 months.

• 400ml whole milk • 6 large free-range egg yolks (see Debbie’s tip) • 375g caster sugar • 450g cherries, stalks removed, pitted and halved • 2 tbsp lemon juice • 2 heaped tbsp flaked almonds, toasted in a dry frying pan until coloured • 600ml double cream • 16 ice-cream wafers 1 Bring the milk slowly to the boil in a non-stick saucepan. Meanwhile, beat the egg yolks and 200g of the sugar in a mixing bowl until pale and fluffy. Gradually stir in the boiling milk, then return the mixture to the cleaned pan and stir over a low heat until it thickens sufficiently to coat the 60 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

back of a wooden spoon. Pour the custard into a bowl, leave to cool, then cover and chill until completely cold. 2 Meanwhile, put the halved cherries, the lemon juice and 125g of the remaining sugar in a saucepan, place over a low heat until the sugar dissolves into the juices to make a syrup. Leave to simmer gently for 25 minutes or until the cherries are very tender. Scoop the cherries into a bowl with a slotted spoon. Return the syrupy juices to the heat and boil for 2 minutes. Cool slightly, then stir back into the cherries in the bowl and leave to cool completely. The mixture should be quite thick and almost jam-like. 3 Line a baking sheet with baking paper. Put the remaining 50g caster sugar in a small pan with 2 tbsp water. Place over a low heat until the sugar has completely dissolved, then boil rapidly until it has turned into a deep orangecoloured caramel. Remove from the heat, quickly stir in the toasted almonds, then pour onto the prepared baking tray and spread out in a thin layer. Leave to cool completely, then peel the solid caramel away from the baking paper and transfer to a small plastic food bag. Coarsely crush

with the end of a rolling pin. 4 Line a shallow, 20-23cm square loose-bottomed brownie tin with baking paper. Stir the cream into the chilled custard and churn the mixture in an ice-cream machine until frozen. (If you don’t have one, pour the mixture into a shallow container and freeze until almost solid, then scrape into a food processor and blend briefly until smooth. Return to the container and freeze once more. Repeat this procedure once or twice until the mixture is very smooth.) 5 Spoon the ice-cream mixture into the lined tin, then spoon over lines of the cherry mixture. Scatter the crushed almond brittle on top, then zig-zag the handle of a wooden spoon through the mixture to create a ripple effect. Freeze for at least 6 hours or overnight. 6 To serve, remove the ice cream from the tin and leave it to soften slightly at room temperature for 15-20 minutes. Cut in half lengthways, then slice widthways into 8 evenly sized bars. Sandwich between pairs of ice-cream wafers and eat with your hands. PER SERVING 685kcals, 44.3g fat (25.1g saturated), 7.4g protein, 68.2g carbs (57.4g sugars), 0.2g salt, 0.7g fibre


SUMMER

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SUMMER

• 100g clotted cream • Icing sugar to dust FOR THE GOOSEBERRY COMPOTE

• 500g gooseberries, topped and tailed (see tips) • 75-100g caster sugar

Clotted cream and vanilla cheesecakes with gooseberry compote

If you are making these cheesecakes in advance, take them out of the fridge 30 minutes before serving.

You can cook the cheesecakes in ramekins instead of poaching rings, if you like. There’s no need to turn them out – just spoon the compote on top to serve. If you can’t get hold of fresh gooseberries, buy frozen and thaw before using. You’ll only need to bake for 7-10 minutes in step 4.

Make the cheesecakes up MAKE to 2 days in advance, then AHEAD keep in the fridge. The compote will keep, chilled, in a sealed container, for up to a week.

• 450g full-fat cream cheese • 125g caster sugar • 1½ tbsp cornflour • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste or extract • 2 medium free-range eggs

SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 50-60 MIN

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FOOD TEAM’S TIP

1 Tightly wrap foil around the bases of 6 metal poaching rings, each measuring 7cm x 6cm, to form a watertight seal (see tips). Line the base and sides with baking paper, then put them on a baking sheet. 2. Heat the oven to 110°C/90°C fan/gas ¼. Put the cream cheese in a mixing bowl and beat with an electric hand mixer until smooth and creamy. Beat the 125g sugar, cornflour, vanilla, eggs and a pinch of salt. Add the clotted cream and beat until combined. 3 Divide the mixture among the prepared moulds (about 115g each), then bake for 35-40 minutes until the cheesecakes are set but still slightly wobbly in the centre. Set aside to cool – they’ll continue to firm up. 4 Meanwhile, make the gooseberry compote. Increase the oven temperature to 180°C/160°C fan/ gas 4. Put the gooseberries in a shallow baking dish, then sprinkle over 75g of the sugar and bake for 15-20 minutes until the berries are just tender but still holding their shape. Carefully drain the juices into a bowl (save them for another occasion). Spoon half the cooked gooseberries into a mini processor and whizz until smooth, then push through a fine sieve into a clean mixing bowl. Taste and add a little more sugar if needed. Add the remaining baked gooseberries to the purée and stir to combine. 5 To serve, gently slide the cheesecakes out of the moulds and carefully peel away the baking paper from the bases only. Place on small plates, then peel off the remaining baking paper. Dust the cheesecakes with icing sugar, then serve with the compote on the side. PER SERVING 610kcals, 48.6g fat (29.5g saturated), 5.7g protein, 38.5g carbs (35.1g sugars), 0.7g salt, 1.6g fibre


COMING SOON…

COUNTRY CHRISTMAS

ON SALE

8 SEPTEMBER

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Autumn

As the countryside turns from green to yellow, red and brown, the harvest brings a time of plenty for cooks. Pumpkins are transformed into Halloween lanterns and bonfire parties are warmed by mulled cider. Hedgerows yield their bounty of blackberries, perfect partners to the plentiful crisp apples and pears. Curries and gently spiced dishes hint at an Indian summer‌ But now is the time for comforting casseroles and hearty stews


This season, enjoy…

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PUMPKINS • BLACKBERRIES • PEARS


• ARTISAN CIDER • DAMSONS • QUINCE • SQUASH • APPLES

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Green chicken biryani SERVES 8-10. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR 20 MIN, OVEN TIME 30 MIN, PLUS 12 HOURS/ OVERNIGHT MARINATING AND RESTING

• Sunflower oil for shallow frying • 350g onions, halved and thinly sliced • 25g toasted flaked almonds • 2 tbsp mixed chopped fresh mint and coriander to garnish FOR THE CHICKEN

• 2 tbsp coriander seeds • Seeds from 20 green cardamom pods • 10 cloves • 3 x 5cm pieces cinnamon stick • 2 dried red cayenne or kashmiri chillies, or 1 tsp kashmiri chilli powder or cayenne pepper

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• ½ tsp black peppercorns • ½ tsp ground turmeric • 1 tbsp white poppy seeds or ground almonds • 2-4 medium-hot fresh green cayenne chillies • 5cm piece fresh ginger, sliced • 6 fat garlic cloves, sliced • 20g fresh mint leaves • 40g fresh coriander leaves • 1 tbsp sunflower oil • 250g natural yogurt • 750g skinless and boneless free-range chicken thighs and breasts, cut into large chunks • 400g chopped skinned tomatoes, fresh or tinned • 1 tsp soft brown sugar FOR THE RICE

• ½ tsp saffron strands

• 3 tbsp warm milk • 500g basmati rice • 4 tsp salt • 1 tsp cumin seeds • 8 green cardamom pods, cracked • 12 cloves • 50g butter or ghee, melted 1 For the chicken, grind the coriander and cardamom seeds, the cloves, cinnamon, dried chillies/chilli powder and peppercorns in a spice grinder or pestle and mortar. Add the turmeric and poppy seeds/ almonds and grind again briefly. 2 Put the spice mixture in a food processor with the green chillies, ginger, garlic, mint and coriander leaves, 1 tbsp oil and 1 tsp salt, then grind to a smooth paste. Put this paste in a large bowl with the yogurt and combine, then add the chicken and turn to coat. Chill, covered, for 12 hours or overnight. 3 When ready to cook, heat 1cm of sunflower oil in a large, deep frying pan. Fry the onions, stirring as they start to brown, until crisp and golden. Lift out with a slotted spoon on to kitchen paper, sprinkle with salt and leave to go cold. Reserve the oil in the pan. 4 For the rice, lightly grind the saffron in a pestle and mortar, then add to the warm milk in a jug. Put the rice in a bowl, cover with cold water and set aside for 5 minutes. 5 Meanwhile, heat 3 tbsp of the reserved oil in a large frying pan. Add the chicken and its marinade, the tomatoes and the sugar, then simmer for 5-7 minutes until the chicken is nearly cooked through (it will cook in the oven). Lift the chicken out of the sauce into a bowl, then simmer the sauce until reduced by about half. Return the chicken to the pan, stir well and season. Keep it over a low heat. 6 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Meanwhile, cook the rice: put 4 litres cold water, the salt, cumin seeds, cracked cardamom pods and 12 cloves in a very large pan and bring to the boil. Drain the soaked rice and add it to the pan, then bring back to a vigorous boil and cook for 5-6 minutes. Drain. 7 Set aside a large handful of the cold fried onions to garnish.


AUTUMN

Gently heat half the butter/ghee in a 5-6 litre flameproof dish with a lid. Spread half the rice over the base, then pour over half the saffron milk. Spoon over the curry, then scatter over three quarters of the fried onions. Cover with the rest of the rice, then pour over the remaining milk, melted butter/ ghee and 3 tbsp boiling water. 8 Cover the dish with foil, crimping it over the edges to seal, then put the lid on. Set over a high heat for 2 minutes to build up steam, then transfer to the oven for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave to rest for 10 minutes. 9 Serve the biryani in a warmed dish, scattered with the remaining fried onions, toasted almonds and chopped mint and coriander. PER SERVING (FOR 10) 401kcals, 12g fat (4.3g saturated), 24.5g protein, 47.3g carbs (6.1g sugars), 2.2g salt, 2.7g fibre

GREAT FOR A CROWD

Sticky beer-baked chicken SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN, OVEN TIME 45-50 MIN, PLUS 4 HOURS/ OVERNIGHT MARINATING

I like to serve this with a Turkish cacik salad (peeled, seeded and diced cucumber mixed with natural yogurt, crushed garlic, olive oil and salt) or a good coleslaw. Make up to 12 hours MAKE ahead, cover and chill. AHEAD Serve cold in a buffet. • 2.5kg British free-range chicken joints (a mix of skin-on, bone-in thighs, breasts and drumsticks)

• 1 tbsp dark soft brown or muscovado sugar • 50g maple syrup • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar, red wine vinegar or lemon juice • 2 tsp dijon mustard • 3 garlic cloves, crushed • 1½ tsp sweet paprika

FOR THE DRY SPICE RUB

• 1½ tsp fine sea salt • 1½ tsp sweet paprika • ¾ tsp each onion powder, dried thyme and ground white pepper • ½ tsp each cayenne pepper, finely ground black pepper and garlic powder FOR THE STICKY GLAZING SAUCE

• 200ml dark, sweetish ale (I used Theakston Old Peculier) • 200ml tomato ketchup

1 Cut the bone-in breasts in half. Put all the chicken joints in a large, non-stick roasting tin. Mix the dry spice rub ingredients together in a small bowl and sprinkle over both sides of the chicken pieces. Cover with cling film and chill for at least 4 hours, or overnight. 2 Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. Bake the chicken pieces skin-side up for 15 minutes, turn the pieces, then bake for a further

15 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, for the sticky glazing sauce, mix all the ingredients together in a pan. Simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the sauce has reduced and thickened slightly. 4 Remove the chicken pieces from the oven and brush liberally with some of the sauce. Return to the oven for a further 5 minutes, then remove them, turn them back over and brush with some more glaze. Bake for another 5 minutes. Repeat once or twice until the chicken is tender and cooked through. Serve with a cacik salad (or coleslaw) if you like. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 408kcals, 11.4g fat (3.2g saturated), 60.4g protein, 14.3g carbs (13.4g sugars), 2.2g salt, 1.2g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 69


FRUIT OF KINGS

Quinces are exotically scented and inedible raw. Once cooked, they take on a beautiful colour and unbeatable, deep flavour. Find them in October at farmers’ markets and good greengrocers.

