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The LAU President’s Report

2006–2007


The LAU President’s Report

2006–2007


Mission Statement The Lebanese American University is committed to academic excellence, student-centeredness, the advancement of scholarship, the education of the whole person, and the formation of students as future leaders in a diverse world.


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Table of Contents Letter from the President..........................................................................................................................2 Implementing Our Mission.........................................................................................................................4 Academic Excellence ...................................................................................................................................................................6 Spotlight on the School of Arts & Sciences...........................................................................................................8 Student-Centeredness..............................................................................................................................................................10 Spotlight on the School of Business .......................................................................................................................12 Advancement of Scholarship .................................................................................................................................................14 Spotlight on the School of Engineering & Architecture ................................................................................16 Education of the Whole Person.............................................................................................................................................18 Spotlight on the School of Medicine.....................................................................................................................20 Formation of Future Leaders in a Diverse World ...........................................................................................................22 Spotlight on the School of Pharmacy....................................................................................................................24 Our Partners & DONORS...............................................................................................................................26 The Case for Giving....................................................................................................................................................................27 A Transformational Gift...........................................................................................................................................................28 List of Contributors 2006–07................................................................................................................................................30 Endowed Scholarships & Established Grants .................................................................................................................34 MEDGULF Contribution Advances Actuarial Sciences .................................................................................................37 Making It Possible............................................................................................................................................38 Student Development & Enrollment Management.....................................................................................................38 Human Resources & University Services .........................................................................................................................40 Human Resources..........................................................................................................................................................41 Facilities ............................................................................................................................................................................42 Information Technology .............................................................................................................................................43 University Advancement.........................................................................................................................................................44 Alumni Affairs ................................................................................................................................................................45 Development..................................................................................................................................................................46 Marketing & Communications................................................................................................................................47 Public Relations .............................................................................................................................................................48 Advancement Services................................................................................................................................................49 Finance...........................................................................................................................................................................................50 Board of Trustees and Board of International Advisors 2006–2007 ......................................................................52 Our Vision for the Future .......................................................................................................................54

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Letter From the President

Education is Our Best Hope for Peace and Progress Dear Friends of LAU, In times of crisis, one doesn’t speak of keeping one’s heart. For better or worse, the heart’s passion often fuels conflict. Rather, we at the Lebanese American University believe that when we face obstacles and opponents, the road to resolution and advancement depends greatly on our ability to keep our heads without losing our hearts. Sometimes, keeping one’s head doesn’t come as naturally as following one’s heart. Staying cool amid confrontation requires having a vision for the future and a plan for achieving it. It means being able to evaluate a situation from multiple vantage points while drawing on a depth of knowledge about the issues at hand and the tools that might help create peace and progress. Equally, keeping one’s head depends on the clear articulation of the vision and its benefits to all parties involved. Finally, it assumes that others are watching and will follow your example. As Martin Luther King, Jr., wrote in his 1963 book of sermons Strength to Love, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” Since its noble beginnings in 1835 as a school for girls in the Ottoman Empire, the Lebanese American University has proved that it is up to the task. LAU’s commitment to building an environment in which students can gain the knowledge and develop the skills needed to keep one’s head has been tested time and again over the past century and a half and most recently during the summer 2006 war. The momentum of the meticulously articulated five-year strategic plan that had gathered over the previous year not only helped the university weather the disruptions caused by the 34-day war but also propelled the completion of the first major initiatives, including achieving candidacy for accreditation from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), in record time.

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! President Joseph G. Jabbra


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In this year’s annual report, the first of its kind for the university, we review the past year’s successes and the people and processes that have made them possible as well as our plans going forward. The report is divided into three sections. In the first several pages, we illustrate the many ways in which LAU is fulfilling the five basic tenets of its mission: academic excellence, studentLAU is in the midst of dramatic and centeredness, advancement of scholarship, education of the whole person, and the formation of future leaders in a far-reaching institutional change. diverse world. We’ll also update you on the strides made NEASC Accreditation Team, April 2007 at each of our five academic schools.

Then, giving them the prominence they deserve, our centerfold features major donors and contributors to the annual fund and the more than 150 academic scholarships offered to students at LAU. We outline how everyone in LAU’s immediate and extended communities can contribute to our success. Finally, we’ll canvas LAU’s administrative divisions and take a close look at how they are leveraging their resources and expertise to support the institution’s mission. A summary of our most recent financial statement also appears here. On its visit last April, the NEASC accreditation team announced that “LAU is in the midst of dramatic and far-reaching institutional change.” Indeed it is. It is an exciting time, full of promise for a better future for our students, for Lebanon, and for the world. We hope you’ll join us as we share some of that promise in the pages that follow, which chronicle achievements that wouldn’t have been possible without the hearts and minds of every member of our extended LAU family. Thank you. And remember: Excellence is our passion. LAU is our pride.

Sincerely,

Joseph G. Jabbra

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Implementing Our Mission

S t r at e g i c P l a n P r o g r e s s

Jabbra joins LAU; presents vision for the university

Board of Trustees approves draft Mission, Vision, and Goals

Surveys and focus group interviews conducted; draft Mission, Vision, and Goals developed

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2005–2010 Strategic Plan approved by Board of Trustees

Strategic Plan drafted based on Mission, Vision, and Goals

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Reduction of teaching load for selected full-time faculty; faculty orientation and mentoring program created

Faculty Senate created

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LAU’s Goals The overarching goal of the Lebanese American University is to function as “one University” with two campuses in an effective, efficient and nimble manner. The Strategic Goals are:

1. To drive LAU to become a world-class institution of higher learning 2. To target enrollment to achieve academic objectives while properly nurturing and 3. 4. 5. 6.

supporting students

To provide a service-centered environment that stimulates and facilitates: student growth and development; intellectual and professional development for faculty and staff; scholarly and creative endeavors for faculty, students, and staff To make LAU the higher education employer of choice in Lebanon by instilling a culture of ownership, empowerment, fairness, accountability, integrity, and reward for achievement To strengthen relationships with the extended LAU community To demonstrate leadership in providing state-of-the-art systems and infrastructure to properly support academic, student and administrative activities and initiatives

7. To use financial resources in a well-planned and highly effective manner

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NEASC self-study comNEASC candidacy pleted; integrated achieved; comprehensive Student Advisement profive-year fund-raising gram implemented; Staff plan approved Advisory Council created Five-year alumni PRIDE plan developed

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Strategic enrollment plan approved by Board of Trustees

New job classification system created

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" Caucusing at the 2007 Global Classrooms-Model UN

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First LAUMS class arrives in Byblos

First medical school class enters; NEASC accreditation achieved

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Completion of 2005–2010 Strategic Plan

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Implementing Our Mission

Academic E xcellence

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he heart of a university must be its academic core. This is one of six major themes that emerged as LAU faculty and staff engaged in an intensive process of self-evaluation that led to the articulation of the initiatives of the university’s five-year strategic plan. The first of these initiatives is “to promote excellence in teaching, learning and research.” By embarking on the self-study required by the rigorous accreditation process of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), LAU took a major step in 2006–07 toward implementing this initiative. The completion of the study in record time further underscored the university’s dedication to upholding both NEASC’s and its own high standards. In September 2007, NEASC announced that LAU had achieved accreditation candidacy, firmly setting the university on course to becoming a world-class institution and fully accredited by the fall of 2009, an admittedly ambitious but reachable goal. LAU has also reaffirmed its commitment to recruiting highly qualified, tenure-track faculty. Since 2000, the number of full-time faculty members, nearly half of whom hold the rank of associate or full professor, has increased, bringing the student-faculty ratio to a respectable 20:1, on par with many U.S. institutions of a similar size. Not only is the number of full-time faculty increasing but so is the amount of time they can spend in the library, field, or lab. Teaching loads were reduced to give faculty members desperately needed time to engage in more research and writing. Similarly, several new faculty members were recruited in part because of their leadership on innovative projects already under way.

Student Achie vers Helen Saad ’02 International Fulbright Science and Technology Award Fulbright scholar Suha Itani ’03 Outstanding Teacher Award from Florida State University

Mireille Rayess Jaoude ’04 Valedictorian at the 2007 commencement for master’s degree candidates in finance at George Washington University Faten Fathallah Represents Lebanon and LAU in the marketing apprenticeship program Dubai Summer Surprises

Vatche Isahakian ’06 Full assistantship in PhD program at London South Bank University Mona Hatoum ’72 Marya Kazoun ’00 Exhibiting artists at the 2007 Sharjah Biennial 8

Helen Sadek ’07 Full scholarship for PhD studies in molecular biology at Johns Hopkins University Dina Jabbour ’07 Full scholarship for PhD studies in molecular microbiology at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg

Carol Daoud ’99 ’06 Full scholarship for PhD studies at Heidelberg University, Germany

Suha Yazbeck ’05 Full scholarship for PhD studies at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio.

