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Engage, Learn, Lead


Table of Contents

02

WELCOME

04

HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014

08

ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES & ACCOMPLISHMENTS

20

ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN RESEARCH & SCHOLARSHIP

28 COMMUNITY & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE ACTIVITIES & ACCOMPLISHMENTS 32

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES

34

DEVELOPMENT: WHERE WOULD WE BE WITHOUT FRIENDS


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Welcome Welcome to the first Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing Annual Report.

It isn’t that long ago that I walked into the space set aside for LAU’s new nursing school to find only three desks, three book cases and an assortment of chairs; missing were phones, computers, books and the supplies and accoutrements usually seen in an academic setting. Most important, there were no faculty, staff or students. Over the past five years the School of Nursing has grown remarkably fast and we can now boast that we have everything expected of an academic program. At the heart of the Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing (ARCSON) is a community. Faculty, staff and students alike have a sense of purpose-we aim to help raise the stature of nursing in Lebanon and our region so that those in need of health care will benefit from highly educated nurses who combine a strong knowledge base with polished technical skills and genuine compassion. This is our first annual report but through it you will get a glimpse of all five years of our short history. We hope you enjoy reading about our accomplishments to date. Many of you have contributed to our success. I hope you share the pride that I feel and that you will continue to help us achieve even more over the years to come. Sincerely,

Nancy Hoffart, Ph.D., RN

Founding Dean and Professor


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Mission Statement The Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing is dedicated to improving the health of the people of Lebanon and the Middle East region by educating professional nurses and contributing to advances in healthcare through innovative research, scholarship and service. To ensure academic excellence the curriculum is built on a liberal arts foundation and complements nursing science with knowledge from the biomedical and social sciences. Through an interprofessional educational process we engage students as whole persons, preparing them to be empathic, competent and ethical clinicians and future leaders in healthcare.

Vision To be the pioneering school of nursing in Lebanon and the Middle East region through the interprofessional education of knowledgeable, skilled and conscientious professional nurses and the generation of new nursing knowledge to address contemporary healthcare needs.

Mrs. Alice Ramez Chagoury with Dean Hoffart during the inauguration of the Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury Health Sciences Center


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Highlights 2013-2014 The highlight of 2013-2014 was the email received by President Jabbra and Dean Hoffart from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE, Washington, DC) notifying LAU that the bachelor of science in nursing (B.S.N.) program had been awarded accreditation. The effort to achieve this milestone began in the fall of 2009, with the dean’s arrival at LAU. Every step in developing the academic program, recruiting faculty, establishing affiliations with clinical sites and creating the system to promote student success was designed in light of the CCNE standards. The aim was to host a successful accreditation visit by Spring 2013 so that even the first class of graduates would be earning their degrees from an accredited nursing program. Faculty, staff and students alike were committed to this goal. When the notice from CCNE arrived in November 2013, the decision was retroactive to the first day of the April 2013 site visit. The goal had been met!


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

ARCSON Earns Accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) Adapted from LAU website, November 15, 2013 LAU’s Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing has many reasons to celebrate these days as it was recently informed that the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) has accredited its baccalaureate program for five years to December 31, 2018. The sense of pride in achieving accreditation reverberated across both campuses and was felt most palpably among the recent graduates of the program. “We are very proud that ARCSON has received CCNE accreditation for its undergraduate program!” enthuses nursing alumnus Chant H. Kazandjian. Khaled Salem echoes the sentiment: “It brings me joy knowing that I was amongst the first students to have graduated from LAU with a B.S.N. degree,” he says, adding, “I hope for continuous success for this awesome school and its great staff and administration.” For Dr. Nancy Hoffart, dean and founder of the School, LAU has a tradition of academic excellence. “We are pleased to have the official recognition to go with it,” she says. “Having achieved accreditation confirms what we already knew—that we have a curriculum that prepares nurses to be high functioning professionals in a variety of health care settings, in hospitals as well as community health settings,” she adds. The unusually rapid speed at which the School achieved accreditation is a result of the concerted effort of the entire university. CCNE sets standards for the preparation of nurses to meet the high demands for safe and effective care in an ever more sophisticated healthcare system. As an autonomous accrediting agency, it contributes to the improvement of public health. According to the official website, CCNE serves the public interest by assessing and identifying programs that engage in effective educational practices. In fact, CCNE’s emphasis on self-regulation sharply aligns with ARCSON’s culture of continuous selfimprovement.


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Moving into a Permanent Home The second highlight of 2013-2014 was ARCSON’s move into the Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury Health Sciences Center (CHSC). The second week of April 2014, found us moving “home” to the fifth level of the CHSC. The space dedicated to nursing is 425 square meters, with 15 offices and work areas for faculty and staff, a meeting room outfitted with videoconferencing capabilities, reception areas and storage space. ARCSON shares the Clinical Simulation Center, classrooms and computer lab in CHSC with the Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine.

Students learning about mechanical ventilation in the Clinical Simulation Center


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Ambassador Chagoury speaking during the dedication

Dedication of the Chagoury Health Science’s Center: A Home for the Health Sciences Adapted from LAU website, April 2, 2014 LAU formally inaugurated the long-awaited Chagoury Health Sciences Center on the Byblos campus on March 31, 2014. The state-of-the-art building was made possible by Ambassador Gilbert Chagoury and his wife Rose-Marie. Already a landmark of the Byblos campus, the ultra-modern 15,500 square meter complex will serve as a key LAU education and research facility, merging cutting-edge anatomy and biomedical research laboratories with classrooms, lecture halls, computer labs and student lounges for the Schools of Nursing, Medicine and Pharmacy. The six-story building is also home to one of the Arab world’s finest clinical skills and simulation centers. The center’s full-body mannequin simulators are a key learning tool for students at all three schools. Capable of simulating physiological changes such as a loss of pulse, a sudden drop in blood pressure or pupil dilation, the mannequins can be used to simulate a range of scenarios including injections, labor, heart attacks or stab wounds. LAU has been a regional pioneer in using simulation technology in teaching the health sciences and aspires to play a regional role in healthcare education by also providing training to practicing doctors, pharmacists and nurses.