Lamb and quince tagine with chermoula and buttered couscous SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR, SIMMERING TIME 1 HOUR 30 MIN

Prepare the tagine up to MAKE 48 hours in advance, AHEAD cover and chill. • 3 tbsp olive oil • 1kg lean lamb shoulder or leg, cut into chunks • 2 onions, thinly sliced • 5cm fresh ginger, finely grated • 200g skinned chopped tomatoes, fresh or tinned • Small cinnamon stick • 1 tsp ground ginger • 4 tbsp clear honey • 1 small preserved lemon, flesh discarded (from the world food section in large supermarkets), or 2 strips lemon zest, chopped • 750ml lamb or chicken stock • ¾ tsp salt • ½ tsp black pepper • 400g tin chickpeas, drained and rinsed • Zest and juice 1 lemon • 1kg quinces (about 4 medium) • 40g butter, plus an extra knob • 2 tbsp caster sugar • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon • 50g blanched almonds, toasted in a dry frying pan, then halved FOR THE CHERMOULA

• 3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped 70 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 2 tsp ground cumin • 2 tsp ground coriander • 1½ tsp paprika • 1 tbsp harissa • Good pinch saffron strands • 2 tbsp lemon juice • 20g fresh coriander leaves • 20g fresh mint leaves • 4 tbsp olive oil • ½ tsp salt FOR THE BUTTERED COUSCOUS

• 350g couscous • ½ tsp salt • 450ml boiling water • 25g butter • Finely grated zest 1 lemon 1 For the chermoula, blend all the ingredients to a smooth paste in a food processor. 2 Heat 1½ tbsp of the oil in a large flameproof casserole. Fry the lamb in 2 batches until browned, then lift onto a plate. Add the rest of the oil and onions to the pan and fry over a medium heat until soft. Add the grated ginger, fry for 1 minute, then add the tomatoes, cinnamon, ground ginger, 2 tbsp honey, 2 tbsp chermoula and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Add the lamb and the preserved lemon (or zest), stock, ½ tsp salt and the pepper. Partcover, then simmer for 1 hour. 3 Add the chickpeas and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes until the lamb is tender. 4 Meanwhile put 1 litre cold water

and the lemon zest and juice in a saucepan. Peel, quarter and core the quinces, putting them in the pan as you go, to stop them browning. Bring to a simmer over a medium heat and cook for 10-15 minutes until just tender when pierced with a knife. Drain well and transfer to a deep frying pan or sauté pan. Add the 40g butter, the remaining honey, the sugar, cinnamon, 4 tbsp from the lamb cooking liquid in the pan and the remaining ¼ tsp salt, then cook gently, turning now and then, until the juices are sticky and reduced and the quinces are tender. 5 Shortly before the lamb is ready, put the couscous and salt in a large heatproof bowl, then stir in the boiling water. Cover with a clean tea towel and leave for 5 minutes. Uncover, then fluff with a fork. Melt the 25g butter in a large pan, add the couscous and stir on a low heat for 2 minutes to heat through, then stir in the lemon zest. Melt the knob of butter in a pan and fry the almonds in it for 1 minute. 6 Stir the remaining chermoula into the lamb and adjust the seasoning to taste. Arrange the quinces over the top, scatter with the almonds, then serve with the buttered couscous. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 707kcals, 30.3g fat (10.4g saturated), 38.1g protein, 67.6g carbs (23.2g sugars), 1.6g salt, 5.6g fibre


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• 200g chopped skinned tomatoes, fresh or tinned • 2 tsp light muscovado sugar • 600ml fresh beef stock • 1 tsp dried oregano • 4 fresh bay leaves • 100ml soured cream to serve FOR THE AVOCADO AND CHILLI SALSA

• 3 medium vine tomatoes, skinned, deseeded and diced (see delicious magazine.co.uk/ peeltomatoes) • 2 small ripe avocados, diced • ½ red onion, finely chopped • 1 fresh jalapeño chilli, deseeded and finely chopped • 10g fresh coriander leaves, coarsely chopped, plus extra to serve • Juice ½ lime • 2 shakes Tabasco sauce

Chilli con carne with avocado and chilli salsa SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 45 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 3 HOURS 20 MIN, PLUS OVERNIGHT SOAKING

Classic chilli con carne is about more than heat – just as important is depth of flavour. A combination of the right type of fresh and dried chillies is what’s needed. Use a habanero if you like your chilli hot, or a couple of jalapeños for a milder taste. And if you’re going to spend time slow cooking this recipe, it’s almost as easy to make double and freeze half, ready for a later date. Many supermarkets sell KNOW- fresh jalapeño chillies. HOW You can find habaneros in specialist shops or large grocers, or use scotch bonnets instead. 72 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

Make to the end of step 7 MAKE up to 3 days in advance, AHEAD then cool, cover and chill – the flavours will develop further. Or freeze for up to 3 months. • 175g dried black beans, soaked overnight, then drained • 1 large dried chipotle chilli or 1 tbsp chipotle chilli paste (from the world food aisle of large supermarkets or coolchile.co.uk) • 4 tbsp sunflower oil • 1kg British chuck or blade steak, cut into 2.5cm chunks • 1 large onion, chopped • 4 garlic cloves, crushed • 2 tsp chilli flakes • 1 fresh red habanero chilli or 2 fresh green jalapeño chillies, deseeded and chopped (see Debbie’s intro and Know-how) • 2 tsp freshly ground cumin seeds • 1 tbsp paprika • 1 tsp medium-hot chilli powder

1 Put the soaked black beans in a medium saucepan and cover with cold water. Boil vigorously for 10 minutes, then reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 45-50 minutes until tender. Drain. 2 Meanwhile, remove and discard the stalk and seeds from the dried chipotle chilli, if using, then put in a small bowl and cover with boiling water. Leave to soak for 30 minutes, then scrape out and chop the flesh (discard the skin). 3 Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a large, heavy-based flameproof casserole. Brown the meat in batches over a high heat until well coloured all over, then transfer to a plate. 4 Add the remaining oil and the onion to the casserole. Cover and cook gently for 10 minutes or until the onion is soft and nicely browned, stirring now and then. 5 Add the chopped chipotle/ chipotle paste to the casserole with the garlic, chilli flakes, habanero/jalapeños, cumin, paprika and chilli powder. Fry over a medium heat for 1 minute. 6 Return the meat to the casserole with the chopped tomatoes, sugar, stock, oregano and bay leaves. Season lightly, bring to the boil, then reduce to a gentle simmer and cook, covered, for 2 hours. 7 Add the cooked black beans to the casserole and simmer for a further 20-30 minutes until the meat is tender (see Make Ahead).


AUTUMN 8 When ready to serve, mix all the salsa ingredients together in a medium bowl and season to taste with a little salt. Taste and adjust the seasoning of the chilli con carne if necessary, then divide among bowls. Drizzle with a little soured cream, spoon over the salsa and garnish with chopped coriander. Serve with steamed rice or warm flour tortillas, if you like, with the rest of the salsa and soured cream on the side. PER SERVING 779kcals, 41.5g fat (13.5g saturated), 71.2g protein, 32.7g carbs (11.8g sugars), 0.5g salt, 13.8g fibre

Dorset pork and cider casserole with mustard and sage SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 50 MIN, OVEN TIME 2 HOURS

Make up to 48 hours in MAKE advance and keep, AHEAD covered, in the fridge. Bring up to room temperature before heating over a low-medium heat on the hob. I serve this with baked DEBBIE’S potatoes and homegrown TIP greens. If peeling a lot of shallots, FOOD TEAM’S cover with boiled water in TIP a heatproof bowl for 1-2 minutes. Cool under cold running water, then peel easily.

medium-high heat, add 1½ tbsp of the oil, then the bacon lardons, and fry slowly until crisp and brown. Lift onto a plate using a slotted spoon. 2 Heat the rest of the oil in the casserole and brown the pork in 2 batches, setting it aside with the bacon when ready. Put the shallots in the pan and fry until golden all over. Set aside with the pork and bacon. 3 Put half the butter and the chopped onion in the pan, cover and cook for 10 minutes until soft and lightly browned. Return the pork and bacon to the pan, pour over the cider and stock, stir in the sage and bring to the boil, stirring now and then. Cover with foil and the lid, then transfer to the oven to cook for 1½ hours. 4 Stir the celery and shallots into

the casserole, re-cover and return to the oven for a further 30 minutes, by which time the meat and vegetables should be tender. 5 Put the casserole on the hob, uncover it and bring to a simmer. Mix the remaining butter with the flour to make a smooth paste (known as a beurre manié). Stir in a little paste and let it simmer and thicken, adding a little more if need be, until the casserole liquid has a good sauce consistency. (You might not need to use all the paste.) Stir in the mustard and crème fraîche, then simmer for 1-2 minutes more. Add an extra splash of cider just before serving. PER SERVING 576kcals, 32.5g fat (13.3g saturated), 53.7g protein, 10.9g carbs (6.2g sugars), 2g salt, 2.5g fibre

GREAT FOR A CROWD

• 3 tbsp sunflower oil • 200g British free-range smoked bacon lardons • 1.2kg well-trimmed, free-range pork shoulder, cut into 5cm pieces • 400g small shallots, peeled (see food team’s tip) • 55g butter, softened • 1 medium onion, chopped • 450ml dry cider, plus an extra splash • 450ml fresh chicken stock • 1 tbsp chopped fresh sage • 3 large celery sticks, cut into chunky slices • 30g plain flour • 2 tbsp wholegrain dijon mustard • 4 tbsp crème fraîche 1 Heat the oven to 170°C/150°C fan/gas 3½. Put a large, flameproof casserole over a deliciousmagazine.co.uk 73


• 2 large fresh thyme sprigs • 1 tsp cracked black peppercorns • 75g butter • 65g plain flour • 150g cheddar, finely grated • ¼ nutmeg, freshly grated YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 20cm x 29cm shallow baking dish

Parma ham, chicken liver and mushroom vincisgrassi SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 55 MIN, OVEN TIME 30-35 MIN, PLUS INFUSING

Vincisgrassi is a version of lasagne from the Marche region on the east coast of Italy. It was traditionally made with assorted cockerel giblets, but I’ve turned it into something slightly more luxurious by using chicken livers. I’ve also used cheddar instead of parmesan. This is a dish for a special DEBBIE’S occasion as it takes time TIPS

to prepare, but you can make it a day ahead. Take it out of the fridge an hour before baking to bring up to room temperature. The original dish used black truffles. As these are beyond 74 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

most people’s budget, you could add a splash of truffle olive oil to the chicken livers in step 5. If you don’t like chicken FOOD TEAM’S liver, use 400g TIP sausagemeat in step 5 and fry for 10 minutes longer. • 50g dried porcini mushrooms • 250ml fresh chicken stock, hot • 150g parma ham slices • 9 sheets (175g) dried lasagne • 30g butter, plus extra to grease • 1 tbsp olive oil • 450g chestnut mushrooms, thinly sliced • 400g free-range chicken livers, trimmed and coarsely chopped FOR THE SAUCE

• 1 small onion, halved • 8 cloves • 1 litre whole milk, plus extra for topping up if necessary • 6 fresh bay leaves, crumpled

1 For the sauce, stud the onion with the cloves and put in a pan with the milk, bay, thyme and peppercorns. Bring to the boil, then take off the heat. Leave to infuse for 30 minutes. 2 Put the porcini mushrooms in a small bowl, cover with the hot stock and put a ramekin on top to keep them submerged. Set aside. Boil a large pan of salted water. 3 Cut the parma ham slices in half lengthways, stack them up, then cut them across into thin slivers. 4 Drop the lasagne a sheet at a time into the boiling water and cook for 12 minutes or until al dente. Drain, rinse under cold water, then lay out the sheets side by side on a large sheet of cling film. Cover with more cling film. 5 Drain the porcini, reserving the stock, then squeeze out any excess liquid. Heat the 30g butter and oil in a large non-stick frying pan, add the porcini and fry gently for 2 minutes. Add the fresh mushrooms, increase the heat and fry for 3 minutes. Add the reserved chicken stock and cook rapidly until the liquid has almost evaporated. Add the chicken livers and fry for 3 minutes, stirring. Add the parma ham and stir to mix. Remove from the heat and season with pepper only – the ham will make it salty enough. 6 Bring the milk for the sauce back to the boil, then strain through a sieve into a jug (discard the flavourings) and make back up to 1 litre with extra milk if necessary. Melt the 75g butter in a medium pan, add the flour and cook gently for 2 minutes, stirring, without letting it colour. Remove from the heat and gradually stir in the milk. Bring back to the boil, stirring, then simmer gently over a very low heat, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until it thickens to coat


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the back of a wooden spoon. 7 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Remove the sauce from the heat, then add 75g of the grated cheddar and the nutmeg. Season. Butter a 20cm x 29cm shallow baking dish and line the base with 3 of the cooked lasagne sheets. Spoon over a third of the chicken liver mixture, then pour over a third of the cheese sauce. Repeat these layers twice more to finish with the lasagne sheets. Sprinkle with the rest of the cheddar. 8 Bake for 30-35 minutes until golden and bubbling. Serve with a mixed leaf salad. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 509kcals, 29.3g fat (16.3g saturated), 30.9g protein, 28.7g carbs (6.8g sugars), 1.7g salt, 3.4g fibre

Vinegar chicken SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 20 MIN

I am amazed at the complexity the vinegar adds to the dish.

