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LOOSE LIPS Eight bells — Chuck Streatch. For the most part, journalism isn't like in the movies, where cutthroat Woodward wannabes will do anything to screw another reporter out of a story. Like anybody, we enjoy one-upping the other guy now and then, but in the world of sailing journalism, we mostly know and respect one another. In any given year, we share much more information than we covet. So it is with sadness that we report the passing of one of the 'family' patriarchs. Charles Streatch, publisher of 48° North died on June 25 after a long battle with cancer. He was 79. Chuck was born in Canada. When he made his way to the U.S. as a teenager, he was earning a living playing jazz trumpet(!). He became a citizen in 1954, and graduated from the University of Oregon five years later with a degree in Journalism (and a minor in Chuck Streatch. Chemical Engineering). He did stints as a technical writer for Boeing and as an advertising director for a group of local newspapers before founding 48° North in 1981. His continued guidance made it one of the better regional sailing magazines in the country, and made sailing more fun and accessible for his large readership in the Seattle area. Chuck is survived by his wife Mary, step-daughter Marcia Fox of Phoenix, Arizona, and several cousins still in Canada. Our condolences to his family and the whole crew at 48° North.

San Francisco Bay Area Jim Leech 415 827-1177 Jack D. Scullion 510 919-0001 Monterey Bay Area Kurt White Larsen 800 800347-6817 347-6817 Bob

Bud Lowrie. The local sailing community also lost one of its elders — Bud Lowrie, founder of Lowrie Yacht Harbor in San Rafael, passed away at home on May 28. He was 89. Bud's life was forged in hard times. His father died when Bud was two, leaving him, five siblings and a pregnant mother. The family drove from Texas to the 'promised land' of California in a Model T, but things didn't improve much. Bud left home at the age of 8 (not a typo) and lived for a time under the Stanislaus Bridge. He ate what he could pick from nearby fields and got a job cleaning a slaughterhouse. He later worked in San Francisco as an autobody man. Still later, Bud's innate mechanical ability and wild streak got him a position as a professional motorcycle racer for Triumph. Bud married Christie Banfield of San Anselmo and had two children, Lance and Bonnie. He started Lowrie Boat and Steel Works in San Rafael in the early '40s and built Lowrie Yacht Harbor in 1948. He was the West Coast distributor for several lines of boats over the years, and owned the molds (in Taiwan) for the PT line of trawlers. He loved to sail the Bay, did several TransPacs, and visited some of the far-flung ports of the world. In addition to all his other gifts, he had a great talent for remembering and telling jokes. He lived a full life and will be missed. — Bonnie Lowrie-Preston Dear Latitude 38, We would like to commend Latitude 38 on your efforts to bring the issue of boating safety to the forefront. In particular, your educational campaign to increase PFD useage has likely contributed to saving the lives of sailors.

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Latitude 38

• August, 2006

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 August 2006  

The August 2006 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 August 2006  

The August 2006 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.