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Academic Activities & Accomplishments Recruitment and Enrollment Data The nursing student body has grown more rapidly than expected, thanks to collaboration with the LAU Admissions Office and to LAU’s strong financial aid program for nursing. In October 2010 we admitted the first 13 nursing students and subsequent classes have grown in size, bringing young women and men from across Lebanon. As of September 30, 2014, nursing enrollment was just shy of 100 students. Most students are admitted directly from high schools in Lebanon but some have transferred into the nursing major from the freshman program and other majors at LAU as well as from other universities. We have enrolled several students who earned a first degree in another field, then returned to school to earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) because of the high employability of registered nurses in Lebanon and outside the country. Figures 1 and 2 show the five-year nursing admission and enrollment trends. Figure 1. Admissions to Nursing, 2010-2014

Figure 2. Total Enrollment in Nursing, 2010-2014


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Outcome Data: B.S.N. Graduates The first nine students graduated from the B.S.N. program in July 2013, and 23 more graduated in July 2014. To date, all of the B.S.N. graduates who have taken the Lebanese colloquium for licensure as a registered nurse have passed. In February of each year ARCSON gathers data about the employment rate for the graduates of the previous year which has revealed high employment rates. For the 2014 class, the table includes the two students already enrolled in graduate studies. (Table 1).

Table 1. Outcome Data: B.S.N. Graduates

Number of Graduates

Colloquium Pass Rate

6-month Employment Rate

2013

9

100%

100%

2014

23

100%

91%

First graduating class with ARCSON faculty and President Jabbra - July 2013


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Recognizing Outstanding Students Every school and university proudly recognizes outstanding students. Even though ARCSON is a new school, nursing students have gained attention at LAU because of their enthusiasm, sense of responsibility and academic and extracurricular accomplishments. Nursing students are eligible to be considered for university-wide awards and ARCSON has a number of nursingspecific awards. Through the generosity of friends of our shcool, we have established three awards specifically for nursing students.


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

2013

Marie Elise Haddad

2014

Wassim Al Koros

2013

Chant Kazandjian

2014

Nour Al Andary

The President’s Circle Award is given to a graduating nursing student in recognition of professional presentation, delivery of patient-centered nursing care and strong academics.

2013

Alaa Othman

2014

Razmig Saghbazarian

The Shaké Ketefian Award for a Graduating Student is given in recognition of excellent academics, patient-centered care delivery and strong leadership potential.

2013

Chant Kazandjian

2014

Hiba Mawed

The Shaké Ketefian Award for a B.S.N. II Student is given to a junior nursing student to recognize his or her compassion, caring, effective communication and sound clinical judgment when delivering patient care.

2013

Laila Maraqa

2014

Melissa Ghoussoub

2012

Chant Kazandjian

2013

Hiba Mawed

2014

Ninar Skheita

The Torch Award is a university award that is given to one graduating student in each school who shows high leadership and service spirit. The Riyad Nassar Leadership Award is a prestigious university award given to only two graduating students each year, one on each campus. The recipients must have high academic accomplishments and have shown exceptional leadership. We are extremely proud that the Byblos campus recipient of this award in both 2013 and 2014 was a nursing student. This is evidence of the high quality of students we have been able to recruit and their engagement in school and university-wide extracurricular opportunities.

Each spring the Lions Club of Beirut recognizes outstanding junior nursing students from several schools of nursing in the area. Beginning in 2012 ARCSON has been invited to participate in the Lions Club Award program.

ARCSON Hosts Nursing Ph.D. Student for a Teaching Practicum Currently there are no nursing doctorate programs in Lebanon, but that hasn’t stopped ARCSON from being involved in the education of a student pursuing a Ph.D. in nursing. In Spring 2014, Ms. Kelly Gallagher, a certified nurse midwife who hails from Albuquerque, New Mexico, was living with her family in Lebanon and was enrolled in an on-line nursing Ph.D. program in the U.S. That semester she was slated to enroll in a teaching practicum, which required a host school. She contacted ARCSON to see if she could come to LAU to complete the experience. ARCSON had several

initiatives underway, so a deal was struck! Dean Hoffart agreed to serve as Ms. Gallagher’s preceptor and Ms. Gallagher agreed to apply her classroom learning about curriculum and instruction to teaching and curriculum projects. She helped design a learning needs assessment tool, developed maternity nursing simulation scenarios, and participated in the Interprofessional Education program. Ms. Gallagher’s contributions were important for her learning and helped the School move forward on the projects.


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Meet the Faculty and Staff Faculty are the backbone of ARCSON. The School is fortunate to have recruited highly qualified faculty to ensure its future success. Each year since 2009 the School has hired new faculty to accommodate the growth of the student body and ensure depth of expertise in core areas of the curriculum. All faculty have earned either a masters degree in nursing or related field or a doctorate in nursing.

Mira Abi Saad-Youssef

Joseph Abou Rjeily

Myrna A.A. Doumit

Rita Doumit

Zeina El Jordi

Mahmoud Ghouzail

M.S.N., RN, Clinical Instructor; pediatric and maternity nursing, nursing administration

Ph.D., M.P.H., RN, Assistant Professor; medical-surgical nursing, health behavior

M.S.N., RN, joint appointment as Clinical Instructor and Director of Perioperative Services, LAUMCRH; perioperative nursing, nursing administration

M.S.N., RN, Clinical Instructor; psychiatric-mental health nursing

Ph.D., M.P.H, RN, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean; medical-surgical nursing, nursing administration

M.S.N., RN, Clinical Instructor; medical-surgical nursing, nursing administration


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School of Nursing

Maha Habre

Nancy Hoffart

Ola Sukkarieh-Haraty

Hera Tashjian

Tarek Na’was

Wissam Faour

M.S.N., RN, CEN, Clinical Instructor; critical care and emergency nursing

M.S.N., RN, CCNS, joint appointment as Clinical Instructor and Chief Nursing Officer, LAUMCRH; critical care nursing, nursing administration

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Annual Report

Ph.D., RN, Professor and Founding Dean; nursing administration, nephrology nursing

Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology/Pharmacy; serves as the Faculty Advisor for nursing students during terms enrolled on the Beirut campus

Ph.D., M.P.H, RN, Assistant Professor; medical-surgical nursing, health behavior

Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmacology and Physiology, Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury School of Medicine; nursing pharmacology


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Every semester ARCSON hires part-time faculty to teach in some of the clinical courses. These individuals are senior nurses with knowledge in a specialty area, generally working full-time in practice; they are keen to share their knowledge with students and to gain teaching experience. Depending on their other work/career responsibilities, they may be with us for a semester, or up to several semesters. The School and nursing students benefit from their discerning clinical knowledge and effective role modeling.

