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SIGHTINGS argonaut — cont’d side to sink the Argonaut.” What further frustrates Rice’s family and friends is that, according to Rice-Morris, the Indonesian government searched the wrong area for debris and have yet to question the Hasses about that day. “I really want to know what happened during those 14 days because, as far as we know, the investigators haven’t even questioned the crew of the fishing boat. We’ve been going in circles with them,” she said. “It’s been nothing but heartbreak and confusion.” Rice-Morris holds out little hope that her father is still alive, but she says what she really wants is to get the full story of what happened that day. She doesn’t know if that day will ever come, but she hopes that cruisers will keep an eye out for any boat resembling Argonaut. If you suspect you’ve seen her since July 25 — or have any pertinent information in the case — get in touch with the family through a website they’ve set up: argonautismissing.com. — ladonna

AMSA

boeing 777 rescues sailboat Okay, so the headline might be a bit fantastic but the story is very real. On October 3, Australian Glenn Ey, 44, set off singlehanded from Pittwater, just north of Sydney, on a cruise of the eastern coast of Oz aboard his Cavalier 36 Streaker. All was well — “It was beautiful, really,” Ey said of the weather — until a southeasterly gale blew up toward the end of his second week. Not wanting to get caught inshore during a gale, Ey heaved to and set Streaker on an offshore course. Mid-day on October 14, Ey said “a huge wave came along, picked me up and just rolled me over.” He recalled sitting on his settee one moment, smashing into the overhead the next, and then landing on the table. “It all happens very quickly and it’s most unpleasant.” With the companionway door torn off in the rollover, water flooded into the boat. “Everything was just floating around and I was up to my knees in water,” Ey said. “I put my head up and the mast was down. It was in three pieces.” That’s enough to tempt even the saltiest sailor to set off his EPIRB, but Ey spent the next 36 hours cleaning up the mess and bailing out the boat. He initially tried to bring the largest piece of the mast aboard to set up a jury rig but the conditions were so severe he was concerned it might hole the boat. In the end, he jettisoned the whole lot. “Your first priority is survival,” he told an interviewer who asked why he didn’t immediately set off his beacon. “If your boat is holed, you’re going down and an EPIRB won’t save you then.” An airliner first spotted the dismasted ‘Streak- Believing he was about 100 miles er’ drifting in the Tasman Sea. offshore, Ey spent the next day or so trying to make his way to Sydney — under power when conditions had calmed and under a jury rig he set up with his spinnaker pole. Then he ran out of fuel and realized that a strong current had pulled him farther out to sea than he’d originally presumed. At 8:15 a.m. on October 16, Ey set off his EPIRB. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) requested two commercial flights to divert and search in the vicinity of the signal about 270 miles off Sydney. Ey had not registered his EPIRB so they had no information other than the location. An Air Canada Boeing 777 was first on the scene and it wasn’t long before sharp eyes oncontinued on outside column of next sightings page Page 74 •

Latitude 38

• December, 2012

shopping • Hostage: A Year at Gunpoint with Somali Pirates, Paul & Rachel Chandler, $15.95 — Start reading this harrowing account of a kidnapping that caught the world’s attention and you won’t be able to put it down. Not for the faint of heart or those with an irrational fear of piracy. • Maiden Voyage, Lois Joy Hofmann, $29.95 — A beautiful coffee table book featuring photos and stories of Lois &

y p p a H ys a d i l o H

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Latitude 38 Dec. 2012  

The December 2012 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Dec. 2012  

The December 2012 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.