• 2 tbsp brandy • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard • 150ml crème fraîche • 3 vine-ripened tomatoes, skinned (see food team’s tips), deseeded and diced • 1 tbsp each chopped fresh tarragon and curly parsley 1 Put the butter in a pan over a low heat until just melted. Pour into a large, deep frying pan or sauté pan with a lid, discarding the milky liquid from the bottom of the butter pan (see tips). 2 Cut the chicken legs in half through the joint and halve each part-boned breast. Season on both sides, then fry, skin-side down, in the clarified butter over a medium heat until golden. Turn over and brown the other sides. Add the garlic, cover, lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until the chicken is cooked. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 110°C/90°C fan/gas ¼. 3 Lift the chicken onto a warmed

serving plate, cover and keep warm in the oven. Pour any juices from the pan into a small bowl, leave to settle, then skim off and discard the fat. 4 Return the pan to the heat, add the vinegar and sugar and bring to the boil, scraping up any bits with a spoon. Boil to reduce to about 2 tbsp, then add the wine and brandy and boil until reduced by half. Add any chicken cooking juices and boil until reduced to about 150ml (see food team’s tips). Press the sauce and garlic through a sieve into a clean pan, discarding the garlic skins. Return the sauce to the pan, then stir in the mustard and crème fraîche. Simmer until thickened slightly. 5 Return the chicken to the pan, spoon over some sauce and reheat briefly. Stir in the tomatoes and herbs, then season and serve. PER SERVING 652kcals, 34.1g fat (19.1g saturated), 64.2g protein, 5g carbs (4g sugars), 0.9g salt, 1.5g fibre

Freeze minus the MAKE tomatoes and herbs. AHEAD Defrost, reheat and finish the recipe. To joint a chicken see KNOW- deliciousmagazine.co.uk, HOW or ask your butcher To skin tomatoes, score FOOD TEAM’S the bases, then lower TIPS gently into a pan of just-boiled water. Leave for 30 seconds, then remove and allow to cool slightly. The skins should peel off easily. You can use 40g ready-clarified butter or ghee instead of making your own in step 1, if you like. If the chicken doesn’t produce much juice after step 3, use 100ml chicken stock instead for step 4. • 50g unsalted butter (see tips) • 1.5kg free-range chicken joints (2 large breasts, wings attached, and 2 large legs; see Know-how) • 6 large garlic cloves, unpeeled • 6 tbsp good-quality malt vinegar (I used Artisan Malt Vinegar, from souschef.co.uk) • 2 tsp caster sugar • 300ml dry white wine deliciousmagazine.co.uk 75


GOLDEN GLOBES

Available throughout autumn, squash has a firm, sweet, almost nutty flesh, and the small seed cavity means it yields a lot for its size. Look for Crown Prince, Kabocha and Onion varieties.

Squash parmigiana SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 10 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 25 MIN, OVEN TIME 55-60 MIN, PLUS RESTING

This dish works well with the sweetness of squash. It makes a great side dish with a simple roast chicken. • 50g butter • 900g butternut squash, deseeded and peeled • 3 fat garlic cloves, thinly sliced • 2 x 400g tins plum tomatoes • 200g passata • 1 tbsp chopped fresh oregano • 4 tbsp red wine vinegar • 2 tsp caster sugar • 300ml double cream • 75g parmesan, or vegetarian alternative, finely grated 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/ 180°C fan/gas 6. Melt 25g of the butter. Cut the squash into small,

76 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

chunky, 1cm thick slices and put into a shallow baking dish that measures about 23cm x 32cm. Pour over the melted butter, sprinkle with ¼ tsp salt, then toss together well. Arrange the slices in an even layer over the base of the dish. Cover the dish tightly with foil and bake for 30-35 minutes or until the squash is just tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife. 2 Meanwhile, melt the remaining butter in a large frying pan, add the garlic and as soon as it starts to sizzle, add the tinned tomatoes, passata and oregano. Simmer rapidly for 25 minutes, stirring regularly and breaking up the tomatoes with a wooden spoon, until the sauce is thick but still slightly moist. Put the vinegar and sugar into a small pan and boil rapidly until reduced to around 2 tsp worth. Stir into the tomato sauce and season well with salt

and freshly ground black pepper. 3 Remove the squash from the oven, uncover and pour away any excess liquid. Spoon over the tomato sauce. Put the cream into a small pan and simmer rapidly (watch it like a hawk so it doesn’t boil over) for 4-4½ minutes, stirring now and then, until it has reduced a little and coats the back of a wooden spoon. Take off the heat, stir in 50g of the grated parmesan or vegetarian alternative, then season to taste. 4 Pour the parmesan cream in an even layer over the top of the tomato sauce and sprinkle with the remainder of the cheese. Bake for 20-25 minutes until richly golden and bubbling. Remove from the oven and leave to rest for 5-10 minutes before serving. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 459kcals, 37.8g fat (23.5g saturated), 8.9g protein, 20.2g carbs (12.7g sugars), 0.5g salt, 4.9g fibre


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GREAT FOR A CROWD

Lamb kofta curry SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 1 HOUR

This spicy meatball curry goes well with steamed rice, mango chutney and poppadoms to serve alongside. Fresh curry leaves are available from Asian grocers, some supermarkets and online. If you can’t find any, use dried curry leaves (available from large supermarkets) – they’re not as flavourful, so add more to taste. FOOD TEAM’S TIP

• 2 tbsp coriander seeds • 1 tbsp cumin seeds • ¼ tsp cardamom seeds (from green cardamom pods) 78 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 2 tsp ground turmeric • 2 tsp garam masala • 1½ tsp medium-hot chilli powder or cayenne pepper • 6 tbsp ghee or sunflower oil • 4 medium onions, finely chopped • 6 fat garlic cloves, crushed • 5cm piece fresh ginger, grated • 2 long, medium-hot red cayenne chillies, deseeded and finely chopped • 1 cinnamon stick, broken in half • 300g skinned chopped tomatoes, fresh or tinned • 1 tbsp tomato purée • 300ml fresh chicken stock or water • 200ml coconut cream • 750g lean British lamb mince • 3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander • 1½ tbsp beaten free-range egg

• Small handful fresh curry leaves (see food team’s tip) • 5 green cayenne chillies, slit open lengthways 1 Heat a dry, heavy-based frying pan over a high heat. Add the coriander and cumin seeds and shake over the heat for a few seconds until they darken slightly and smell fragrant. 2 Grind to a fine powder in a spice grinder or pestle and mortar. Add the cardamom seeds and grind to a fine powder, then mix with the turmeric, garam masala and chilli powder/cayenne pepper. 3 Heat half the ghee/oil in a wide pan. Add the onions and fry gently for 7-10 minutes until soft and golden. Add the garlic, ginger and red chillies and fry for 2 minutes. Add the ground spices and 1 tsp salt and cook for 2 minutes more. Scrape half the mixture into a mixing bowl to cool. 4 Add the cinnamon to the onion mixture in the pan and cook gently for 2-3 minutes. Add the tomatoes, tomato purée, stock/ water and half the coconut cream, then bring to a gentle simmer. 5 Add the lamb, chopped coriander, beaten egg and 1 tsp salt to the bowl of fried onions and gently mix to combine (take care not to overwork the mix or the meatballs will be hard). Shape into golfball-size meatballs. 6 Heat the remaining ghee/oil in a large non-stick frying pan. Add the meatballs, in batches if necessary, and fry for 2-3 minutes, turning now and then, until lightly browned all over. 7 Drop the browned meatballs into the simmering sauce. Add the curry leaves and green chillies, part-cover and simmer gently for 1 hour, stirring now and then, or until the sauce is thickened. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary, then spoon the curry into a warmed serving dish and drizzle with some of the remaining coconut cream. Serve with steamed basmati or pilau rice, if you like. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 522kcals, 43.7g fat (25.3g saturated), 27.8g protein, 8.9g carbs (5.7g sugars), 0.1g salt, 2.2g fibre


AUTUMN Cheddar and chard tart with cheese and oatmeal pastry SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR, PLUS CHILLING

Chard, a member of the beet family (which includes beetroot, spinach and, interestingly, quinoa), is one of the most nutritious vegetables around. If it’s not in season, use spinach instead. Make the pastry up to MAKE 24 hours ahead and keep AHEAD wrapped in cling film in the fridge. The tart is best freshly baked but will keep chilled overnight. Bring back to room temperature to serve. If the chard has very thick FOOD TEAM’S stalks, halve lengthways TIP before slicing (step 3). • 400g chard, washed and dried thoroughly • 25g unsalted butter • 3 large free-range eggs • 300ml crème fraîche • 225g mature cheddar, coarsely grated

flatten into a fat disc, wrap in cling film, then chill for 30 minutes. 2 Roll out the chilled pastry to the thickness of a pound coin on a lightly floured work surface, then use to line the tart tin. Prick the base here and there with a fork, then chill again for 30 minutes. 3 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Cut the green leaves away from the white stalks of the chard. Bundle up the stalks, then thinly slice them across. Shred the green leaves. Set aside. 4 Remove the pastry case from the fridge and line it with a crumpled sheet of non-stick baking paper, then fill with baking beans or uncooked rice. Bake for 15-20 minutes until the edges are biscuit-coloured. Remove the paper and beans/rice, return the pastry case to the oven and bake for 7-8 minutes more until the base is golden brown. Remove from the oven and set aside.

5 Reduce the oven temperature to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. Melt the 25g butter in a large pan, add the swiss chard stalks and a little salt and pepper, stir, then cover and cook for 2 minutes or until just tender. Uncover, stir in the shredded chard leaves and some salt and pepper, re-cover and cook for 5 minutes. Tip into a colander in the sink and gently press out the excess liquid. 6 Mix the eggs and crème fraîche in a measuring jug with some salt and pepper until combined. Loosely layer the chard and grated cheese in the cooked pastry case, then pour the crème fraîche mixture over. Bake for 30 minutes or until set and richly golden. Leave to cool slightly, then remove from the tin to serve. PER SERVING 580kcals, 45.4g fat (26.6g saturated), 17.5g protein, 24.7g carbs (1.3g sugars), 1.3g salt, 1.5g fibre

FOR THE PASTRY

• 175g plain flour, plus extra to dust • 65g medium oatmeal • 50g chilled unsalted butter, cut into chunks • 50g chilled vegetable shortening (or lard for non-vegetarians), cut into chunks • 75g mature cheddar, finely grated • 2 tbsp iced water YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 25cm x 4cm deep, loosebottomed tart tin 1 For the pastry, put the 175g flour into a food processor with the oatmeal, a pinch of salt, the butter and vegetable shortening or lard. Process briefly until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Add the grated cheddar, then whizz briefly to mix. Add the iced water and whizz briefly until the mixture comes together into a ball. Tip onto a lightly floured work surface, deliciousmagazine.co.uk 79


PERFECT PEARS

The two most common British varieties are conference and comice – which are delicious raw. Williams is a good one to cook with. Pears ripen best once picked – they’re ready when the area near the stem yields slightly when pressed.