ARCSON Hosts Fulbright Faculty Scholar Marilyn (Lynn) Lotas, Ph.D., RN, associate professor and associate dean for the B.S.N. program of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH, was a 2011-2012 Fulbright Faculty Scholar at ARCSON. Dr. Lotas’ many years of experience leading the B.S.N. program at Case, and particularly her role in developing several innovative curricular components, enabled her to offer insight into the design of the ARCSON B.S.N. program. One of Dr. Lotas’ main educational interests is in community-campus partnerships and service learning in nursing; consequently she was the perfect person to work with the faculty to identify community concepts for our curriculum. She also provided guidance in forming the School’s governance structure and in drafting promotion and tenure criteria. She spurred the School to offer its first professional conference, Crucial Conversations in Nursing, in April 2012. It was beneficial to have a consummate academician as a visiting professor so early in our history.

ARCSON students, faculty and staff celebrate International Nurses Day at the Fountain area


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

If faculty are the backbone of a school, the academic staff are the tissues that support and help ensure communication among the parts. We are fortunate to have three qualified staff at the school. Corinne Waked Dargham, M.Sc., was the first staff member to join the School during academic year 2009-2010 and currently serves as Executive Assistant to the Dean. Tala Hasbini Danawi, M.S.E.S, RN, is the ARCSON Assessment Officer. In this role she assists in all data-related and assessment activities at the School. Cynthia Bou Gharios, B.S., joined the School in spring 2014 as Academic Assistant, she provides critical support for curriculum and student-related activities.

Left to right: Tala Hasbini Danawi, Corinne Waked Dargham, Cynthia Bou Gharios


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Clinical Learning Experiences and Affiliation Agreements Each ARCSON student spends approximately 1,200 hours while enrolled at LAU providing care to patients in a variety of acute and chronic care hospitals and community agencies. The students start as novices, progressively applying their knowledge to more complex cases and providing more comprehensive and holistic care. They are supervised directly by part-time and full-time faculty, each an expert clinician who has earned either a master’s or a doctorate degree in nursing. In the senior capstone course and in the summer cooperative education experiences (internships) experienced nurses assist faculty by serving as clinical preceptors and practice partners, respectively, to the students. The close supervision by faculty and clinical nurses helps ensure that ARCSON’s students are guided to apply what they learn in the campus classroom to deliver safe, evidence-based nursing care. Figure 3 shows that LAU nursing students have provided approximately 62,000 hours of clinical care from July 2011 through August 2014. This is equivalent to nearly 29 years’ worth of nursing care (based on the equivalent of 2,112 hours of work per year for a full-time nurse).

Figure 3. Hours of Clinical Care Provided Annually by ARCSON Students


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Affiliated Health Care Agencies To meet the clinical learning needs of ARCSON’s growing student body, as of September 2014 the School has signed affiliation agreements with several hospitals and community health agencies. We continue to add more as needed. Students rotate among these agencies, learning to deliver nursing care to patient populations who need different levels and types of care. We are grateful to the health care institutions shown in Figures 4 and 5 for their willingness to help us educate the next generation of registered professional nurses for Lebanon.

Figure 4. Clinical Affiliations outside Beirut

Figure 5. Clinical Affiliations in Beirut


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Nursing in the Community Nurses worldwide play an important role in the delivery of healthcare to people in the community. Our B.S.N. curriculum places a strong emphasis on community health by including concepts such as health promotion, disease prevention, environment, population health, human diversity and the social determinants of health. We also have incorporated clinical learning experiences in the community at all levels of the curriculum. Armed with this knowledge, ARCSON graduates are prepared to work in community settings and when working in acute care settings to collaborate with community health agencies to promote continuity of care for patients across settings.


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Engaging with the Community Adapted from LAU website, December 10, 2013 Senior year nursing students have just completed community-centered courses, which focus on the knowledge and skills that foster health behavior changes in individuals, families, communities and populations. Helping to screen, immunize, educate and teach the prevention of diseases across various outpatient clinics and schools in Lebanon, they engaged with the community, gaining real hands-on experience. Students worked with local schools, such as Rosary School in Jbeil, to learn the role of a school nurse and educate grade 1-6 students on a variety of health-related topics from how to correctly wash their hands to dental care, first aid measures and physical changes during puberty. Another clinical opportunity took students to Karagheusian Center in Borj Hammoud, where they worked with underserved populations, such as Syrian refugees. Here in an outpatient center, they practiced the role of the community nurse helping with everything from immunizations to teaching mothers about nutrition on a budget. “There were so many people and so much to do. It was my favorite part of the course,” says Nada Kazoun, a final year nursing student, who worked at the center. “The most important thing when working within the community is teaching awareness and prevention, to stop diseases from happening and thus break the cycle,” says Mrs. Mira Abi Saad-Youssef, who leads the course. “Treatment after discharge is almost more important than in the hospital.” “Students come away from the community courses with a much better appreciation of aftercare and what a patient goes home to,” says Nancy Hoffart, dean. “They realize that when you’re in the community you don’t always have the same resources you would normally have in a hospital.” For her, it is important that the students build an understanding of the continuity of care that patients need.


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Accomplishments in Research & Scholarship The challenge of launching the B.S.N. program has not kept the nursing faculty from pursuing their research and scholarship.

