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Artistic Forgeries

DON DURANT

LETTERS

Forged Shackles

When it comes to shackles, you shouldn’t just accept a forgery, you should insist on it! Shackles have a tough job to do (usually holding expensive bits of your boat together), so it makes sense to buy the toughest, strongest, most reliable shackles made. Those would be the brilliant forgeries by Wichard. These extraordinary shackles are created by drop forging 17.4 PH stainless steel, then painstakingly polishing them to a brilliant finish that defies the crevice corrosion which can cause lesser shackles to fail with catastrophic consequences.

We have 17 stores in Northern California, including our Alameda Sailing Superstore! Log onto westmarine.com or call 1-800-BOATING to find the store nearest you. Page 36 •

Latitude 38

• August, 2009

DON DURANT

If you want to skimp on something, go buy a forged painting. But don’t skimp on something as important as a shackle. Insist on forged shackles by Wichard.

between the two halves of the swivel. That pin will generally be designed to take a straight line pull. But if the swivel is connected directly to the anchor, as the Foy's was, and the wind then shifts or for some other reason the direction of pull changes, unless the anchor rolls and resets, the swivel pin will be subjected to a bending load that could easily cause it to snap. This is because the swivel can only hinge in a vertical plane when it is attached directly to the anchor. The correct way to set up an anchor swivel is to put a bow shackle on the anchor and then connect the swivel to the shackle. The shackle acts like a toggle to allow the swivel to orient itself in any direction so that the swivel pin is always subjected to a straight line pull. If you don't think that the anchor attachment would be subjected to If you have a shackle, what's major side loads, then take a look the point of the swivel? at my second photo. This anchor came back from a boat that was anchored at Drake's Bay a couple of months ago. If the side loading on this anchor was big enough to bend its shank like that, think what it would have done to a little swivel pin that had only a small fraction of the cross sectional area of the anchor shank. This can happen to any anchor, but lightweight fluke type anchors like the one in the photo are especially prone to digging in and not moving when the direction of pull changes. Setting up one's ground tackle correctly is some of the cheapest insurance that a cruiser can buy. When you think of what's at stake, it's silly to skimp to save a few bucks on a shackle. This is one place where the 'weakest link' isn't just a metaphor, it's literal. P.S. I just came back from the Summer Sailstice event on Treasure Island. Latitude's John Arndt did a terrific job of organizing this event, and I think that he deserves big kudos for all that he is doing for the sailing community! Jim Hancock School Director & General Manager, Club Nautique Alameda Marine Engineer / USCG 50 Ton Master US SAILING Instructor & Instructor Trainer Jim — We understand what you're saying, but for a couple of reasons we don't completely agree with you. If you need to put a bow shackle between the anchor and the swivel for a "correct installation," why waste your money on the swivel? Looking at the first photo with your letter, it's a very nice set up, but what exactly does the swivel — which readers should If a bad load can bend a shank, think know isn't a Kong brand what it could do to a swivel pin. — bring to the party? In addition, some other brand swivels — such as the Ultra Swivel by Quickline — can rotate up to 30 degrees in all directions,

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 August 2009  

The August 2009 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 August 2009  

The August 2009 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.