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LETTERS a sun shade. Use filters, as rainwater can be dirty inshore. Welcome to the adventure, new cruisers. Roddy Mac, Ph.D. Delusions Friday Harbor, WA Roddy — We can confirm that Taylor Made is wonderful about backing their fenders — we'd never buy another brand. The only point where we might disagree with you is with regard to watermakers. The first one we bought 20 years ago was a disaster. Our much newer model has been simple to use and has required very little maintenance.

LATITUDE / RICHARD

⇑⇓BAJA COULD DISAPPEAR IN 10 YEARS Most of my life, I have relished the relief I felt while retreating to Mexico. But after reading the following, I had a knot in my stomach. It was written by Serge Dedina, Director of the environmental group Wild Coast, and sent to me by Martha Armenta, my business consultant in Mazatlan: "Summertime's coming and just about everyone who lives for the long point waves of Baja believes in the Pristine Myth — the conviction that Baja will be empty, desolate and wild forever. This delusion is erroneous at best and dangerous at worst. The Baja California that drives us to live for that frenzied first round-the-bend glimpse of a pumping swell at a 'secret' point we’ve surfed for the past quarter century is going fast and could disappear in 10 years. Here are five reasons why the Baja you love, the Baja you dream of, the Baja that makes you feel like a primeval surf explorer, will no longer exist in a decade — unless you take action to save it: 1) Energy Development. In the past four years, some of the world’s biggest energy companies — Sempra, Shell, ChevronTexaco, and Marathon Oil — have either built or proposed the construction of liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals along Baja’s Pacific coast. Sempra-Shell is already halfway through a terminal that destroyed famed Harry’s. Next on the list of doomed sites — the Coronado Islands, where Chevron-Texaco plans a massive facility, and Cabo Colonet, where a LNG terminal would also be housed next to a major new port and industrial complex. 2) Port Construction. The Port of Ensenada is planning a massive $5 billion industrial, LNG, and urban complex on one of the last pristine stretches of coastline between Ensenada and San Quintin at Cabo Colonet. This new port will be larger than the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles combined. The city associated with the port will eventually rival Ensenada, and will envelop every surf spot around Cuatros. 3) Marinas and Mega-Resorts. In 2003, John McCarthy, Mexico’s Chief of Tourism Development (FONATUR), announced plans to roll back a plan to build marinas at six point breaks on Baja’s Pacific Coast — including Scorpion The only marina in Loreto is this one for pangas. Bay and Punta Abreojos. Unfortunately, FONATUR recently announced plans for new marinas at Punta Abreojos and La Bocana. These projects are planned despite the fact that a similar marina at

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Latitude 38

• August, 2006

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 August 2006  

The August 2006 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 August 2006  

The August 2006 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.