Faculty research is focused primarily on health issues important in Lebanon: breast cancer and other cancer-related issues, the increasing incidence of eating disorders and obesity and patient self-management of diabetes mellitus. Faculty also are collaborating with faculty from other schools on a variety of studies and scholarly projects. An example of this is the collaboration of Dr. Rita Doumit and Dr. Ola Sukkarieh-Haraty with Dr. JoAnn Long, Professor, Lubbock Christian University (LCU), Texas, in a project to test an evidencebased research tool. An example of scholarly work related to the School’s innovative teaching approaches is the conference presentation, “Integrating Simulation in the Curriculum Map of a Concept-Based Nursing Program,” by Ms. Maha Habre and Mrs. Mira Abi Saad-Youssef, Clinical Instructors. The School’s Research, Scholarship and Faculty Development Council has the responsibility to review the faculty’s research grant applications and requests for funding to attend and present at professional conferences. Table 2 shows the research grants that have been funded by the School to date. Figure 6 shows the number of faculty presentations and publications each year.

Table 2. Intramural Research Funding

Principal Investigator

Grant Name

Project Title

Amount

Date Granted

Dr. Rita Doumit

LAU New Faculty Seed Fund

Influence of Religiosity on Disordered Eating Behaviors in Lebanese Female Students

$5,000

July 2013

Dr. Ola SukkariehHaraty

LAU New Faculty Seed Fund

The Effect of a Diabetes Educational Program on Diabetes Self-Care Adherence and Glycemic Control (HbA1c Levels) in the Lebanese Population with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

$5,000

March 2014

Dr. Myrna Doumit

Rima Hourani Annual Nursing Research Grant

Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Lebanese Women Towards Breast Cancer, Breast Self-Examination and Mammography

$12,000

March 2014


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Figure 6. Faculty Scholarly Presentations and Publications

School of Nursing Faculty Member Benefits from Hourani Research Grant Adapted from LAU website, August 4, 2014 Myrna Doumit, associate professor, received a $12,000 grant from the Rima Hourani Annual Nursing Research Fund to study Lebanese women’s self-care practices related to breast cancer. Dr. Doumit is a qualitative researcher focusing on the quality of healthcare for cancer patients in Lebanon. “I was extremely happy to know that we received money earmarked for research. This denotes the trust that the donor has in the nursing profession at LAU,” she said, thanking Hourani. Doumit’s study gathered data about the practices and attitudes of Lebanese women toward breast cancer. The results of the study are being finalized now and will be used to plan a culturally appropriate approach to enhance women’s compliance with international breast cancer screening recommendations.


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

2009 / 10 PUBLICATIONS Nancy Hoffart

PRESENTATIONS Nancy Hoffart

LeMaster, C., Hoffart, N., Benzer, T., Chafe, T., Pallin, D., Schreiber, H., Wang, R., & Schuur, J. (2010). Implementation of the central venous catheter observer and checklist bundle in emergency departments: A qualitative study. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 56(3), Supplement 1, S155. [abstract] LeMaster, C.H., Hoffart, N., Benzer, T., Chafe, T., Pallin, T., Schreiber, H., Wang, R., & Schuur, J. (2010, September). Implementation of the central venous catheter observation and checklist bundle in emergency departments: A qualitative study. Las Vegas, NV: American College of Emergency Physicians Scientific Assembly. [poster]

2010 / 11 PUBLICATIONS Myrna Doumit

Doumit, M. (2011). Lebanon making a start in palliative care. Hospice Information Bulletin, 8, 2, 10. Doumit, M. (2011). Cancer patient support: The Lebanese experience. Psycho–Oncology, 20, 443.

Nancy Hoffart

Hoffart, N., Waddell, A., & Young, M.B. (2011). A model of new nurse transition. Journal of Professional Nursing, 27, 334-343. Sroczynski, M., Gravlin, G., Route, P.S., Hoffart, N., & Creelman, P. (2011). Creativity and Connections: The Future of Nursing Education and Practice: The Massachusetts initiative. Journal of Professional Nursing, 27, e64-e70. Hoffart, N., Huijer, H.A-S. (2011, May 17). Lebanon nurses - a serious nursing crisis. [editorial/commentary]. Beirut: The Daily Star http://www. dailystar.com.lb/Opinion/Commentary/2011/May-17/Lebanon-nurses-aserious-nursing-crisis.ashx#axzz1Mbg4yvjI

PRESENTATIONS Myrna Doumit

Nancy Hoffart

Doumit, M., Abu-Saad Huijer, H., Kelley, J., El Saghir, N., & Nassar, N. (2011, February 10). Coping with breast cancer: The Lebanese experience. Los Angeles, CA: 11th National Conference on Cancer Nursing Research. Hoffart, N., Waddell, A., & Young, M.B. (2011, May 13). A model of new nurse transition. Beirut: First International Nursing Research Conference, Lebanese Order of Nurses.


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School of Nursing

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Annual Report

2011 / 12 PUBLICATIONS Myrna Doumit

Abu-Saad Huijer, H., Abboud, S., & Doumit, M. (2012). Symptom prevalence and management of cancer patients in Lebanon. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 44, 386-399. Abu-Saad Huijer, H., Doumit, M., Abboud, S., & Dimassi, H. (2012). Quality of palliative care in Lebanon: The perspectives of patients with cancer. Lebanese Medical Journal, 60(2), 91-98. Doumit, M. (2012). Palliative care and Lebanese cancer patients. Human & Health, 20, 28.

Nancy Hoffart PRESENTATIONS Mira Abi Saad-Youssef

Myrna Doumit

Hoffart, N., (2012). Leadership. In J.M. Giddens (Ed.), Concept-based Nursing (1st ed., pp. 376-386). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Abi Saad-Youssef, M., Khatcherian, G., & Hoffart, N. (2012, April 20). A concept-based approach to the B.S.N. curriculum. Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference. [poster] Doumit, M., Lockhart, J., Nassif, S., & Azoury, N. (2012, September 9). The experience of oncology nurses in Lebanon. Prague, Czech Republic: 17th International Conference on Cancer Nursing. Hoffart, N., Khoury Hanna, G., & Doumit, M. (2012, April 20). Cooperative education in the B.S.N. curriculum. Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference. [poster]

Rita Doumit

Hoffart, N., & Doumit, R. (2012, April 20). Interprofessional education at LAU. Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference. [poster]

Nancy Hoffart

Abi Saad-Youssef, M., Khatcherian, G., & Hoffart, N. (2012, April 20). A concept-based approach to the B.S.N. curriculum. Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference. [poster] Hoffart, N., & Doumit, R. (2012, April 20). Interprofessional education at LAU. Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference. [poster] Hoffart, N., Khoury Hanna, G., & Doumit, M. (2012, April 20). Cooperative education in the B.S.N. curriculum. Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference. [poster]


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School of Nursing

Annual Report

Schuur, J.D., Steptoe, A.P., Mills, S.E.A., Yokoe, D.S., Pallin. D., Hou, P.C., Hoffart, N., Day, N.M., Espinola, J., & Carmargo, C.A. (2012, May 12). Infection prevention practices in U.S. emergency departments, 2011. Chicago: Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting.

