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Clockwise from above: Alene and Bruce, somehow oblivious to the presence of a real, live, mammaleating Komodo dragon right in front of them. Komodo dragons have a nasty stink eye, sharp claws, and toxic saliva. The couple in the rice fields of Bali. Alene with a dolphin in Indonesian waters.

But there are a lot of calms around Indonesia and Malaysia. Because we were in a hurry, we ended up motoring more than in the previous 18 months. And all that motoring means fueling — often by jerry jug — which can be tiresome. We certainly wanted to stay longer in every place we visited. We had to keep telling ourselves we’d see them on the way back. That’s another challenge — how to get back to the Pacific? There’s so much more we want to see in that ocean. But we’ll deal with that after the refit. However, this trip has made very clear our biggest problem — there are just too many intriguing, amazing, fascinating places to visit in the world. How can we decide where to go next? But at least that’s a pretty cool problem to have. — bruce 11/01/12 Second Chance — Hylas 46 Dick Oppenheimer, Linda Dalton

Sailing the Maine Coast (San Francisco) As we write, it’s early October in Camden Harbor, Maine. The famous 'windjammer' schooners have been covered in shrink wrap. Brilliant yellow, red and orange leaves are dropping. And the temperatures have definitely cooled. All are signs that sailing here is finished for the season. So it's time to haul our Hylas 46 Second Chance, and place her in a covered shed for the winter. Once that's done, we'll return to San Francisco, having enjoyed another wonder ful summer of sailing. Just a month earlier, a small fleet of historic, lovingly restored wooden ships sailed past our moor-

SECOND CHANCE

ing and into the harbor for the annual Camden Windjammer Festival. Victory Chimes, a magnificent 132-foot threemasted schooner, glided her way into the harbor with her yawl boat maneuvering her through the mooring field to the city waterfront. The yawl boat provides power for the schooner when needed. With a hand on the tiller, crewmembers can gently nudge an engineless tall ship forward and into A y a w l o p e r a t o r her slip. It was an guides a windjammer extraordinary sight into her berth. to see the schooner come into port, and a wonderful demonstration of skilled seamanship on the part of captain, crew, and yawl boat drivers. Even after several months in Maine, it feels as though we have just begun to explore this extraordinary cruising area. With almost 3,500 miles of scenic coastline, thousands of pristine islands, and the only fjord on the East Coast, there is no shortage of beautiful anchorages in this state. Wildlife abounds, and it’s not unusual to see osprey, bald eagles, porpoises and seals. While it’s difficult to pick a favorite spot in Maine, Northeast Harbor stands out as a place of exceptional beauty. It is to the east of Somes Sound on Mount Desert Island, and is one of the major yachting centers in Maine. It is home to a small fleet of beautiful pleasure craft as well as working lobster boats. With Morris Yachts located near the town slips, there is a constant stream of Morris vessels on show. Since it's water-oriented, Northeast Dick and Katie Oppenheimer on 'Second Chance'. What could be more satisfying than cruising Maine with your grandchildren?

SECOND CHANCE

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Latitude 38 Dec. 2012  

The December 2012 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Dec. 2012  

The December 2012 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.