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SIGHTINGS clined, you can buy it. Owned since 1964 by former San Francisco resident David Glickman — who bought it for $49,500 with the hopes of whacking off the top and building a casino — Red Rock is the only privately owned island in the Bay. Glickman, who now lives in Bangkok, is getting on in years and would like to leave his family a comfortable inheritance. To that end, Glickman is asking a mere $10 million for the six-acre hunk of manganese — a bargain for prime San Francisco waterfront real estate. Unfortunately, Red Rock is the intersecting point for three counties and two cities, so any development plans would likely take years and miles of red tape to get approval. MORRO BAY — “Stay out of the water. No, wait. Get back in.” That was the mescontinued in middle column of next sightings page

a life changing journey Tomorrow I will be leaving to sail to Hawaii thanks to a story in the June edition of Latitude 38. A week ago I was thinking of what to do this summer when my dad dropped the Latitude on my desk and pointed to the story about Lynx. I was immediately hooked, and ten minutes later I was emailing the Lynx Education Foundation asking if there were any more spots left for the sail from Oakland to Hilo, Hawaii. To my surprise, there were two berths left, but I wasn’t totally sure I wanted to go. The following Becky set off on a journey of a lifetime aboard ‘Lynx’. Sunday I went on a sunset sail aboard Lynx. Between swabbing the decks and raising the sails, I decided that I wanted to be a part of this life-changing experience. I have been sailing since I was very young and, within days, I will be embarking on a journey that I never thought possible. — becky ware

passport pandemonium In early June, under pressure from thousands of irate summer travelers and their Senators, the Bush administration temporarily suspended the strict passport rules that went into effect in January. The new rules required all US citizens flying to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda to have a passport. Since the implementation of the rules, passport processing centers across the country have been inundated with applications, causing a tremendous backlog and months-long delays in processing the applications. With their travel plans looming and no sign of their passports, vacationers started getting vocal with their Congressmen who, in turn, got vocal with the State Department. The suspension — in effect until at least September — doesn’t mean air travelers won’t have to get their passport, though. They must show proof that they’ve applied for one in the form of a receipt from the State Department, in addition to a government-issued ID. Of course, anyone without a passport may undergo more, um, invasive scrutiny at security checkpoints, but at least they’ll be able to get on the plane. At the time, no changes were expected to the passport requirement for land and sea crossings to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda, which was due to take effect January 1, 2008. Then, later in the month, another announcement was made that these new rules would also be suspended for at least six months. Unlike the revised air travel rules, land and sea border crossings will only require a government-issued ID and birth certificate. “We’ve come to understand that it’s important to build flexibility in our systems,” said Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, who also called the passport goat-rope a “hiccup” in a plan that was otherwise coming off “flawlessly.” This is great news for cruisers, at least for the time being, but you will need to get that passport — sooner rather than later. — ladonna July, 2007 •

Latitude 38

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COURTESY BECKY WARE

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Latitude 38 July 2007  

The July 2007 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 July 2007  

The July 2007 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.