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Clockwise from above; Marina Coral, one of Ensenada's two marinas, is also a resort. Careful, the Honeymoon Suite is not a high dive platform. Santo's Restaurant is one of our favorites. The Guadaloupe Valley wine country is only a few miles away. Ensenada officials are in one building.

Mexico's version of the Internal Revenue Service, informally impounded several hundred foreign-owned boats, often on the most dubious grounds. Latitude did a great job of keeping everyone up to date as possible. For me the incident was just educational, while for those who had boats impounded, it was life-changing. We hadn't sailed SeaGlub since making our passage from San Francisco to San Diego in July, and a group of friends came up with the idea that we ought head down to Ensenada for a week or so. Call it a Baja Ha-Ha hangover from all the parties we attended in San Diego, as we were craving more. But first SeaGlub and crew had to get legal, and after all the stories from 2013 fiasco, I was apprehensive. Lo and behold, I'm here to tell a story of success, one of a large government body recognizing a problem and fixing it. Our experience of applying for a Temporary Import Permit (TIP) for our boat, getting tourist visas, and physically checking in

and out of Mexico, was streamlined and effective. We started with the paperwork by logging onto the Banjercito (Mexican military bank) website a month before we wanted to leave for Ensenada in order to get our TIP. I was given the direct link to www.banjercito.com.mx/registroVehiculos/, but it wouldn't work for me. But I clicked on another link with success. From there it was just a matter of entering my personal information and boat information, including things like the engine serial number. It was straightfor ward except at Step Four, when it asked if we were bringing in "Recreational Vehicles". I checked 'no', but on second look found I could have checked 'yes' for my dinghy, as one of the options in

the drop down menu was for boats less than 4.5 meters. I was later told it was not necessary to include it. Next, I needed to send copies of my boat registration and passport. Somehow I missed that, but need not have worried, as the folks in Mexico didn't forget. At 6:45 am the next morning I received an email informing me that my form from 12 hours before hadn't been fully completed because I hadn't sent the copies of the boat registration and my passport. I replied to the email with pictures from my phone of each, and 24 hours later received an email that said I would receive my TIP in two days via DHL. That was it? I was done!? It seemed too easy, but sure enough, two days later DHL delivered my TIP. The one caveat I have is that unbeknownst to us, when we arrived in Ensenada we had to pay a port fee of 385 pesos — which at nearly 17 pesos to the dollar wasn't very much. Something else to remember is that if you arrive or depart Ensenada on the weekend, the fee is double. And you need to check out of Ensenada by 12:30 pm on any given day to be able to leave that day. Actually, I'd do it earlier just to be sure you don't get stuck until the next day. Something else I wasn't aware of, there is a fee of $27.50 for checking back into the United States that is collected at the Customs and Immigration dock in San Diego by U.S. officials. And they only take cash. You get a decal for your fee that is good for one calendar year. Overall the experience was extremely efficient, and I say kudos to Mexico! I look forward to our next visit — and to much longer stays in years to come. — chris 11/15/2015 Readers — The process of getting a If you love fresh seafood prepared every way imaginable, you'll love Ensenada. And at 16.50 pesos to the dollars, you'll love the prices, too. LATITUDE / RICHARD

ALL PHOTOTS LATITUDE / RICHARD

IN LATITUDES

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 Dec 2015  

The December 2015 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Dec 2015  

The December 2015 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.