Ola Sukkarieh

Sukkarieh, O., Howard, E., Nemr, R., & Nasrallah, M. (2012, January). The relationship among diabetes self-care, psychological adjustment, social support and glycemic control in the Lebanese population with Type 2 diabetes. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico, College of Nursing. Sukkarieh, O., Howard, E., Nemr, R., & Nasrallah, M. (2012, March). The relationship among diabetes self-care, psychological adjustment, social support and glycemic control in the Lebanese population with Type 2 diabetes. London: Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2012. [Poster] Also presented (2012, April 20). Byblos, LB: Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing, Crucial Conversations in Nursing Conference.

2012 / 13 PUBLICATIONS Myrna Doumit

Daher, M., Doumit, M., Hajjar, R., Hamra, R., Khoury, M.N., & Tohmé, A. (2013). Integrating palliative care into health education in Lebanon. Lebanese Medical Journal, 61, 191-198. Doumit, M., & Khoury, N. M. (2013). Coping with the experience of having a child with cancer: A Lebanese perspective. Pediatric Blood and Cancer Journal, 60(83), 188. [abstract] Kalisch, B., Doumit, M., Kyung, H. L., & El Zein, J. (2013). Missed nursing care, level of staffing and job satisfaction: Lebanon versus the United States. Journal of Nursing Administration, 43, 274-279. Khoury, M., Abu Saad Huijer, H., & Doumit, M. (2013). Lebanese parents’ experience with a child with cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 17, 16-21. Khoury, N. M., & Doumit, M. (2013). Coping with the experience of having a child with cancer: A Lebanese perspective. Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository, http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/ handle/10755/303887 [abstract]

Rita Doumit

Doumit, R. (2013). Coping, stress and well-being in Lebanese entering college students. Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository, http://www. nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/303869 [abstract] Velsor-Friedrich, B., Militello, L. K., Kouba, J., Harrison, P. R., Manion, A., & Doumit, R. (2013). Pediatric obesity and asthma quality of life. Nursing Clinics of North America, 48, 259-270.

Nancy Hoffart

Hoffart, N. (2013). Developing an evidence-based interprofessional education (IPE) program. Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository, http:// www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/304193 [abstract]


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PRESENTATIONS Myrna Doumit

School of Nursing

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Annual Report

Khoury, N. M., & Doumit, M. (2013, July 24). Coping with the experience of having a child with cancer: A Lebanese perspective. Prague, Czech Republic: Sigma Theta Tau International, 24th International Nursing Research Congress. [poster]

Rita Doumit

Doumit, R. (2013, July 25). Coping, stress and well-being in Lebanese entering college students. Prague, Czech Republic: Sigma Theta Tau International, 24th International Nursing Research Congress.

Nancy Hoffart

Hoffart, N. (2013, July 26). Developing an evidence-based interprofessional education (IPE) program. Prague, Czech Republic: Sigma Theta Tau, International, 24th International Nursing Research Congress.

Ola Sukkarieh-Haraty

Sukkarieh, O., Howard, E., & Rodgers, R. (2013, September). The role of social support and glycemic control in an Arabic speaking population with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A path analysis study. Barcelona: 18th Federation of European Nurses in Diabetes. [Poster]

2013 / 14 PUBLICATIONS Myrna Doumit

Hoffart, N., Vacek, J., Doumit, M., Liesveld, J., & Brady, D. (2014). Host partner factors for partnership and sustainability. In Upvall, M.J., & Leffers, J. (Eds.). Global health nursing: Building and sustaining partnerships (pp. 101115). New York: Springer. Hoffart, N., Vacek, J., Doumit, M., Liesveld, J., & Brady, D. (2014). Considering host partner factors in developing a nursing program in Lebanon. In Upvall, M.J., & Leffers, J. (Eds.). Global health nursing: Building and sustaining partnerships (pp. 116-122). New York: Springer. Kobeissi, L., Abou Saad, M., Doumit, M., Mohsen, R., Salem, Z., & Tfayli, A. (2014). Face validity of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Symptom Index (FACT- B) into formal Arabic. Middle East Journal of Cancer, 5, 151-165. Majdalani, M.N., Doumit, M., & Rahi, A. (2014). The lived experience of parents of children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in Lebanon. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 51, 217-225.

Rita Doumit

Long, J.A., Gannaway, P., Doumit, R, & Ford, C. (2014). Outcomes of an evidence-based research (EBR) tool to teach online research and critical thinking skills. Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository, http:// www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/335375 [abstract]

Maha Habre

Mudd, S.S., Habre, M.A., Bahreman, N., & Stanik-Hutt, J. (2013). International residency for the development of the emergency department clinical nurse specialist role. International Emergency Nursing, 21, 194-196.


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Nancy Hoffart

Hoffart, N., Vacek, J., Doumit, M., Liesveld, J., & Brady, D. (2014). Host partner factors for partnership and sustainability. In Upvall, M.J., & Leffers, J. (Eds). Global health nursing: Building and sustaining partnerships (pp. 101115). New York: Springer. Hoffart, N., Vacek, J., Doumit, M., Liesveld, J., & Brady, D. (2014). Considering host partner factors in developing a nursing program in Lebanon. In Upvall, M.J., & Leffers, J. (Eds.), Global health nursing: Building and sustaining partnerships (pp. 116-122). New York: Springer. LeMaster, C.H., Hoffart, N., Chafe, T., Benzer, T., & Schuur, J.D. (2014). Implementing the central-venous catheter prevention bundle in the emergency department: Experiences among early adopters. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 63, 240-250.

