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LETTERS have to burn dinosaurs to make water or ice or enjoy all the many electric and electronic goodies that we have. We have a friend in San Diego — yeah that's you, Roger — who has amp envy. Catch The Wind is very happy to be using less fuel and all that free solar power. Sam Crabtree & Susie Wilson Catch The Wind, Cal 39 Currently in Sea of Cortez Sam and Susie — We've got amp envy just like Roger. As such, we intend to have Profligate outfitted with an array of solar panels by the start of this fall's Ha-Ha. The only thing that surprises us is that you use the engine in order to take hot showers. Our normal routine in Mexico is to take a swim in the late afternoon, then use the fresh water in our Solar Showers for the final rinse. By the late afternoon, the water in those bags is still almost hot enough to scald. On the other hand, it is important to run the diesel regularly to keep it lubricated and the seals from drying up. ⇑⇓LIFE ATTAINS A WONDERFUL SIMPLICITY In your June response to the Stephen Burns' letter on climate and conservation, you mentioned in passing how much you were enjoying the simpler life imposed by limited living quarters. This struck a chord with us, because it was in our four years of living aboard and cruising that we adapted to the concept that less is, with only rare exceptions, better than more. We consider this insight one of the more important lessons we learned from our cruising experience. We were fairly typical. We sold a big house and went cruising. The divestiture of property necessary to achieve this was very painful, and took almost two years. It really hurt, for example, to get rid of an old backpack frame that I'd had in the rafters since the '80s, but it had to go — that and a lot of stuff even more dear. But now, six years or so later, I don't miss one bit of that stuff. The things really important to us now fit very nicely — if a little tightly — into 1,000 sq ft, and after living for years on a 38-ft sloop, the space is really quite luxurious. Reach the point of where you have to get rid of something in order to have space for something new, and life attains a wonderful simplicity. Jimmie Zinn Dry Martini, Morgan 38 Pt. Richmond Jimmie — Here's how much we've been enjoying the simple life. Even though our friends who were members of the San Francisco YC moved out of our place and into their new home last month, we still haven't even been into our main house. We don't need those other three bedrooms, two baths and all the stuff we'd have to put in them. After all, our real living quarters are the Latitude office and Profligate. However, to paint a complete picture, we couldn't have raised our two kids the way we would have wanted had we not had the whole house when they were living with us. But before and after kids, who needs the trouble and expense? And yes, like you, we're finding the simplicity to be wonderful. ⇑⇓EYE CANDY IN THE BEST SENSE OF THE TERM It's interesting that you mentioned that the lifelines on Profligate are 42 inches above the deck. I'm in construction and, on job sites, 42 inches is the OSHA requirement for the top rail on temporary handrails — for a good reason. I suspect that 42-inch lifelines on my 30-ft boat, besides looking "way Page 78 •

Latitude 38

• July, 2007

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 July 2007  

The July 2007 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 July 2007  

The July 2007 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.