" Students do tests in an engineering lab

Manal Maalouf ’07 Full tuition and stipend for PhD study at Case Western Reserve University, Ohio Alian Hasrouny ’05 Fulbright scholarship for a master’s degree in international affairs Dominik Haddad ’07 Full scholarship for PhD studies at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

Rita Aad ’04 MEPI scholarship for six-month training course on leadership and democracy Raida Basma ’07 Full stipend for PhD studies at the American University of Beirut 6


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Maintaining excellence in so “many areas is not a burden; we

To support the university-wide accreditation process, program reviews are taking place leading to revised curricula are driven by genuine passion as well as the introduction of new majors, too. A thorough review of all academic programs will take place over the for what we do. next five to six years. In addition, 18 centers and institutes LAU President Joseph G. Jabbra provide portals for interdisciplinary investigation on issues such as Lebanese heritage, migration, family and entrepreneurial business as well as the mechanism for hosting conferences and colloquia that encourage contributions from scholars from around the world.

Finally, achieving academic excellence would be impossible without a well-stocked, well-organized, and technology-enabled library system. The inauguration of the Riyad Nassar Library represented light years of progress in this area for LAU. In 2006–07, the print and electronic collections continued to expand both in Byblos and Beirut with the donation of more than 13,000 volumes from the Sabre Foundation and the acquisition of ebrary, a collection of 30,000 digital books and documents. LAU is currently recruiting a university librarian who will head library services across the whole institution.

" In the ceramics studio

" The periodicals room in the new Beirut library

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Implementing Our Mission

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ome to LAU’s oldest programs, the School of Arts & Sciences spans both the Byblos and Beirut campuses. It forms the core of the university’s commitment to a solid grounding in the liberal arts while allowing students to pursue individual interests in a broad range of disciplines. Much of the 2006–07 academic year was spent assessing programs in the School of Arts & Sciences with regard to the standards set forth by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). In addition to preparing for university-wide accreditation, the school also implemented a program review process of its own. In addition, new degree programs, in history and philosophy, and a new minor, in actuarial sciences, were introduced. The school also inaugurated two major projects in Byblos that will enhance the scope of scientific research undertaken at LAU. The Genomics & Proteomics Research Center, the only one of its kind in the Arab world, was equipped with sophisticated equipment worth $2 million. Construction of a European Union–funded $250,000 wastewater treatment plant was completed. The plant will not only serve the LAU community but will also be available for teaching, research, and capacity building of local engineers. Among other important developments, the school signaled its expectations for significant growth in the field of education by creating a separate education division. And in conjunction with the LAU Medical School, which expects its first class in 2009, the premedical school curriculum was finalized. Recruitment continued in earnest and resulted in the hiring of many new faculty members with exemplary credentials, including the internationally acclaimed Lebanese writer, poet, and novelist Rachid El Daif, who has joined LAU as an adjunct professor, and the geneticist Pierre Zalloua, who was jointly appointed to Arts & Sciences and the Medical School and is renowned for his work on Phoenician DNA.

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Implementing Our Mission

Student-Centeredness

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or us it’s simple: Students come first. From the moment a student expresses interest in attending LAU, we begin looking at things from their perspective.

Think about what kind of world “you want to live and work in.

In particular, we believe that diversity benefits every student, What do you need to know to build which is why last year LAU representatives visited 305 high that world? Demand that schools in Lebanon and the Middle East and participated in 52 your teachers teach you that. one-day fairs. On these trips, they introduce LAU and seek out motivated individuals from an array of geographic, religious, Peter Kropotkin ethnic, and linguistic backgrounds to assemble the most diverse and driven class possible. Economic diversity is also important, and LAU’s leadership has long committed to providing the funding necessary for financially disadvantaged students to attend. In 2006–07, about one-third of the student body received financial aid.The resulting ethos, palpable at new student orientations, is one that rewards tolerance and fosters cooperation and collaboration among disparate minds.

Academic diversity is also essential. At LAU students can choose to pursue degrees in about 40 disciplines—including architecture, biology, computer science, economics, education, engineering, hospitality and tourism, pharmacy, political science, and psychology. Nearly 1,300 course sections were offered each semester during 2006–07, ensuring that students were able to satisfy course requirements in a reasonable amount of time. A new integrated student advising program helped them sort through all the offerings and select those most relevant to them. Most important, however, options abound for students exploring how to leave their imprint on the world. Plenty of options also exist for those, yearning for the knowledge to develop a passion into a vocation—like Hussein Abbas ’06, whose passion to understand cancer led him to co-found Toufoula (Childhood), an organization dedicated to

! Hussein Abbas '06 with his mentor, chemistry professor Ahmad Houri

! The LAU newsroom

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helping children deal with cancer, before pursuing a PhD at the worldfamous M.D. Anderson Medical Center in Houston, Texas. Despite the challenging telecom environment in Lebanon, as modes of communication and conducting research evolve and become more and more dependent on digital technologies, LAU is making sure its students are keeping up with ever-advancing technology trends. In addition to the complete wireless coverage on campus, during 2006–07, the university put plans in motion to double its bandwidth, introduce 29 audio- and video-enabled “smart” classrooms, and conduct eight training sessions on WebCT, a well-known, easy-to-use web-based software application that lets instructors provide their students with syllabi and assignments online. In addition to providing numerous on-campus opportunities to experiment and excel with a range of extracurricular and communityservice activities, LAU also dedicates significant resources to making sure that students engage with the world outside the gates. Through LAU’s Global Classrooms–Model UN program, about 70 students volunteer each year to train high school students around Lebanon in the art of diplomacy and protocol as it’s practiced in the United Nations. Graduate assistants are also often invited to coauthor papers and attend international conferences alongside their professors.

" International Day

As students prepare for life after college, LAU also helps. Year-round, the Guidance Office posts job announcements internally for students and alumni, and each spring it hosts career fairs on both the Byblos and Beirut campuses. Last year, a total of 125 Lebanese, regional, and multinational companies participated in the fairs, and 285 job offers were channeled through the Guidance Office.

! Love Your Body day, a health-awareness campaign

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Implementing Our Mission

Business graduates went on to work at Fortune 500 companies last year and to prestigious PhD programs—following the scholarly example set by their faculty, who not only contribute extensively to international journals but also produce one of their own. The Berkeley Electronic Press signed a contract to publish Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, edited by the school’s Byblos faculty. The journal is the only internationally peer-reviewed journal dealing with Middle East economics and finance. Also during 2006–07, the executive MBA and hospitality and tourism programs got a boost. An agreement was signed with the Union of Arab Banks to offer the executive MBA program to their members and a new hospitality management lab became fully operational, giving students in this popular program access to much-needed resources to further their food-preparation and protection skills.

school of business

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ore than 72 percent of all degrees granted in 2006–07 on the Beirut campus were granted to graduates of programs offered in the business school, attesting to the explosive growth the school has seen in recent years. With business programs on both campuses that encompass all the necessary skills—accounting, banking and finance, economics, management, marketing—LAU is uniquely positioned to help ambitious Lebanese men and women achieve their goals to become industry leaders in Lebanon and across the Middle East.

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" Students working in the new hospitality lab

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Implementing Our Mission

Advancement of Scholarship

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ver the past year, LAU’s pursuit of accreditation, focus on faculty recruitment, reduction in teaching loads, and augmentation of library and IT resources as well as electronic databases have all contributed markedly to the advancement of scholarship at the university. But as any researcher will tell you, the most important type of project support comes in the form of a grant, whether it’s for ground-breaking research or for a chance to take theory—and students—out of the classroom and into the field. In 2006–07, LAU raised a record $4 million from a variety of foundations and private funders, such as the U.S. Embassy, Cisco, the National Geographic Society, and the European Union, for a wide range of innovative initiatives with the potential for far-reaching implications. The Institute for Women’s Studies in the Arab World (IWSAW) received three grants, the largest of which will support an ongoing teacher-training program focused on increasing literacy among Lebanese women. A seven-year, $2.1 million grant from the Middle East Partnership Initiative will provide educational opportunities to 18 underserved students, more than half of them women, from countries in the Middle East and North Africa. The project will be managed by the University Enterprise Office, an in-house management consultant on special projects for LAU. A grant from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation helped underwrite the Institute for

" Dr. Zalloua conducts DNA research

! Experimentation in a Beirut science lab

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Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation, a 10-day residential summer academy that trained 30 university students from seven Arab countries in conflict resolution, negotiation, and mediation skills. Other grants will fund software development and the continuation of the Cisco Academy Training Centre in the School of Engineering & Architecture in Byblos.

If we are to teach real peace in this world, if we are to declare war on war, we must begin with the children. Ghandi

" A recent cover of the IWSAW journal

To undergird the university’s new research focus, LAU has initiated a search for a dean for research and graduate studies. The dean will be charged with providing faculty with the tools and information they need not only to put together winning grant applications but also to manage the monies effectively once they arrive.

Owing to Lebanon’s status as a cultural crossroads and key catalyst for change in the region, special emphasis is placed on encouraging applied research and investigation that impact the local and regional environment. Typical of these projects is work being done by the recently founded Institute for Migration Studies. Current institute activities include organizing an international conference titled “Politics and the Culture of the Lebanese Diaspora” and two studies on the culture of Ethiopian domestic workers in Lebanon and the impact of return migration of Lala, a village in the western region of the Bekaa Valley.

