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DECember 2012

ARIZONA EDITION

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My Help perspec tive ing of v Hur ictim : rica s ne Sand

Tinsel, ladder & ligh s ยกcuidats-


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Journal of the American Latino Dream

Volume 9

{December 2012}

Issue 4

20

26

Gifts that change lives

Make giving to a nonprofit one of your holiday traditions

7 8

From the editor Happy holidays from LPM

¿Será posible?

Write a book, diagnose a disease, or take a nap – all in porcelained privacy

14 Latino Vibe artists seldom seen among Kennedy

Center honorees; free Sundays at area museums; Future Loves Past performs at MIM

15 17

Anaya Says

Political awareness can’t start too early

Latina still standing

What are you giving yourself this holiday season?

A little forethought goes a long way to making the holidays safer

19 Rincón del arte Phoenix Center for the Arts’ inaugural arts

festival features a collaborative public mural

29 Movin’ up CPLC’s Edmundo Hidalgo honored as Hero of

Education; Phoenix College Alumni Association Hall of Fame inductees for 2012; Avondale mayor, Lopez Rodgers, gains presidency of National League of Cities; Julio Cesar Morales joins ASU Art Museum’s curatorial staff

12 LP journal Mexican immigrant madres rate high on

mothering skills; coalition nurtures political involvement among Latino youth; Alfredo Gutierrez’ To Sin against Hope to be published in early 2013

Common holiday hazards

33

Entrepreneur

Guillermo Quintero’s Suitcases & More puts the emphasis on the “more”

35 Navajo Briefcase environmental activists organize to replace coal-based energy production with renewable alternatives

41 Education Eco-friendly products for schoolchildren; ARS 43-1089-01 lets taxpayers commit $200 to $400 to educational programs of choice

43 How Health to treat the “whole child,” according to pediatrician Anne Young, M.D.

46 Time out Competition enhances the joy of giving 49 P.S.

The mythical meeting of la Virgen and Talking Eagle

50 My perspective 38 Those who serve ... on taking responsibility for those in need: A Arizona National Guard’s Major General Hugo first-hand account of power restoration efforts E. Salazar: A profile

on Long Island after Hurricane Sandy

Coming in January: Year in review latinopm.com

¡ December 2012!

Latino Perspectives Magazine

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ยก! from the executive editor

December 2012 Publisher/CEO Ricardo Torres Executive Editor/COO Cecilia Rosales, Ph.D. Copy Editor Virginia Betz

Happy Holidays

Art Director Jorge Quintero Contributing Writers Catherine Anaya, Diana Bejarano, Virginia Betz, Art Canizales, Jr., Erica Cardenas, Ruben Hernandez, Penny Krick, M.D., Robrt L. Pela, Stella Pope Duarte, Annie Young, D.O. Director of Sales and Marketing Carlos Jose Cuervo Advertising Account Executives Grace Alvarez and Barry Farber Webmaster QBCS Inc.

Contact Us

www.latinopm.com P.O. Box 2213 Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 602-277-0130 Advertising: sales@latinopm.com Editorial: editor@latinopm.com Design: art@latinopm.com

Subscriptions

For home or office delivery, please send your name, address, phone number, and a check for $24 to Latino Perspectives Magazine at the address above. Subscriptions also available for credit-card purchase by calling 602-277-0130. Visit latinopm.com/digital for a free digital subscription. Latino Perspectives Magazine is published 12 times a year and is selectively distributed throughout Arizona. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Latino Perspectives Media, LLC, all rights reserved, and may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without written permission from the publisher.

From all of us at Latino Perspectives Magazine Editorial mission statement

Latino Perspectives creates community, cultivates c u lt ural pr ide and provokes, challenges and connec ts L at inos who are def ining, pursuing, and ac h iev i n g t he A me r ic a n L at i no D re a m .

Your thoughts? Tell us what you think. Send your thoughts to editor@latinopm.com

Latino Perspectives welcomes feedback from readers regarding published stories or topics of interest. Please include your name and phone number. Mail letters to Editor, Latino Perspectives, P.O. Box 2213 Litchfield Park, Az. 85340. Or, email letters to editor@latinopm.com. latinopm.com

ยก December 2012!

Latino Perspectives Magazine

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¡! ¿Será posible?

All wet By Robrt Pela

That cacophony of cheers you hear

may be the rejoicing of multi-taskers everywhere. Several new inventions have recently hit the market, each designed to increase productivity in that most time-sucking place in your home: the bathroom. Go-getters who’ve long resented the minutes wasted while bathing will be thrilled with Aqua Notes, an alreadybestselling, waterproof notepad that allows the busy-minded to organize their thoughts while shampooing, make a shopping list while rinsing off, or – as the brand’s packaging giddily suggests – “draw, sketch, or doodle in the shower!” No more soggy notes scribbled onto a plain old paper pad left on the back of the toilet; the 21st century has provided us with new technologies that will help

Fear sets in.

Cancer diagnosis.

banish our need to focus on trivial matters like bathing. Reading on the toilet is no longer enough, either. Those who want to combine their morning yoga stretches with another daily chore will be thrilled with Adjustable Advantage, which, according to a press release, allows its users to “improve your posture while using the toilet!” The movable seat improves blood flow, reduces knee pain and relieves pressure on the sciatic nerve – all while one is relieving oneself! President Lyndon Johnson, it’s been rumored, used to conduct business meetings while on the john. Perhaps, inspired by this early form of multitasking, Japanese toilet designers have come up with the Toto Intelligent Toilet, a pricey device that not only provides

wi-fi access (thus enabling users to Skype into office meetings or just chat with friends), but also allows its owner to skip annual trips to the doctor. The Toto device includes a special receptacle inside the bowl that collects urine, then tests it for sugar content and elevated temperatures. An armband attached to the commode monitors blood pressure, and a scale built into the seat measures body weight. Toto is reportedly working on an updated version that will automatically e-mail these test results to one’s general practitioner. Finally, for those who find showering an unbearable time-waster, there’s the new Horizontal Shower from a German bathroom fittings firm called Dornbracht, which allows its owner to nap while also getting clean. The invention’s low,

Your treatment team collaborates on your case.

You meet your personal cancer navigator.


¡! ¿Será posible?

narrow stall employs what Dornbracht calls “water bars” that spray bathers horizontally. Water temperature and intensity are controlled by a high-tech control panel at face-height; settings include “Relax” and “De-Stress,” both of

which are certainly necessary for people who work so hard they can afford a shower stall that costs $35,000. How long, one wonders, before these time-saving contraptions are combined? Will 2013 bring us a reclining shower

stall fitted with a wi-fi-enhanced toilet, one that allows us to teleconference while bathing, and includes a mechanized flossing attachment and a mute button to mask flatulence? We’re counting the minutes.

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Conversation starters from the world around us

12 LP Journal

Mexican immigrant moms poor but resilient; Alfredo Gutierrez’ new memoir; activism in high school

15 Anaya says

Nasty campaign ads yield some positive political fallout

i say... This is just a manufactured fantasy.

David Morrison, astrobiologist at NASA’s Ames Research Center, referring to the alleged Mayan apocalypse of December, 2012

As you can see, I put my pumpkins out.

Talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, in costume, parodying Sofia Vergara’s tight clothes and wardrobe malfunctions

What can he tell me, other than how to protect my liver?

page

14

Brad Pitt to People, about asking George Clooney for advice on turning 50

Local indie band, Future Loves Past, performs at the Musical Instrument Museum on January 17

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¡ December 2012!

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¡!

LP journal

Low socioeconomic status not an obstacle to good mothering skills among Mexican immigrants

Survey says: Mexican madres rate high on nurture scale What’s the difference between a Chinese-born “tiger mom,” a U.S.born white “helicopter parent” and a Mexican-born madre? No, this is not a joke, and don’t even dare mention the chancla word. According to a recent study by a research team at University of California, Berkeley, immigrant Mexican madres argue less (39 percent less) with their husbands than Chinese women, have less depression than white women, and provide “warm and supportive home settings” for their families, despite their being poorer than the other two groups. The study was published in the September/October issue of Child Development. In addition, the study concludes that non-citizen immigrants tend to be more resourceful and ambitious than nativeborn white moms. The latest findings add nuance to the discussion of the “Latino paradox” among immigration researchers. The paradox refers to the fact that Hispanic immigrants in the U.S. have similar, or better, health outcomes than white U.S. citizens on many measures, contradicting the conventional wisdom 12

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¡ December 2012!

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that more prosperous and better educated people are healthier. However, not all was good news. The study also found that Mexican mothers didn’t read to their niños as often as Chinese-born and U.S.-citizen mothers, with the result that Mexican kids didn’t do as well as Chinese and white children in school. Mexican mothers read to their toddlers about 71 percent less often than U.S. whites, and Chinese mothers read to their young children 12 percent more than white moms. That reading to kids can enhance educational success is a key finding that all mothers can take from this study. Researcher Bruce Fuller called the findings that Mexican madres can mitigate some of the downsides of poverty a “surprise.” “Poverty is definitely a drag on the well-being of families, but at the same time, at least for Mexican immigrants, they have cultural strengths that buffer the negative effects on family,” he said.

Portrait of a Chicano luminary A new generation of Hispanic youth calling themselves “Chicanos” arose

in Arizona during the 1960s and 1970s to advocate for fair treatment of farmworkers, Latino student rights and other social issues. These young people were aggressive, outspoken and proud of their Mexican heritage. Alfredo Gutierrez was directly involved in the struggles of that time. He participated in groups such as the Mexican American Student Organization, Valle del Sol, Chicanos por la Causa and the United Farm Workers. Today, at 72 years old, Gutierrez is publishing a 300-page book titled To Sin against Hope. He says his new book, chronicling that sometimes tumultuous era and pre-statehood Arizona, is scheduled to be published in January or February of 2013. “It’s not purely an autobiography,” he says, “I use my story and my family’s story to tell the history of Mexicans in the United States, immigration and border policies.” Gutierrez recounts how his family arrived in the United States in the late 1800s. Some family members were deported once, and later, they were almost deported for a second time. They are now all citizens. “The book has elements of autobiography in it. I mention [former Arizona governor] Raúl Castro and my


LP journal participation in the early days of César Chávez,” he says. Other highlights of Gutierrez’ life may also be mentioned. His activism led him to be elected to the state Senate when he was just 25 years old; eventually he became the Majority and Minority Leader. There were ASU campus demonstrations, a student walk-out at Phoenix Union High School, and strikes against Valley businesses and Arizona farms discriminating against Latino workers. Gutierrez continues to be active in the immigrant rights movement of today. He commented to Latino Perspectives in 2007 that, “My own reactions to all the changes since we launched the Chicano Movement are an emotional cauldron of joy and sadness and so much in-between.” To Sin Against Hope can be preordered at Barnes and Noble, Amazon. com, Changing Hands bookstore in Tempe, and other bookstore outlets.

