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Clockwise from lower right: 'Quixotic's port bow looking worse than it really is; much of the Winstondamaged cat wasn't wrecked; Alyssa, now a catwoman, takes a selfie in the port hull; 'Quixotic' was left in the bushes by Winston; boatyard workers were soon amputating the bad bow.

37 Eleutheria that he was going to sail around the world. How they started cruising with the 2013 Ha-Ha. How they did the 2014 Puddle Jump and cruised the South Pacific. How they fell in love with Fiji — and if we’re not mistaken, bought some land there. What we didn’t report is that they’d changed plans and had both taken training to become professional crew on larger yachts. In fact, they were advertising for crew positions as recently as February. Given our belief that being professional crew is something that sounds great but is often like working on a floating prison, the destruction of Winston may well have come as a blessing in disguise for them. Buying a hurricane-damaged boat can be tricky, of course. One has to be

able to accurately access the true value of the boat. Such boats are frequently overvalued, even at pennies on the dollar. On the other hand, some people have come away with tremendous bargains. Fatty Goodlander, for example, did his first circumnavigation on a hurricane-damaged boat he bought for only $3,000. Allen says he's glad to be in Fiji, where he's been able to find excellent fiberglass workers at $17/hour. Repairing holes in fiberglass hulls is actually quite easy, and they've already made

great progress. Lewis and Alyssa are currently living aboard Eleutheria while working on Quixotic, having already sold their Tartan 37 monohull to Kurt ' The Drone Man' Roll of San Diego. "We arrived in Cuba from Jamaica on March 2," report Geoffrey and Linda Goodal of the British Columbia-based Bowman 36 Curare. Readers may remember they got to the Caribbean the hard way — via Cape Horn rather than the Panama Canal. "Clearance procedures at Cayo Largo on the south coast were straightforward. The medical officer deemed us healthy, and then agriculture and veterinary services arrived to inspect our fruits and vegetables. We thought for sure they were going to hit us up for some mordida, but they were just doing their jobs. Immigration and customs were no problem either. "We've seen a few things that make Cuba unique in our politically correct, ultra-safety-conscious Norte Americano attitude. Smoking, for example, is an accepted part of life in the street, on the bus, and even in restaurants. The city streets are buzzing with activity both day and night, and salsa music can be heard into the early morning hours. This is especially true here at anchor in Cienfuegos. Latitude is correct that the movement and control of electronics is real, but we haven't found it a nuisance — at least not as much of a nuisance as trying to find good Internet access. "Cienfuegos is a city of about 100,000 or so on the edge of a large bay of the same name. The anchorage is comfortable and safe, although as in typical Cuban style, we were obligated to anchor in front of the marina. For $.20 CUC (Cuban convertible peso) per foot per night the marina provides security, a dinghy dock and water. There is a small In Cienfuegos, as in the rest of Cuba, you can anchor anywhere you want. As long as you want to anchor where Cuban officials want you to. CUBA AERIAL PHOTO

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY QUIXOTIC

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Latitude 38 June 2016  

The June 2016 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 June 2016  

The June 2016 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.