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Implementing Our Mission

The 2006–07 academic year was very fruitful in terms of faculty recruitment. The school increased its faculty roster by 35 percent, a remarkable achievement considering that almost all new members are coming from outside Lebanon at a time when the region is struggling with unfortunate political tensions. Also last year, infrastructure software and solutions provider MWH Soft established an endowed scholarship to fund the senior year of study for a civil engineering major who “has a passion for promoting the advancement and wellbeing of all people by building, operating, and sustaining safe, reliable water and wastewater infrastructures.” In addition to the funds, the company, whose president and CEO is Paul Boulos, a member of LAU’s board of international advisors, will contribute hydraulic infrastructure and modeling and design software to the university. The SEA’s architecture program is undergoing re-accreditation by the French Ministry of Culture, in accordance with a major change in the teaching and professional practice of architecture in France, a process that is expected to be complete by the end of 2007. The school also established exchange programs for architecture students and faculty with the University of Venice and the École Spéciale d’Architecture in Paris. Closer to home, LAU’s Urban Planning Institute called on the school’s Landscape Workshop students to help with the development of a linear park in the Bekaa municipality of Fourzol. SEA students can earn one of several minors, in computer graphics, graphic design, packaging, and, soon, in biomedical engineering, petroleum engineering, and Islamic art and architecture, a program that’s being revitalized to take advantage of the region’s rich building tradition as well as the university’s exceptional collection of Islamic art. Finally, last year also saw the launch of a student chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and the first alumni reunion—and later a full-fledged alumni chapter—of SEA graduates.

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school of engineering & architecture

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AU offers eight bachelor’s and, as of fall 2006, three master’s degree programs in its School of Engineering & Architecture (SEA), where a variety of laboratories and an architecture and design workshop facilitate technical instruction and experimentation. In 2006–07, three of these labs—telecommunications, stress analysis, and computer integrated manufacturing—were updated with stateof-the art equipment whose purchase was made possible by an American Schools & Hospitals Abroad grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development.


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Implementing Our Mission

Education of the Whole Person

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yopic worldviews lead to missed opportunities. At LAU, we firmly believe that for our graduates to emerge as confident, compassionate decision makers, they must have a well-rounded education that begins with strong grounding in the liberal arts. As called for in the strategic plan, during the 2006–07 academic year, the core liberal arts curriculum was revised and strengthened through the establishment of new majors in history and philosophy. In fall 2007, new students began following the new curriculum, which comprises a wide spectrum of courses in English, Arabic, computer applications, ethics, health and physical education, philosophy, religion, history, literature, and the natural and social sciences.

As much as one can learn in the classroom, LAU remains keenly aware that learning also takes place between people. Following the American educational model that emphasizes learning over teaching, we go to great lengths to create and support enjoyable and challenging extracurricular and athletic activities on both campuses for our more than 6,300 students. A vast network of clubs and societies—Environment, Finance, Ciné, Debate, Hiking, Human Rights, Red Cross—meet regularly, galvanizing student interests and campus communities. Theater productions and art exhibits are well-publicized and well-attended. Varsity teams often compete in national and international tournaments. Several health awareness campaigns are held each year. On International Day, students from other countries set up booths and share their culture and lifestyle with their classmates. On-campus events are also organized, such as the hospitality program’s Taste Lebanon, where students to put their classroom skills to use for real customers.

! International clubs help sustain diversity

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" Students joined the 2006 relief effort


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Educating the whole person also means recognizing that people can change. Developing human beings who have the capacity to work well with others requires acknowledging that people make mistakes—and providing a mechanism for those mistakes to be rectified. After the spring 2006 on-campus violence among 19 students, 18 of these students successfully completed a series of conflict resolution and communication workshops hosted by LAU, peace is returning to the university as leaders instead of fighters.

Establishing a lasting “ the work of education; all politics can do is keep us out of war. ” Maria Montessor

Finally, when aggression is perpetrated from outside, LAU students, faculty, and staff have a long tradition of banding together to help those in less fortunate positions. Such efforts have included offering support and supplies to internally displaced refugees after the 2006 war and during the bombardment of the Nahr el Bared camp in spring and summer of 2007. Similarly, Toufoula (Childhood), an organization founded and run by several LAU alumni and students has worked doggedly with several Lebanese architects over the past year to design and fund dream rooms for children suffering from cancer. The first such dream room was unveiled in the fall.

" A Toufoula dream room in the making

! IWSAW publications support women's literacy

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Implementing Our Mission

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or more than a decade, establishing an American-style medical school on the Byblos campus has been one of LAU’s grandest visions. In December 2006, this vision became reality with the arrival of the school’s founding dean, Kamal F. Badr, MD. Dr. Badr has spent much of his career in the field of medical education, most recently as professor and chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at the American University of Beirut and previously at Vanderbilt and Emory universities, two top-ranked medical schools in the United States. In one of his first acts as dean, Dr. Badr formalized a 10-year agreement with Harvard Medical International to develop LAUMS into “a highquality academic medical institution to train medical professionals to serve Lebanon and the greater Middle East.” Great strides toward making this possible came with the generous contribution from board member H.E. Ambassador Gilbert Chagoury toward the construction of the state-of-the-art facility that will house the school, which is slated to open in August 2010. With the signing of an agreement with the Clemenceau Medical Center, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins, to be the teaching hospital for the program, another internationally renowned name in the field of medicine also joined the effort. And after the completion of a feasibility study, in September, the Board of Trustees also approved the creation of a nursing school. The school will address the regional shortage of qualified nurses and be tightly integrated with the medical school. In one year, LAU has not only begun to realize its vision for a medical school but has put the university on the road to establishing a full-fledged medical complex. In the words of Dr. Badr, “it is the hope to create at LAU a new kind of medical academy, one that will define and shape the character of a ‘new physician’.” The first class of students will begin applying next year for admission to the class entering in fall 2009. They are expected to earn their MDs by 2013. Dr. Badr and two newly recruited assistant deans dedicated much of their time this year to developing both a premedical curriculum and the four-year curriculum for the medical school itself, which seeks not only to set a new standard for the quality of training offered in the region and to instill the values of community-based practice in its students but also to qualify its graduates to pursue postgraduate residencies and fellowships in the United States in accordance with North American standards and curricula.

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Implementing Our Mission

Future Leaders in a Diverse World

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ebanon is the crucible where many of the world’s most pressing geopolitical issues are defined. Its democratic society and religious and cultural diversity, as well as its location between Europe and the Middle East, between Western Asia and Northern Africa, perfectly position this small nation and LAU to take a leading role in encouraging communication and cooperation among diverse cultures. Last year—in conjunction with the American University of Beirut, the American University of Cairo, and the American University of Sharjah—LAU began to capitalize on this potential by promoting American-style education as one of the most effective strategies to reverse not only the burgeoning religious extremism in the region but also the Western propensity to affix negative and monolithic stereotypes to Muslims and Arabs. The message was delivered to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Washington, D.C., and during a public panel discussion at Columbia University in New York. One of the many ways universities can advocate for change, besides providing a first-rate liberal arts education, the presidents agreed, is to bolster cultural-exchange programs such as LAU’s decade-old Summer Institute for Intensive Arabic Language and Culture, which offers courses for credit in classical Arabic, Lebanese dialect, Arab culture, and

" Global Classrooms-Model UN

! SINARC students visit the Cedars

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regional history and politics to students from outside Lebanon, and especially from the U.S. SINARC, as the program is known, has an exceptional reputation and before the summer 2006 war had record enrollments. In 2007, SINARC hosted its first fall course, originally planned for fall 2006 at the request of Georgetown University, which has one of the most revered international affairs programs in the United States. While simply exposing oneself to other cultures goes a long way toward breaking down barriers between people, sustaining the relationships that emerge requires skills that don’t always come naturally. This is one of the tenets behind the Global Classrooms– Model UN initiative, which turned two this year. After participating in rigorous training sessions, more than 70 Since wars begin in the minds LAU students spent several Saturdays over five months of men and women, leading workshops for more than 700 students across Lebanon in the arts of negotiation and diplomacy as they it is in the minds of men and women that the defences of peace learned about United Nations protocol and how to draft resolutions. The GC-MUN culminates each year in a must be constructed. weekend-long simulation of UN committee and security UNESCO council meetings on the Beirut campus.

Four Presidents Tour Last spring, President Jabbra joined the presidents of the American University of Beirut, the American University in Cairo, and the American University of Sharjah to speak in New York and Washington, DC, about the value of American-style education in the Middle East. “Our institutions, American institutions, do play the role of agents of change in two ways,” said President Jabbra. “One, providing students with the opportunity to go through a process, an educational process, where reason and the heart come together . . . So that they learn how to accept the other, although they might have a different opinion than they do, without having recourse to violence.”

