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TRANSPAC PART 2 — A

s this issue of Latitude 38 goes to press, the party has long been over in Honolulu and the bulk of the fleet has successfully returned to the Mainland, bringing this 50th edition of the Transpac well and truly to a close. Last month's race recap went to press just before the awards had been handed out, and while a few boats were still on the course, this month's issue has the benefit of time and distance to help us reflect.

W

hen Jason Seibert set the ambitious goal of competing in the Transpac aboard his Texas-based Schock 40, he knew he had a long road ahead of him and that the end result would be anything but a foregone conclusion. With a small and ultra-light canting-keel boat that has a pretty sketchy reputation for durability and seaworthiness, the boat's name — Gamble — seemed quite appropriate. When the race's technical committee balked at the boat from a safety and stability standpoint, a determined Seibert set out to satisfy the requirements and sail his boat to Hawaii. "We finally got the calculations done and approved, we were fortunate to find a sponsor, and I drove the boat to San Diego," said Seibert. "The keel normally cants to 55 degrees, but the calculations showed we needed to limit this to 37.5° to meet the requirements. So we

SHARON GREEN / WWW.ULTIMATESAILING.COM

The 1937-vintage 'Chubasco' at the finish.

removed the bulb, reset the stops on the keel system, re-attached the bulb, checked the stops, then remeasured the list angle after launching. Everything checked out." The smallest and slowest boat to start on the last day of starts — which was

The Schock 40 'Gamble' at the finish. — photo by Walter Cooper / www.ultimatesailing.com

by far the slowest starting day — the little canting-keeler from Texas was a smart choice to pick up the Tail-End Charlie award for being last to finish. With hard reaching in solid breeze in the early stages followed by big conditions going downhill in the trades, the boat proved to be a handful for the admittedly inexperienced crew. "The boat took everything we threw at it," said Seibert. "We just needed to understand better how to handle the conditions. I'm still happy — we set out to get here, and we're here." Also sailing aboard Gamble was onboard media man Justin Richard Edelman, who has been making a name for himself in West Coast sailing

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 Sept 2019  

The September 2019 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Sept 2019  

The September 2019 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.