Teachers advise next generation of Latino leaders Civil rights leader, César Chávez, said it best: “Once social change begins, it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read. You cannot humiliate the person who feels pride ...” A group of mostly Phoenix Union High School District (PUHSD) teachers have taken Chávez’s values to heart, and have formed a coalition to support each other as they help students who want to organize and get politically involved in their communities. Maria Chacon, a history teacher at Central High School, says the teachers are responding to the students’ requests for help as they engage in actively working with DREAM Act youth, advocating for immigrant student rights, and exploring ways to learn Mexican American history without violating Arizona’s law banning ethnic studies programs in schools.

Chacon makes it clear that the teachers are not initiating the students’ actions. “The students express their desires and the teachers help them organize to accomplish them,” she says. “Our newest endeavor is to get the students to bring their parents to the PUHSD board meetings.” Chacon adds that the students are responding emotionally, and then politically, to Arizona laws that affect their families and friends. “When laws are aimed at influencing one particular ethnic group, the students of that group have thoughts and feelings about them,” she says. “In the past, students organized car washes and bake sales to support their causes.” Now, they are more actively working on DREAM Act issues, advocating for immigrant students’ rights, and making their school communities more aware of issues affecting Latinos in Arizona. Another big issue for students, she says, is the state’s ban on ethnic studies. The teachers support the students without breaking the law, she emphasizes. “We discuss with them how they can share their culture with friends through the

¡!

M.E.Ch.A. clubs without violating the law.” Three years ago, Guadalupe Meza from South Mountain High School helped the students organize the first ever PUHSD M.E.Ch.A. conference. The tradition continued and the numbers of participants has grown every year. In September, 2012, the Central High School M.E.Ch.A. hosted the third of these conferences with the theme, “Our History; Mi Voz!” Participants included academics, public and elected officials, and representatives from several social services and advocacy organizations. Elizabeth Toledo, assistant principal for student opportunities at Central High where Chacon teaches, says school administrators support the advisement role of teachers as long as they are nonpartisan and not representing any political candidate. “We encourage the students to vote. It’s our responsibility to educate the students regarding what their responsibilities are for becoming politically engaged. That’s the only way they are going to make a difference,” she says.   Chacon doesn’t believe there will be a backlash against the advocacy of teachers and students for Latino issues. “We are doing exactly what we are supposed to be doing – which is getting students civically engaged and learning the ideals of our democracy,” she says.

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¡ December 2012!

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vibe

Target 3 for free

Indulge in Té Tiempo

Yep, gratis; no strings attached. You can explore

If you’re looking for the perfect gift for your boss or your comadre, look no more. This nifty Té Tiempo gift set is sure to impress and delight even your abuela. While hectic schedules and fast-paced lives may not be compatible with high tea ceremonies, a cup of té de canela or yerba buena (cinnamon or spearmint) can be fixed in a jiffy. Did we say they taste and smell dee-li-cious? The set ($35) includes five reusable tins with 27 round, natural tea bags, packaged in an attractive woven box with an artisanal feel. The following flavors are included in the set: Dulce Té de Jamaica, Dulce Té de 10 Azhares, Dulce Té Verde con Mango and Dulce Té de Canela; individual tea tins and other flavors are also available. Get your gift or tea fix at tetiempo.com or call 855-DULCETE.

Dinosaur Hall, take your little tykes for interactive hands-on activities, or be stimulated by an art exhibit, for free. On the first Sunday of the month, through May 5, 2013, admission to the Arizona Museum of Natural History, Arizona Museum for Youth and the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum (MCA) is complimentary. The program, sponsored by Target, is presented by the Mesa Arts Center and includes special activities for kids and live performances at the MCA. Upcoming performances include Dawgus Bongoman Duo, folk rock; Smootmahooty, americana; Jan Sandwich Trio, jazz; and Noemy, traditional Mexican music. Go to mesaartcenter. com for a complete schedule and more information.

Get more Vibe at latinopm.com

Future Loves Past at the MIM The Tempe-based indie, soul, psychedelic rock band,

Future Loves Past, will perform under the stars at the Musical Instrument Museum on January 17 as part of the MIM’s “Music in Motion” series. The band has cultivated a loyal following and is scheduled to release a new sci-fi concept album, The Serpent & The Owl: Our Solar System, in December, 2012. Take a listen at futurelovespast.bandcamp.com; we are sure you’ll like it as much as we do here at LPM. Tickets for the performance are free with museum admission ($18; $7 performance only, available at mim. org). Patrons can imbibe locally brewed beer, Arizona wine and specialty cocktails from the on-site cash bar. Mixologists have prepared a signature concoction for the evening, “Lost in Space” – very apropos.

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Clockwise from top left: Photo courtesy of Arizona Museum of Natural history; TÉ Tiempo; Future Loves Past

¡!


vibe

¡!

Anaya says Son’s up on political landscape By Catherine Anaya

After a bitterLY fought election

Chita Rivera, lonley Latina among arts honorees

Latinos rare recipients of Kennedy Center honors The Census Bureau’s estimate that

the ethnic minority population of the U.S. (with Hispanics as the largest constituent) will become the majority by 2050 emphasizes that our nation’s destiny is multiculturalism. Yet, this year’s choices for the annual Kennedy Center Honors program seem to reflect a degree of resistance to this new reality. On September 12, the Kennedy Center’s tribute line-up was announced, and not one Latino was named in the arts honoree roster. That prompted a frustrated Felix Sanchez, the chair of the National Hispanic Foundation of the Arts (NHFA), to telephone Michael Kaiser, the president of the Kennedy Center. Sanchez had been trying for two years to discuss the lack of Latinos in their honor roll. Of the Center’s 170 honorees selected over the decades, only two, Plácido Domingo and Chita Rivera, have been Hispanic.

both nationally and across our state, voters seemed unanimous in their disdain for the negative tone of the political ads. But a civics lesson for my nine-yearold son actually came from those ads. A few weeks before the election, he asked me to explain the role of a U.S. Senator. I did so and explained how one of Arizona’s U.S. Senators was retiring so that the seat was up for grabs. He exclaimed, “Oh, I know who’s running for that, Richard Carmona and Jeff Flake.” I was blown away that he knew their names. “How did you know that?” I asked. “From their ‘commercials’ on TV,” he answered. We talked about the purpose of political ads and then he asked why they were “so mean.” I loved his intrigue and curiosity. He saw me studying a binder of facts pertaining to the election and got a kick out of seeing that “mommy has homework too!,” something he shared with his class when his teacher talked about the voting process. I was thrilled to see him engage in the political process; it got my mind swirling. “Perhaps I’ve got a future political consultant, political writer or a presidential candidate,” I thought to myself. Okay, I was getting a little ahead of myself, but you get the idea. On election eve, he asked if I’d be voting in the morning. He was disappointed to learn I had already voted by mail a few weeks earlier. So

I promised to take him by a polling place election morning on our way to school. A wonderful volunteer at the polling station walked him through the voting process and he left with a greater understanding and an “I Voted Today” sticker. On election night I was on the air with election results and updates every half hour, so I didn’t have much time to talk with the kids by phone. At about 8 p.m., I got this e-mail from my daughter about my son: “[He] is obsessed with this election. He’s updating me every five seconds and hasn’t taken his eyes off the TV. And he’s asking me about Obama and Romney’s policies and deciding which ones he agrees with. It’s so funny. He totally understands it too.” I can’t tell you how happy it made me that my nine-year-old son could get so involved in the election process at such a young age; that he could actually want to read up on each presidential candidate’s policies and positions on issues; that he asked to visit a polling station. These are solid reminders of a simple lesson that our children are not too young to learn: the right to vote is a privilege that we should never take for granted. Catherine Anaya anchors CBS 5 News weeknights at 5, 5:30, 6 and 10 p.m. She is a mother of two, marathon runner and motivational speaker. Reach her at catherine.anaya@cbs5az.com, connect with her on Facebook, twitter and at CatherineAnaya.com.

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vibe

Continued from page 15

Within hours, Kaiser returned the call on Sanchez’s cell phone while he was shopping for ballet slippers for his niña. Soon the conversation turned ugly. “How can you continue to exclude Latinos from the Kennedy Center Honors,” Sanchez bluntly began. “F— yourself!” Kaiser reportedly shot back to end the short-fused chat. Kaiser later sent Sanchez an apology for his outburst. The repercussions from that explosive conversation rippled through arts and media circles. The Los Angeles Times, Washington Post and even syndicated columnist, Ruben Navarrete, of CNN commented on both Kaiser’s swearing and the pattern of exclusion. In his column, Navarrete even recommended a boycott of the CBS prime-time broadcast of the December 2 Kennedy Center gala later in the month. Two Latino advocacy organizations, the NHFA and the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, sent letters to the Kennedy Center, President Barack Obama and Congressional Hispanic Caucus members calling for major changes in the method used to select honorees. Sanchez and other arts advocates argue that Latinos and other minorities are under-represented in the entertainment industry and, by overlooking talented Latino entertainers, the Kennedy Center only perpetuates this exclusion. In its own defense, the Kennedy Center – a nonprofit funded by federal dollars – points out that the Center’s International Committee was in Spain honoring Spanish entertainers; its National Symphony Orchestra toured Latin America this past summer; and the Center helped to train arts leaders in Spain, Mexico and Argentina. This admission reveals a somewhat disturbing pattern at the Kennedy Center – honoring and working with Spanishspeaking and Latin American artists in their home countries, but not Latinos in the United States.

Latina still standing

¡!

Latinas always give By Diana Bejarano

Latinas are natural-born givers.

They give of their time, their talent and their treasure. They give to their children, spouses and significant others, as well as to their parents, to their extended families, to their employers and to many great causes. It would be difficult to highlight just one Latina Still Standing who gives back, because I know so many who give immeasurably. I have grown up watching Latinas give of themselves; they have been great role models in many respects. My grandmothers, my mother and so many others have given selflessly. And, while I do believe that it is truly better to give than to receive, there is one person in a Latina’s life that is oftentimes left out of the giving equation. That is the Latina herself. I know that, during this time of the year, many of us will go above and beyond to give to others. We want to give the best to our children, our families, our friends and to many great causes that are near and dear to our hearts. This holiday season while we are wrapped up in giving so much to so many, let’s not forget to give a gift to ourselves. I know that “self” is not always top of mind, especially during the season of giving, but I would like to propose that, as Latinas, we learn to include ourselves as a recipient of our giving. Here are a few questions to ponder: How will you give to yourself? What will you give to your most important asset – YOU? How will you honor and be kind to yourself? How will you invest in your emotional well-being, your health, your body, your spirit and your soul? Have you added any gifts to this year’s list to help YOU de-stress this holiday season? If you have done this, kudos to you!