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Implementing Our Mission

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n 1993, LAU established the School of Pharmacy on the Byblos campus. The school offers two professional degrees, a five-year bachelor of science in pharmacy that forms the foundation for practicing in Lebanon and a six-year doctor of pharmacy that qualifies graduates to sit for the North American Pharmacy Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) in the United States. The doctor of pharmacy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), a status shared with no other such program outside the United States. Since the ACPE accreditation, our graduates have consistently earned a 100 percent passing rate and scored above the average. In May 2007, the school yet again proved why it deserves such a distinction: 100 percent of LAU graduates passed the rigorous exam with an average score of 107.67, much higher than the U.S. national average of 89.95. In addition, during the year, the school increased the number of doctoral students admitted to 28; recruited several new faculty members; converted the Pharm.D program from a graduate level to a professional program; and, in accordance with ACPE guidelines and standards, revised its requirements to mandate that, effective fall 2007, students who are accepted into the professional program and pursue their Pharm.D degree later on must undertake all advanced pharmacy practice experience in the United States. Top of mind for the next academic year is preparing for the ACPE’s periodic accreditation review, expected to take place in fall 2008. " Pharmacy students get first-hand experience

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O u r Pa rt n e r s & D o n o r s

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The Case for Giving to LAU As the university renews its mission and makes strides toward establishing

itself in the minds of all as a world-class institution, we must also ask our extended family to renew their relationship to the university and play an

active role in helping us achieve our vision. Throughout this report, we’ve touched on the many ways in which we’re transforming the challenges

we’ve laid before us into success after success. We have the faculty, staff, and, most important, students to realize all our goals. One of our primary goals is to become less dependent on tuition to fund our progress. Already, we’ve

raised a record amount of grant funds this year and have taken a major step toward taking the medical school from concept to campus. Now, we would like to invite you to join us in taking LAU to the next level of excellence.

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O u r Pa rt n e r s & D o n o r s

A Transformational Gift What convinced you to offer such a transformational gift to LAU in general and the medical school in particular?

This year, businessman and LAU board member, H.E. Ambassador Gilbert Chagoury and his wife, Rose-Marie, pledged their support for the vision of the new LAU Medical School with a transformational gift of $10 million. Born in Nigeria, where he long led the Chagoury Group, Chagoury considers himself first Lebanese and talks fondly of his parents’ hometown of Miziara in northern Lebanon. The couple’s philanthropic endeavors began long ago and have helped sustain venerable institutions, such as the Louvre Museum in Paris and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Below Mr. Chagoury offers some insight into why he chose to contribute so generously to LAU, both in terms of what it can do for the university and for Lebanon.

Although I was born outside Lebanon, I have always felt strong ties with my Lebanese origins and consider myself Lebanese before anything else. I come from a great village in the North, and I always miss the simple and warm atmosphere that exists there. My friendship with Dr. Jabbra, and my admiration for the passion he has for LAU has greatly motivated me to help the institution. His enthusiasm is so contagious that you cannot but back him up. As for the medical school, it is a necessity for the region. It will attract students seeking a top-notch education with first-class faculty and state-ofthe-art equipment in a friendly environment.

When did you first hear about the plans to establish a medical school? What were your first thoughts?

What kind of impact do you foresee the LAU Medical School having on Lebanon and the region in the near and long term?

I first heard about the possibility of the school from Dr. Jabbra, a long-time friend, and promised to help him realize the effort once he took the presidency of LAU.

LAU’s Medical School will reinforce Lebanon’s leadership in the health-care field in the Middle East. Lebanon will benefit immensely from LAU's excellence in this field and can use the school to help improve its economy and attract foreigners to the country.

My first thought was that it was being planned in a location that will serve students who cannot commute everyday to the capital, which I believe is needed to encourage people in second-tier population centers to stay and develop their areas rather than abandon them and move to Beirut, which already suffers from being over-congested.

Furthermore, since the school will be in Byblos, it will provide not only more opportunities for students living outside the capital but also additional jobs for professionals in the area, reviving the local economy.

What encouragement would you give others considering making such a gift to LAU?

I also remember thinking that the medical school would encourage skilled and talented students to study in Lebanon instead of going abroad. Education, like health care and health education, has always been one of the country’s strongest assets.

I would look at it differently and call it a duty rather than a gift. Anybody who can afford to contribute even a small or modest amount should not hesitate to back up the flourishing of noble causes at LAU.

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! H.E. Ambassador Gilbert Chagoury and his wife, Rose-Marie

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O u r Pa rt n e r s & D o n o r s

2006-2007 Contributors The Lebanese American University acknowledges with gratitude the following contributors who made generous financial, matching, and in-kind gifts to the university between October 1, 2006, and September 30, 2007:

FOUNDERS’ SOCIETY ($25,000 AND UP)

A. M. Qattan Foundation Al Waleed Bin Talal Humanitarian Foundation Alumni Association, Abu Dhabi Chapter* Alumni Association, Dubai and Northern Emirates* Anonymous Donor Bank Audi SAL Bank of Beirut Bank of Beirut and the Arab Countries SAL BankMed SAL BLOM Bank Byblos Bank SAL CAT International / Fouad El Khazen Curtis W. McGraw Foundation Nadim Daouk European Commission / DG XII Fransabank SAL Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury Foundation Interstate Resources Incorporated Suad Juffali* Maha Kaddoura* Medgulf Paul F. Boulos* / MWH Soft, Inc. Occidental Petroleum Corporation / Ray Irani Sabre Foundation+ Saudi Aramco Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation U.S. Agency for International Development United Nations Association of the USA 30


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TRIREME SOCIETY ($10,000–$24,999)

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL ($2,000–$4,999)

Richard A. Abdoo Hanan Abou Ghazaleh Ali A. Tamimi Company Alumni Association, Athens Chapter* Michael Ameen Anonymous Donor Edmond and Taline Ouzounian Avakian* Samir Badro Bloomsburg Metal Company Zuhair and Ghada Daniel Boulos* Citigroup Dar Al-Handasah Consultants (Shair and Partners) E. A. Juffali and Brothers Estate of Gale R. Mcdonald* Hani Hakim Richard Heath+ Wadih S. Jordan NAPCO Group of Companies (Including Easternpak) Ghassan M. Saab Ramzi and Hayat Dabar Sanbar* Henry and Elda Mirna Mansourian Sarkissian*

Alumni Association, Damascus Chapter* Alumni Association, Kuwait Chapter* Jamil H. Badran Al Baraka Islamic Bank BLC Bank Georges Harik Fadi H. Hourani International Advertising Association The International Foundation Latifa H. Kosta* Mennonite Central Committee Michel and Aida Nasser Wilbert F. Newton James C. Nixon Todd E. Petzel Abdel Karim and May Shahine Rostom* U.S. Omen National Organization George and Liza Massaad Zakhem*

PRESIDENT’S FORUM ($1,000–$1,999)

Nizam W. Abdel Baki Abdel Kader Adlouni Hani and Raja Arnaout Ali* Ronald G. Cruikshank Mary Makdissi El-Yousef* Hussam and Siham Asrawi Hamzeh* Heirs of the Late Jameel Abbas Imad A. Khalil* Amal K. Kurban L. & J.G. Stickley Incorporated Bishara M. Lawrence Lebanese National Commission for UNESCO Modern Arab Construction Company Ibtissam A. Mutawa* Issam and Aida Salman Naaman* Ralph N. Nader+ Walid and Victoria Fattouh Nasr* Ghada Qaddumi* Sama S. Qaddumi* Tarek S. Qaddumi* Richard A. Rumsey Farid and Wafa Saab Saab* Imad and Ghia Saidi Saad*

PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999)

Mariam Al Doy Aboul* Alumni Association, Bahrain Chapter* Alumni Association, London Chapter* American Task Force for Lebanon Burhan and Nariman Abou Ghazaleh Beidas* Ziad and Lina Mamiche Afara Cheikh* Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church The Ghassan Jdeed Development Foundation Ghandi and Ilham Asrawi Halabi* Hanna Ayoub / Al Hamra Kuwait Company Nafez Jundi Sami Khouri LAU/Bank of Beirut Affinity Card Community Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation International Mideast Data Systems SAL Khaled and Chafika Dayeh Omari* Pepsi Cola International Company Fredrico Senno* Abdel Rahman and Naima Fakhro Taki* Wafa G. Yammine* 31


O u r Pa rt n e r s & D o n o r s

William A. and Janet Stoltzfus Trags Agencies U.S. Trust Company of New York Jamil A. Wafa Ibrahim Zeineldine

Samir and Laure Milki Obeid* Bernadette Redano Lyna Khoury Rumbarger* Walid M. Shaar* Adnan M. Tarabishi* Basil A. Zahed* Bahaa S. Zaher* Bilal Khaled M. Zankar*

DEAN’S LIST ($500–$999)

Paul Abbott Nabil A. Banna* Edgar Chaar Leila Dagher* Irma K. Ghosn Hikma - Liban Suad Hoss Hoss* Joseph and Caroline Hourani Al Khal Printers SAL+ Middle East Airlines Maureen Mitchell Lama M. Nasr Edward Shiner Tarek Juffali Foundation Westminster Presbyterian Church John Wholihan Mohamad and Rowaida Hussein Yaghi*

