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LETTERS ⇑⇓ NICE COVER. HOW DOES IT WORK? I loved Latitude's December 2018 cover, and I have some sailing questions. Regarding the spinnaker: #1) It looks like it's symmetrical? How many ounces is the cloth? #2) It looks like it's set up to be able to tack by using the foot as the clew and the clew as the foot for both port and starboard tacks. We have our Seawind 1160 set up like that with a 1.75-ounce symmetrical. #3) No spinnaker sock? #4) You are streaming what looks like three lines. Is there anything on those lines? And are you doing that to steer or slow down? And how long are they? Thanks for a great magazine. Dave Mark Cat Bama Breeze, Seawind 1160 Wilmington Shores

The flag on the moon hasn’t moved since 1969. Neither has Svendsen’s Chandlery.

RICHARD SPINDLER

Still located in the Alameda Marina.

Dave — The spinnaker flying from Profligate on the December 2017 cover is a 1.5-ounce North spinnaker that was originally used on one of Roy Disney's 70-ft Pyewacket sleds. Great sail. Yes, it's symmetrical. Profligate usually carries six chutes, two of them asymmetrical and four of them symmetrical. Most of them are 1.5-ounce. Monohulls heel, so shock loads are partially absorbed by the heeling. Big cats don't heel, so almost all of the shock loading forces end up on the spinnaker itself. In the last 20 years, we've destroyed at least 20 lightweight spinnakers from shock loads. Fortunately, we get them pretty cheap on the used market. And these days we rarely fly anything less than 1.5. We do have a huge lightweight asymmetrical from the Farr 60 that Dennis Conner used to own. If it's not too big, it might be perfect in certain conditions — such as the normally light-air, flatwater Pirates for Pupils spinnaker run from Punta Mita to Paradise Marina. Maybe we'll drag it out next year. Gino Morrelli showed us how to rig the spinnaSailing us out of 2017, 'Profligate' flies ker tack anywhere from one of her big symmetrical chutes. the windward bow to the leeward bow using lines between the bows and a couple of blocks. On Profligate we call it our 'forward traveler'. It's way more versatile than having the tack in one place at the end of a pole — although that extra projection would be nice, too. It's surprising how high you can point if the tack is all the way down on the leeward bow, particularly if it's a reaching chute that you can flatten out almost like a genoa. We don't use spinnaker socks because I like to keep things simple. And with the foot of the main being 26 feet long, it's pretty easy to blanket the chute when setting or dropping. Doña and I did a couple of doublehanded races on San Francisco Bay where we flew a Santa Cruz 70 chute. But that was a few years ago. The lines behind Profligate are fishing lines. The boat is only moving at about five knots in the photo. When she's really going — say 20 knots — water firehoses over the bows. We've never had to drag lines or drogues to slow her down.

svendsens.com OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! Chandlery & Rig Shop / 510.521.8454 store@svendsens.com / www.svendsens.com 1851 Clement Avenue, in the Alameda Marina Page 20 •

Latitude 38

• February, 2018

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 Feb 2018  

The February 2018 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Feb 2018  

The February 2018 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.