There are so many simple ways you can be kind to yourself. So many simple gifts that can benefit your mind, body and spirit. Rest is one of them. Many of us try to do too much for so many, especially during the busy fall and winter seasons. Some of us have to attend events, prepare Thanksgiving meals, host holiday parties, shop for our families, volunteer our time and do all of this while holding down at least one full-time job. If we take a little time out for ourselves, we will reap the benefits of feeling more energized. It doesn’t have to be a complicated task. Perhaps it’s allowing the first couple of hours in the day to be your uninterrupted time to gather your thoughts, meditate, hike or go for a walk; perhaps it’s adding a much needed foot massage or spa day to your weekly calendar; or, maybe just simply picking a block of time to do absolutely nothing. If we do not give back to ourselves, it could be detrimental. If we invest in comforting and nurturing ourselves a little more, we will avoid “burnout.” MerriamWebster defines burnout as “exhaustion of physical or emotional strength or motivation, usually as a result of prolonged stress or frustration.” Please consider taking time to nurture your own body and soul. Give yourself the gift of rest and relaxation once in a while. This will improve your ability to give and, so, benefit you and all of those you love. Happy Holidays! Diana Bejarano is an Arizona native and a graduate of Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Reach her at latinastillstanding@yahoo.com or latinastillstanding.blogspot.com

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rincón del arte

¡!

A mural for the ages All are invited to partake in the Phoenix Festival of the Arts

Our friends at the Phoenix Center for the Arts are revving up for the inaugural Phoenix Festival of the Arts, the municipality’s first signature arts festival. The free, family-friendly, three-day arts extravaganza will take place in the heart of downtown Phoenix at Margaret Hance Park, December 7–9, 2012. As of press time, over 80 local artists had signed up to participate in a collective, community mural; all are invited to join-in, pick up a brush and contribute to the “mural of the ages” – no experience required. Visitors can also enjoy live performances, arts and crafts vendors, food trucks, and beer and wine gardens. Hance Park is located at 1202 N. 3rd Street. Festival hours: December 7, 2–9 p.m.; December 8, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.; December 9, 10 a.m– 5 p.m.

Established and emerging artists will work alongside community members on the Phoenix Art Festival’s community mural. Above, artwork by some of the artists participating in the mural painting or as art vendors include (clockwise from top right): “Transposition,” by Rafael Navarro; “El Domingo,” by Armando-Adrian Lopez; “Cuervo in the Desert,” by Martin Moreno; a young muralist in the making; a work in progress by Lalo Cota; “La Máscara,” by Monica Crespo; and “Frida Dorada,” by Gennaro García

Help us highlight the local arts Send information to editor@latinopm.com.

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Socially giving cha

Add mea

ning to the h season oliday

T

he sights, sounds and aromas of the holiday season can evoke a swirl of emotions. Diverse feelings, such as the anticipation of parties, savoring tamales and pan dulce, the excitement of gifts to come, pride of families gathering, laughter of camaraderie, and the quiet satisfaction of celebrating holiday religious services. Truly, the year-end holiday season enriches our lives and lifts our spirits.

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responsible nges lives The downside of this river of emotions is the anxiety about a limited gift-buying budget, dread of mall crowds and the frustration of ever finding that perfect gift. In other words, the negative feelings of being trapped in a “giving crunch.” It’s so easy to be swept up in the commercialism, the festivities and the things to eat that we rarely stop and reflect on the true meaning of the season – the joy of expressing love for our fellow humans, and sharing our abundance with others. An alternative to all the stress of frenzied gift exchange is creating a holiday tradition of socially responsible giving. If you haven’t already done so, include giving to nonprofit charities as part of your family’s sharing this holiday. This December, give a gift that can change lives. Don’t think that your personal contribution can’t make a difference. More than 90 percent of donations to charities in 2011 were from individuals, according to Giving USA 2012, an annual report on philanthropy. Philanthropy literally means the “love of mankind,” and what greater expression of compassion for those less fortunate can there be than to donate

money or volunteer time to a local charity? You also can donate in the name of a loved one. In addition, help ease the stress on those who want to give you gifts by encouraging them to donate to charity instead. Donating to social service organizations with a mission to help others also sets an example of giving and serving to children. By becoming a

“I asked her what the problem was. ‘My feet are freezing,’ she said. So I got her and all the other residents of the home socks to warm their cold feet.”

role model for responsible social giving, you raise children who learn to give, share and care for others, too. Latino Perspectives has its own proud December tradition of sharing vignettes of local charities that serve the suffering, the poverty-stricken and the outcasts of our society. This is our way of offering our readers positive opportunities to invest in making our community a better place for everyone.

Socks for Seniors

Jaime Coyle, founder of the Socks for Seniors organization based in Columbus, Ohio, says he got the idea for the sock drive and giving program while playing music at a home for retirees. “One older lady who was usually upbeat seemed down,” Coyle says. “I asked her what the problem was. ‘My feet are freezing,’ she said. So I got her and all the other residents of the home socks to warm their cold feet.” Coyle reports that the first program in Ohio has led to the establishment of Socks for Seniors giving programs in 250 U.S. cities. Last year, 25,000 socks were given as gifts. latinopm.com

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Phoenix is one of the big metropolitan areas that needs local Socks for Seniors coordinators to collect and give the gift of warm feet and holiday comfort to the elderly in nursing homes, community centers or isolated in their own houses. Yes, it’s fine to give donations, Coyle explains, but when you give your personal time and actions to put a smile on the faces of the recipients during the holidays, you’re really immersed in the joy of compassionate volunteering. “This program is completely different because it doesn’t collect money, it collects socks,” he says. “It doesn’t take a lot of time and doesn’t take a lot of money.” Socks for Seniors can be just one box for collecting new socks. This is a perfect program for volunteer organizations, schools, churches and businesses, says Coyle. Single families can even do it, getting their kids involved in helping others. The national headquarters in Columbus will provide logos and marketing materials. They will even connect you to a Phoenix metro nursing home or community center for a sock giveaway. To connect with the sock drive program, visit socksforseniors.com. What is so great about Socks for Seniors is that program start-up time can be short. “A lot of the programs wait until the week before Christmas to start collecting and distributing socks,” Coyle says. What many program managers have learned in past years is that older adults don’t just want grip-bottoms or tube socks in sensible colors to warm their tootsies. Coyle relates the story of Emma Mae, a 91-year-old nursing home resident. When giving her a choice of socks at the distribution, she chose brightly colored, striped toe socks. 22

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“We’re just old, not dead, and we still have a sense of humor,” she said. “I want those!”

Caring for the caregivers

Caregiving for anyone else is hard work demanding constant attention. But, if you are an untrained relative – grandparent, older sibling or other family member – providing care to children too young to fend for themselves, the responsibility can be overwhelming. Irene Cañez is a grandparent who raised her grandchildren. She took on this great obligation because of the parents’ drug and alcohol abuse and the resulting domestic violence. Desperate for help in 2004, Irene contacted the nearby Golden Gate Community Center for support for her frazzled self and husband. That’s where she connected with the KARE program of the Arizona Children’s Association.

“As Latinos, we know that family is very important. If we don’t do it, they go into the state foster care system. That’s the reason we do it – for love of family.”

KARE centers around the state offer resources such as caretaking and advocacy training, counseling, legal advice, and adult and youth groups for peer support. Irene decided to start a KARE center at the Golden Gate Center because she knew of others in the same tough situation of being in their retirement years and having to raise young kids once again. “I needed help,” she recalls, “I knew five other families all there for the same reason. Now there are about 30 to 45 families that attend each month. We are able to offer each other support, letting one another know we are all going through the same stresses. The group has been a blessing.” Now Cañez leads the “Time to Share” support group at Golden Gate. She is president of the KARE grandparent advisory board. She also is an instructor in the Kinship Care training program sponsored by the state Child Protective Services and a mentor to other caregivers. She was influential in the 2007 statewide Grandfamilies Rally that resulted in legislation to provide grandparent caregivers extra financial help to care for their grandchildren. She has been a force in advocacy for the Grandfamilies Housing in south Phoenix. Only one grandchild of the four she was raising remains with her. She says her commitment to the kids has been rewarded since the other three became adults and left her home. “Oh my God, it’s wonderful what they say now,” she says. “They come back and tell me, ‘You’re my mom. You raised me.’ I would do it again in a heartbeat.” She adds, “As Latinos, we know that family is very important. If we don’t do it, they go into the state foster care system. That’s the reason we do it – for love of family.”


She encourages people to donate to the KARE program. “I think the program gives back. It enables older families to mentor new families who come in. The grown kids mentor the new kids. It really does make a difference.”

The gift of caring for another

Angela Luna was getting too old to stay in the foster care system. She also was experiencing bad situations in her life. She was using drugs, fighting with her roommate and finally landed in jail. That’s when she met Christa Drake, executive director of the In My Shoes program based in Tucson, another program within the Arizona Children’s Association. The program supports youth who age out of the foster care system through one-on-one mentoring, group mentoring and special events. Drake connected with Angela at her job the day after her release from jail. Their friendship began when Christa told Angela she should be proud of showing up for work. “Nobody in my life had ever told me they were proud of me before,” Angela says. Drake helped Angela reconnect with her family. She stood by her when nobody else would. “Christa once told me that there was nothing I could do or say that would make her turn away,” says Angela. “It’s essential to have someone like that in your life.” Angela graduated from cosmetology school and got her cosmetologist’s license. She believes that her life would have worsened if Drake had not believed in her. That faith was the gift of hope she needed to straighten out her life, she says. With more than 40 programs and services across the state, Arizona’s Children Association can be the

difference between a future filled with hope and one filled with despair for many children and their families. Visit arizonaschildren.org to learn more.