CENTURY CLUB ($100–$199)

Jalal Y. Abdel Ahad* Iman F. Ajouz* Aradi Development L.L.C. Hrair and Mary Ekmekji Atikian* Maha Y. Audi* Najib and Gisele Akkouri Azar* Helen M. Badawi* Samira Baroody* May Kinai Ben Essa* Edmond S. Boustani* Pauline Emily Coffman* Garold L. Faber Irene D. Faffler Ronney and Souad Farah Helen B. Flack Mona B. Gedeon* Reham J. Haddad* Lina A. Hajj Abdoun* Bassel M. Halabi* Iman Shebaro Hamdan* Janet Hitti Hitti* Michele Ann Holcomb* Yvonne Agini Kabban* Choucrallah K. Karam* Peter and Suad Khallouf Katul* Sawsan S. Khanafer* Salim and Huda Khalil Kheireddine* Christian G. Kozma* Craig and Phyllis Chadbourne Lichtenwalner* Sabah Khoury Makhoul* George H. Mallat* Ernest and Adele Haddad McCarus* Marguerite Boueri Mcleod* Fauzi and Vivian Najjar

UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES ($200–$499) Marwan B. Abboud* Theodore and Diana Domian Abdo* A.S. Abdullah Rose M. Clark* Leila Shahine Da Cruze* Rand F. Fakih* Ghaida Firestone Harold A. and Elaine Fisher Rabih A. Haddad* C.M. Hudspeth Fady Y. Kamal* Irmgard F. Karle Tarif S. Mais* Hala Y. Masri* Anne A. Meyer Fredrick C. Milkie Mimar Trading Group+ Walid and Danice Najjar

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Marwan H. Noueihed* Charalambos Pattichis Ghassan and Jinan Majzoub Rachache* Janie Rees-Miller Steven and Nuha Farraj Rice* John and Valerie Roper Ani Sarafian Sarkissian* Naim M. Solh* Gilbert D. Soufan* St. Stephens Glastonbury Society James and Samia Khalaf Sullivan* Dima H. Tahtah* Maan and Widad Khatib Tell* Hiba M. Yazbeck* Aida Hamadeh Younis* Anahid Nahabedian Zartarian*

Ghada A. Itani* Siran Bezirganian Jizmejian* Neda N. Juraydini* JustGive Karen M. Kassouf Anahid Sislian Ketefian* Shake K. Ketefian* Lamia Haddad Khairallah* Stanley and Clio Hembekides Khoury* John S. Khoury* Oussama and Roula Khreiss* Catherine Kano Kikoski* Reem Halawi Kontar* Seta Kouyoumdjian* Kozloff and Meaders Alberta S. Magzanian* Adele E. Mazloom Richard C. Michaels Nadine Kasbani Mokbel* Erma Khoury Nettles* Hugh Outterson Bahaa and Sarah Richani* Aida Topalian Sarkissian* Richard L. Schwary Rima J. Shadid* Samar W. Sheaib* Larry and Karen Towner Slotta* Nadine H. Tajideen* Caline E. Trad* Sherrill M. Weary

FRIENDS (UP TO $99)

Robert A. Abi Saab* Wassim M. Al Dayaa* Georges R. Assaf* Raghida Ayoub Irene R. Azar* Nuha E. Azar* John and Rania Abdo Bartick* Nathaniel and Mary Bercovitz David and Nadine Birney John and Christine TeRonde Burr* Samuel Cross Charbel J. Cury Wafa Sheaib Dada* Mary D. Dinno* Elizabeth E. Duncan Estate Emad F. Fakhreddine* Wassim G. Farah* Suzanne Freij Farraj* Berj and Hermine Vartanian Fermanian* Hiba Samadi Fleifel* Roger and Nancy Warnock Harmon* John and Sarah Grafious Havens* Eric and Sarah Davies Hertfelder* Anthony T. Hoglind* Ahmad and Nisrine Machaka Houri John and Grace Salibian Hyslop*

*Alumni and alumni chapters +Gifts in-kind

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O u r Pa rt n e r s & D o n o r s

The 2006–07 Endowed Scholarship Program

• The Elias and Ferial Baz Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Salim and Laudy Baz Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ikram Shakhashir Beidas Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Frank and Margaret Bitar Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Robert and Mabel Bitar Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Boodai Group of Co. Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Badie Boulos Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ghada Daniel Boulos Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Alex Fauti Bouri Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ziad and Lina Cheikh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Nicolas Choueiri Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Fahed Nayef Dabbous Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ramzi and Saeda Dalloul Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Dr. Nadim and Noura Daouk Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Dar As-Siyassah Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Darwish Engineering Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Rushdi Dayeh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Elizabeth Elser Duncan Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Edward Y. Elias Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Emirates Computer Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Eva Kotite Farha and Peter Farha Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Issam Michael Faris Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Sheikh Abdallah Fouad Endowed Scholarship Fund • The James and Arthur Gabriel Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mahmoud Alghanim Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Youssef A. Alghanim and Sons Endowed Scholarship Funds • The Frances M. Gray Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Samuel Habib Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund

The following funds were established to provide ongoing financial aid to deserving students demonstrating need: • The Albert Abela Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Hanan Abou Ghazaleh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Nariman Abou Ghazaleh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Paul Youssef Abou Khater Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The LAU Alumni Association - Abu Dhabi Chapter Endowed Scholarship Fund • The LAU Alumni Association - Beirut Chapter Endowed Scholarship Fund • The LAU Alumni Association - Damascus Chapter Endowed Scholarship Fund • The LAU Alumni Association - Dubai and Northern Emirates Chapter Endowed Scholarship Fund • The LAU Alumni Association - Kuwait Chapter Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Anglo Lebanese Cultural Foundation Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Fred and Emily G. Arrigg Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ramzi Asfour Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Marwan Toufic Assaf Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Hazem F. Aswad Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Walid Attieh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Edmond and Taline Avakian Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mohamad Abdul Rahman Bahar Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Adelaide Bahu Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Samih Barbir and Mounira Barbir Naamani Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Leila Kurban Barkett Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 34


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• The Aida Haddad and Daughters Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Bertha and Michael Nakhleh Haddad Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Toufic Khalil Haddad Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The George William Hajjar Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Lana Ghandi Halabi Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Dany Hamchaoui Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mohamed Harasani Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Rafik Bahauddin Al-Hariri Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Taha Hassiba Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ray Irani Education Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Wadih and Gertrude Jordan Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ahmad and Suad El-Juffali Endowed Scholarship Fund • The E.A. El-Juffali Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Nafez Jundi Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Jamile Dagher-Jureidini Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Maha Kaddoura Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Albert and William Kanaan Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Fawzi Kawash Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Suad Wakim Kesler Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The AbdelRahman Ismail El-Khalil Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Jamil Fouad El Khazen Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Nasr Khnaisser Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mohamad and Naziha Knio Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Selina Korban Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Latifa Kosta Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Emile and Rima Lamah Endowed Scholarship Fund • The LAU / BOB Affinity Card Endowed Scholarship Fund

• The Selim Lawi Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Bishara M. Lorenzo Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Gabriel Maliha Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Joseph and Carmen Maroun Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Salwa Tuma Mayassi Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Gale McDonald Endowed Memorial Scholarship Fund • The Mc-Swiney-Mead Corporation Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Michel Merhej Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Elias and Leila Mezzawi Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mimar Group Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Hassib Mroueh Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • MWH Soft Environmental Engineering Endowed Scholarship Fund • HH Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al-Nahyan Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Tony Nagib Najjar Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Khalid and Sossy Nasr Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Marwan Walid Nasr Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Milia and Helen Nassar Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Riyad F. Nassar Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Salwa C. Nassar Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Aida and Michel Nasser Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Argent Maksoud Nasser Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mohamad Nasser Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Naim Nasser Endowed Scholarship Fund • The National Paper Products Company Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Edith Newton Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Layla and Musa Nimah Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Khaled and Chafica Omari Endowed Scholarship Fund 35


O u r Pa rt n e r s & D o n o r s

ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS The following grants were established to support the financial aid program for deserving students demonstrating need during the 2006–07 academic year:

• The Suliman S. Olayan Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Rhoda Orme Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Hussam Qanadilo Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Hamad Rafeh Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Kamil Shaheen Al Rayyes Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Donald Rynne Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Karim Fayez Saab Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mahmoud Khalil Saab Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ghia Saidi Saad Endowed Scholarship Fund • The George Saadeh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Sheikh Nasser Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabbah Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Diana Tamari Sabbagh Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Mohamad Safadi Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ghassan Ibrahim Shaker Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Abdul Aziz Shakhashir Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Adma Nakhoul Shakhashiri Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Antoine Shebaya Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Walid Jamil Shehadeh Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Simon Siksek Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Ethel Stoltzfus Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The William Stoltzfus Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Nehmeh and Therese Tohmeh Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Kevork Toroyan Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Abdulaziz Al-Turki Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Joe and Wafa Yammine Endowed Scholarship Fund • The Hanneh Salim Zakhem Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund

• Jameel Abbas Memorial Scholarship Grant • AlBaraka Islamic Bank Annual Scholarship Grant • Alumni Association Athens Chapter Annual Scholarship Grant • Alumni Association Bahrain Chapter Annual Scholarship Grant • Alumni Association Beirut Chapter Annual Scholarship Grant • Alumni Association London Chapter Annual Scholarship Grant • Bank Audi Annual Scholarship Grant • Bank of Beirut Annual Scholarship Grant • BankMed Annual Scholarship Grant • BLOM Bank Annual Scholarship Grant • Byblos Bank Annual Scholarship Grant • CAT International Annual Scholarship Grant • Citigroup Annual Scholarship Grant • Fransabank Annual Scholarship Grant • Fares El-Hajj Memorial Scholarship Grant • Joseph J. Jacobs Memorial Scholarship Grant • Nafez Jundi Annual Scholarship Grant • Elie Kai Annual Scholarship Grant • LAU Alumni Annual Scholarship Grant • LAU Alumni Emergency Fund for Financial Aid • Modern Arab Construction Co. Annual Scholarship Grant • Ghada Qaddumi Annual Scholarship Grant • Sama Qaddumi Annual Scholarship Grant • Tarek Qaddumi Annual Scholarship Grant • Henry and Elda Mirna Sarkissian Annual Scholarship Grant • U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Scholarship Grant • U.S. Omen National Organization Annual Scholarship Grant • Ibrahim Zeineldine Annual Scholarship Grant

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PRESIDENT’S FUND The following grants were established under the President’s Fund to support the financial aid program for deserving students demonstrating need:

• Omar and Sima Sawaf Graduate Scholarship Grant • Fredrico Senno President’s Fund • Ali A. Tamimi Co. President’s Fund • George Zakhem President’s Fund

• Richard Abdoo President’s Fund • George Faris Scholarship Grant • Georges Harik Annual Scholarship Grant • Ghassan Jdeed Memorial Scholarship Grant • Tarek Juffali Annual Scholarship Grant • Maha Kaddoura Annual Scholarship Grant • Sami F. Khoury Annual Scholarship Grant • A.M. Qattan Foundation Annual Scholarship Grant • Ismat Rabbat President’s Fund

The Lebanese American University has made every effort to create an accurate listing of all contributors and funds. If your name has been inadvertently omitted, or incorrectly spelled, please accept our apologies. If you have any queries, please contact Mrs. Amal Abdel Massih, Director of Advancement Services, by fax, at +961 1 786472, or by email, aafares@lau.edu.lb. Thank you.

MEDGULF Contribution Advances the Study of Actuarial Sciences at LAU This year, Mr. Lutfi Zein, president of the board of directors of MEDGULF, made a gift of $500,000 on behalf of the company to endow a chair and create a minor in actuarial sciences in the Division of Computer Science and Mathematics in the School of Arts & Sciences. The gift is the first installment of a $2 million pledge, which Mr. Zein calls a “source of pride” for MEDGULF, one of Lebanon’s and the region’s leading insurers. The new minor will prepare students to understand and model basic actuarial problems using mathematical, probabilistic, and statistical methods as well as apply actuarial mathematics to issues of financial security. At a ceremony where the agreement was finalized, President Jabbra expressed his thanks to Mr. Zein for MEDGULF’s commitment to meeting the needs of the Lebanese market and for introducing this field of study to current and future students at LAU. ! Dr. Jabbra and Mr. Zein formalize the MEDGULF gift

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Making It Possible

Student Development & Enrollment Management Student Development & Enrollment Management (SDEM), once known as simply Student Affairs, has begun the process of repositioning itself to reflect the office’s expanded responsibilities as outlined in the strategic plan. Chief among these goals is for SDEM, in conjunction with other university departments, to “develop a strong enrollment management plan that includes all components of student enrollment, advising, retention and graduation.”The plan will be based on market research and analyses and be consistently honed to keep the focus on students’ academic and emotional well-being. This year, SDEM developed an integrated advising program that not only makes advising and registration easier by moving these processes online but also features early-alert mechanisms that advisors can use to identify and assist students having academic difficulties. Improving recruitment also factors largely into SDEM’s enrollment management plans. Training in recruitment planning and systems has been proven to help educational institutions find and keep students who can benefit most from the university’s programs and resources while maintaining the character of the institution. Last year, LAU representatives visited more than 300 schools across Lebanon and in Kuwait, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman, and Syria looking for students who not only fit the LAU profile, but whose achievement and diversity would enrich LAU. In fall 2006, overall enrollment increased slightly, despite the devastating summer war, and grew in spring 2007, especially on the Byblos campus, where it climbed 6.8 percent. More students graduated in 2007 than in the previous year, and enrollment for fall 2007 is up 7.5 percent.

! Athletes compete in Lebanon and abroad

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! LAU students benefit from on-campus career fairs


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One of SDEM’s most important roles is to help academically qualified yet financially disadvantaged students attend LAU. Over the past several years, financial aid has increased significantly at the university, both in terms of dollar amounts and the number of students who benefit. In 2006–07 financial aid offered by the university increased substantially. Nearly $13 million was allotted in financial aid, in the form of grants, loans, and work-study, to 1,833 students. SDEM also administers the residence halls and supervises a range of extracurricular activities, including health-awareness campaigns, athletics programs, campus clubs, the well-regarded Global Classrooms–Model UN program, and the Summer Institute for Intensive Arabic Language and Culture, a magnet Financial Aid: 2006-07 for undergraduate and graduate students from all over the world.

Financial Aid 2006 | 2007 LAU awarded a total of US$12.7 million in financial aid last year. $1,096,000

$365,805

$2,065,300

$2,135,650 $2,000,000

Grants Financial Aid - Endowment Merit Scholarship Student Work Aid Loans Graduate Assistantship Student Employment

$600,000

$4,439,205

" Students perform dabke

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Making It Possible

Human Resources and University Services The scope of the work of Human Resources and University Services is literally monumental. The department is currently overseeing not only an intensive reevaluation of LAU’s human resources department and the implementation of sophisticated information technology solutions, but is also leading the design, construction, and maintenance of numerous capital projects, including the new LAU Medical School. This year the department has been reorganized into three main functions: planning, construction, and operations and maintenance. Together the HR, US, and IT teams will pool and integrate their resources, as well as those of the finance department, to address major initiatives of the strategic plan, including developing facilities and financial master plans, positioning LAU as “the higher education employer of choice in Lebanon,” and using information technology as a “strategic tool for the implementation of change.”

! Strolling to class in beirut

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HUMAN RESOURCES LAU is committed to fostering “a human resources environment that enables employees to fulfill their responsibilities and achieve their aspirations.� To that end, hundreds of hours have been devoted over the past year to reviewing job classifications, titles, duties, and recruitment practices from a competency-based perspective to create consistent procedures and payscales from Byblos to Beirut. ! Students and faculty at a campus health event

In addition, the performance review process in being updated to recognize achievement and encourage professional development as a means of establishing a work culture based more on empowerment and transparency than command-and-control leadership. The HR department will also conduct a local market survey to benchmark LAU positions against others in similar fields in the region. The study will be completed in spring 2008 and the results released soon afterward. In tandem with this initiative, LAU is placing renewed emphasis on training and development. Each year, every employee will be expected to undertake 20 hours of training in his or her field. Similarly, a staff development fund was created to augment the computer literacy and administrative know-how of support staff. Other ongoing projects include implementing the necessary technical measures to allow the Human Resources Management System to interface with Finance department software so that both systems can run off one unique database. Finding opportunities to integrate processes to produce such efficiencies is a major priority for Human Resources and University Services, which has been charged with a mandate to improve effectiveness, eliminate waste, and improve efficiency of workflow across all academic, administrative, student, and community functions.

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Making It Possible

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Each academic year, facilities management handles thousands of maintenance requests in Beirut and Byblos. While day-to-day maintenance is an inevitable part of any facility manager’s job, it’s essential to streamline this work so that time can be dedicated to maximizing the value of improvements and developing much-needed new space. As a result, the facilities management department is overhauling the way it maintains buildings by focusing efforts on preventive maintenance that can be managed with software. This is just one small-scale example of the thinking going into finding ways to leverage LAU’s physical resources to “create an environment that enables the University to successfully achieve its goals and to promote a culture of academic excellence,” as called for in the strategic plan. On a larger scale, 2006–07 saw the appointment of a master plan steering committee and the beginnings of the development of an in-house master plan to address academic and administrative priorities in detail. Progress was made on a number of high-profile structures as well as on less glamorous but equally necessary infrastructure, power plant, and underground parking projects: • LAU Medical School: Concept renderings are complete and the permitting process has been initiated. Construction is estimated to begin in August 2008 and take two years to complete. • The Frem Center: The center is expected to open in June 2009. • Byblos Recreational Facility: The Board of Trustees approved the construction of a three-level sports facility in Byblos. • Road in Byblos: Slated for completion at the end of 2007, the road will provide direct access from the highway to the campus. • Road in Beirut: With the closing of the road between the new business building and the old campus at the end of 2007, the LAU campus will become larger and more cohesive, as well as more pedestrian-friendly. Also during the year, facilities management completed a number of projects, including work on dormitories, the provision of new offices in the architecture and engineering building, an extension to the biology lab, and the creation of new computer and chemistry labs. 42

