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LETTERS Pt. Loma. We hailed the officials at the Police Dock over the VHF, and they told us where to go. Our next stop was Santa Barbara Marina, where it was the same deal. Ditto for Santa Cruz and our homeport of Sierra Point Marina in Brisbane. While having lunch on our boat at Sierra Point, we stopped to think how different it was in California from Mexico. If we'd called for a slip in a marina in Mexico, when we reached the dock, we would have met by two to four smiling linehandlers, who, as soon as we'd gotten tied up, would have connected our water hose and electricity. And maybe somebody would have offered us some food or a homemade pie, and at the very least filled us in with regard to stores, the internet, restaurants, laundry facilities and transportation. And within 10 minutes, some eager workers would have come by and, at reasonable prices, have offered to wash our boat, clean the bottom or wash our mast. For a lot of reasons, it's sure good to be back in the old United States — but where is the warm and fuzzy feeling we're used to getting when arriving at marinas in Mexico? We guess that we'll just have to head back south this winter. You wouldn't know of a group of boats that we could hang with on the way down from San Diego to Cabo? Say toward the end of October? Wayne 'the Mango Man' Hendryx & Carol Baggerly Capricorn Cat, Hughes 45 Brisbane Readers — There truly are many wonderful things about California and the United States, but as most people returning from a cruise to Mexico will tell you, while we Americans may have the most money, collectively we're not the warmest of people, nor do we rank among the happiest. After our mother died, our dad kept saying he was going to take his van down to Mexico and do some exploring. Despite our encouragement, he never did, and as such, missed out on meeting many wonderful people and having great adventures. Our advice to those of you who are sick of the 'same-old, sameold' is to not fear the unknown. ⇑⇓NOT A COMPLAINT, JUST A FACT With regard to your recent 'Lectronic and Latitude items about San Diego and the noise caused by airplanes, maybe you should back off the military and the noise of their jets. After all, they were there before you were. Capt. Paul Petraitis Espresso, CT-41 PH Seattle, WA Capt. — When we said that San Diego could accurately change its motto from America's Finest City to America's Noisiest City, we were stating a fact and making a joke, not complaining. We actually like the sound of the F-18s — or whatever they are — as we find them reminders of the sophisticated things modern man is capable of producing. After all, nothing in them existed even 100 years ago. Besides, you only hear them a couple of times a day. We find the sound of the commercial jet traffic, which is almost nonstop, more annoying. But as you point out, both Lindbergh Field and the North Island Naval Air Station were around first, so it's a little hard for anyone to complain. By the way, while Profligate was hauled out in San Diego, we spent a bit of time kicking around the redeveloped downtown near Petco Park. The touristy Gas Lamp District is understandably a little cheesy, but overall, San Diego seems to have done a pretty good job. In fact, it feels a lot like the San Page 60 •

Latitude 38

• August, 2009

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 August 2009  

The August 2009 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 August 2009  

The August 2009 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.