Ryan House: Haven of hope

Another worthy cause to donate to is Ryan House, a nonprofit organization that offers compassionate counseling services to children at risk for early death and their caregiver families. Ryan House offers pediatric palliative, respite, end-of-life and bereavement care; for many families it’s a haven of hope. The people that fill its rooms and the hearts of its staff have many positive stories to share about Ryan House and the people whose lives it has touched. Born 21 months apart, both Soliz and Camilia have a rare chromosomal syndrome called Wolf-Hirchhorn Syndrome. They are both considered to be “deafblind” – visually and hearing

“Nobody in my life had ever told me they were proud of me before,” Angela says... That faith was the gift of hope she needed to straighten out her life.

impaired and need hearing aids and glasses. Both children also are prone to seizures. With these extreme limitations, both required almost 24/7 care. The constant care resulted in near exhaustion for their parents, Heather and Andre. Time off spent at Ryan’s House renewed their energy and their hope. “Ryan House has become a huge factor for us, someone to count on,” says Heather. “After our first weekend we felt renewed ... we felt like we had been on a two-week vacation. Ryan House allows us to rest and reconnect with each other.” “I wish I could convey to other families how important total respite is, not just for me as a mom but for Andre and me as a couple. If we don’t take this break, we can’t give our family what they need and deserve.” “It’s such a precious resource,” Andre says. “It’s humbling that there is a community that donates its time and money to help us. I’m really grateful.” Another story unfolding at Ryan House is that of Mikaela Magdaleno, the bravest little girl you’ll ever meet. Born with a severe heart defect, pulmonary atresia and one kidney, she needs around-the-clock care. “I thought respite was like hospice, but the first thing we noticed was Ryan House felt like home,” said Melody, Mikaela’s mother. “During our tour, our jaws dropped; it was like a resort! I was never more nervous than the day we booked our first stay, but, within days, we booked a second visit,” she says. “Ryan House gives me time to rest and her brother, Jovani, time to shine. He loves the Playstation and all the attention he receives and so desperately needs.” “We will be forever grateful,” Melody adds. latinopm.com

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Special advertising section

Established in 1978, the Arizona Community Foundation’s mission is to lead, serve and collaborate to mobilize enduring philanthropy for a better Arizona. In the tradition of 700+ community foundations across the country, ACF and its statewide affiliates steward the charitable gifts of individuals, families and businesses, manage these gifts in endowed funds, and distribute a portion of the earnings throughout the community as grants and scholarships. ACF is proud to support two initiatives: Latinos Unidos and the Latina Giving Circle. These efforts share the goal of creating a model for philanthropy that fosters the giving of talent, time and resources to build on the many assets and inherent strengths of Arizona’s Latino community.   Learn more and get involved by emailing Tony Banegas at tbanegas@azfoundation.org. azfoundation.org 602-381-1400

Through your generous gift we will be able to eliminate the waiting list and continue to provide the necessary services to those most in need in our community. Visit www.aaaphx.org or call 602-264-4357

A Stepping Stone-Transformational Education When you begin life with parents who love you but have few resources to support you, your community should be there to help. Help us support our Stepping Stone families by attending Cena y Serenata 2013 on Feb 9.

asteppingstone.org/events 602-843-8281

Give with purpose and gusto

Since 1920, Friendly House has served Arizona families by providing the tools, training and support needed to attain sustaining, self-sufficiency. Our comprehensive programs include:  workforce development, adult education, elderly care, youth education, family and immigration services, and mentoring. We also operate an early childhood education center and a charter school serving children in central - south Phoenix from K-8th grade.

friendlyhouse.org 602-257-1870 24

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At Arizona ’s Children Association, we believe that a child can’t wait for a safe, loving home when they are desperately in need of comfort and stability.  As someone who cares about our community, you know that a child can’t wait when there’s someone like you who can make a difference in their life.   Tell us we can count on you to be an everyday hero and donate today to help change the life of a child.   arizonaschildren.org 800-944-7611

Golden Gate Community Center has a spirit so strong that children have returned there for generations.  It holds together the soul of the community.  Today, we provide children with a place to learn, to play, to grow healthy, and to belong, surrounded by a community of people who see that child’s success as their own.  Help us continue the legacy of Golden Gate ! Donate today.   goldengatecenter.org 602-233-0017


Special advertising section

Life without limits for people with disabilities JFCS is one of the largest providers of mental health and counseling services to Latino children and youth.  A nonprofit, non-sectarian organization, JFCS provides behavioral health and social services to over 30,000 children, families and adults throughout Maricopa County each year. Reduce your AZ state taxes with the Working Poor Tax Credit by donating to JFCS before Dec. 31st, 2012! jfcsaz.org 602-279-7655

Latino combat soldiers report both higher prevalence and greater overall severity of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms than non-Hispanic Caucasians. U.S. War Veteran’s PTSD Foundation Serving All Combat Veterans For information or to make a donation visit or call

azptsd.org 480-922-4950

UCPofCentralAZ.org

Since 1952, United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) of Central Arizona has served countless individuals and families in our community, living with cerebral palsy, autism, Down syndrome, developmental delays and learning disabilities. This Holiday Season please consider making a donation in honor of someone you love to United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) of Central Arizona. Your contribution can support life without limits! UCP serves our community through: Early Intervention Early Learning Center Day Treatment & Training Home & Community Based Services Therapy Services Information and Referral

Socially responsible giving Arizona Transplant House at the Village at Mayo Clinic is a special home for special patients recovering from organ transplant surgery and their caregivers. Financial contributions help the House provide comfortable and supportive living accommodations. Further assistance comes from memorials, foundation grants and trusts.

Serving the community since 1934, we are the leading sexual health organization in Arizona. Last year, we provided 90,000 men, women, teens and parents with high quality, affordable health care, education and information, and proudly fought for women so they could get the reproductive services they need. At Planned Parenthood Arizona we care deeply, with respect, without judgment. Seventy percent of Arizonans support Planned Parenthood Arizona’s mission — we’re proud to be here to meet the needs of the community. Planned Parenthood Arizona is a 501c3 nonprofit organization – your generous support is tax-deductible.

To make a donation, send a check to: The Arizona Transplant House 5811 E. Mayo Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85054

Make a donation online at ppazdonate.org

aztransplanthouse.org

ppaz.org 602-263-4215

Creating Music…Changing Lives At Rosie’s House, a free music academy in inner-city Phoenix, we have proven music changes lives. Rosie’s House seeks your support. Help us: Build Confidence, Teach Discipline and Foster Creativity through the power of music education. Our program includes classical, mariachi and choir for students from low-income families.

rosieshouse.org

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Tinsel, ladders & lightscuidado!

W

hile the holiday season is usually a time for family, decorating everything from the outside of the house to the top of the tree has become part of the holiday tradition. However, no one wants to dampen the festive spirit with a trip to urgent care or, even worse, the emergency room. Every year, emergency department doctors treat a variety of patients with serious injuries, from children who have eaten tinsel to those with trauma from a serious fall from a ladder or even a new bike. Unfortunately, this scenario is all too common in the average American household. In recent years, more than 13,000 people have been treated in the emergency room for holiday-related injuries. This is an increase of 30 percent since 2007, with a majority of these injuries resulting from falls. Emergency room traffic also gets a significant bump after the holidays, suggesting that many try to keep the holiday spirit and tough it out with their injury. While the holidays are a busy time of the year for everyone, it is important to make sure and take safety precautions seriously in order to avoid common mistakes that can have serious consequences. Fall-related injuries can result from a variety of activities. These include standing on the top of a ladder, using unstable furniture to decorate the tree, slipping on a wet surface, or even a child falling from a new bike, skateboard, etc. Here in Phoenix, we do not have to worry about injuries such as slipping on ice. However, because we experience more mild weather, families are more likely to spend time outdoors. This can mean more time playing outdoors with new toys, or deciding to hang holiday decorations yourself instead of leaving it to a professional. Because we like being outdoors so much during winter, one of the most common holiday traditions, besides decorating a tree, is putting lights up on the house. According to the Home Safety Council, four out of five U.S. households use ladders around their homes in preparation for the holiday season. However, when not used properly, ladders can be extremely dangerous. In a study completed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it has been reported that of all holiday fall-related injuries, 51 percent were specifically from falling from ladders and 46 percent of all people treated had injuries to one of their extremities (hands, arms, legs or feet). Other common trips to the emergency room include burns caused by candles or Christmas tree fires, lacerations from broken bulbs or ornaments, and 26

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By Penny Krich, M.D.

Prevent injuries this holiday season

tragic injuries resulting from crowds and even stampedes during the busy shopping season. During a fall, our first instinct is to brace ourselves by putting hands and arms out in front to shield our body from the impact. This creates a well-documented mechanism of injury known as “falling on an outstretched hand,” or simply called FOOSH. It is because of this natural reaction that 34 percent of holiday injuries end with fractures of the extremities, especially the hand and wrist, along with lower leg injuries including the ankle. While we can’t change our body’s reaction to help us break our fall, we can lower our chance of injury by making sure the surface we stand on is safe and stable. Soft tissue injuries, such as sprains and strains, bruising and minor swelling, are very common. Each of these injuries can be treated at home with rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE). However, should the injury become worse, I recommend visiting the doctor, because a more serious injury can initially have similar symptoms and appear minor. If a fall does happen, there are specific signs adults should keep an eye out for to let them know whether a trip to the doctor is necessary: Swelling: This can happen at, or around, the point of impact and can be a


symptom of a break, also called a fracture, in the bone or even a sprain to the joint. Look for rapid or severe swelling. A large, quickly expanding bruise can mean a significant pocket of blood is forming under the skin. Pain and loss of function: Intense pain is a warning sign and a good indicator to seek medical attention. Be aware that symptoms, such as loss of strength (loss of grip strength in the hand), reduced range of motion, and nerve pain or changes in sensation, can be equally worrisome. Limb deformation: If you’ve had an injury and things just don’t look right, you should consult a doctor. If your limb is set at an odd angle or you can’t straighten or bend a joint, medical attention is necessary. In addition to the common fall from a ladder injury, other common, holiday-related injuries I see are linked to new toys children receive for Christmas or Hanukkah. In a 2009 study completed by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 60 percent of toy-related fatalities resulted from riding toys such as tricycles, powered riding toys and non-motorized riding toys. These can occur due to children falling from their toy and hitting their head against a street, sidewalk or wall surface. Therefore, when getting ready to purchase children’s toys this holiday season, I recommend that parents look for toys that are age-appropriate, as young children are at particular risk for injuries when toys are not age-appropriate. Pay close attention to, and remove, the small pieces that may come with a toy. Each year we see many young children in our office that have swallowed a toy and require evaluation. In order to help combat the number of holiday injuries, individuals should take the following precautions this season: Use a step stool: Grabbing a chair or some other piece of furniture is generally the quickest way to go when hanging the star on the top of the tree. However, using a step stool provides a more stable surface and can lessen the chance of injury. Don’t stand on the top: Ladders are often used during this time of year to decorate everything from the house to the top of the tree. However, it is important to remember that you should never stand on the top two steps of the ladder as that can cause the ladder to become unstable and leads to a greater chance of falling.