Parkin puddings with pan-fried pears and spiced golden syrup SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 20 MIN

Parkin is similar to sticky gingerbread but has the addition of oatmeal, giving it a slightly nutty texture. To make these puddings extra moist, I’ve added finely chopped stem ginger. Make the puddings up MAKE to the end of step 1, AHEAD 24 hours ahead, cover and chill, then reheat in a microwave or medium oven. They will freeze for up to 1 month, individually wrapped in cling film. Make the pears and syrup to serve. • 75g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing • 175g plain flour • ½ rounded tsp bicarbonate of soda • ½ tsp baking powder • 2 tsp ground ginger • ½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg • ½ tsp ground mixed spice

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• 150g stem ginger pieces (from a jar of stem ginger in syrup) • 100g light muscovado sugar • 2 tbsp golden syrup • 2 tbsp black treacle • 2 medium free-range eggs, beaten • 50g medium oatmeal • Clotted cream to serve FOR THE PEARS AND SPICED GOLDEN SYRUP

• 150g golden syrup • ½ tsp ground mixed spice • Large squeeze lemon juice • 3 ripe but firm pears, such as williams • 25g unsalted butter YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 6 x 250ml non-stick pudding moulds 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Grease the moulds with butter and put on a baking tray. Sift the flour, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder, ginger, nutmeg, mixed spice and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Whizz the stem ginger in a mini food processor until finely chopped. Put the remaining

butter, muscovado sugar, 2 tbsp golden syrup and black treacle in a large pan, then warm gently, stirring, until smooth. Stir in the stem ginger, then fold in the flour mixture, eggs, oatmeal and 150ml warm water. Divide the mixture equally among the moulds and bake for 20 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, for the spiced golden syrup, heat the golden syrup, mixed spice and lemon juice gently in a pan for a minute or so. Set over a low heat to keep warm. 3 Peel, quarter and core the pears. Melt the butter in a non-stick frying pan and lightly brown the pears over a mediumhigh heat for 2-3 minutes, turning now and then. Add a splash of the spiced golden syrup and cook for 1-2 minutes. 4 Turn out the parkin puddings into warmed bowls and add the pears. Drizzle over a little of the remaining syrup and serve with clotted cream (leftover syrup is great drizzled over pancakes). PER SERVING 535kcals, 17g fat (9.6g saturated), 7.1g protein, 86.2g carbs (56.6g sugars), 0.7g salt, 4.7g fibre


AUTUMN

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Pear and ginger Eve’s pudding with brown sugar custard

• 500g (about 4) large conference or comice pears

SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 50 MIN,

FOR THE SPONGE

OVEN TIME 1 HOUR

• 190g unsalted butter, softened • 190g caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling • 3 large free-range eggs • 150g self-raising flour • 1½ tsp baking powder • 1½ tsp ground ginger • 6 tbsp syrup from a jar of stem ginger • 45g ground almonds • 5 pieces stem ginger, finely chopped

I do love nursery puddings. In this one, ginger-laced pears are baked in a toffee-caramel sauce and covered with a stem ginger sponge topping. Make the custard a few MAKE hours in advance and lay AHEAD cling film on the surface to prevent a skin forming. Chill. Pour the ginger sauce into FOOD TEAM’S the dish quickly in step 2 TIP to make an even layer. FOR THE SAUCE

• 90g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing • 90g granulated sugar • 2 tbsp syrup from a jar of stem ginger • 5cm piece fresh ginger

82 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

FOR THE BROWN SUGAR CUSTARD

• 300ml whole milk • 100ml double cream • 4 large free-range egg yolks • 50g light muscovado sugar • 2 tsp cornflour YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 23cm x 25cm (about 2 litre) shallow baking dish

1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Grease the baking dish. 2 For the sauce, melt the butter in a medium pan. Add the sugar and ginger syrup, then cook over a medium-high heat, stirring often, until the mixture becomes a sauce. Pour evenly over the base of the baking dish (see food team’s tip). 3 Finely grate the fresh ginger into a mixing bowl (squeeze the juice from any ungrated ginger into the bowl, then discard the fibres). Peel, quarter and core the pears, then cut each piece across into two. Add them to the bowl with the grated ginger and any juice and toss together, then spoon evenly over the sauce in the baking dish. 4 For the sponge, beat the butter and sugar in a large bowl using a hand-held electric mixer for about 5 minutes until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, adding a tablespoon of the flour with the second and third egg. Sift over the remaining flour with the baking powder, ground ginger and a pinch of salt, then gently fold in using a large metal spoon in a figure-of-eight motion. Gently fold in the stem ginger syrup, ground almonds and chopped stem ginger. 5 Spoon the sponge mixture evenly over the top of the pears and bake for 1 hour, covering the dish with a double thickness of foil halfway through, once the pudding has turned a rich golden colour. 6 Meanwhile, make the brown sugar custard. Bring the milk and cream to the boil in a small non-stick pan. In a mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks and sugar together briefly, then whisk in the cornflour. Pour in the hot creamy milk, whisking, then return the mixture to the pan and stir over a low-medium heat for a few minutes until the mixture coats the back of the wooden spoon. Don’t let it boil. Stir in a pinch of salt. Remove from the heat and keep warm. 7 Remove the pudding from the oven and leave it to sit for 5 minutes, then sprinkle with caster sugar and serve with the warm brown sugar custard. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 795kcals, 46g fat (25.3g saturated), 10.2g protein, 83.7g carbs (66.6g sugars), 0.6g salt, 2.8g fibre


AUTUMN Pecan and cinnamon streusel coffee cake SERVES 10-12. HANDS-ON TIME 45 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR

In the US coffee cakes aren’t actually made with coffee but are made to be served with coffee. This recipe (one of my all-time favourites) is a butter-rich vanilla cake baked with a band of cinnamon and pecan streusel running through the centre and scattered on top. This wonderful cake MAKE will keep in an airtight AHEAD tin for 3-4 days. The streusel will possibly change position in the middle of the cake as it bakes, so don’t worry if it sinks a little – the taste will be just as good. To toast pecans, spread DEBBIE’S over a baking tray and put TIP in a warm oven (170°C/ 150°C fan/gas 3½) for 10 minutes. Leave to cool before using. • 140g plain flour • 35g cornflour • 1 tsp baking powder • ½ tsp salt • 110g soft unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing • 225g caster sugar • 3 large free-range eggs • 1½ tsp vanilla extract • 125ml soured cream FOR THE CINNAMON STREUSEL LAYER

• 40g pecans, lightly toasted (see tips) and coarsely chopped, plus extra to decorate • 50g plain flour • 1 tsp ground cinnamon • 50g chilled unsalted butter • 75g light muscovado sugar TO DECORATE

• 1½ tsp caster sugar • Pinch ground cinnamon YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• 900g loaf tin, lightly greased and base and sides lined with non-stick baking paper 1 For the cinnamon streusel layer, put 25g of the pecans into a food processor and whizz briefly, using

GREAT FOR A CROWD

the pulse button, until finely chopped but still with a little texture. Tip into a bowl and set aside. Put the flour, cinnamon and butter into the food processor and whizz until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Stir in the muscovado sugar and the whizzed pecan nuts. 2 For the cake, heat the oven to 170°C/150°C fan/gas 3½. Sift the flour, cornflour, baking powder and salt into a mixing bowl and set aside. Beat the butter and sugar in a medium mixing bowl until it starts to stick together – it won’t go creamy at this stage because of the high proportion of sugar. Add one of the eggs and the vanilla extract and beat until pale and fluffy. Add the remaining eggs, one at a time, adding 2 tbsp of the sifted flour mixture with each egg. 3 Fold in the remaining flour in 3 additions, alternating with the soured cream. Spoon half the cake mixture into the prepared

tin (there’s no need to smooth it), then sprinkle over two-thirds of the streusel mixture. Stir the reserved chopped pecans into the remaining streusel mixture. Spoon the rest of the cake mixture into the tin and level the top. Sprinkle over the remaining streusel mixture. 4 Bake for about 1 hour or until a skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Leave the cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then carefully lift out onto a wire rack and leave to cool completely. Carefully peel away the baking paper once the cake has cooled. 5 To decorate, mix the caster sugar and a few extra chopped pecans with the cinnamon and sprinkle over the top of the cake. Serve in slices with a good strong cup of coffee. PER SERVING (FOR 12) 342kcals, 17.5g fat (9.2g saturated), 4.6g protein, 40.9g carbs (26.1g sugars), 0.4g salt, 1.1g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 83


ARTISAN CIDER

This traditional beverage involves shredding September’s bitter cider apples, then wrapping the pulp in hessian to form ‘cakes’, which are then pressed firmly to release the golden juices (above). Those juices are left to ferment, relying on their natural yeasts, then matured.

Chunky apple, raisin, walnut and cider cake SERVES 8-10. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR 25 MIN, PLUS SOAKING

Bake up to 2 days in MAKE AHEAD advance. Keep in a sealed container in a cool room. Or freeze for up to 1 month. • 50g each sultanas and raisins • 6 tbsp medium-sweet cider • 175g butter, softened, plus extra for greasing • 215g plain flour • 15g cornflour • 1½ tsp baking powder • ½ tsp salt • ½ tsp ground cinnamon • ¼ tsp ground cloves • ¼ tsp ground ginger • ¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg • 300g golden caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling • 2 medium free-range eggs

84 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 750g eating apples (about 6), peeled, cored and cut into 1cm pieces • 100g lightly toasted walnuts, broken into small pieces 1 Put the sultanas and raisins into a small bowl, cover with 3 tbsp of the cider and set aside for at least 2 hours or overnight. 2 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Grease and line a 23cm round, loose-bottomed cake tin. Tie a band of folded newspaper around the outside of the tin, so it comes about 8cm above the edge of the tin, and secure with string (to stop any over-browning). 3 Sift the flour, cornflour, baking powder, salt and ground/grated spices into the bowl of a stand mixer or a large mixing bowl. Add the sugar and butter and beat on a medium speed for 1 minute, stopping and scraping the mixture down the sides of the bowl, if

necessary, until well mixed. 4 Add the eggs and mix on low speed for a few seconds, then increase the speed and beat for 1 minute until light and fluffy. Beat in the remaining 3 tbsp cider. 5 Fold in the prepared apples, sultanas/raisins and walnuts. The mixture will look too thick and too appley, but don’t worry. Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin and gently level the surface. 6 Bake for 1 hour 25 minutes, covering loosely with foil or a double sheet of baking paper once it’s richly browned on top, until it is firm to the touch and a skewer pushed into the centre comes away clean. Leave to cool in the tin on a wire rack. Remove from the tin to a plate, sprinkle with caster sugar and serve. PER SERVING (FOR 10) 501kcals, 23.1g fat (10.4g saturated), 6.3g protein, 64.9g carbs (46.8g sugars), 0.9g salt, 2.7g fibre


AUTUMN

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PURPLE REIGN

Happily, the revival of British heritage fruit and veg has started a damson resurgence. In season from September to early October, these small, tart, deepcoloured plums are becoming easier to find in farmers’ markets and even in some supermarkets.

Damson cheese and caraway oatcakes MAKES 8 X 40G DAMSON CHEESES. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 2 HOURS, OVEN-TIME 25 MIN, PLUS COOLING

This set, sweetened purée is a little like dulce de membrillo (quince cheese). It will keep in the fridge for 2-3 months and makes a lovely gift. Pour the purée (step 3)

DEBBIE’S into a small tin lined with TIP

cling film and leave to set. Cut into cubes, toss in granulated sugar and serve with coffee. • 1.5kg damsons • About 1.1kg granulated sugar • Flavourless oil (such as sunflower), for greasing • Strong blue cheese, such as barkham blue or stilton (allow about 75g per person), to serve FOR THE CARAWAY OATCAKES (MAKES 18)

• 50g fine oatmeal, plus extra for sprinkling • 175g medium oatmeal • 1 tsp caraway seeds • ½ tsp salt • ¼ tsp baking powder • 25g unsalted butter 86 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

1 To make the damson cheese, put the damsons and 150ml water in a large, heavy-based pan. Put over a medium-high heat until the juices run, then cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes until soft and pulpy. 2 Push the pulp through a sieve into a bowl using the back of a wooden spoon to remove the skins and stones (discard). Measure the fruit pulp in a measuring jug, then return to the cleaned pan and add 350g sugar for every 400ml pulp. Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 1½-1¾ hours until very thick, stirring frequently and skimming off any scum from the top. Make sure it doesn’t catch on the base of the pan. When you can scrape a wooden spoon along the bottom of the pan and a visible line shows briefly, it’s ready to set. 3 Lightly oil 8 moulds (100-120ml each) – ramekins, plastic tubs or tea cups, jelly or friande moulds (or see tip). Fill with the purée, cover loosely with baking paper and leave for 4 hours to set. Once cold, cover each with a dampened cellophane jam pot cover held on by an elastic band and store in a cool dry place. 4 For the oatcakes, heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Put

both oatmeals, the caraway seeds, salt and baking powder into a mixing bowl. Put the butter and 90ml water in a small pan, then slowly melt the butter and bring to the boil. Quickly pour it onto the oatmeal mixture and mix with a wooden spoon to form a fairly stiff mixture. If it looks too dry and crumbly, add up to 1-1½ tbsp water, a little at a time. 5 Sprinkle some oatmeal onto the work surface and gently roll out the mixture as thinly as possible without it cracking. Cut into 6cm discs using a biscuit/scone cutter and put onto 1-2 large baking sheets lined with baking paper. Re-roll the trimmings to make about 18 biscuits. 6 Bake for 20-25 minutes until just turning golden at the edges. Transfer to a wire rack to cool, then serve straightaway or store in an airtight tin until needed. Thinly slice the damson cheese, then serve with blue cheese and the oatcakes. PER 40G DAMSON CHEESE 77kcals, no fat, 0.1g protein, 19.4g carbs (19.4g sugars), trace salt, 0.6g fibre PER OATCAKE 61kcals, 2.3g fat (0.7g saturated), 1.6g protein, 8.7g carbs (no sugars), 0.2g salt, 1.1g fibre