PRESENTATIONS Mira Abi Saad-Youssef

Abi Saad-Youssef, M. & Habre, M. (2014, June). Integrating simulation in the curriculum map of a concept-based nursing program. Orlando, FL: 13th Annual International Nursing Simulation/Learning Resource Centers Conference. [poster]

Myrna Doumit

Liesveld, J., Brady, D., Vacek, J., Doumit, M.A.A., & Hoffart, N. (2014, April 10). Sustainability in global nursing education partnerships. Seattle, WA: Western Institute of Nursing, 47th Annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference. [poster]

Rita Doumit

Gannaway, P., Long, J.A., Brown, J., Proper, S., Ford, C., & Doumit, R. (2013, December). Lessons learned from developing a web-based tool to teach evidence-based practice: Application to institutional effectiveness. Atlanta, GA: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges. Long, J.D., Ford, C., Gannaway, P., Doumit, R., Zeeni, N., Sukkarieh-Haraty, O., & Milane, A. (2014, July 23). Outcomes of an evidence-based research (EBR©) tool to teach online research and critical thinking skills. Hong Kong, China: Sigma Theta Tau International, 25th International Nursing Research Congress.

Maha Habre

Abi Saad-Youssef, M. & Habre, M. (2014, June). Integrating simulation in the curriculum map of a concept-based nursing program. Orlando, FL: 13th Annual International Nursing Simulation/Learning Resource Centers Conference. [poster] Habre, M. (2014, March 8). The new sepsis guidelines: Nurses’ role in clinical practice. Beirut: Annual Congress of the Society of Critical Care Medicine.


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Nancy Hoffart

Carney, M., Diani, J., & Hoffart, N. (2014, January 10). Short and longterm outcomes of an international cooperative educational experience for undergraduate nursing students. Lisbon, Portugal: Seventh World Universities Forum, University of Lisbon. Liesveld, J., Brady, D., Vacek, J., Doumit, M.A.A., & Hoffart, N. (2014, April 10). Sustainability in global nursing education partnerships. Seattle, WA: Western Institute of Nursing, 47th Annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference. [poster]

Ola Sukkarieh-Haraty

Long, J.D., Ford, C., Gannaway, P., Doumit, R., Zeeni, N., Sukkarieh-Haraty, O., & Milane, A. (2014, July 23). Outcomes of an evidence-based research (EBRŠ) tool to teach online research and critical thinking skills. Hong Kong, China: Sigma Theta Tau International, 25th International Nursing Research Congress.


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Community & Professional Service Activities & Accomplishments The initial aim of ARCSON’s service effort has been to engage with the LAU community through faculty representation on university councils and committees. The School is now represented in the LAU Faculty Senate, on five key faculty councils and on many other committees and work groups. We also have faculty involved in professional associations and service to community agencies. For example, Ms. Maha Habre serves on the Administrative Committee of the Order of Nurses in Lebanon. Dr. Myrna Doumit is on the board of directors for Dispensaire Saint-Antoine de Roueissat, Jdeideh, and has served on their committee leading the effort to earn accreditation from the Ministry of Public Health. Being the newest school at LAU, we are also striving to educate the LAU community about professional nursing and the university’s role in contributing to a well-prepared professional nursing workforce for the country. With the support of LAU’s Marketing and Communication Department, ARCSON’s progress, activities and accomplishments have been reported in a wide array of LAU publications. In addition, nursing students have been excellent ambassadors for the School on the Byblos campus and in the community. With support from the Byblos Dean of Students Office, the Nursing Club was launched in academic year 2011-2012. Its goals are to organize awareness campaigns about health-related topics on and off campus, organize lectures and presentations on topics of interest to its members, and promote the nursing profession. Their enthusiasm and professionalism is evident in the long list of activities they have sponsored.

Nursing Club’s Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign


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Nursing Club Activities • National Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign, ABC Shopping Stores, Lebanon, October 2011 • Breast Cancer Awareness, Byblos Campus, November 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 Participation in Beirut Marathon, 10-K Walk, November 2011, 2012, and 2013 • “Welcome to Byblos” for nursing students transferring from Beirut to Byblos campus, February 2012 and 2013 • Nature and culture outing to The Cedars and Gibran Khalil Gibran Museum, February 2012 • “A Talk about Psych-Mental Health Nursing,” Jouhayna Bejjani-Gebara, MSN, RN, Certified Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Specialist, Spring 2012 • “A Talk about Nursing Education in the United States,” Marilyn Lotas, Ph.D., RN, Fulbright Scholar ARCSON; Associate Dean, Case Western Reserve University, Spring 2012

at

• Celebration of International Nurses’ Day, May 2012, 2013, and 2014 • Diabetes Awareness and AIDS Awareness campaigns, Byblos Campus; held in collaboration with medical, pharmacy and nutrition students, 2012 and 2013 • World Diabetes Day Health Awareness and Screening, Shatila Camp, Beirut; held in collaboration with pharmacy, medical and nutrition students, November 2012 • “Communication and Spirituality,” Sr. Maureen Grady, Department of Nursing, St. Mary’s College, South Bend, Indiana, Spring 2013 • “Motivational Interviewing to Enhance Patient Engagement,” Hussein Tahan, DNSc, RN, Corporate Director of Nursing Research and Education, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, May 2013 • Corona Virus Awareness Campaign, Byblos campus, Fall 2013 • Christmas Party and food donation to Dar Al 3inaya Nursing Home, Lebanese Maronite Order, Hboub, December 2013 • Health Awareness Week: Breast Self-exam, Fast Food, Smoking, Alcohol, Spring 2014; held in collaboration with other LAU clubs


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Crucial Conversations in Nursing The school has Adapted from LAU website, June 12, 2012 sponsored a highly successful Under the name Crucial Conversations, the School of Nursing organized its first symposium for nurses and nursing leaders in conference for Lebanon on April 20, 2012. The symposium brought together deans and faculty in schools of nursing, directors of nursing at hospitals, nursing leaders from and other nursing leaders from the community. It provided a platform throughout Lebanon. for all parties to hear from international and local speakers. Dr. Joyce Fitzpatrick, endowed professor of nursing at Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, kicked off the conference with her presentation about spirituality in healthcare and its importance in a religiously diverse country like Lebanon. “Healthcare providers must be aware of their own spiritual, cultural and religious beliefs, and consider their impact during interactions with patients with different backgrounds,” she explained.