Use the buddy system: It is never a good idea to climb onto a high surface without first selecting a friend or family member to assist. Let the family member hand you a tool or ornament rather then reaching for it from the top of the ladder or the roof. The buddy will also be on hand to assist should anything happen. Don’t just buy the toy; buy the helmet: During the holidays, many children receive new bikes, skateboards, roller blades and other new and exciting toys. It is important to also provide children with the proper safety equipment, which can include helmets, knee and elbow pads, and wrist protectors. Watch out for items that can be ingested: Many of these hazards can be avoided simply by inspecting each gift. Look for warning signs, such as sharp edges, small parts, loose pieces or poor overall construction. Children also tend to reach for shiny objects, so precautions are needed to keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of reach. Unfortunately, we can never completely avoid holidayrelated injuries, but following proper safety measures and taking the time to slow down and do something right will allow us to spend this time with our families and stay out of emergency rooms. Penny Krich, M.D. is a musculoskeletal radiologist at EVDI Medical Imaging with an office in Gilbert, Arizona.

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33 Entrepreneur Local luggage retailer thrives on philosophy of loyalty and service

35 Briefcase

On the reservation. Navajos must decide their energy, economic and cultural futures

Movin’ Up PC alumni Hall of Fame The Phoenix College Alumni Association recently recognized the work and careers of ten distinguished community members. Among the 2012 inductees are: Daniel Enrique Perez, professor of Spanish and Chicano/Latino Studies at the University of NevadaReno; Lourdes Vasquez, social entrepreneur and documentarian; and Albert Celoza, faculty and chair of PC’s Liberal Arts Department. Cecilia Esquer was inducted posthumously and recognized for her work in the community

Daniel Enrique Perez, newly inducted to the Alumni Hall of Fame by the Phoenix College Alumni Association

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¡!

movin’ up

as an advocate, lawyer, scholar and administrator of PC’s Justice and Legal Studies Department.

will appoint chairs, vice chairs and members to the standing committees and councils for one-year terms. In 2011, the NLC membership elected Lopez Rogers as its first vice president. Before being elected mayor of Avondale in 2006, she served as a council member and vice mayor for 14 years. The National League of Cities is dedicated to helping city leaders build better communities.

educational opportunities. Proceeds from the event will benefit several college scholarship funds.

Jessie Gonzales Wakefield

Rebeca Ronstadt-Contreras

Gonzales Wakefield Joins CenturyLink

Promotions, new hires at ASU

Jessie Gonzales Wakefield has been hired by CenturyLink as the lead multicultural marketing manager. She will be responsible for developing and executing comprehensive go-to-market strategies and marketing in support of the multicultural segment. Wakefield, a 10-year industry veteran, most recently served as the director of marketing for the Education Industry Association. She is a graduate of the University of Panama and Park University, and has a certificate in Management and Global Leadership from Thunderbird School of Global Management.

Rebeca Ronstadt-Contreras recently joined the Office of Educational Outreach and Student Services as assistant director of Access ASU. In this capacity, she will oversee the Collegiate Scholars and Barrett Summer Scholars programs, as well as academic programs at all ASU campuses geared toward student preparation for future enrollment and success at ASU. RonstadtContreras has worked for ASU for over a decade, most recently at the Vice President’s Office for Public Affairs. Also joining the Office of Educational Outreach and Student Services is Andrea González Sotelo. She was hired as an educational outreach specialist and will be working primarily with firstgeneration, aspiring college students and their families to provide guidance and

Mayor Lopez Rodgers at the helm of NLC Avondale mayor, Marie Lopez Rodgers, will lead the National League of Cities (NLC) during 2013. As the organization’s president she

Edmundo Hidalgo

Hidalgo is Hero of Education Edmundo Hidalgo, president and CEO of the nonprofit social services agency, Chicanos por la Causa (CPLC), has been selected by the Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation as a 2013 Hero of Education. He will be presented with the award during a dinner ceremony to be held April 25, 2013, at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Phoenix. The fundraising event honors individuals who have a proven personal and professional commitment to supporting students and

Movin’ Up Know someone who has been promoted, elected or honored? Send us the news of their achievements! Email movinup@latinopm.com 30

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information on how to attain a higher education.   The ASU Art Museum has hired Julio Cesar Morales as its new art curator. Morales is an award-winning artist, educator and curator whose work has been exhibited internationally. Most recently he served as adjunct curator at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, California.

Alfredo J. Molina

ACF lauds philanthropic efforts On December 11, 2012, the Arizona Community Foundation (ACF) will recognize Belen Gonzalez and Alfredo J. Molina for their work towards the advancement of philanthropic initiatives in Arizona and within the local Latino community. Gonzalez is a program officer for the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust and volunteer chair of the Latina Giving Circle, an ACFendowed fund; Alfredo J. Molina in an international jeweler and chairman of the Molina Group.


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¡!

entrepreneur

Success is in the bag Guillermo Quintero, store manager and co-owner, Suitcases & More Founded:

1985

Career highlights: I came to United States for the first time as an exchange student in 1989 to attend school in southern Oregon, in small, artisitc Ashland. I couldn’t have asked for a better place to learn English and about American culture. I returned to Colombia to finish my education with a degree in Business Administration followed by a major in Marketing and Advertising. Ultimately, I came back to the U.S. as the next big step in my career and life, and where I began my current job and started a family.

Elevator pitch:

Photo Courtesy of Guillermo Quintero

Through experience, we learned the three key ingredients to making our business successful: price, service and locally ownership. Suitcases & More makes a simple promise to our customers: we always guarantee the lowest prices. No retailer, big nor small, online nor in a warehouse, will ever under-price Suitcases & More. We are a local business that strives to give excellent, knowledgeable customer service. You can find the same items at a different store, but the level and quality of service you get at our store is unmatched. Suitcases & More sells more than great suitcases. The “More” refers to the many travel accessories, like electrical adaptors and converters that we offer, and also refers to the amount of knowledge that our staff has regarding all aspects of travel. Suitcases & More supports the idea that locally-owned businesses make communities stronger. We are an original member of Local First Arizona.

Important business milestones: This business was begun in 1982 and moved to its current location in 1985. I was lucky enough to become a part of this family in 2002. After suffering harsh losses during our country’s recession, Suitcases & More was able to achieve record sales in 2011. We are proud of our years of loyalty to our customers, and also from our customers. Our next milestone is to join the 21st century with better technology and a larger internet presence.

to others is that, if your customers see that you enjoy your job today, they will be back tomorrow.

If you could do it all over again, what you would do differently? There

Best business advice you have received: When I first came to Suitcases & More, the two

isn’t much that I could have done differently. It is often said that if you knew “this,” then you could have avoided “that.” There are a lot of things I might have done differently that might have improved one aspect of business, but then might have affected another less positively. If I was better at something or made a different decision about something, I might have made an extra dollar, but, I might have missed a special moment. Thus, if I were to begin anew, I would do more to help others, because I can’t imagine giving up something I have today for the possibility of getting something else tomorrow.

pieces of advice that I was given were “one step at a time” and “do not bite off more than you can chew.” My personal advice

Website: suitcasesandmore.com

Suggest an entrepreneur Send your information to editor@latinopm.com.

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Meet Linda Gutierrez

President and CEO, Women’s Hispanic Corporation and a graduate of a Maricopa Community College Which of the Maricopa Community Colleges did you attend? I received my Associate of Arts degree from Phoenix College. After I graduated, I was able to transfer every single credit to ASU. Why Phoenix College? I originally had a scholarship to Loyola Marymount in L.A. but something said, “stay home.” PC was almost in the neighborhood. At one time I did not have a car and I took the bus. It stopped right near campus. Any memorable instructors? I remember taking one of the best Spanish courses from Professor Vega. When I write something in Spanish, I think: “How would Professor Vega want it stated?” Most rewarding experience? Having the opportunity to bring together the biggest Latina conference in the nation and providing scholarships to students who need them. Strongest personal characteristic? Tenacity. Characteristic you admire in others? Kindness and integrity. www.maricopa.edu maricopa.edu @mcccd

You make a difference in your Community. We make a difference in you. Chandler-Gilbert | Estrella Mountain | GateWay | Glendale | Mesa | Paradise Valley Phoenix | Rio Salado | Scottsdale | South Mountain | Skill Centers The Maricopa Community Colleges are EEO/AA Institutions

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DECEMBER 6–JANUARY 6 Celebrate the holiday season and experience the sights and sounds of winter traditions from around the world. Bring your family to MIM to enjoy live entertainment, shop for one-of-a-kind gifts, savor holidaythemed menu items, and attend a holiday concert at the MIM Music Theater. View the complete event schedule at MIM.org.

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On the reservation Navajos must decide their energy, economic and cultural futures By Ruben Hernandez

Latino Perspectives writer, Ruben Hernandez, visited the Navajo and Hopi lands on an environmental journalism fellowship from the New America Media news service. Here is his special report.

