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BAJA HA-HA XXII RECAP — year. Fleet members always get a warm reception — especially from local kids who hope these foreign ambassadors had the forethought to bring along some Halloween candy. By Wednesday afternoon most of the bigger boats had arrived, so when the wind piped up to 20 knots that afternoon, accompanied by 8- to 10foot swells, only the smaller and slower boats were left outside to deal with it. By Thursday morning, Day Four, all but the smallest boats in the fleet had completed

the 360-mile leg. On the morning net we learned about mishaps, moments of glory, and minor drama: "Last night it was a bit like Mr. Toad's Wild Ride," reported Jim Brainard of Brainwaves. But he and his crew seemed to revel in it, sailing the whole way. Others were pumped with enthusiasm also: "We had our best run ever yesterday," said Doug Thorne of the Emeryville-based Celestial 48 Tamara Lee Ann, who's done four previous Ha-Has. "We hit 13 knots, our top speed ever," said Douglas and Mary

FIN BEVEN

crews were visited by friendly local entrepreneurs in pangas, rowboats and at least one kayak, offering to deliver diesel, gas, ice and potable water, or take away trash for a dollar a bag. In this dusty desert town, much of daily life revolves around the local fishing industry, and although the three-mile-wide natural anchorage could easily hold a thousand boats, on a typical day here there's usually only one or two visiting boats in the bay. So the Ha-Ha fleet's arrival is by far the most unusual thing that happens all

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Latitude 38

• December, 2015

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 Dec 2015  

The December 2015 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Dec 2015  

The December 2015 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.