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LETTERS

DRY STORED BOATS SELL!

J/32, 1997 Ragtop – the ultimate J/Boat. Ready for cruising and racing. $108,000

FREEDOM 39, 1985 Innovative, easy to handle schooner rig. Great for the Bay and beyond. $79,500

SYDNEY 38, 1999 High performance, easy to sail, sharp interior. Come see this beauty. $199,000

S-2 36, 1982 Cruise equipped, center cockpit, open roomy interior. $49,500

WESTSAIL 32, 1977 Cruising vet, ready to go again. $60,000

HUNTER LEGEND 37.5, 1988 New upholstery, rigging, dodger. Two staterooms. $62,000

CATALINA 36, 1989 Beautiful boat. Mk II interior. $62,500

PEARSON 34, 1985 Dodger and canvas. Great family Bay and coastal cruiser. $52,900

ADDITIONAL LISTINGS: Irwin 45 CC, 1973 ...........................58,000 Roberts 44 CC, 1981 ......................79,000 Olson 40, 1982 ...............................82,000 Freedom 39 Schooner, 1985 ..........79,500 Freedom 38, 1992 ..........................99,000 Sydney 38, 1999...........................199,000 Hunter Legend 37.5, 1988 ..............62,000 S-2 36 CC, 1981 .............................49,500 Catalina 36, 1989 ...........................62,500 Jeremy Rogers OOD 34, 1980 .......37,500 Pearson 34, 1985 ...........................52,900 Westsail 32, 1977 ...........................60,000

J/32, 1997 .....................................108,000 J/30, 1981 .......................................23,500 Carter 30, 1976...............................19,950 Hunter 30, 1980 ..............................15,000 Santana 30/30 Grand Prix, 1983 ....14,000 Cal 29, 1972 ...................................17,000 Catalina 27, 1978 .............................9,800 Hunter 27 ..........................................9,500 POWER Sunseeker Manhattan 48, 1999 ...375,000 Sea Ray 400EC, 1993 ..................109,500 Bavaria 290 Sport, 2003 .................82,500 SeaRay 27 ......................................Inquire

NEW Grand Soleil, Hunter Trailerables Chris Corlett • Ruth Scott • Steve Coghlan • Justin Scott • Chad Freitas

www.nelsonyachts.net • 510 337-2870 Page 92 •

Latitude 38

• February, 2006

I was loaded into that ambulance along with the driver and the passenger of the truck that had almost killed us. We were taken to the local hospital, and we all shared the 'emergency room' together. When the ambulance left the scene of the accident, my poor Martin was left there alone, unable to speak Spanish, and having to face the police. To say that I was petrified is an understatement. For six hours I was in the hospital being very well taken care of, but I had no idea what had happened to my husband, our van, or our belongings. However, a policeman came to interview me about the accident. Meanwhile, the driver of the small truck was transferred to Guadalajara under police escort. I was assured that my husband was probably with the Ministerio Publico, which is like a local District Attorney. After being X-rayed, given a shot for pain, being watched for possible internal injuries, and having a neck-brace made for me, the emergency room doctor gave me a prescription for pain meds and told me that someone would take me to the Ministerio's office. I was not charged one peso, asked to sign any forms or papers, or questioned about insurance coverage! I found Martin at the Ministerio's office, along with the insurance agent for the Mexican auto insurance that we had on the van. This is very important! Since we had the insurance, and because it was evident from the skid marks of our van in our lane of the road, no one even questioned who was culpable. The insurance agent had arrived on the scene to assist Martin, and stayed with us and helped us locate a mini-van-taxi to load all of our belongings. These belongings included the metal parts — all of which had lodged themselves in various parts of the van rather than beheading either of us. We then drove back to the marina. It was a horrible experience, and we lost our van. But there were also many positive things — such as our experience with the police, the hospital and the insurance agent. But never drive at night in Mexico, and always carry Mexican insurance on your vehicle. As long as I'm on a roll, I'd also like to let all sailors know that some of us powerboaters are cruisers, too. We don't cause big wakes around anchorages or marinas, we don't run our generator all day or night, we aren't any more loaded down with money than many people with average sailboats and, generally speaking, we are no different than most cruisers on sailboats. The only differences are that we can provide the muscle if and when needed to pull sailboats off the shore, we can provide faster response time to many emergencies, we have stronger antennas for relaying radio messages, and we have ice for warm beer. There are plenty of big fishing boats and large yachts that are a nuisance, but they are a nuisance to us, too! And they are not cruisers. It really pisses me off when I see a negative reference — for example, Dan Fitzpatrick made a slur in his recent piece — to those of us who prefer power to sail. We have many close cruising friends who happen to be sailors, and we all get along very well, and do not hold on to the useless 'sailor versus powerboater' standoff. So it would be nice if the sailors in the cruising fleet would refrain from referring to all powerboaters as scum or otherwise being less than desirable. Lastly, the Sea of Cortez island cleanup that Latitude intends to organize sounds like a great idea, and we are sure many boaters will be ready to lend a helping hand. However, it's been our experience that the majority of the trash in the Sea of Cortez comes from the pangero fish camps or from the Baja peninsula pueblos and cities, not from cruisers. Most

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 February 2006  

The April 2006 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 February 2006  

The April 2006 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.