Kayenta, Arizona. When you flip on a light switch or open a faucet for water, you are probably unaware that your electricity and water come directly from coal mines and aquifers on the Navajo Reservation in northeastern Arizona. Millions of city residents in Phoenix, Tucson, Las Vegas and Los Angeles don’t know, and likely don’t care, that Navajo natural resources from the Black Mesa coal mine near Kayenta are used to generate electricity for their city lights. In addition, this electricity is sent to U.S. Bureau of Reclamation facilities, which use it to power the Central Arizona Project that delivers water to our household taps, as well as to irrigate the fields where the vegetables and fruits we eat are grown. However, some Navajo Reservation residents and activists do care. They claim they are getting sick from breathing the hazy air that drifts across their land from

the smokestacks at the Navajo Generating Station (NGR) near Page. Activists and their allies also worry about the depletion of the Reservation’s aquifers and the Colorado River water they need for their families to drink and for growing their own crops. These fears have motivated the formation of coalitions among Black Mesa area residents, local grassroots groups, such as the Black Mesa Water Coalition (BMWC), and national organizations, such as the Sierra Club, Grand Canyon Trust and Indigenous Environmental Network. These groups and others are working together to develop a vision and action plan for a sustainable future. Seeking Latino allies Now the Navajo activists are uniting with Latino organizations, such as Puente and Tonatierra in Phoenix latinopm.com

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and similar advocacy groups in Tucson. Latinos comprise 41 percent of Phoenix city residents and 41.6 percent of Tucson residents. Latinos comprise 34.1 percent of the population in the Phoenix metropolitan area, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures. “In December or January we have a mural project planned in Phoenix to draw attention to our situation,” says Jihan Gearon, executive director of the Black Mesa Water Coalition. She adds that their long-term strategy involves engaging the Latino community to use their growing political power to achieve some major changes for the Navajo people. While the immigration issue gave Latinos the motivation to vote in record numbers in the 2012 election – putting many swing states with high Latino populations in President Barack Obama’s win column – Native American activists believe that their issues concerning clean energy and economic parity on the Reservation will become the hot issues of the future for Latino voters in Arizona and nationwide. Navajo coalition members realize that the time is right to seize opportunities to make the transition from fossil fuels to cleaner electricity-generating sources, such as solar and wind. The potential of generating clean energy from renewable resources presents tribes with an opportunity to create jobs, as well as to protect the natural and cultural resources on reservation lands. According to a report from the National Tribal Environmental Council and Intertribal Council on Utility Policy, Southwest tribal lands have the potential to produce 17.6 trillion kilowatt hours of electricity annually from solar power, about 4.5 times the total amount of electricity generated in the United States in 2004. The coalition is introducing a new concept they call the “Just Transition

Plan” to the Navajo Tribal Council and to residents in small town meetings in Navajo communities. The “Just Transition Plan” focuses on the interests of the Black Mesa community members instead of those of the big corporations. The blueprint calls for the development of solar and wind energy facilities to replace coal-fueled power plants. “Our goal is to not just shut down the coal mines,” says Wahleah Johns, the Black Mesa solar project coordinator for the BMWC, as we drive in a van toward the Black Mesa coal mine on winding, washboard-rutted dirt roads. “We understand that there has to be a transition to something more sustainable.”

ditioned into landfills with grass after the coal extraction can be used as locations for solar panels to generate electricity. Johns says the reclaimed land is no good for grazing cattle and sheep because the animals get sick. Moreover, the landfills already have roads leading to them. “We want to create a model in which a solar developer partners with the people for solar panels, and the people earn money by selling the extra electricity they don’t use to the utilities,” Johns says. The Navajo tribal government is also looking at developing alternative energy. Eighty miles west of Flagstaff, the Navajo Nation is developing the Big Boquillas Wind Project, with the construction of 48 turbines. The tribe also has weathermeasuring towers in Cameron and are considering another wind site and possible solarutility project in the Four Corners area.

“The tribal government benefits, but it doesn’t get to the people. We want to create a new model of economic development for community members”

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The elevations on the Navajo reservation range from 3,900 to 6,500 feet. The stark geography consists of multi-hued flats, buttes and mesas dotted with juniper and pine woodlands. Winds brisk enough to snatch baseball caps off heads sweep from the hills through the flat valleys. Johns says that the corporations pay millions of dollars in royalties to the Navajo tribal government to use the tribe’s natural resources. “The tribal government benefits, but it doesn’t get to the people. We want to create a new model of economic development for community members.” She adds that sites on Navajo lands are being evaluated for their future wind and solar energy potential. Lands on, or near, the coal mine that have been recon-

Tale of colliding values Gearon and Johns say there is an important, non-economic imperative that drives their passion to end the coal mining and eventually close down the Navajo Generating Station. As Native people with a deep love and spiritual connection to the land and Mother Earth, they need to get back to being stewards of the resources provided by the sun and wind, they say.

High economic stakes The stakes are high in the struggle between old and new energy sources, old and new economic development models, and the often colliding values of modern capitalism and Native American spiritual values and their special relationship to their lands. There’s also big money involved. The coalition of environmental activists has convinced the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to order the Navajo Generating Station to install $1 billion worth of pollution-filtering devices


briefcase or shut down.The NGS is operated by a group of regional utilities and SRP. The region could suffer a big economic hit as a result of NGS’ closure A National Renewable Energy Laboratory report found that, in the past 23 years, the Peabody Coal Co. paid about $50 million annually to the Navajo and nearby Hopi tribes, totaling nearly $1.3 billion. In 2010, the total tribal payments for coal royalties were $34.4 million and coal bonuses for the two tribes totaled $5 million. The same report found that wages and benefits paid to the 400 Navajo employees was $52 million annually. The

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out power for millions people served by the utility companies in the plant’s consortium. He said that, in the summer of 2011, Valley households and businesses set a record for electricity use. These consumers and millions of other residents using the electricity NGS sends wouldn’t like it if their power were reduced. “We are under certain threats that could shut down this plant prematurely,” Astapuk says, referring to EPA pressure to install more pollution controls. The NGS spokesman said that SRP has invested in renewable energy sources like wind and solar. However, Astapuk says, “Keep in mind that solar and wind is more expensive and less cost efficient right now.”

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average NGS job pays about $35/hour, twice the rate of other jobs in the county. On a reservation where unemployment runs close to 50 percent, these jobs are sorely needed, say tribal government and SRP officials. Environmental activists counter that 400 jobs in a tribe with 174,000 members is insignificant. A recent study by the William Seidman Research Institute at Arizona State University found that the power plant and mine would have a $20.5 billion impact on Arizona through 2044. Paul Astapuk, SRP general manager of the NGS in Page, said that the three electricity generating units there send

He further notes that these two kinds of power generation also impact land and wildlife. Large amounts of land are needed for hundreds of solar panels and wind towers with whirling blades. Some reservation residents have already warned that the wind tower blades will kill birds that fly into them, he says. There is probably no easy solution to the face-off between reservation residents and environmentalists in Navajo land. However, in Arizona, the great potential of tribal land to generate clean energy means that the tribe can take a big role in providing global warming solutions. It also has the opportunity to mark its own path to future energy independence.

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Arizona’s top guardsman Major General Hugo E. Salazar, Adjutant General, Arizona National Guard Emergency Management Division Major General Salazar received his commission

from the Officer Candidate School at Ft. Benning, Georgia, in 1983. His military assignments include two company level commands, Brigade Fire Support Officer, Battalion Executive Officer, Brigade Executive Officer, Operations and Executive Officer of the Arizona Joint Counter-Narcotics Task Force, State Mobilization Officer, State Training Officer, Commander 1-180th FA Battalion, Commander 98th Brigade, Senior Military Advisor with the MultiNational Security Transition Command-Iraq, and Deputy Chief of Staff of Operations for the Arizona Army National Guard. Major General Salazar assumed the duties of the Adjutant General of the Arizona National Guard on December 16, 2008. He serves concurrently as the Director of the Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (DEMA), which consists of the Army and the Air National Guard, the Division of Emergency Management, and the Joint Programs Division. DEMA provides unique capabilities and services to the citizens of Arizona at three distinct levels: community, state and federal. This assignment follows two years as the Assistant Adjutant General and full-time director of the Arizona Army National Guard, and one year as Deputy Chief of Staff of Operations for the Joint Force Headquarters. As Adjutant General, his duties and responsibilities include managing the day-today activities of Arizona’s Army National Guard and Air National Guard, the Joint Programs and the Emergency Management Division. These organizations consist of over 2,400 full-time federal, military and civilian personnel, along with 600 state employees, and a total of more than 8,000 soldiers and airmen.

Major General Hugo E. Salazar, Adjutant General, Arizona National Guard

Major General Salazar has worked full-time for the Arizona National Guard for almost two decades. He received a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Administration from Indiana University and attended the Inter-American Defense College at Fort McNair, Washington, D.C.

Nominate a candidate

Help us acknowledge those who serve. Men and women currently in the military or a first responder. Send your info to editor@latinopm.com. 38

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On November 29, 2012, Latino Perspectives Magazine,

Police Department; Daniel Rincon, Sergeant, Scottsdale Police Department; Tom Ryff, Chief, Tempe Police Department; Diana Tapia-Williams, Detective, Mesa Police Department; Adam M. Tellez, Crime Prevention Specialist, Goodyear Police Department; Roberto A. Villaseñor, Chief, Tucson Police Department. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton delivered welcoming remarks. He shared with the audience the municipality’s efforts to recruit, retain and support veterans. Other speakers at the event included Carrie Young, a 20-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force and Senior Director of Corporate Operation Services for SRP; Elisa de la Vara, District Director, Office of U.S. Rep. Ed Pastor; Anna Solley, President of Phoenix College and Ricardo Torres, Publisher of LPM. David Gonzales, U.S. Marshal for the District of Arizona and Major General Hugo Salazar, the Adjutant General, Arizona National Guard, served as keynote speakers.

All photos by Alfredo Hernandez

the Raul H. Castro Institute at Phoenix College and SRP hosted the fifth edition of this annual event at the Renaissance Hotel in downtown Phoenix. Over 200 guests gathered for a luncheon acknowledging the work of first responders and those serving in the Military, the Reserves, and the National Guard. Emmy Award-winning journalist and CBS5 news anchor, Catherine Anaya, served as emcee along with Phoenix City Manager, David Cavazos. During the ceremony, we shone a light on the individuals profiled throughout the year in LPM: Monica Abril Aragon, Resource Manager Craftsman, Arizona Air National Guard; Patrick Camuñez, Captain, Arizona Army National Guard; Jimmy Chavez, Sergeant, Arizona Department of Public Safety; Daniel V. García, Chief, Phoenix Police Department; Edward Muñoz, former Chief, San Luis

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Saving planet earth, one student at a time By Erica Cardenas

With eco-consciousness on the rise, everyone is trying to “go green” in one way or

another. As young people become more educated and aware of the hazards of producing, using and discarding non-green items, they are attempting to switch to green alternatives. So what can you do as a family to care for the environment, and what are some eco-friendly products your child can use both at home and in the classroom? Color yourself green: Most crayons are made from petroleum, a non-renewable resource that takes years to biodegrade. Opt for soy-based crayons instead, such as the Prang brand. The nontoxic Prang Fun Pro soybean crayons are made from soybean oil and are $1.95 for sixteen; available at stubbypencilstudio.com. Other school supplies can be switched, too. Consider this: If your child’s school uses 20 cases of recycled instead of regular paper, it’ll save 17 trees and 7,000 gallons of water. To help decrease water pollution specifically, choose chlorine-free recycled paper. And, while the good old number-two pencil isn’t going anywhere anytime soon, there are still plenty of eco-choices such as the Paper Mate® EarthWrite™ pencils made from 100 percent recycled materials, down to the lead and eraser. There’s even a brand on the market called Smencils, made from recycled newspapers and infused with scents for scratch-n-sniff fun. Art with a “green” touch: Kids are crafty by nature, so having a well-stocked array of art supplies on the home front will allow them to unleash their inner artists at whim. Some eco-friendly art supplies that can be used both at home and in the classroom include a green paste, known as “Ecoglue.” This handmade concoction is composed of rice flour,

water, sugar, citric acid, corn starch, potassium sorbate and rosemary oil. It comes with its own small applicator brush and costs $6.99 at ecokidsusa.com. Also available at Eco-kids is their handmade finger paint made with organic fruit and vegetable extracts from beets, carrots, curcumin, annatto seed, purple sweet potato, red cabbage and spinach mixed in a base of flour, cornstarch, wheat paste and clay. This powder-based, all-natural finger paint set includes five 4-ounce containers for $23.99 and is also available in a gluten-free variety for $30/set. In addition to opting for some of these eco-friendly products, getting involved with local organizations, such as the Valley Permaculture Alliance, can inspire you and your family to create a more sustainable community. From tours of local sustainable homes to hands-on training and demonstrations, the organization also works closely with St. Luke’s Health Initiatives in supporting school and community garden startups by organizing classes and providing technical assistance to garden groups across the Valley, among other activities. latinopm.com

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G O FA R , CL OSE T O H O M E .

