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SIGHTINGS

CARMEN TEDESCO

sumptuous — cont’d and anchored on the east side of Tiburon at California City. Our guests included leaders of the San Francisco and Miami Slow Food movement, a longtime chef at Chez Panisse, a former restaurateur, and two former chefs — a total of 13 — people. We chose Italian food as the theme for the potluck. Dishes included: pastiche, a Sicilian polenta with porcetta, sausage and raisins; veal tongue with wild mushrooms; cap o n a t a , m e a t b a l l s enriched with ricotta cheese — the creamiest meatballs ever! — pasta with roasted shallots; artichokes and eggplant; crostini with goat cheese A potluck on ‘Iolani’ is sure to be culinary delight. and roasted roma tomatoes; and orange-scented olive oil cake with sea salt. What a feast! What a great day sailing, and what a joy to combine my two main hobbies while enjoying it with like-minded folks! — sylvia stewart

inspirational sailors Army sergeant Urban Miiyares woke up in the middle of the Vietnam War in a body bag. Left for dead while in a diabetic coma during a firefight, Urban was rescued by a medic. After a lengthy rehabilitation, his body recovered, but not his eyesight. Being blind did not suppress his determination to live a full life. In ‘78, two disabled veterans decided to take up sailing. At the time there were no programs or sailing schools that could accommodate their needs, so they bought a Cal 20 and invited other disabled veterans, including Urban, to learn how to sail with them. They started entering races and formed Challenged America (ChallengedAmerica.org), which has been attracting disabled sailors, whether experienced or first timers, to sail on San Diego Bay. Urban was a member of the ‘03 Challenged America Transpac Team, the first crew of disabled sailors to enter the Los Angeles to Hawaii race, and was happy to volunteer for the night watches. Because of Urban’s ‘vision’ in helping to create Challenged America, thousands of veteran and civilian sailors with numerous disabilities, both physical and mental, have experienced an introduction to adaptive sailing, developing new skills and abilities, working as a team, helping with rehabilitation, building self-confidence, and being fulfilled with the joy of being on the water. One group of sailors participating in a recent Wednesday evening Beer Can race in the Challenged America boat included of Hiro Iwamoto, who was born with a congenital defect that caused him to become blind in adolescence. In ‘06, before moving from Japan to San Diego, Hiro led a team to win the Japanese Blind Sailing World Championship. He took the title in Newport, Rhode Island, sailing a Sonar 23 and a J/22. Working foredeck is a challenging enough position for a sighted person, but Hiro is agile as he secures the jib pole and maneuvers to his position as ‘rail meat’. Hiro is always quick to laugh and loves being on the water. He feels the wind, hears nearby boats, and can smell what the shoreside restaurants are cooking as the aromas waft out to sea. Wedged in the cockpit and working the jib sheets was Steve Muse, who lost the use of his legs due to a spinal injury from a car accident, continued on outside column of next sightings page Page 80 •

Latitude 38

• October, 2011

welcome the new sf The Chronicle reported last month that San Francisco Marina’s new harbormaster took the reins just after Labor Day. John Moren, 49, was hired in the midst of a $24.8 million renovation of the West Harbor, which took nearly a decade years of wrangling — and the arrival of the America’s Cup on the Bay — to get final approval. Work began this spring with a target completion date of November, 2012. Moren may have inherited a hornet’s nest of issues — increased slip fees,slip reassignments, etc. — but he also appears

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Latitude 38 Oct. 2011  

The October 2011 eBook issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 Oct. 2011  

The October 2011 eBook issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.