! A rendering of the planned Frem Center


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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Technology on its own is of little use. But when braided with sound business practices and well-defined learning outcomes, it can become the catalyst for amazing achievements. Recognizing this potential, LAU has made it a priority to strategically embed information technology in all its academic and administrative systems. In addition to providing the LAU community with always-on wireless internet coverage on both campuses, much of IT’s most important work happens behind the scenes. For example, the department works to integrate the many software packages in use in various departments, updates policies and procedures with regard to disaster recovery and network security, and is converting the university’s telephone system to lower cost, more flexible IP telephony. ! One of LAU's many computer labs

In 2006–07, in particular, LAU’s IT experts paid particular attention to ways in which technology could enhance the academic experience by upgrading the university’s license for WebCT, an online virtual learning environment that allows instructors to post syllabi, assignments, and lectures—and students to post back. New LAU-developed software was also used in class and exam scheduling, turning the tedious task into one that could be done almost at the touch of a button. Another techenabled academic initiative focused on facilitating advising by reducing paperwork and, thereby, increasing time faculty members can devote to helping students. Reliable internal communication systems are an absolute necessity for any operation and especially for one spread across two campuses and three continents. In spring 2007, nine flat-panel screens that can display real-time announcements were mounted around the Beirut and Byblos campuses, completing the first phase of the university’s Electronic Bulletin Board. Finally, last summer, IT staff traveled to New York to “dramatically improve” the Manhattan office’s tech infrastructure. New email and file-sharing servers were installed, modern videoconferencing systems set up, a wireless internet connection configured, and centralized virus protection and data backup systems established, all of which help keep LAU’s North American staff in lockstep with what’s happening seven time zones and 5,612 miles (9,031 kilometers) to the east in Lebanon.

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Making It Possible

University Advancement University Advancement encompasses five diverse but inter-related departments—Alumni Affairs, Development, Marketing and Communications, Public Relations, and Advancement Services—that work together to advance LAU’s mission. Jointly, we are responsible for maintaining and enhancing the university’s image, securing financial support for programs and projects, and keeping LAU’s alumni engaged in the life of the institution. Working through offices in Beirut and New York, this new division, now a must-have in the increasingly competitive and global highereducation marketplace, is responsible for the institution’s image, as well as much of its non-tuition, non-research-related income. University Advancement must reinforce a collective vision and deliver a consistent message as it serves every office, department, and division on campus. We are achieving this delivery through enhanced communication, both internal and external, which has helped streamline departmental operations. A departmental reorganization and the addition of several highly trained professional staff members has resulted in measurably more alumni contact and involvement, a higher university profile in both foreign and domestic markets, enhanced communication tools, and a record increase in both private and government support for LAU.

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! An alumni business networking event in Beirut


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ALUMNI AFFAIRS LAU has significantly revamped the way it communicates with its alumni and keeps them engaged in the university long after they’ve graduated. These ongoing efforts fall under the strategic plan mandate to implement a PRIDE initiative that connects graduates, whether from BUC, BCW, or LAU, to their alma mater and “stresses the value and importance of alumni as key members of the University community.” ! The alumni brunch at Homecoming 2007

During the 2006–07, Alumni Affairs established seven new alumni chapters—in Oman, New York/New Jersey, Washington, D.C., Detroit, Florida, Boston, and the School of Engineering & Architecture— bringing the total to 23, with plans for another eight chapters next year. Several of the chapters, both new and old, hosted alumni gatherings in their home countries. In addition, educational lectures and a business networking reception were held in Beirut to galvanize alumni residing in Lebanon. Finally, the 2007 Homecoming and Class Reunion was one of the best attended ever, with alums from 1952 to the present returning to show their pride in LAU. Alumni communications also got a boost this year with the launch of LAU Matters, a bimonthly electronic newsletter, and a new Alumni Affairs website. The office is also promoting free email addresses for life for graduates, no matter what the year, and is planning to set up an alumni portal soon to keep graduates connected for a long time to come. Finally, as we go to press, Alumni Affairs reports that its firstever Web-facilitated officer elections were an enormous success.

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Making It Possible

DEVELOPMENT The Development Office is committed to generating financial support that will continue to advance LAU’s mission and to secure its future by diversifying revenue and reducing the university’s reliance on tuition income. A hallmark of this year’s success was the tenfold increase in university support in cash and pledges from government and private sources, including the gifts listed in this publication. The development team raised record funds from private gifts, with this year’s total exceeding the cumulative amount raised in the past five years. These successes have not only helped lay the groundwork for the university’s first comprehensive fund-raising effort, but also positioned LAU to garner significantly more support from individuals, corporations, and foundations around the world. Our plans to boost student financial aid will allow more deserving yet financially disadvantaged students to pursue their education at LAU. In addition, funds will also be directed toward LAU’s five schools, new programs, faculty and research initiatives, as well as toward the renovation and construction of much-needed facilities. Further, the Development Office is cementing ties with LAU’s historic supporters and forging new relationships among philanthropists eager to contribute to American-style education in the Middle East as it remains actively engaged in informing the entire LAU community about its collective role in promoting the culture of philanthropic giving.

! Sage Hall is an icon of LAU

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MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In September, the Marketing and Communications Department, formerly the Publications Office, was established, fulfilling the sixth initiative of the strategic plan to create an entity “to coordinate all aspects of communication, image and awareness activities.” The department is expected to grow significantly over the next year as it initiates a comprehensive marketing and communications plan.

! Cover of the summer 2007 issue of the LAU Magazine

One of the department’s major objectives is to refine LAU’s visual identity and position the university for internal and external, regional, and global audiences. Relying on data gathered from current and prospective students, parents, alumni, and faculty and staff, the Marketing and Communications Department and key consultants will engage in a serious and thoughtful process that clearly delineates LAU’s unique qualities and strengths, defines its distinctiveness in the marketplace, communicates its values, and tells the university's story in the most compelling and dynamic way. The Publications Office had a long tradition of supporting the institution by producing print and electronic publications for a variety of in-house clients. In 2006–07, it played an especially important role in maintaining communication among the LAU community during the summer war and subsequent crises. More than any other medium, the LAU website proved essential to keeping a dispersed staff and student body informed about fast-breaking developments.

! The current homepage of www. lau.edu.lb

In the spring, a strategic planning website was launched to keep the faculty and staff members abreast of major accomplishments as plan goals are fulfilled, and last summer a new Alumni Affairs website was unveiled. Two new electronic publications were inaugurated this year: LAU Matters, which goes to external constituents, including alumni, and TalkingPoints, which keeps members of the boards of trustees and international advisors updated on LAU news. Finally, the beloved LAU Magazine and Alumni Bulletin was redesigned.

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Making It Possible

PUBLIC RELATIONS In addition to leading an aggressive plan to communicate with Lebanese leaders and public figures, as well as the diplomatic corps, the Public Relations office has significantly raised LAU’s profile in the print and broadcast news media in Lebanon, the Middle East, and North America. In September 2007, The Providence Journal, a U.S. newspaper, published a commentary by President Jabbra, who during the past year also promoted American-style education in the Middle East in interviews with Aramica, The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, and the Christian Science Monitor. LAU also has enjoyed weekly coverage in the U.S.–based Beirut Times, an independent cultural, social, and political newspaper serving the Lebanese and ArabAmerican communities, and in important Arabic-language newspapers in Canada. Similarly, in the Middle East the Public Relations office has expanded the reach of LAU’s image in Qatar, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi through a variety of pan-Arab publications, satellite television stations, and inflight magazines, such as Middle East Airlines’ Cedar Wings. Passengers of Gulf Air will soon start to see coverage of LAU in that airline’s magazine as well. In addition, the office has strategically expanded the scope of its duties to support fund-raising efforts by building a bridge with the Bank of Beirut, which now sponsors many alumni events both in Lebanon and abroad. Ties have also been strengthened between LAU and the Alwaleed Bin Talal Humanitarian Foundation.

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ADVANCEMENT SERVICES As the backbone of the Advancement team, Advancement Services ensures that the profiles and contact details of all alumni and donors are up-to-date. Using a specialized database system, Advancement Services updates individual information, processes gifts, maintains mailing lists, and runs reports that assess current progress and inform future planning. This year, as in years past, the department upheld its top-notch service standards, preparing timely reports organized by myriad criteria, ensuring that the LAU staff keeps the dimension and diversity of their constituents in mind. Plans for 2007–08 include briefing others on campus about the vital role of Advancement Services, and suggesting ways in which Advancement Services can help academic and other programs achieve their missions. Last but not least, the office will employ creative ways to find graduates with whom we’ve lost touch, by placing ads in newspapers, synchronizing contacts between Beirut and Byblos and our international alumni chapters, and contacting human resources departments at major banks and companies in Lebanon to ask them to help identify which of their employees are graduates of LAU.