The conference continued with Dr. Marilyn Lotas, Fulbright Scholar and visiting faculty at the School of Nursing, who reported that 90% of nursing curricula are currently acute care focused and community health courses are generally introduced in the very last semester. This is in contrast to a healthcare system that is shifting more care delivery away from acute care hospitals and into to the community. She advocated the need for more education in the community to enable nursing to make this shift. Dr. Nancy Hoffart, dean of nursing, spoke about interprofessional education, a contemporary approach being taken at LAU and health programs elsewhere to bring students from two or more professions together to learn about, from and with each other. Such learning experiences enable effective collaboration among disciplines. Each presentation was followed by an engaged discussion with the audience, with all eager for more such conferences.


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Students learning intravenous medication skills in the Clinical Simulation Center

Students performing pediatric simulation

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Alumni Activities As of September 2014 the School of Nursing can claim 32 alumni. While the number is still small, the School has much to be proud of. The first class of graduates achieved 100% employment within six months. The second graduating class also was well on their way to full employment soon after graduation. Our alumni are working in settings that range from general medical-surgical, to intensive care, to emergency care units in well-regarded hospitals. Some have chosen to work in community settings, building on the strong community health thread in the curriculum. And some are already pursuing graduate studies. The following stories attest to the quality of our graduates.


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Chant Kazandjian Wins Fulbright Scholarship Adapted from LAU website, July 18, 2014 LAU’s Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing (ARCSON) applauds the success of a distinguished member of its first graduating class, Chant Kazandjian, who recently was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in pursuit of a masters in Mental Health Counseling. “When I got the news all I felt was shock and excitement—a mixture of happiness and a sense of accomplishment,” says Kazandjian. According to the young scholar, what excites him most about the award is the opportunity to be an ambassador for both LAU and Lebanon in the U.S. The Fulbright Scholarship is a highly prestigious and competitive award sponsored by the U.S. government. Applicants from all over the world, who exhibit exceptional academic merit and leadership potential, compete for limited positions to teach, study or conduct research at an American educational facility. Kazandjian certainly has the bona fides to take on this challenge, having graduated top of his class. True to his modest character, the nursing graduate unreservedly attributes his success to his alma mater. “My success, first and foremost, goes to LAU. Without a solid education and the opportunities for enhancing leadership skills, the Fulbright Scholarship would not have been possible for me to attain,” he says. For Dr. Nancy Hoffart, dean of ARCSON, “Chant has been ‘the first’ for so many things in the School of Nursing— our first applicant, the first student we admitted, the top in his class and our first student to receive the Riyad Nassar Leadership Award,” she said while spreading the news of his latest achievement. “He has continuously helped us build the School and communicate our message to a wider audience.”

ARCSON Alumna Wins Award Adapted from ARCSON website, July 9, 2014 Marie Elise Haddad, B.S.N., Class of 2013, received the “New Joiner Award” at Bellevue Medical Center (BMC), Mansourieh, El Metn, during the hospital’s May 2014 Nursing Day celebration. This award is given to one RN who was hired within the past year. A committee of nurse managers and physicians selected Ms. Haddad based on her record of providing safe patient care, her fit with the hospital culture and values, positive effect on patient satisfaction, and collegiality with others. When asked what the award means to her she stated, “I have only practiced what I learned at LAU, and worked according to the values that you have taught us. It is my turn now to say thank you sincerely for everything!”


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Development: Where Would We Be Without Friends ARCSON would not have achieved the success it has in such a short period without generous support from many individuals and organizations. The school is indebted to those who recognize the importance of nursing within the healthcare system and share their resources so that the school can open its doors to more students who want to pursue a nursing career, recognize students’ accomplishments and support faculty research. In this, our first annual report, we recognize and thank all who have generously supported us. The School of Nursing had friends who stepped forward to support LAU’s entry into the nursing education arena even before we had faculty and students. Of course, the first friends were Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury. Their decision to endow the School and honor Mr. Chagoury’s mother by naming it after her is the type of gift that schools of nursing around the world yearn for. Nursing has often been the forgotten school when naming endowments are considered. The Chagoury gift allowed LAU, as a top ranked university in the country, to grant nursing its rightful place as an independent school. It is apt that we thank the Chagoury family every time our shield is printed on a document, is seen on a nursing student’s uniform, is read on a complimentary travel mug or is said aloud during a presentation.


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Amal and Rima Hourani

ARCSON is particularly grateful for the backing from Mrs. Rima Hourani and her husband Amal, who have provided magnificent scholarship support to nursing students since the School’s inception. Their continuing support has been instrumental in the School’s ability to recruit students. Mrs. Hourani, a 1970 graduate of the Beirut College for Women, had always wanted to support nursing education. She has stated, “Nursing is a noble job and hopefully the incentive of a scholarship will encourage more students to join a profession that is greatly needed and yet so undervalued.” In 2013 the Houranis also established the Rima Hourani Annual Nursing Research Grant to fund faculty members in conducting research to improve healthcare in Lebanon. Another donor whose gift preceded the opening of the nursing school is Mrs. Yvonne Kabban, who created the Jad and Yvonne Kabban Endowment Fund to provide scholarship support for B.S.N. students. Mrs. Kabban is a 1952 graduate of the Beirut College for Women (BCW). As a girl she was interested in a nursing career but was steered in a different direction. Many years later she reaffirmed her interest and appreciation of the nursing profession by establishing the endowed fund. Annual interest from the fund means that support will always be available for nursing students.


