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CHANGES where the locals hang out. Charter boats pick up and drop off their passengers here. Refueling is either by bringing the boat alongside the dock or jerry jugs. The harbor is well protected, but the wind is constantly changing direction, so it is necessary to be sure you know how your boat will react in all conditions. The busy little yacht club offers a temporary membership for approximately $45 US per week. We were thus able to use the showers and laundry tubs (no washers), and jerry-jug water to our boat. There was no Wi-Fi available. Much to my delight, I was able to arrange laundry with a local woman through a referral from the yacht club. After paying $100+ for a huge bag of two months' worth of laundry, I was caught up. From then on, I did my laundry at the yacht club wash tubs. The yacht club had a restaurant where we ate that is now being remodeled. We had a few meals there with no complaints about the food or service. The offerings were the usual — pizza, pasta, salads, fish & chips and such. The prices were relatively expensive, but in line with local prices for takeout and inexpensive restaurants. The Seychelles are not a bargain for the average cruiser. But with a little local knowledge, you can get provisions and dine out at prices comparable to those in an expensive city in the US. Considering the Seychelles are in the middle of nowhere, we were surprised to see the large selection of goods available. Another thing that makes the Seychelles expensive are the fees. A day after arriving, we were instructed to visit the accounting office — a 15-minute walk from the harbor and through a lovely park — to settle up. The folks who worked in the office were incredibly kind and helpful, as was everyone. Nonetheless, it was a bit of a shock to learn that

VICTORIA YACHT CLUB

The Victoria YC, in the process of being remodeled, has a bar and restaurant, and is a popular meeting place. But it doesn't have Wi-Fi!

we were charged $275 US to have the officials on Merle come and inspect us. Oddly enough, the same price applies to any vessel, no matter the size. We had no choice but to pay. For two months we paid about $800 in fees, including $100 to an agent. The government required that we hire an agent to extend our visa beyond the initial 30 days, which we did. More next month. bonnie 09/15/2017 Geja — 1976 Islander 36 Andrew Vik 10th Summer in the Med (San Francisco) When I bought Geja sight unseen in 2008 — she was in Italy at the time — after a rather convincing article in Latitude, I figured that I would sail her around the Med for a season or two, and then sell her. I've now been sailing her in the Med for 10 years. Although Geja is now a 42-year-old boat instead of a 32-year-old boat, she's still going strong. I get in about six weeks of cruising each summer, mostly in the Adriatic Sea, as I dry-berth her every winter in the UNESCO town of Trogir, Croatia, west of the big city of Split. My first crew this summer were my sister and nine-year-old nephew Chase, fresh out of a two-week sailing camp at the Sausalito YC. We had a blast sailing around the islands, but little Chase probably enjoyed the inflatable water parks the most. There are several spots in Croatia where one can anchor within swimming distance of such floating play structures. Heck, I probably like them as much as he does. Aside from that, he was greatly amused by the common sight of German nudists, particularly the woman SUP-ing her way around an anchorage. My next crew couldn't have been more different than the first — a six-guy wolf pack. We chartered a second boat for the occasion as Geja only sleeps four, and preferably three. We kicked off two weeks of buddy-boating by anchoring next to the soccer stadium in Split for Ultra Europe, Europe's largest rave. Thanks to an inside connection with one of the headlining DJs, we had VIP access for the entire three-day festival. As it turned out, we only managed to attend the first night. Well, and first morning, as it was only the rising sun that indicated it was time for us to paddle back to the boats. The second night

of Ultra Europe was hit by a bora, a localized dry Santa Ana-like offshore wind that kicks in after dark and blows like crazy through mid-morning. Still anchored in the lee of the stadium, we held on tight as gusts well into the 30s roared through; we were barely able to hear David Guetta's performance over the roar of the wind. The bora blew for two days, providing some fast and fun downwind sailing. We did have to modify our plans, as initially we'd planned to sail east. But with the strong northeasterly blowing from land, we sailed south instead, and caught up with our original route later. One of the beauties of Croatia is there are interesting destinations and countless anchorages in almost every direction. One of my favorite anchorages is Rasotica on the east end of the island of Brac. It was there that our two boats rafted up for a night with Rob and Christine Aronen's charter boat. Ten years earlier, the Aronens and I buddy-boated

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 Nov 2017  

The November 2017 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Nov 2017  

The November 2017 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.