AUTUMN

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AUTUMN

Blackberry, lemon and almond bars

• 200g blackberries • 35g flaked almonds

MAKES 10-12 BARS. HANDS-ON TIME 25 MIN, OVEN-TIME 1 HOUR, PLUS CHILLING for the pastry base

• 175g plain flour, plus extra for dusting • Pinch salt • 50g icing sugar • 100g chilled unsalted butter, cubed, plus extra for greasing • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon • 1 medium free-range egg yolk • 1½ tsp lemon juice for the topping

• 125g unsalted butter, softened • 125g golden caster sugar • Finely grated zest 1 large lemon • 2 large free-range eggs, lightly beaten • 25g self-raising flour • 175g ground almonds • 150g good-quality blackberry jam 88 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

1 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. For the pastry base, sift the flour, salt and icing sugar into a food processor. Add the butter and lemon zest, then pulse briefly until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Transfer to a mixing bowl. Lightly beat the egg yolk with the lemon juice, then stir into the flour mix until it comes together in a ball. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface, then knead until smooth. 2 Grease and line a 21cm x 30cm shallow tin with baking paper. Roll out the pastry to a rectangle the same size, then line the base of the tin. Prick all over with a fork, then chill for 20 minutes. 3 Bake the pastry for 15 minutes until golden, then remove and set aside to cool slightly. 4 For the topping, put the butter,

golden caster sugar and zest into a mixing bowl, then cream together with an electric hand mixer until pale and fluffy. Gradually beat in the eggs, then fold in the flour and ground almonds. 5 Spread the jam evenly over the pastry base, then carefully spread the almond mixture over the top. Scatter over half the blackberries, then gently press them into the mixture. Scatter over the remaining berries. 6 Bake for 10 minutes, then remove and swiftly scatter over the flaked almonds. Return to the oven as quickly as you can, then bake for a further 35 minutes until richly golden and an inserted skewer comes away clean. Leave to cool, then remove from the tin and slice into bars. PER BAR (FOR 12) 419kcals, 27.2g fat (11g saturated), 7.3g protein, 36.3g carbs (24.6g sugars), 0.5g salt, 1.4g fibre


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delicious. is a magazine created to inspire your cooking every day, from speedy midweek meals to show-stopping food for friends. It’s also about teaching you new skills and knowledge to make you a better cook, and bringing you the latest stories from the world of food. With the chance to subscribe for just £12.90 for 6 issues (that’s half price!), now is the perfect time to treat yourself, or a friend, to a subscription to delicious.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE • Chef’s step-by-step recipes • Food for friends: inspiring menus to impress • Easy midweek dishes • Advice from our test kitchen • The latest wine and cocktails • It’s perfect for food lovers deliciousmagazine.co.uk 89


90 deliciousmagazine.co.uk


Winter

Short days and cold temperatures call for hearty, comforting food. Time indoors is well spent turning winter produce into casseroles, pies and splendid roasts. The arrival of scented oranges from Seville, those great sun-like orbs, calls for bubbling pans of marmalade and

indulgent puddings galore. When the clouds clear to blue and the sunlight turns crisp and cold, it’s time to work up an appetite with a long country walk


This season, enjoy…

92 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

FORCED RHUBARB • RABBIT • SEVILLE ORANGES


• MAIN CROP POTATOES • SMOKED HADDOCK • WHISKY • LEEKS • CARROTS

deliciousmagazine.co.uk 93


Braised rabbit with tarragon mustard sauce SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 1 HOUR

Rabbit is similar in flavour to free-range chicken. Try to get higher welfare rabbit, such as French Label Rouge – and ask the butcher to joint it. This dish will keep MAKE overnight in the fridge. AHEAD Reheat gently until piping hot before serving. Make fresh stock by FOOD TEAM’S placing 1 rabbit or chicken TIPS carcass in a pan with 2 sliced celery sticks, 1 sliced carrot, 1 sliced leek, 4 bay leaves, 1 thyme sprig, ½ tsp black peppercorns and ½ tsp salt. Cover with 2 litres water, bring to the boil, then simmer for 1½ hours. Strain, discarding the solids, then cool and chill. 94 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

You might need to add more stock or water during step 4 if your sauce has reduced too much during cooking. • 25g plain flour, plus 2 tsp extra • ½ tsp English mustard powder • 1.5-2kg farmed rabbit, jointed (see Debbie’s introduction) • 3 tbsp olive oil • 350g small shallots, 50g finely chopped and the rest left whole • 50g butter, plus 2 tsp extra • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar • 300ml dry white wine • 300ml fresh rabbit or chicken stock (see food team’s tips) • 2 tsp wholegrain mustard • 2 tsp hot English mustard • 3 tbsp crème fraîche or soured cream • 2 tbsp chopped fresh tarragon, plus extra leaves to garnish 1 Mix the 25g flour and mustard powder on a plate, then use to

dust the rabbit pieces, reserving whatever’s left on the plate. Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a flameproof casserole or large, deep frying pan, add the rabbit and brown the pieces on both sides. Lift them onto a plate and wipe the pan clean. 2 Add the rest of the oil and the whole shallots to the pan and toss them around for 5-6 minutes until nicely browned all over. Set them aside with the rabbit. 3 Add the 50g butter to the pan and, when it has melted, add the chopped shallots and fry gently until soft but not brown. Add the vinegar and leave it to sizzle until it has almost evaporated. Add the wine and simmer rapidly until reduced by half. Add the stock and bring to the boil. Return the rabbit to the pan, cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the whole shallots, then simmer, covered, for 30 minutes more or until the rabbit is tender. 4 Lift the rabbit and shallots onto a warm serving dish, cover and keep warm in a low oven. Increase the heat under the pan and boil the sauce rapidly for 2-3 minutes until slightly reduced. Mix the remaining 2 tsp flour and 2 tsp butter into a paste, then whisk in a little at a time until the sauce has thickened a little. Stir in the wholegrain and english mustards, crème fraîche or soured cream and tarragon, then taste and season. Pour the sauce over the rabbit, sprinkle with the tarragon, then serve. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 464kcals, 26.6g fat (11.6g saturated), 38.7g protein, 7.7g carbs (2.6g sugars), 0.7g salt, 1.4g fibre

Roast loin of pork with black pudding stuffing and cider gravy SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME 40 MIN, OVEN TIME 1¼ HOURS, PLUS RESTING

Ask your butcher to remove the skin (but not the fat) from the joint. Also, ask for the bones and pop these under the joint when roasting. They’ll act like a trivet as well as adding a superb flavour to the gravy.


WINTER

If you can’t fit all the stuffing into the loin, roll into balls and roast for 20-30 minutes. FOOD TEAM’S TIP

• 1.5kg boned pork loin, skin removed (see Debbie’s introduction) • 1 onion, sliced • 1 carrot, sliced • 2 tbsp plain flour • 300ml medium-sweet cider • 1 tbsp crab apple, quince or redcurrant jelly • 300ml fresh chicken stock • Roast potatoes and winter greens to serve FOR THE BLACK PUDDING STUFFING

• 1 tsp olive oil • 150g black pudding, skinned and cut into 1cm pieces • 25g butter • 6 British free-range streaky bacon rashers, chopped • 1 small onion, finely chopped • 75g celery, finely chopped • 1 eating apple (such as cox), peeled, cored and finely chopped • 75g fresh white breadcrumbs • 1 tbsp chopped fresh sage • 1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves • ½ beaten free-range egg

then open them out like a book. The aim is to end up with a long, even rectangle that’s easy to stuff and roll. Shape the stuffing into a fat cylinder and lay it down the middle, then tightly roll up the loin. Secure with kitchen string. 4 Heat the oven to 230°C/210°C fan/gas 8. Lay the onion and carrot in a large roasting tin and sit the pork on top, fat side up. Season. Roast for 20 minutes, then turn the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4 and cook for 55 minutes more or until the internal temperature is 70-75°C when tested with a digital probe thermometer (when you pierce the thickest part of the meat the juices should run clear). Remove the pork from the oven and take out of the tin (discard the bones, if

using). Put on a chopping board, cover loosely with foil and leave to rest for 10 minutes. 5 To make the gravy, pour away the excess fat from the roasting tin, put over a medium heat and stir in the plain flour. Gradually stir in the cider, then stir in the jelly. Bring to the boil, scraping up the caramelised bits with a wooden spoon. Lower the heat slightly, then simmer until reduced by half. Stir in the chicken stock, then simmer until reduced to a well-flavoured gravy. Strain into a warmed gravy boat. Slice the pork and serve with the cider gravy, roast potatoes and winter greens. PER SERVING 581kcals, 25.6g fat (9.9g saturated), 60.4g protein, 23.2g carbs (5.6g sugars), 1.9g salt, 1.3g fibre

GREAT FOR A CROWD

YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• Digital probe thermometer • Kitchen string 1 For the stuffing, heat the oil in a medium frying pan, add the black pudding and fry for 2 minutes, turning occasionally, until lightly coloured and crisp. Scoop into a mixing bowl and set aside. 2 Add the butter to the pan and, when it’s melted, add the bacon and cook until lightly golden. Add the onion and celery, then fry gently for 5 minutes or until the onion is soft and lightly coloured. Add the apple and fry for a further minute. Add the mix to the bowl and leave to cool, then stir in the breadcrumbs, sage, thyme and some seasoning to taste. Stir in the egg to bind the mixture together. 3 Lay the pork, fat-side down, on a board. The meat will be thicker on one side or both sides, so slice into these thick parts at an angle, deliciousmagazine.co.uk 95


COMFORT FOOD

Leeks are in season from mid-November onwards until late winter, which makes them ideal for the veg patch – that and the fact they go so well in comforting soups and gratins.

Smoked bacon, leek and butter bean chowder SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 35 MIN

The chowder will keep in MAKE a sealed container for up AHEAD to 48 hours in the fridge or up to a month in the freezer. Defrost, then heat gently to warm through. Sprinkle with fresh parsley to serve. A speedy soda bread, DEBBIE’S made with milk, would go TIPS really well with this soup (see delicious.magazine.co.uk/ soda-bread for a recipe). We liked this sprinkled FOOD TEAM’S with a little dried chilli TIP flakes with a squeeze of lemon juice. • 50g butter • 350g leeks, thickly sliced • 200g British free-range smoked bacon lardons

96 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 1 tsp olive oil • 1 small onion, chopped • 1 litre Jersey, Guernsey or full-cream milk • 2 bay leaves • 50g plain flour • 200ml good-quality chicken stock • 2 x 400g tins butter beans, drained and rinsed • 100ml single or double cream • 3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley 1 Melt half the butter in a large pan. Add the sliced leeks, stir well to coat with butter and season lightly. Cover and cook gently for 3 minutes until just tender and still bright green. Tip the leeks into a bowl and set aside. 2 Return the pan to a medium heat, add the lardons and oil, then fry gently until the lardons have released some of their fat. Increase the heat to high and fry a

little more briskly until lightly golden. Add the rest of the butter and the onion to the pan, cover and cook over a low heat for 10 minutes until the onion is soft but not browned. Meanwhile, gently heat the milk and bay leaves together in a separate pan. 3 Stir the flour into the bacon and onions, then cook for 1 minute. Gradually stir in the stock, then stir in the warm milk and bring almost to the boil. Add the butter beans and season to taste, then simmer for 5 minutes. 4 Remove and discard the bay leaves, stir in the leeks and cream, then bring back to a simmer. Stir in the parsley and season to taste. Serve in bowls with fresh homemade bread. PER SERVING 325kcals, 19.4g fat (10.4g saturated), 14.3g protein, 20.2g carbs (7.6g sugars), 1.1g salt, 6g fibre


WINTER

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Manchego rarebit SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN

This rarebit has a decidedly Spanish theme, what with the manchego sheep’s cheese and the quince paste – a popular accompaniment known as membrillo. There’s still a kick of mustard and Worcestershire to make it a proper rarebit. • 85ml whole milk • 100g manchego cheese, rind removed and discarded, coarsely grated • 100g mature cheddar, coarsely grated • 20g plain flour • 1 tsp English mustard powder • ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce • 2 medium free-range egg yolks • 4 x 2cm thick slices rustic white bread • 100g quince paste (from larger supermarkets) 1 Put the milk and grated cheeses into a pan and stir over a low heat

until the cheese has melted and the mixture is smooth. Whisk in the flour, mustard powder, Worcestershire sauce and some seasoning to taste, then cook briefly over a low heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture thickens and leaves the sides of the pan. Remove the pan from the heat, leave to cool slightly, then beat in the egg yolks, one at a time. 2 Heat the grill to high. Put the slices of bread on a baking tray and toast until lightly golden on both sides. Remove and spread each slice with quince paste, then top with the rarebit mixture, spreading it out to the edge so all the bread is covered. Grill for another 1½-2 minutes, turning the tray around if necessary so it cooks evenly, until golden and bubbling. Eat straightaway (cut each slice into chunky fingers first, if you wish). PER SERVING 511kcals, 29.5g fat (17.9g saturated), 22.9g protein, 37.5g carbs (10.1g sugars), 2g salt, 1.5g fibre

