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ALL PHOTOS COURTESY PRIVATEER

IN LATITUDES

'Privateering' in the South Pacific, clockwise from above right: Racing the heavy Hans Christian 33 in Tonga. Getting some cardio on a bike in Niue. Because Chris and Lila were young, they easily made friends with locals. Room for more on a ferry at Fanning Island. Lila imitates a big manta ray.

girl in Niue, and then kept making it myself. You take two spoonfuls of old yogurt, add powered milk and water, and let it sit inside a thermos surrounded by hot water. That activates the culture. In 12 hours the milk and water become yogurt. Chris: You'd be surprised, but it's the best tasting yogurt in the world. Lila: But you always save two spoonfuls for the next batch. You can also make yogurt cheese and stuff. We don't have an oven, so we also learned to use the pressure cooker for baking. 38: How long did it take you to make beer? Chris: A week to ferment, depending on what country we were in because the ambient temperature makes a difference. Two weeks later I'd siphon it into bottles, put it in cold water, add a COURTESY ICHI BAN

change rate is good, and they've got pigs for roasting. 38: Last time we were there, the locals were dining on canned spaghetti. Chris: They are big on corned beef hash and stuff like that. They'd rather eat canned food than lobster. Lila: And boiled bananas. If somebody invites you to their home, you're likely to be served crackers, corned beef and boiled green bananas. To be polite, you have to say, "Oh yummy." Chris: Tonga was pretty inexpensive because we'd brought all the staples with us from American Samoa, and would only go to Neiafu (Tonga) every couple of weeks for fresh stuff. 38: We're you able to get plenty of fresh greens? Chris: Not always. Sometimes we had to make our own food, such as yogurt and cheese. Lila: I bought yogurt starter from a

couple of teaspoons of sugar — not too much or it would explode — then cap it. Then we'd pour it into frosty mugs and nobody could tell the difference. It cost just a couple of cents a serving. We gave a lot of it away, too. 38: What percentage of cruisers did you see who were under 30? Chris: I'd say 10% or less. Lila: Not many, but young cruisers naturally gravitated to each other. Chris: We'd always look for people rowing long distances, as it was either going to be someone who had been cruising for 40 years or young cruisers who couldn't afford an outboard and gas. So when we saw somebody in a rowboat, we knew we'd be instant friends. 38: What do you have? Chris: An eight-foot hard dinghy and a two-person kayak. 38: What kinds of cruising boats do young cruisers have? Chris: All kinds. One couple had a Westsail 32, and we recently met another couple that have a Columbia 34. 38: You must be speaking of our friend Justin Jenkins and his lady Anna Wiley of the San Diego-based Ichi Ban. Chris: Yes! Those two are awesome! Lila: Get outta here! Those two are great. We were about to leave Bora Bora when we bumped into them. We immediately decided to stay for another week. We'd all play music and drink this local brew that Justin made with fruit. Chris: We met them because of their rowing dinghy. I like Justin because he's such a hustler. He'd get on the radio and say he was available for bottom cleanings, mast climbing, whatever. He scored lots of jobs, too. A lot of cruisers who would normally clean their own bottoms had Justin do it because they like to support young cruisers. 38: The last we heard they were down These folks have a hard dinghy, so they must be longtime and/ or budget cruisers. Hey wait, it's Justin Jenkins and Anna Wiley of 'Ichi Ban'.

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Latitude 38 March 2014  

The March 2014 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 March 2014  

The March 2014 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.