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When the School of Nursing first opened, Mr. Abdallah Yabroudi was already a donor to the School of Engineering at LAU, and he extended his philanthropy by including nursing as one of the majors designated for his support. Mr. Yabroudi, Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Dubai Contracting Company and former member of the Board of Trustees, is an advocate for professional internships and understands the value of recognizing student excellence. The students who have received his scholarship support have been able to focus on their studies, and his gifts have enabled ARCSON to reach enrollment targets. Mrs. Wafa Yammine graduated from the American Junior College for Women (an early predecessor of LAU) in 1947 with an AA degree. In 1995 Mrs. Yammine established a fund in the name of her late husband, Dr. Joseph Yammine, to support the Byblos campus library. In 2004 she transferred the fund into a newly established endowment, the Joe and Wafa Yammine Endowment Scholarship Fund, with the aim to benefit students studying the medical sciences. In May 2011, after learning about the opening of the School of Nursing, Mrs. Yammine amended the endowment so that the fund would benefit nursing students specifically. The evolution in her support to LAU will benefit nursing students in perpetuity. Dr. ShakĂŠ Ketefian with Dean Hoffart


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Another supporter is Shaké Ketefian, Ed.D., RN, FAAN, Professor Emerita, University of Michigan School of Nursing, who funds two annual nursing student awards: the Shaké Ketefian Award for a B.S.N. II Student and the Shaké Ketefian Award for a Graduating Student. Dr. Ketefian also graduated from BCW in 1959 with an associate’s degree in Liberal Arts, and recounts fond memories of that time. She continued her education, earning a B.S.N. degree from the American University of Beirut and masters and doctorate degrees in nursing education from Teacher’s College, Columbia University, New York. Dr. Ketefian is an internationally recognized scholar who has taught nursing students at all levels. Her research and scholarly work has focused on global health, scientific integrity, and international doctoral education in nursing. The members of the President’s Circle, which is chaired by Dr. Layla Nimah, are volunteers inspired by their care for and loyalty to LAU. They fundraise and promote the university. They also operate the gift shop at LAUMC-RH, using the proceeds to support patients and families in need. Through their interactions with patients and families, they have come to appreciate the difference that a caring nurse can make in the hospitalization experience. Consequently, in 2013 they created the President’s Circle Award to recognize a graduating nursing student for her/ his patient-centered and caring approach. Dr. Layla Nimah presenting the President’s Circle award, 2013


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Al Diyar International is a Beirut-based company that has pledged to underwrite the annual ARCSON graduation dinner in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Led by its owner and general manager, Mr. Fouad Laham, and his two sons, Roger and Simon, the company understands the importance of robust clinical skills preparation by nurses and other health care professionals. The company supplies a wide array of training mannequins and simulators for use in health education. Their generous support for the graduation dinner gives students and faculty a chance to reflect and celebrate together a noteworthy achievement. In February, 2014, Mr. Michel Zoghzoghi, owner of Dima Healthcare, established the Dima Healthcare Annual Scholarship Grant to support nursing students. Zoghzoghi’s aim in establishing the gift was to challenge the perceptions about nursing that some people have. “I’m always interacting with nurses through Dima Healthcare and I see how hard they work and how difficult their job is,” he says. “I felt it was important to establish the scholarship as a token of appreciation for Lebanon’s nurses. We already have very good nurses, but we need even more of them.” ARCSON is privileged and thankful to be the beneficiary of his largesse.

Graduation Dinner, June 2014


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In 2014 Mr. Ali Rifai established the Ghaidaa Rifai Annual Scholarship Grant, in the name of his mother, for nursing students joining ARCSON from Baalbek and Akkar regions. By establishing this scholarship, Rifai wanted to contribute to improving healthcare in these two deprived regions and provide opportunities for students who are financially disadvantaged. Gifts such as this one help the School achieve its vision to positively affect the nursing profession throughout the country and make it possible for young women and men who do not have the personal means to attend ARCSON to do so. Two Beirut hospitals have created bursary programs with the School, providing scholarships to students who then repay this support through a period of employment at the hospital. LAU’s own hospital, Lebanese American University Medical Center–Rizk Hospital (LAUMC-RH), began offering the bursary with the first enrolled class. Currently eleven students are being supported and seven B.S.N. graduates who were supported are now working at LAUMC-RH. Clemenceau Medical Center (CMC) began a bursary program for LAU nursing students in 2014, supporting four students. Such bursaries benefit all parties: The School’s recruitment efforts are enhanced because more financial assistance is available. Applicants interested in studying nursing can join LAU knowing there is support for their education. The hospital proactively ensures a supply of well-educated B.S.N. graduates to meet their staffing needs. This is particularly important in light of the country’s continuing nursing shortage. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID), through the University Scholarship Program (USP), has provided full scholarships and related financial and academic support to 22 nursing students since the USP began in 2011. The first three USP nursing students graduated in 2014; others are progressing through the B.S.N. program. Nursing is considered by USAID as a profession sorely needed for Lebanon’s economic, social and political development and the School of Nursing has benefited from this generous support by the American people. There are always donors who wish to keep their own names out of the limelight. Two scholarship donors to the School of Nursing fall into this category. Both have made gifts that will help young women and men pursue careers in nursing, and upon graduation contribute to advances in healthcare in Lebanon. The School is grateful for their silent yet notable support.


Contact us! >> LAU School of Nursing Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury Health Sciences Center 5200, Byblos campus Email: nursing.school@lau.edu.lb Phone: +961 9 547254 ext. 2494

www.nursing.lau.edu.lb


BEIRUT CAMPUS P.O. Box 13-5053 Chouran Beirut: 1102 2801, Lebanon Tel +961 1 786 456 Fax +961 1 867 098

BYBLOS CAMPUS P.O. Box 36 Byblos, Lebanon Tel +961 9 547 262 Fax +961 9 546 262

NEW YORK HEADQUARTERS AND ACADEMIC CENTER 211 East 46th Street New York, N.Y. 10017, USA Tel +1 212 203 4333 Fax +1 212 784 6597

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing at LAU School of Nursing is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, (202) 887-6791.

Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing Annual Report 2014  

The Lebanese American University Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing annual highlights and progress report for the year 2014.