Roast chicken with chard, Italian sausage and parmesan stuffing SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 45 MIN, OVEN TIME 1 HOUR 25-30 MIN, PLUS SOAKING AND RESTING

The stuffing here is baked golden and crunchy. Salsiccia are meaty Italian KNOW- pork sausages. Find them HOW in Italian delis, or use other free-range sausages. Prepare the stuffing 1 day MAKE ahead, then chill, covered, AHEAD in its dish. Bring to room temperature before baking. Don’t be tempted to use FOOD TEAM’S cheap bread for this dish TIP as it will disintegrate. • 2kg free-range British chicken • 8-10 fat garlic cloves, unpeeled • 3 fresh rosemary sprigs • Vegetable oil for greasing • 2 rounded tsp plain flour • 300ml good-quality chicken stock (preferably homemade) FOR THE STUFFING

• 175g piece fresh bread (see tip) • 200ml whole milk • 1 tbsp olive oil • 450g salsiccia (see Know-how), skinned, meat crumbled • 1 fat garlic clove, crushed • 1 medium onion, finely chopped • 1 celery stalk, finely chopped • 350g swiss chard, leaves and stalks separated, thinly sliced • 2 tsp chopped fresh sage • 1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary • 10g fresh basil leaves, torn • 10g fresh flatleaf parsley leaves, chopped • 50g parmesan, finely grated • Butter for greasing YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• Digital probe thermometer 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Season the chicken, then tie it neatly with cook’s string. Scatter the unpeeled garlic cloves and rosemary sprigs in a lightly oiled roasting tin, then place the chicken on top. Roast for 1 hour. 2 Meanwhile, for the stuffing, cut the bread into 2cm thick slices, then put them in a large bowl with 98 deliciousmagazine.co.uk


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the milk and stir gently. Soak for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. 3 Heat the oil in a frying pan. Fry the sausagemeat until browned, then put on a plate, leaving the fat in the pan. Fry the garlic, onion and celery for 5-8 minutes until soft and lightly browned. Add the chard stalks, cover and cook for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and add the chard leaves. Leave to wilt, then add 4 tbsp water, cover and cook gently for 5 minutes. 4 Break the milk-soaked bread into small, chunky pieces using your hands. Add the sausagemeat, the onion and chard mixture, the fresh herbs, 40g of the grated parmesan, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix together well, then spoon into a shallow, buttered

2 litre baking dish and sprinkle over the remaining cheese. 5 After the chicken has been roasting for 1 hour, put the stuffing dish on the oven shelf below and bake for 25-30 minutes. Once cooked, the stuffing should be crisp and golden, and the chicken juices should run clear when you pierce the thickest part of the leg (a digital probe thermometer pushed into the breast should read 65-70°C). 6 Lift the roast chicken onto a board, wrap it closely with foil and leave to rest for 10 minutes. Loosely cover the stuffing with foil. 7 Meanwhile, make the gravy. Pour away all but 1-2 tsp fat from the roasting tin (discard the

rosemary but leave the garlic cloves in the tin). Stir in the flour, then gradually stir in the stock, crushing the garlic cloves as you go to release the flavour. Simmer on the hob for a few minutes until reduced and well flavoured, then strain the gravy into a saucepan and keep hot. 8 To carve the chicken, remove the string, slice off the legs and cut in half at the joint. Cut each breast away from the carcass in one whole piece, then carve each lengthways into long thin slices. Serve with the stuffing, gravy and accompanying veg if you like. PER SERVING 887kcals, 34.3g fat (7.1g saturated), 106.2g protein, 38.8g carbs (7.8g sugars), 3.3g salt, 3g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 99


FISHY TALES

Avoid the mass-produced smoked fish that’s been artificially dyed. Instead, look for fish produced by artisan smokers as the taste is far superior.

Winter fish pie with potato pastry crust SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR, OVEN TIME 45-50 MIN, PLUS COOLING

FOR THE FILLING

• 100g butter • 1 large leek, cleaned, trimmed and thinly sliced • 1 small onion, halved • 4 cloves • 450ml whole milk • 300ml double cream • 4 fresh bay leaves • 500g thick skin-on sustainable pollock fillet (or cod/haddock) • 225g sustainable undyed smoked haddock fillet • 100g peeled and cooked brown shrimps or North Atlantic prawns • 3 large free-range eggs • 45g plain flour • 75g mild cheddar, grated • 4 tbsp chopped curly leaf parsley • Freshly grated nutmeg FOR THE PASTRY

• 350g floury potatoes, such as king edward, cut into chunks • 225g self-raising flour, plus extra to dust • 175g chilled butter, cubed • 1½-2 tbsp cold water • 1 medium free-range egg, beaten, to glaze 1 For the pastry, cook the potatoes in a pan of boiling salted water for 15 minutes until soft. Drain well, then mash. Leave to go cold. 2 Meanwhile, for the filling, melt 50g of the butter in a saucepan. Add the leek, season, then cover and cook for 2-3 minutes until soft. 3 Stud the onion halves with the 100 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

cloves and put them into a wide, shallow pan. Add the milk, cream, bay leaves and fish (not the shrimps/prawns). Bring just up to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 8 minutes or until the fish is just cooked. Lift the fish onto a plate and set aside until cool enough to handle. Strain the milk mixture into a jug, discarding the flavourings left in the sieve. 4 Flake the cooled fish into a bowl in large pieces, discarding the skin and any bones. Add the shrimps/ prawns and leeks. Boil the eggs for 8 minutes, then leave to cool. Peel and thickly slice. 5 Meanwhile, melt the remaining 50g butter in a saucepan, then stir in the plain flour and cook gently for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and gradually stir in the strained milk. Return to the heat and bring to the boil, stirring all the time. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring now and then, until slightly reduced. Stir in the cheese and parsley, then taste and season with nutmeg to taste, salt and pepper. Cool slightly. 6 Stir three quarters of the sauce into the fish mixture, then spoon it into a 1.75 litre deep pie dish. Put a pie funnel (or a piece of foil rolled into a funnel) in the centre of the filling, then arrange the sliced eggs on top. Pour over the rest of the sauce, then set the dish aside for the filling to go cold. 7 For the pastry, sift the flour into a food processor and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add the chilled butter and whizz briefly until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Add

the cold mashed potato and mix quickly using the pulse button. Tip the mixture into a bowl, then add the water (how much will depend on how dry your potatoes are) and stir gently with a round-bladed knife until the mixture starts to stick together. Tip out onto a lightly floured surface, bring together gently into a ball, then knead briefly until just smooth. 8 Heat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface into a circle slightly larger than the top of the pie dish, then cut a small cross in the centre for the pie funnel. Trim a thin strip all the way around the edge of the pastry, brush with a little beaten egg, then press it onto the rim of the dish and brush with a little more beaten egg. Lay the large pastry round over the dish so the funnel pokes through the cross, pressing firmly onto the rim of the dish. Trim away the excess pastry, then crimp the edges with your forefinger and thumb to form an attractive seal. 9 Brush the top of the pie all over with beaten egg, then decorate with little fish or leaves cut from the pastry trimmings, if you like, and brush with egg. Bake for 45-50 minutes, covering loosely with a sheet of foil if it’s browning a bit too quickly, until the filling is bubbling hot and the pastry is an even golden brown. Remove the pie funnel and serve. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 808kcals, 59.7g fat (35.6g saturated), 31.8g protein, 36.8g carbs (5.3g sugars), 2.6g salt, 3.7g fibre


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GREAT FOR A CROWD

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GREAT FOR A CROWD

Griddled sausages with lentil and pimentón stew SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME 35 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 40 MIN

In Spain they would use pardina lentils for this dish, which have a lovely nutty texture. Puy lentils will work just as well however.

• 100g thinly sliced serrano ham, pancetta or rindless streaky bacon, finely chopped • 1 tbsp pimentón dulce (sweet smoked paprika from Spain) • 500g Cumberland sausage ring • 200g chopped skinned tomatoes, fresh or tinned • 150ml dry white wine • 150ml fresh chicken stock • 2 tbsp chopped flatleaf parsley

For ease of cooking,

DEBBIE’S twist and snip the TIP

uncooked Cumberland sausage into shorter lengths. • 300g greenish-grey lentils, such as pardina or puy, rinsed • 3 tbsp olive oil, plus extra for brushing • 8 fat garlic cloves, crushed • 200g banana shallots or 1 medium onion, finely chopped • 1 large carrot (about 200g), finely chopped • 1 large celery stick, finely chopped 102 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

1 Put the lentils in a medium pan with enough cold water to cover by 5cm, then bring to the boil over a high heat. Lower the heat and simmer for 25-30 minutes until just tender but still a little al dente. Drain well and set aside. 2 Meanwhile, put the olive oil and garlic in a wide, shallow pan over a medium heat. When the garlic is sizzling, add the shallots/onion, carrot and celery and cook gently for 10 minutes or until soft and beginning to brown. Add the ham/ pancetta/bacon and fry for

5 minutes. Add the pimentón and fry for 1 minute more. Set aside. 3 Brush a griddle or frying pan with a little oil and put over a high heat until smoking hot. Reduce the heat to low-medium and cook the sausages for 8-10 minutes, turning, until well browned and cooked through (see Debbie’s tip). 4 Meanwhile, stir the tomatoes and wine into the fried veg and simmer for 5 minutes or until reduced and thickened. Stir the lentils into the sauce with the stock and some salt and pepper, then simmer for 5 minutes until the liquid has reduced further. Stir in the parsley, taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. 5 Spoon the lentil stew among 4 warmed shallow bowls or plates, arrange the sausages on top and serve. PER SERVING 741kcals, 36.8g fat (11.1g saturated), 43.6g protein, 51.7g carbs (10.8g sugars), 3.8g salt, 12.9g fibre


WINTER North African chicken with honey and saffron SERVES 4-6. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, SIMMERING TIME 40 MIN

Although simple to put together, this dish does take a little time, so it’s best kept for special occasions – but you can make it in advance and reheat it just before serving. Orange blossom water adds fragrance and flavour. Find it in most supermarkets, or use the finely grated zest of 1 orange instead. FOOD TEAM’S TIP

• 1.75kg free-range chicken, jointed into 8 pieces • 3 tbsp olive oil • 1 large onion, chopped • 3 garlic cloves, crushed • 5cm fresh ginger, finely grated • 2 x 5cm cinnamon stick pieces • 1 tsp ground ginger • 800g skinned and chopped tomatoes, fresh or tinned • 1 tsp harissa paste, rose if you can get it (I like Belazu) • 300ml good chicken stock • ½ tsp saffron strands • 2 tbsp clear honey • 1 tbsp lemon juice • 1 tsp orange blossom water (see food team’s tip – I like Nielsen-Massey)

2 Add the rest of the oil and the onion to the pan, then cook over a medium-high heat, stirring, for 6-7 minutes until soft and golden. Add the garlic, fresh ginger and cinnamon, then cook for 2-3 minutes more. Add the ground ginger and cook for 1 minute. 3 Stir in the tomatoes and harissa and cook gently for 5 minutes. Stir in the chicken stock, saffron and some seasoning to taste, then bring to the boil. Return the chicken to the pan, cover and simmer for 25 minutes. 4 When the chicken is cooked, lift the pieces onto a plate and cover with cling film to keep moist. Turn up the heat and bubble the sauce briskly for about 10 minutes until reduced by about half. Add the honey, simmer for 2 minutes, then stir in the lemon juice and orange blossom water. Taste and season. 5 Meanwhile, for the couscous, melt 25g butter in a small frying pan, add the almonds and fry gently, stirring all the time, until golden. Tip onto kitchen paper

and leave to cool. Toast the sesame seeds in a clean dry pan over a medium-high heat, shaking now and then, until golden. Tip onto a saucer to cool. 6 Return the chicken to the pan, coat the pieces in the sauce, then cover and simmer for 5 minutes until heated through. 7 Put the couscous and salt in a heatproof bowl, pour over 300ml boiling water, cover with a clean tea towel and leave for 5 minutes. Uncover and fluff with a fork, then melt the remaining 25g butter and stir in along with the olive oil, lemon zest and juice to taste, preserved lemon skin, three quarters of the fried almonds, 2 tbsp of the sesame seeds and three quarters of the herbs. Taste and season. 8 Scatter the chicken with the rest of the almonds, sesame seeds and herbs. Serve with the couscous. PER SERVING (FOR 6) 665kcals, 33.7g fat (8.2g saturated), 54.6g protein, 32.6g carbs (11g sugars), 1.3g salt, 3.2g fibre

FOR THE LEMON AND MINT COUSCOUS

• 50g salted butter • 100g slivered or flaked almonds • 3 tbsp white sesame seeds • 250g organic wholewheat couscous or barley couscous (I like Belazu) • ½ tsp salt • 2-3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • Finely grated zest 1 small lemon and 1-2 tbsp juice • 4 small preserved lemons, pulp discarded, skin finely chopped • Small bunch fresh coriander, coarsely chopped • Small bunch fresh mint, leaves finely chopped 1 Skin the chicken pieces, then season. Heat 2 tbsp of the oil in a sauté pan or shallow flameproof casserole. Add the chicken and fry, turning, until browned all over. Lift onto a plate and keep warm. deliciousmagazine.co.uk 103


SPANISH HERITAGE

The tart seville orange has more uses than you might think. Use it in the same way as you would other bitter citrus fruit – it’s as versatile as a lemon, especially when it comes to puddings.