Register Today!

The term “permaculture” is a combination of “permanent” and “culture,” and addresses the sustainability of human and natural ecosystems – each dependent on the other. The Alliance will be offering a class, “Keeping Vegetables: The ART Technique” on December 15 from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Desert Marigold School, 6210 S. 28th Street in Phoenix. The class will discuss the ART (aqueous revitalization technique), which enables you to keep all your self-harvested produce fresh right up until you’re ready to prepare and serve it to your family. Based on the same principles that florists use to keep their flowers long-lasting, the workshop will teach you the hows and whys of ART, and how your fresh produce can last two to three times as long using this technique. No pre-registration is required and the cost is $15 payable at time of the class. For a complete list of classes and workshops offered by the Valley Permaculture Alliance, visit phoenixpermaculture.org/events. Pack a better lunch: Opt for an insulated Bazura bag, made by a women’s co-op in the Philippines from recycled juice boxes, starting at $15.95 at reusablebags. com, and pair it with a reusable water bottle. And, when it comes to what to actually pack in the lunchbox, try a local farmer’s market. An apple a day will taste good, help the local economy and cut down on the energy costs of shipping. To find a market or co-op near you, go to eatwellguide.com.

Support schools; get a tax credit

Fo l l ow us on www.phoenixcollege.edu Call 602.285.7800 A Maricopa Community College.

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It’s that time of year when local

schools are reaching out to Arizona residents to ask for their help. Arizona law allows taxpayers to donate a portion of their Arizona taxes to the schools and eligible programs of their choosing. And, the best news is that it doesn’t cost taxpayers a thing. Arizona Tax Law ARS 43-1089.01 allows Arizona taxpayers to claim a credit of up to $200 per single taxpayer or $400 per household when they contribute to extracurricular activities or education programs in the Arizona K-12 public or charter school of their choice. So, what exactly is an “extracurricular activity?” It is any optional, non-credit, educational or competitive, schoolsponsored activity such as sports, visual

and performing arts, field trips and before- and after-school clubs. Of course, when considering supporting a local school, you may select which school and program you would like to support and the amount of the tax credit does not have to be for the total allowance. In addition, the credit may be split between one or more schools. To contribute to programs you value, visit your local school’s website to learn how to contribute, stop by your local school office to write a check, or go to arizonaschooltaxcredit.com and select one of the schools that accept on-line tax credit payments. Note that payment must be received by December 31st in order to apply the tax credit to that calendar year.


Healthy kids Everybody has a role to play By Annie Young, D.O.

Every day, parents have to make choices about

what is best for their children. This means making sure their choices will promote both optimal emotional and physical health so their children are better able to face life’s challenges and make good choices. Parents, pediatricians, teachers and other specialists/ clinicians all have a role and must work together to promote a child’s well-being. Based on a partnership of mutual responsibility and trust, clinicians can help the child and family focus on issues such as nutrition, safety, early literacy and mental health. In this way, the whole child, or total health, is considered. As a clinician seeing the challenges children face day in and day out, I invite you, parent or not, to play a role in shaping the futures of our kids. ¡Nos incumbe a todos! It’s everyone’s responsibility! Here’s how: Consider your pediatrician as a partner in your child’s overall success Get to know and embrace the “medical home” concept Get educated and empowered to ask questions of your medical professionals Advocate for all of Arizona’s children by challenging schools, lawmakers and voters to review how we can make all of our systems more efficient and effective Consider pediatricians partners in your child’s success. We are the “medical home” for all things related to health and wellness for a child. This is where evidencebased decisions are made – a one-stop shop of sorts that can coordinate all issues that may arise in childhood. Start early. Children achieve 90 percent of their brain development in the first five years of life, so it is critical that parents actively engage early on, spending quality time together, reading and exploring, to ensure a high level of learning along with developing important

relationship and communication skills that serve to support self-esteem and other intrapersonal skills. As medicine moves toward this integrated health-care model, pediatricians and clinicians are working as a team to address the entire scope of a child’s needs. Oftentimes, this means educating the parents on how to keep their child well or get them back on track. Cultural differences require different approaches or suggestions. The only way to break down cultural barriers is for both the parent and physician to ask important questions and share how your family or culture might look at a particular health issue. Language barriers, education levels and inability of parents to fully explain what their concerns are can sometimes hinder a physician and other providers from offering optimal care. Physicians need to do their part to dig a little deeper, and the family needs to help the pediatrician understand so that he, or she, can latinopm.com

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The parents’ daily decisions on what to feed their child or how to engage them in active recreation will have the most significant impact on their health and future well-being. get to the root of the problem. Otherwise, issues can be under-diagnosed or missed completely.  Much is at stake because parents and clinicians alike have the ability to initiate healthy habits and practices in children during their formative years before the bad habits settle in. The entire family has to be on board. Parents with poor dietary and exercise habits contribute to unhealthy children, setting up a wide range of health issues and often life-long struggles. Strong role modeling on the part of parents and additional support from the schools to reinforce good habits are critical. Most of my visits with families are spent discussing healthy meal options and alternatives that can be used every day. Eliminating liquid calories and switching to low-fat milk is one of my biggest battles. The discussion has to be tailored to focus on the nutritional habits specific to the family’s culture. For example, some cultures eat more carbohydrates, such as tortillas, beans, cactus (nopales) and rice. Others focus on higher-fat content with pork products, as well as rice, beans and bread.  The parents’ daily decisions on what to feed their child or how to engage them in active recreation will have the most significant impact on their health and future well-being. A simple choice for the morning meal between eating a large bagel or some sugary cereal product versus opting for quality protein, such as scrambled eggs, can impact a child’s ability to learn and perform well in school and on tests. 44

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Many pediatricians will affirm that parents are often the biggest obstacle; they often do not accept that their child is overweight. Yet the statistics don’t lie; Arizona posted the biggest increase in the prevalence of childhood obesity of all states between 2003 and 2007. Pediatricians are already seeing significant incidences of cardiovascular disease even in kids as young as 5 years old. Type-2 diabetes is showing up in children, the kind of diabetes once called “adult-onset.” Children are being diagnosed as obese even before they step foot into kindergarten. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says that about 20 percent of obese four-year-olds will grow up to become obese adults. That figure rises to 80 percent among teenagers who are overweight. These children are more likely to have high blood pressure, joint problems and greater risk of death as their weight increases. The Arizona Chapter of AAP advocates parents follow the “5-2-1-0 rule.” This means getting kids to eat 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day (a serving could mean a medium apple or a handful of mini-carrots); spend less than 2 hours in front of a screen including computers and video games; spend at least 1 hour a day being physically active; and limit

sugary drinks to 0 a day. You can embrace this simple rule along with your kids and the entire family will benefit. More information is available at azwaytogo.org. Just as quality foods play a role in a child’s health, so too do immunizations. There may not be any issue we advocate more for on any given day than immunizations. Recent outbreaks of polio, measles and epidemic rates of pertussis (also known as whooping cough, including one death in Arizona this past year) demonstrate that all children should be vaccinated according to the immunization schedule available at the CDC website (cdc.gov).

Mental health and abuse problems are now more prevalent on our list of issues to address. Our offices are often making referrals for community resources and services to help a parent facing any number of needs – from abuse and bullying to access to food or dental care – all of which might keep a child from growing and performing well. While we know that our schools are focused on the education of our children, establishing


good habits in early childhood sets kids up for success. Pediatricians are often the first and only professional a family sees or talks with before the child starts school. That’s why more than 800 Arizona pediatricians voluntarily incorporate AzAAP’s early literacy program, Reach Out and Read Arizona, at each well-child visit. This proven program involves the physician talking to parents about the importance of reading to their child daily to impart crucial language skills. Pediatricians supply children, aged six months to five years old, with a free, developmentallyappropriate book to keep for a period of

10 well-child visits. Only 43 percent of Arizona parents read to their kids daily. Keeping your child physically safe is another component when considering the whole child. Pediatricians talk about booster seats, water safety, wearing sunscreen, firework safety, using helmets when out riding bikes – but we can’t be there when those things are happening. Parents must be diligent through all phases of their child’s life.

In Arizona, drowning continues to be a leading cause of injury-related death for children between the ages of one and five years old, according to the Drowning Prevention Coalition. Adult supervision is the best way to a prevent drowning. Being a good role model is another important factor. Are you showcasing how to treat all people with respect? It may start with “please” and “thank you,” but also include how you speak to, and about, those you disagree with. Bullying, which affects about 10 percent of our kids, is a significant issue in our schools when their focus should be on reading, writing and arithmetic. Parents can be models for critical relationship behaviors, as well as monitor their child’s online activities, which can impact both emotional and physical development. Visit stopbullying.gov for more information. Besides parents and pediatricians, teachers, lawmakers, grandparents and average citizens can make a difference in the lives of our children. Your understanding and investment in improving our state systems for effectiveness and efficiency is needed. As doctors, we invite you to learn more about the importance of the medical home, to increase your understanding of how you play a role in your, or any, child’s health and wellness, and to partner with your pediatrician to create a bright future for our kids. Dr. Anne Young is an Arizona native and pediatrician at Valle del Sol in Central Phoenix. She completed medical school at Midwestern University in Glendale and residency in Savannah, Ga. She is a member of the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Her interests include obesity and nutrition, autism and diabetes.