Have We Lost Touch With Someone You Know from LAU? If you know an LAU, BUC, or BCW grad who should have received this report but didn’t, please let us know. Advancement Services at LAU is committed to finding each and every member of the LAU community to make sure that we all remain connected. Take a moment and write or call us at: Telephone: 961-1-786464 Ext: 1324 Fax: 961-1-786472

E-mail: aafares@lau.edu.lb

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Making It Possible

FINANCE The Finance department has been formulating a financial master plan for the university that “integrates the academic, enrollment, and fundraising plans with the facilities master plan.” This has been coupled with an early formulation of the budgets for operating and capital projects. In this context, a University Budget Committee was convened to establish a process for collaborating efforts with leaders of other departments.

Expenses

Our financial planning efforts seek aggressive revenue diversification to support ongoing operations and initiatives, as specified in the strategic plan. Furthermore, LAU completed an innovative costing exercise to assess cost drivers, measure spending effectiveness, and leverage allocation of funds for the benefit of the entire university. In academic year 2006–07, LAU further solidified its financial position. The endowments and plant funds balances have grown in line with strategic planning targets. Investments are well diversified and sound. Significant grants have been received from generous donors and government agencies. External auditors have examined our USAID and ASHA grants and given a clean and unqualified opinion on both.

USD (000's)

% of Total

12,107

14.73%

23,889

29.06%

Academic Support

11,470

13.95%

Research & Development

3,663

4.46%

University Advancement

2,746

3.34%

651

0.79%

Physical Plant

6,823

8.30%

Financial Aid

12,702

15.45%

Contingency & Transfers

7,500

9.12%

654

0.80%

82,205

100.00%

USD (000's)

% of Total

64,659

78.66%

2,695

3.28%

Auxiliary Income

190

0.23%

Student Association

654

0.80%

Endowment Income

6,000

7.30%

650

0.79%

7,357

8.95%

82,205

100.00%

Administration Education

Auxiliary Enterprises

Student Association Total Expenses

Revenues Tuition Other Educational Income

Interest Income Gifts & Contributions Total Revenue

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! The Byblos campus

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B o a r d s o f Tr u st e e s & I n t e r n at i o n a l A d v i s o r s

Board of Trustees (2006–07) VOTING TRUSTEES

Mr. Richard Orfalea Retired Corporate Banker

Mr. Richard Abdoo Retired Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Wisconsin Energy Corporation

Mr. Todd Petzel Managing Director & Chief Investment Officer, Azimuth Asset Management LLP

Mrs. Taline Avakian Owner, Avakian Jewelry

Mr. Fred Rogers Vice President & Treasurer, Carleton College

Mr. Ronald Cruikshank Retired Senior Corporate Counsel, Omnicom Group Inc.

H.E. Minister Mohammad Safadi Minister of Transportation Chairman, Safadi Group Holding

Dr. Charles Elachi Director of Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Vice President, California Institute of Technology

Sheikh Abdul Aziz Al Turki President, Rawabi Holding

Dr. George Faris Chairman, Faris Group Inc

Dr. John T. Wholihan Dean, College of Business Administration

Mr. Antoine Frem President & Chief Executive Officer, INDEVCO

EMERITUS TRUSTEES

Mr. Arthur Gabriel Secretary Treasurer, Gabriel Brothers

Mr. Jose Abizaid Retired Executive

Mr. William Haddad Managing Director, MACE, Contractors Ltd.

Dr. Amal Kurban, Professor of Dermatology Vice Chairman, Academic & Clinical Affairs, Boston University, School of Medicine and Medical Center

Mr. Jamil Iskandar Chairman & General Manager, DRHTC, SAL

Mr. Wilbert Newton Retired Executive

Mr. Wadih (Bill) Jordan President, Near East Pharma

EX-OFFICIO TRUSTEES

Mr. Walid Katibah Engineer, Office of Engineer Walid Katibah

Dr. Paul F. Boulos Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, MWH Soft, Inc.

H.E. Amb. John Kelly President, John Kelly Consulting, Inc. Former US Ambassador to Lebanon

Rev. Dr. Victor Makari Coordinator for the Middle East and Europe, Presbyterian Church USA

Mr. Joseph Maroun Owner, Caravan Trading Company Rev. David Maxwell Editor, Geneva Press

Rev. Joseph Kassab General Secretary, National Evangelical Synod of Syria & Lebanon.

Dr. Mary Mikhael President, Near East School of Theology

Dr. Joseph Jabbra President, Lebanese American University

Ms. Maureen Mitchell Managing Director, Bear Stearns

Dr. Camille Issa Senate Chair, LAU Faculty Representative 52


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Board of International Advisors (2006–07) Mr. Raymond Audi Chairman & General Manager, Bank Audi SAL, Audi Saradar Group

Mrs. Youmna Salame LAU Alumna Mr. Omar Sawaf Founder, Merchant/Investment Bank

Dr. Francois Bassil Chairman and General Manager, Byblos Bank, SAL

Mr. Philip Stoltzfus Chief Executive Officer, Thayer Brook Partners, LLP

Dr. Paul F. Boulos Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, MWH Soft, Inc.

Mr. Peter Tanous President, Lynx Investment Advisory, LLC

Mr. Zuhair Boulos Engineer H.E. Amb. Gilbert Chaghoury Ambassador

Mr. Jacob H. Yahiayan Managing Director, Continental Advisory Services

Dr. Nadim Daouk President, INFOEL

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

Mr. Raphael Debbane Chairman & Chief Executive Officer Debbane Freres, SAL

Rev. Joseph Kassab General Secretary, National Evangelical Synod of Syria & Lebanon

Mrs. Eva Farha LAU Alumna

Dr. Joseph Jabbra President, Lebanese American University

Mr. Enan Galaly Senior Advisor, International Association of University Presidents

Dr. Camille Issa Senate Chair, LAU Faculty Representative

Dr. Boutros Boutros Ghali Retired Ambassador Sheikh Fouad el Khazen Chairman, Banque de L’Industrie et du Travail Mr. Samer Khoury Executive Vice President, Consolidated Contractors Company

The Lebanese American University is an American institution chartered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York and operating in Lebanon. Originally founded as a Presbyterian school for girls in 1835, LAU is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational institution of higher education encompassing five academic schools—Arts and Sciences, Business, Engineering and Architecture, Medicine, and Pharmacy. Its two campuses, in Beirut and Byblos, offer more than 6,300 undergraduate and graduate students a wide range of academic and professional degrees, including the only doctor of pharmacy program outside the United States to be accredited by the Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education.

Rev. George Mourad Representative, National Evangelical Synod of Syria & Lebanon Mr. Charles Muller Representative, National Evangelical Synod of Syria & Lebanon Mr. Akram Saab Engineer 53


O u r Vi s i o n f o r t h e F u t u r e

LAU LOOKS FORWARD “LAU is in the midst of dramatic and far-reaching institutional change,” said the NEASC accreditation team in April 2007. The major accomplishments of the past year and our common goals for the future attest to the commitment of our students, alumni, faculty, and staff to maintain this momentum and drive toward reinventing LAU as a center for high-quality medical education, for drug research, for conflict resolution, for diplomacy, for the empowerment of women, for innovative engineering, for all of the things that contribute to making a university and a society whole and productive, compassionate and creative. We aim to achieve these goals by holding fast to our vision, which calls on us as educators to:

! The view from the Byblos campus to the sea

• Provide access to a superior education for diverse undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners The progress of freedom • Attract and retain distinguished faculty who excel depends more upon the in teaching, research and community service maintenance of peace, • Enroll and retain academically qualified and diverse students the spread of commerce, • Embrace liberal arts in all curricula and the diffusion of education, • Create opportunities for rigorous research and the than upon the labours of cabinets dissemination of knowledge and foreign offices. • Develop a close-knit community that excels academically, is intellectually stimulating, and is religiously, ethnically Richard Cobden and socio-economically diverse • Attract and retain a highly qualified staff committed to excellence in service • Foster collaboration across the university in teaching, learning, research, and service • Provide a state-of-the-art infrastructure and support services that will enrich the student, faculty, and staff experience • Develop world citizens with a deep sense of civic engagement • Promote the values of peace, democracy, and justice

In the last of these aspirations, the rest are contained. As Richard Cobden, the British radical politician observed in 1850,“The progress of freedom depends more upon the maintenance of peace, the spread of commerce, and the diffusion of education, than upon the labours of cabinets and foreign offices.”We cling tightly to these principles and to our role as diffusers of education to bring them to bear in the lives of our students so that they may also disperse them to the rest of the world. 54


Beirut Campus P.O. Box 13-5053 Chouran, Beirut 1102 2801 Lebanon Tel: +961 1 786456/64 Fax: +961 1 867098 Byblos Campus P.O. Box 36 Byblos, Lebanon Tel: +961 9 547254/263 Fax: +961 9 944851 New York Office 475 Riverside Drive Suite 1846 New York, NY 10115-0065 USA Tel: (212) 870-2592 Fax: (212) 870-2762 http://www.lau.edu.lb


LAU President's Report 2006­2007