Seville orange and vanilla bean marmalade MAKES ABOUT 7 X 450G JARS. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR, SIMMERING TIME ABOUT 2 HOURS 30 MIN, PLUS OVERNIGHT SOAKING

This will keep for up to MAKE 2 years in the sterilised, AHEAD sealed jars. If you can’t find seville FOOD TEAM’S oranges, regular ones will TIP make this sweeter and softer – extra lemon juice and peel will make it firmer and sharper. • 1kg seville oranges (see food team’s tip) • 2 lemons • 1 large vanilla pod • 2kg granulated sugar YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• Muslin squares (from cook shops, around 30-40cm in size) • Cook’s string • Large preserving pan or very large, deep saucepan • Digital probe thermometer or sugar thermometer • Metal jam funnel • About 7 x 450g jam jars • Lids or waxed discs and jar covers (from lakeland.co.uk) 1 Wash the oranges, scrubbing off any wax. Halve, then squeeze and 104 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

reserve the juice. Halve the lemons, squeeze, then add the juice to the orange juice. Scoop the orange and lemon pips and any pulp from the squeezer into the centre of a square of muslin, then tie with string. Cut the orange peel halves in two, then slice into strips (I like mine chunky). Put the peel, juice and muslin bag into a large bowl and add 2 litres cold water. Stir, cover, and leave overnight or for up to 24 hours. This softens the peel and helps release the pectin, which is what sets the marmalade. 2 The next day, slit open the vanilla pod and scrape out the seeds onto a saucer. Cover and set aside. Cut each piece of pod in half. Pour the peel mixture and liquid into a preserving pan or very large, deep saucepan and add the vanilla pod pieces. Bring to the boil, then simmer, uncovered, for 1½-2 hours until you can easily squash a piece of peel between two fingers. 3 Meanwhile put 2-3 saucers into the freezer. Heat the oven to 120°C/100°C fan/gas ½. Wash the jam jars, lids and jam funnel in hot soapy water, rinse well, then put into the oven for 5 minutes to dry (this will sterilise them). Turn off the oven with the jars inside. 4 Fish out the muslin bag from the pan, drop it into a sieve, press out as much liquid as you can back

into the pan, then discard. Add the sugar and stir over a low heat until dissolved. Increase the heat, bring to a rolling boil, then boil, without stirring, for 20 minutes. The bubbles should have subsided and the mixture will look glossy. 5 Keep checking the temperature using the thermometer. Once the marmalade reaches 102°C, see if it’s reached setting point (it can go as high as 104.5°C without spoiling). To test the set, slide the pan off the heat, spoon a blob of marmalade onto one of the cold saucers, then pop it back in the freezer for 2-3 minutes. If the blob wrinkles up when you push your finger through it, it’s at setting point. If not, return the pan to the heat, checking the temperature and testing again on the other saucers in 5 minutes. 6 Once setting point has been reached, take the pan off the heat, stir in the reserved vanilla seeds and leave for 20-30 minutes. Stir it to distribute the peel, then pour through the jam funnel into the warm jars, filling them to the top. While still hot, seal with waxed discs and jar covers, or screw-top lids Label and store in a cool, dark place (see Make ahead). PER TSP 13kcals, no fat, no protein, 3.3g carbs (3.3g sugars), no salt, no fibre


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Marmalade and ginger upside-down pudding SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 30-35 MIN, PLUS COOLING

This is a warming winter pud to serve with lashings of custard or cream. You can also use other fruit jams. Apricot or peach go especially well.

Peel fresh ginger by KNOW- scraping the skin away HOW with a teaspoon (a knife can cut away too much). Make up to 2 days ahead. MAKE Keep, covered, in the AHEAD fridge, then warm in a 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4 oven for 10-15 minutes. Freeze the finished dish for 1 month, defrost and heat as above.

• 110g lightly salted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing • 175g thick-cut marmalade, plus 2 heaped tbsp • 150g self-raising flour • 2 tsp ground ginger • 1 tsp ground cinnamon • ¼ tsp ground cloves • ¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg • 1 tsp baking powder • 110g light soft brown or muscovado sugar • 2 large free-range eggs • 1 tbsp finely grated fresh ginger (see Know-how) • 3 tbsp freshly squeezed orange juice • Custard or cream to serve 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Grease a 1.2 litre shallow oval or round baking dish and line the base with a piece of crumpled and slightly damp baking paper. Warm the 175g marmalade gently in a pan, then pour into the dish and spread out evenly. Leave to cool. 2 For the sponge mixture, sift the flour, spices, a pinch of salt and baking powder into a bowl. Beat the butter in another large mixing bowl until pale and fluffy, using an electric hand mixer. Add the sugar and beat for 5 minutes until paler in colour, then beat in the eggs one at a time, adding 1 tbsp of the flour mixture with the second egg. Beat in the grated ginger. 3 Gently fold in the remaining flour mixture with a metal spoon, followed by the orange juice. Carefully spoon the mixture into the dish and spread it out evenly, making sure it touches the sides. Bake for 30-35 minutes until risen and a skewer pushed into the centre comes away clean. 4 Leave the pudding to cool in the dish for 10 minutes, then run a knife around the edge and carefully turn it out onto a warmed serving plate. Warm the 2 tbsp marmalade, pour on top of the pudding and spread it out evenly to the edges. Serve with custard or cream. PER SERVING 509kcals, 21.8g fat (13.2g saturated), 6.5g protein, 73g carbs (45.3g sugars), 0.2g salt, 1.6g fibre

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WINTER Marmalade and coconut bakewell tart SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 50 MIN, PLUS CHILLING AND COOLING

Bake the pastry case in MAKE advance and either keep in AHEAD a container for up to 2-3 days or freeze for up to one month in its tin, wrapped in cling film. Silverwood makes DEBBIE’S rectangular fluted tins. TIP Find them at John Lewis or amazon.co.uk. You could use a round 23cm tart or cake tin with a removable base instead. The cooking time will be the same. for the pastry

• 150g plain flour, plus extra to dust • 45g icing sugar • 85g lightly salted butter, chilled, cubed, plus extra to grease • Finely grated zest ½ small orange • 1 medium free-range egg yolk • 2 tsp orange juice FOR THE FILLING

• 125g lightly salted butter, softened • 125g caster sugar • 2 medium free-range eggs • 25g plain flour • 125g ground almonds • 25g desiccated coconut • 1 tsp orange flower water (from larger supermarkets, also sold as orange blossom water) • 6 tbsp thick-cut marmalade TO DECORATE

• 15g coconut flakes, toasted in a dry pan until golden • Icing sugar for dusting 1 For the pastry, sift the flour, a pinch of salt and the icing sugar into a food processor. Add the butter and orange zest, then whizz briefly until it looks like fine breadcrumbs. Beat the egg yolk with the orange juice, then add to the food processor and pulse briefly until the mix starts to clump together. (If you don’t have a food processor, you can do this by hand in a mixing bowl, rubbing in the butter with your fingertips, then mixing in the liquid with a

wooden spoon.) Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly until smooth. If the pastry is very soft, chill it for 15 minutes first. Roll it out until 3mm thick and use to line a buttered 12cm x 35cm fluted metal tin (see Debbie’s tip). Prick the base all over with a fork and chill for 20 minutes. 2 Heat the oven with a baking sheet inside to 200°C/180°C fan/ gas 6. Line the tart case with crumpled baking paper and fill with baking beans or rice. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove the paper and beans/rice, then bake for 3 minutes more or until crisp and light brown. Remove and set aside. 3 Turn down the oven temperature to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. For the filling, use an electric hand mixer to beat the butter and sugar together in a bowl until light and

fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time, adding 1 tbsp flour with the second egg. Using a metal spoon, gently fold in the ground almonds, desiccated coconut, the remaining flour and the orange flower water. 4 Spoon the marmalade over the pastry base, then top with the filling and gently spread it to the edges. Bake for 30 minutes until puffed up and golden, and a skewer pushed into the centre comes out clean. 5 Remove the tart from the oven and leave to cool for 10 minutes to serve warm, or leave on a wire rack to go cold. Scatter with the toasted coconut, dust with icing sugar and cut into slices to serve. PER SERVING 534kcals, 35.8g fat (17.8g saturated), 8g protein, 46.3g carbs (29.9g sugars), 0.2g salt, 1.7g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 107


WHISKY GALORE

Scotch whisky requires five things: barley, pure spring water, yeast, oak casks and lots of patience. Long-term ageing in wood is an essential part of the process.

Whisky, walnut and brown butter tart SERVES 10-12. HANDS-ON TIME 1 HOUR, OVEN TIME 50 MIN, PLUS CHILLING AND COOLING

Make the tart up to 48 MAKE hours ahead, then cover AHEAD and keep chilled. Prepare the pastry to the end of step 4, wrap in cling film and chill in the fridge for up to 24 hours, or freeze for up to 1 month. To freeze the leftover egg FOOD TEAM’S whites: as you separate TIPS each egg, put each white in an ice-cube tray, freeze, then remove each cube and store in the freezer in a bag. Defrosted, they’ll whip up perfectly for meringues or mousses. This tart is perfect served with atholl brose ice cream (which takes its name from a traditional Scottish drink made with cream, whisky, honey and oatmeal milk – you’ll find the recipe at delicious magazine.co.uk/recipes), or any good-quality similar flavour ice cream. FOR THE SHORTBREAD PASTRY CASE

• 175g plain flour, plus extra to dust • 50g icing sugar • 90g chilled butter, cubed • 1 medium free-range egg yolk • 1 tbsp cold water 108 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

FOR THE FILLING

• 300g walnut halves • 120g butter • 150g golden syrup • 100ml double cream • 2 tbsp Scotch whisky • 5 medium free-range egg yolks • 150g light muscovado sugar • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste or extract • 1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg 1 For the pastry, sift the flour, icing sugar and a pinch of salt into a food processor, add the chilled butter and whizz until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs (you could do this by hand, rubbing the butter into the flour with your fingers). Beat the egg yolk briefly with the water. Tip onto the flour mixture and pulse (or mix by hand with a spatula) for a few seconds until the mixture sticks together in lumps. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly until smooth. (If soft, wrap in cling film and chill for 1 hour.) 2 Roll out the pastry thinly and use to line a 23cm x 4cm deep loose-bottomed flan tin. Prick the base here and there with a fork, then chill for 20 minutes. 3 Heat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/gas 5. Line the pastry case with a sheet of crumpled baking paper and a thin layer of baking beans and bake for 15 minutes or until the edges are a light biscuit

colour. Remove the paper and baking beans, protect the edges of the case by covering with strips of foil, then return it to the oven for 5-7 minutes until the base of the pastry case is dry and biscuit coloured too. Remove from the oven, discard the foil and set aside. 4 For the filling, spread the walnuts in a single layer on a baking sheet and lightly toast in the oven for 7 minutes. Leave the nuts to cool, then arrange over the base of the pastry case in an even layer. Put the butter in a small pan and leave it over a low heat, swirling the pan every now and then, until lightly browned and smelling nutty. Stir in the golden syrup, double cream and whisky. 5 Lightly beat the egg yolks together in a mixing bowl until smooth, thick and slightly paler, then stir in the whisky cream mixture, muscovado sugar, vanilla extract, nutmeg and a pinch of salt. Pour the mixture evenly over the walnuts, then bake for 30 minutes or so until the surface of the filling is nicely caramelised. Remove the tart and leave to cool for around 30 minutes. Serve warm or cold, cut into wedges, with scoops of the atholl brose ice cream, if you like. PER SERVING (FOR 10) 650kcals, 46.8g fat (17.5g saturated), 9.1g protein, 45.5g carbs (31.8g sugars), 0.5g salt, 2.1g fibre


