Page 102

CHANGES friendly to rush off. — tom 04/29/2016 Iolani — Hughes 48 Sylvia and Barry Stompe Angels On Maui (Sausalito, Hawaii) After sailing from Puerto Vallarta to and around French Polynesia, we sailed up to Hawaii. We've since been spending the winter in the Hawaiian Islands, waiting for the summer weather and the development of the Pacific High before continuing on to Vancouver, B.C. After the exotic delights of French Polynesia, we weren't very excited to be headed back to the U.S. In addition, we had some concerns about the Island's reputation for few sheltered anchorages. Now that we've actually come to Hawaii, we've had some wonderful surprises. First, we've managed to find shelter from the often-boisterous wind and seas. Second, the ubiquity of humpback whales near Maui in February and March has been a great joy we hadn't expected. A third pleasant surprise was the discovery of what we call the 'Gardening Angels of Maui'. Shortly after we arrived in the vicinity of Lahaina, we received the following message: "We live in the neighborhood above where you are anchored. We can see you from our lanai, and it warms our hearts to see you and your neighboring yacht. We are sailors, too, having sailed our Cal 2-46 The Enchantress from Newport Beach to the Islands many years ago. After cruising, we berthed her at Schoonmaker Marina in Sausalito, where she lived six more years until we moved to Berkeley. After living in Berkeley for 30 years, we moved to Maui in 2008. We are now farmers. "We cannot stay off of the water, however, and now have an 18-ft RIB with twin 40-hp engines. We go out every

IOLANI

Doris and Gordon, formerly of the Newport Beach-, Sausalito- and Berkeley-based Cal 46 'The Enchantress', are the 'Maui Angels'.

chance we get to be with the whales. Last Saturday you and your friends passed us as you headed to Lanai. It was really a beautiful sight for us. I'm telling you this because seeing you anchored off our shores brings back so many incredible memories of when we were cruising, and when we spent our time on weekends at Schoonmaker with our two small children and sailing the Bay and beyond." It was signed Doris and Gordon. The message so warmed our hearts that we made a date for them to visit us on Iolani, and they arrived with a big bag of organic vegetables and eggs from their yard and henhouse. Our coming from a family that grew much of our own food, this was a delight. Doris and Gordon turned out to be wonderful people, and we have since had them out for several daysails, and each time they've brought a big goody bag from their farm! They have helped us run errands, and we have visited their lovely home and gardens, dogs and chickens. It's was a great treat for us to spend a bit of time in that environment, enjoying the earth and plants as well as the gorgeous view of the waters we have been sailing in. We think of them as our Maui Garden Angels, for how generous and thoughtful they have been during our time here. And this was hardly the end of our Hawaiian hospitality. When we got to Molokai, we ran into Rob and Lorraine Coleman, who started cruising from Berkeley many years ago with the Columbia 30 Samba Pa Ti, and later did a lot of sailing in the Pacific with their Honolulu-based Angelman ketch Southern Cross. They showed us their garden/ farm and took us and our Canadian friends all around the island. Because so little gets written about cruising in Hawaii, we've come up with a little review based on our admittedly limited experience. As expected, cruising Hawaii in the winter has been challenging in some ways, but also lots of fun. The most fun was getting to share the waters with the humpbacks, the most exhibitionist whales of all, from February through April. That alone made the rising to the challenges worthwhile. The Big Island. The only place we stayed was Radio Bay, where we Med-moored to the dock. It is protected except when a strong north swell breaks over the jetty. Then you get a lot of surge.

It's also possible for a boat or two to anchor in the tiny bay as well. We wish we could have seen the Kona side of the Big Island, but had friends to meet on Maui. Maui. We stayed in the Maui Nui area, which refers to Maui and the neighboring islands of Lanai, Kaho Olowe and Molokai, for more than two months. This is where the most humpbacks congregate. We were able to find decent spots to anchor in strong winds from most directions. Fortunately, we never had to deal with a Kona storm, which makes most anchorages untenable. Watching the weather constantly and moving the boat frequently are necessary for being safe in this area. And we had to spend many days aboard on anchor watch. We got the best advice on where to anchor in various conditions from locals at the Lahaina YC and from people who work on charter boats. The following are the anchorages we visited in this area:

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 June 2016  

The June 2016 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 June 2016  

The June 2016 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.