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Rhubarb and vanilla Jonathan SERVES 6-8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 50 MIN, PLUS RESTING

I’ve dedicated this pudding to the estimable rhubarb farmer Jonathan Westwood from west Yorkshire’s famous rhubarb-growing ‘triangle’. It’s a simple, fruity sponge that you can make with any seasonal fruit – peaches and

110 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

nectarines are good in summer. Rhubarb’s best, though. It’s an ideal pud after a Sunday roast – with cream, of course. • 1 vanilla pod • 300g caster sugar • 2 tbsp plain flour • 1kg forced rhubarb (trimmed weight), cut into 5cm pieces • 115g lightly salted butter, softened

• 2 medium free-range eggs • 150g self-raising flour • 1 tsp vanilla extract • Pinch salt • 3 tbsp milk • Icing sugar for dusting • Cream or custard to serve 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Slit the vanilla pod open lengthways and scrape out the seeds with the tip of a knife into a mixing bowl (save the pod for later). Add 185g of the sugar and mix them with your fingertips, then stir in the plain flour. Add the rhubarb pieces to the bowl and toss to coat. Leave for 20 minutes, stirring now and then, until all the pieces of fruit are coated in sticky sugar/flour mix. 2 Spoon the fruit over the base of a shallow 2 litre baking dish (the shallower the dish, the quicker the sponge will cook). It will look like quite a lot of fruit, but don’t worry – it collapses during cooking. Cut the reserved vanilla pod into 4 pieces and poke them in amongst the rhubarb. Cover and bake for 15 minutes. 3 For the sponge topping, beat the butter and remaining 115g sugar in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon (or with an electric hand whisk) for about 5 minutes until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time, adding 1 tbsp of the self-raising flour with the second egg. Beat in the vanilla extract. Sift over the rest of the flour and pinch of salt, then very gently fold in along with the milk using a metal spoon. 4 Remove the dish of rhubarb from the oven, discard the vanilla pod pieces and drop small spoonfuls of the sponge mixture roughly over the top of the fruit. Don’t worry about a few gaps; these will fill in as the sponge rises and cooks. 5 Bake for about 35 minutes until the sponge is cooked through and crisp and brown on top. Remove the dish from the oven and leave to sit for 10 minutes. Dust the top with a little icing sugar and serve hot with cream or custard. PER SERVING (FOR 8) 319kcals, 14.1g fat (8.1g saturated), 5.3g protein, 43.8g carbs (27.8g sugars), 0.6g salt, 3.3g fibre


WINTER

GREAT FOR A CROWD

Chocolate vinegar cake with sour cherry compote and mascarpone cream SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 35-40 MIN

This cake is moist and chocolatey – and doesn’t taste sour. The vinegar reacts with the bicarb to make it rise. The untopped cake keeps MAKE for up to 3 days, well AHEAD wrapped, in a cool place. • 90ml sunflower oil, plus extra for greasing • 175g plain flour • 225g caster sugar • 50g unsweetened cocoa powder • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda • ½ tsp salt • 250ml warm water • 1 tbsp artisan malt vinegar (or use regular malt vinegar with a good splash of balsamic) • 2 tsp vanilla extract

FOR THE TOPPING

• 300g cherry compote from a jar • 1-2 tsp arrowroot • 125g mascarpone • 2 tbsp milk, if needed • 125ml double cream • 25g icing sugar • ½ tsp vanilla bean paste 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Lightly grease a 20cm diameter, 5cm deep, loosebottomed cake tin and line the base with baking paper. 2 Sift the flour, sugar, cocoa, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the oil, warm water, vinegar and vanilla extract, then whisk together. 3 Pour the batter into the tin and bake for 35-40 minutes. (Cover the top with foil if it’s getting too brown.) The cake is done when a skewer pushed into the centre comes away clean. Remove from the oven and leave to cool in the tin.

4 Meanwhile, for the topping, tip the cherry compote into a sieve set over a bowl and leave to drain. Measure the juice, then pour into a small pan and bring to the boil. Allow 1 tsp arrowroot per 125ml of juice, mixing it with 1-2 tsp cold water. Stir into the boiling juice and simmer for 30 seconds or until thick and clear. Pour back into the bowl and leave to cool, then stir in the drained cherries. 5 In a bowl, beat the mascarpone until smooth, adding milk if it’s too stiff. Pour the cream into another mixing bowl, add the icing sugar and vanilla, then whisk until it begins to form soft peaks. Add the mascarpone and whisk until stiff. 6 Remove the cake to a serving plate. Spread the mascarpone cream over, then spoon the cherry compote over to serve. PER SERVING 469kcals, 25 fat (11.9g saturated), 4.4g protein, 56.9g carbs (40.2g sugars), 0.8g salt, 2.3g fibre deliciousmagazine.co.uk 111


TRUE BREW

Real ale is a beer brewed from four traditional ingredients: malted barley, hops, water and yeast. Other flavourings such as fruit and spices might be added along the way. Craft ale production is now a booming business in Britain.

Beer-laced sticky toffee and ginger pudding SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN, OVEN TIME 30 MIN

Using a medium-bodied, malty ale in this classic dessert might sound unusual, but the toffee-flavoured undertones in the beer work very well. Keep the unbaked sponge MAKE AHEAD for up to 24 hours, covered in the fridge, then bake. If you want to serve the DEBBIE’S pudding in neat pieces, TIP bake in a brownie tin. FOR THE SPONGE

• 300ml strong bitter ale (I used Ringwood Forty Niner, widely available) • 4 balls stem ginger in syrup, chopped, plus 2 tbsp syrup • 175g pitted dried dates, coarsely chopped • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda • 50g unsalted butter • 75g caster sugar • 75g light muscovado sugar • 2 medium free-range eggs • 225g plain flour • 1 tsp ground ginger • 1 tsp baking powder FOR THE TOFFEE SAUCE

• 300ml double cream 112 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

• 225g dark muscovado sugar • 100g unsalted butter • 4 balls stem ginger in syrup, chopped, plus 2 tbsp of the syrup • Pinch fine sea salt • Single cream, clotted cream or vanilla ice cream to serve YOU’LL ALSO NEED…

• Shallow rectangular baking dish (about 20cm x 25cm), greased with butter, or a 3cm deep, 20cm x 24-25cm brownie tin or rectangular cake tin, greased and lined with non-stick baking paper 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. To make the sponge, put the ale, stem ginger, stem ginger syrup, dates and vanilla bean paste in a medium saucepan, then bring to the boil and simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, then stir in the bicarbonate of soda. Set aside. 2 Cream the butter and sugars together in a large mixing bowl until smooth using an electric hand mixer (the mixture won’t turn pale and fluffy due to the high proportion of sugar). Add the first egg, then beat the mixture really well until smooth and becoming lighter in colour. Add the second egg and 1 tbsp of the flour, then beat together well. Sift over the rest of the flour, ground ginger

and baking powder, then gently fold in with a metal spoon. 3 Bring the date mixture back to the boil. Slowly strain the liquid from it into the creamed mixture and beat well to make a smooth batter. Stir in the dates from the sieve, then pour the mixture into the prepared tin or baking dish. Bake for 30 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. 4 Meanwhile, for the toffee sauce, put the cream, dark muscovado sugar and butter in a saucepan and leave over a low heat until the sugar has melted. Stir in the stem ginger along with the stem ginger syrup and a pinch of fine sea salt. 5 When ready to serve, bring the toffee sauce back to the boil briefly. If you’ve used a baking dish for the sponge (as in the picture), pour half the sauce directly over the top of the baked sponge, drizzle with single cream, then serve in bowls with the remaining sauce and cream poured over. If you’ve used a tin, remove the sponge from the tin, cut into even pieces, place on warmed plates and pour over some of the sauce, then serve with cream or ice cream. PER SERVING 757kcals, 37.5g fat (22.9g saturated), 6.5g protein, 95.1g carbs (71.2g sugars), 0.6g salt, 2.7g fibre


WINTER

deliciousmagazine.co.uk 113


FOR YOUR REFERENCE

RECIPE INDEX STARTERS, SIDES & NIBBLES • Asparagus & gruyère soufflés 20 • Asparagus tempura with green herb & garlic sauce 22 • Blue cheese & sweet onion tart with watercress & walnuts 19 • Damson cheese & caraway oatcakes 86 • Manchego rarebit 98 • Seville orange & vanilla bean

PORK • Cumberland sausage hot dogs with beery onions 47 • Dorset pork & cider casserole with mustard & sage 74 • Griddled sausages with lentils & pimentón stew 102 • Roast loin of pork with black pudding stuffing & cider gravy 94 • Roast pork ribs with sticky marmalade glaze 45 • Smoked bacon, leek & butter bean chowder 96

marmalade 104 • Wild garlic & potato soup with garlic butter croutons 16

SALADS

• Cretan dakos 44 • Heritage tomato salad with

POULTRY • Buffalo chicken wings with celery sticks & blue cheese dip 52 • Cider-braised chicken thighs with pearl barley, bacon, carrots & peas 17

air-dried ham, melon &

• Green chicken biryani 68

mozzarella 40

• North African chicken with

• Nectarine, fig & blue cheese salad 51 • Vietnamese-style chicken salad with mint, coriander & basil 42 • Warm broad bean & crisp bacon salad 24

MAIN COURSES

honey & saffron 103 • Parma ham, chicken liver & mushroom vincisgrassi 73 • Poached chicken with spring vegetables & pistou 22 • Roast chicken with chard, Italian sausage & parmesan stuffing 98 • Sticky beer-baked chicken 69 • Vinegar chicken 75

BEEF, VEAL & GAME

• Barbecued fillet of beef with horseradish butter & chunky potato gratin 38 • Braised rabbit with tarragon mustard sauce 94 • Chilli con carne with avocado & chilli salsa 72

• Sage & white bean polpettine with cherry tomato sauce 14 • Squash parmigiana 76 • Tomato, saffron & parmesan tartlets 48

SWEET TREATS • American shortcake with lemon curd & clotted cream 58 • Beer-laced sticky toffee & ginger pudding 112

FISH & SHELLFISH • Bouillabaise with fennel & bay 50 • Mussels with cider, tarragon & crème fraîche 18 • Winter fish pie with potato pastry crust 100

• Blackberry, lemon & almond bars 88 • Cherry ripple ice cream bars 60 • Chocolate vinegar cake with

LAMB

VEGETABLES & VEGETARIAN • Cheddar & chard tart with

rosemary salt & slow-roasted tomato salad 46 • Lamb & quince tagine with

cheese & oatmeal pastry 79

• Cinammon, fruit & almond cruffins 29 • Clotted cream & vanilla cheesecakes with gooseberry

• Pizza bianca with goat’s

compote 62

cheese, courgettes & black

• Florentine shortbread fingers 25

olives 40

• Italian sultana & ricotta

garlic, feta & mint stuffing 15

114 deliciousmagazine.co.uk

pears & spiced golden syrup 80 • Pear & ginger Eve’s pudding with brown sugar custard 82 • Pecan & cinammon streusel coffee cake 83 • Rhubarb & vanilla Jonathan 110 • Scandinavian blueberry & soured cream tart 54 • Slow-roast rhubarb with pistachio

couscous 70 • Roast leg of lamb with wild

pudding 106 • Parkin puddings with pan-fried

mascarpone cream 111 • Chunky apple, raisin, walnut &

• Limoges-style potato pie 12

• Roast beetroot, egg & caper

tart 107 • Marmalade & ginger upside-down

• Silky chocolate & raspberry tart 56

chermoula & buttered • Lamb kofta curry 78

poached peaches 59 • Marmalade & coconut bakewell

sour cherry compote &

cider cake 84 • Butterflied leg of lamb with

• Lemon verbena ice cream with

torte 32

salad with dill & horseradish

• Jaffa cake tea loaf 28

vinaigrette 39

• Lemon, thyme & yogurt cake 53

cake 26 • Sponge drops with strawberry curd & chantilly cream 57 • Whisky & pistachio simnel cake 30 • Whisky, walnut & brown butter tart 108


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Delicious country cooking issue 4 2017  
Delicious country cooking issue 4 2017  
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