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Celebrations of giving Why sporting events and charity go so well together By Virginia Betz

You can make a charitable donation by clicking a button on your computer, or by filling out a check – and it will

probably feel good to do so. Yet, year after year, signing up for marathons and other sporting or quasi-sporting events has become a favorite way to give to good causes. Competitive events are America’s most popular kind of social gathering; and they bring together people of all classes, religions and ethnic groups. The sporting event provides a formal backdrop for what is essentially a celebratory ritual. Charitable giving is a social act; it is an affirmation of our commitment to our mutual welfare. What better way to experience the joy of giving than in the context of a celebration? It reminds us why we give – to strengthen our common bonds and feel a part of something larger than ourselves. Sure, you can just write a check, but a lot of things, especially giving, are more meaningful, and more fun, in a crowd. P.F. Chang’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon is, for sure, Phoenix metro’s biggest charity bash. Sunday, January 20, 2013, tens of thousands will fill the re-vamped urban courses for the marathon, half marathon, cycling and wheelchair events. For those who’d prefer a less massive gathering with targeted local giving, there is no shortage of opportunities in the Valley. LPM offers a partial list of some of these upcoming charity/sports events – some suave, some fuerte. If profuse sweating is not your idea of a good time, you can get in on the excitement by volunteering to provide support services on the day of the event.

McDowell Mountain Frenzy Benefits McDowell Mountain Regional Park Date: December 8 (Saturday) Location: McDowell Mountain Regional Park, Fountain Hills Event type: Cross-country running in 5 distance categories: 50 mi., 50k, 25k, 10 mi. and 5 mi. Time: Day-of-race registration is 6 a.m.; races start between 7 and 8:30 a.m. depending on the event There is probably no other running event in the area that takes place in such stunning surroundings. The shorter races 46

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follow professionally designed competitive tracks. The three longer races (part of the Desert Runner Trail Series) incorporate other trails within the Park appropriate for highly experienced cross-country runners. All races are chip-timed. Colorcoded signage will guide the participants along their chosen course, and water/ snack stations will be available along all routes. Runners are advised to familiarize themselves with their course prior to race day. To get directions to the Park, maps/ descriptions of the courses and on-line registration, visit: aravaiparunning.com/ mcdowell-mountain-frenzy

Registration fees: $65 (50 mi.); $60 (50k); $55 (25k); $50 (10 mi.), $45 (5 mi.). Fees will increase by $10 for day-ofrace registration; in addition, there is a $6 parking fee for each vehicle.

“Chip in for Humanity” Golf Classic Benefits Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona Date: December 14 (Friday) Location: Troon Golf Club, 10320 East Dynamite Blvd., Scottsdale Event type: Golf tournament Time: 8:30 a.m.


What’s more Arizonan than golf? And few sports have such a long tradition of association with charitable giving. The beneficiary of the Golf Classic, HFHCAZ, builds and renovates affordable housing for families of low to moderate income, a group that certainly deserves our attention in the current economic climate. To learn how to register as a golfer or sponsor, visit: habitatcaz.org/news-events/index.php Registration fees: $175, individual; $650, foursome

First Annual Brace It for Brayden Awareness 5k Benefits the Brace It for Brayden Awareness campaign Date: December 29, 2012 (Saturday) Location: Encanto Park Clubhouse, 2605 N. 15th Av., Phoenix Event type: 5k run/walk Time: 8 – 11 a.m. This first-time, family-friendly event takes place at one of downtown Phoenix’ loveliest urban green spaces, and draws attention to fatalities/injuries resulting from inadequately fixed appliances and furniture. For more information about the campaign and on-line registration, visit: braceitforbrayden.org Registration fees: $30, adults; $15, child (10 and under), $20, silent angels (nonparticipants)

The Color Run Benefits Banner Health and Special Olympics Arizona Date: January 26, 2013 (Saturday) Location: Tempe Beach Park, 80 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe Event Type: 5k run/walk Time: Multiple start times – 7:30, 8:10 and 8:45 a.m. Each kilometer represents a “color zone” that participants pass through while they are bombarded with blasts of powdered color. By the end of the course, everyone looks like Jackson Pollock’s version of a rainbow. Pigments are non-toxic and easily removed by blown air. For a map giving route

details and on-line registration (number of participants is limited), go to: thecolorrun. com/arizona Registration fees: $50, individual; $45, per person in a 4+-person color team (fees will go up by $5 after 1/1/13)

AZ Bedrace for Charity Benefits Bridging AZ Furniture Bank Date: February 23, 2013 (Saturday) Location: Tempe Marketplace, 2000 E. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe Event type: Bed race Time: Registration at 10 a.m.; races at 11 a.m. Five-persons teams compete in costumes, theme and speed contests. Each team builds and decorates their own “racebed,” which four “pushers” and one “rider” navigate down a 100-yard course. Proceeds go to the Furniture Bank, an organization that works through several social service agencies to provide furniture and household equipment to Arizona families in need – a truly unique competition for a unique charity. For more info, visit azbedrace.org Registration fees: $15, individual (x5 = $75 per team) (fees will increase after 2/20/13)

AFAA Zoo Walk for Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Benefits Arizona Food Allergy Alliance for Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Date: March 9, 2013 (Saturday) Event type: 5k walk Where: Phoenix Zoo, 455 N. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix Time: 7 a.m. for registration; walk begins at 8 a.m. Another inaugural charity event for the Valley. The AFAA raises funds to support local efforts to raise awareness and education, as well as to support research and advocacy. For more info and early registration, visit: arizonafoodallergy.org/ zoo-walk.html Registration fees: $9, adult; $6, children 3-18 (fees also apply to Zoo members)

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P.S.

Stella Pope Duarte

La Virgen and Talking Eagle By Stella Pope Duarte

How could a man born a peasant

in a remote village outside of Tenochtitlan, the ancient capital of the Mexica (Aztec) nation, ever expect that one day he would be chosen to witness the appearance of a heavenly figure who would change the course of human history? We can be certain that Cuauhtlatoatzin, whose name meant Talking Eagle, then 57 years old, was taken by surprise by what he thought was a Mexica princess early one morning on Tepeyac Hill. By then, his Mexica name had been changed to Juan Diego reflecting his conversion to Catholicism, the religion of the conquering Spaniards. Juan Diego saw the lady for the first time on December 9, 1531, as he made his way through a dark, rocky hillside to Tenochtitlan to attend mass. She was dressed in the elegant garb of a princess, her robe of a scarlet color signifying wisdom, her black belt announcing her pregnancy, and her blue-green cloak of stars alluding to her heavenly power. A temple to Tonantzin, Earth Mother, had once existed in the place where she now appeared, and Talking Eagle, her faithful servant, now wondered if

the ancient goddess had come back to visit earth. The wondrous woman’s skin and features were dark as were Talking Eagle’s. To his surprise, she spoke to him in his native tongue, Nahuatl, in a melodious voice like the trickling of a gentle waterfall. So lovingly did the lady speak to him that Talking Eagle stopped in his tracks. “Juanito, Juan Dieguito, where are you going my son whom I love like a small and tender child? Where are you going?” She addressed him by his new name, and immediately, Juan Diego took on a new image that would forever link Indians to Spaniards, in a dance that would captivate the heart of believers from all corners of the world. He knelt at her feet and told her he was to attend mass in the city. Very clearly the lady spoke again, looking at him tenderly: “I want you to know who I am. I am the ever-Virgin Mary, Mother of the true God who gives life and maintains its existence. I desire a church in this place that I may always show my love and compassion for your people.” Her peace and love reached the man who had now become “Juan Diego,” and he listened further as she directed him to go the bishop in Tenochtitlan and

tell him all he had seen and heard. Juan Diego had no success as he delivered the lady’s message to the bishop and, on his way home, he again encountered the lady who smiled tenderly and simply told him to return to the bishop the next day. Ridiculed and discounted as a dreamer, Juan Diego again was not able to convince the bishop, who asked for a sign from the lady. She, in turn, in a third appearance told him to “Come back tomorrow, the bishop will have his sign.” Tending his uncle, Juan Diego did not return until a day later, and on December 12, 1531, “Juan Dieguito,” as the Lady tenderly called him, carried in his tilma the roses she had asked him to gather from the top of Tepeyac Hill. She arranged the flowers in his tilma and, after presenting the roses to the bishop, he saw impressed on the rough fabric, the image of the lady he had seen on Tepeyac Hill, la Virgen de Guadalupe, she who treads on serpents. Juan Diego lived up to his ancient name, Talking Eagle, as his words soared through the heavens, an eagle telling of la Virgen’s abiding love.

Stella Pope Duarte was born and raised in South Phoenix. She began her awardwinning career in 1995 after she had a dream in which her deceased father told her that her destiny was to become a writer. Contact her at stellapopeduarte.com. latinopm.com

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my perspective on: taking responsibility for those in need

The “Art” of compassion Arizona residents help victims of Hurricane Sandy By Art Canizales, Jr.

More perspectives

Send us your perspective on whatever moves you. Email editor@latinopm.com.

When I first got to

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Woodmere, New York, there were a lot of trees down and a lot of water damage. I saw a lot of personal property on the sidewalks. At first, it wasn’t as bad as I thought. Then, when we got to Rockaway, one of the hardest-hit areas, it was worse than I expected. The damage was just unbelievable. People would come up to us and thank us and start telling us their stories. That was the hardest part. The damage was widespread on the island, and I will never forget the one gentlemen who told us that we were the first people he had seen in the seven days since the storm – the first people to help start restoring power. He came down and shook everybody’s hand and told everybody “thank you.” We met this other man whose restaurant burned down; his residence had been on the third floor. He was out with a shovel cleaning stuff out and yet he came over and offered us water and food. You can’t help but let those things change you. Whether we were digging a hole, setting the pole, putting the primary up or just running services, we knew that we were bringing somebody that much closer to getting power and getting some kind of normalcy back in their life. Then, when the nor’easter hit and the snow came, I thought, “How are they going to live like this with no electricity and no heat in the house?” But they managed. We really do take for granted the things we have. We heard stories about what people did for each other. One guy I talked to told me the flood waters were six feet deep; he and a lady’s son rescued her from the house on a surfboard. Another neighbor went to a house where there was a newborn; he held the baby above the water and took the whole family to his house.

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One thing that really got me was the number of tourists taking pictures. I just thought to myself, “Why don’t you put down the camera and pick up a damn shovel?” I just couldn’t believe people were taking pictures and just walking by. If somebody needs something, give them a hand, even if it’s just a sandwich. It may not be much, but it means something. When I volunteered, I knew I’d miss my cousin Amy’s wedding. I felt bad about it, but I could see that my small loss was nothing compared to the losses the storm victims were experiencing. If anything like this happened to any of my family, I hope that others would respond the same way. I decided to go because it’s the way I was raised – always help out when you can. My dad is the type of guy who would hold benefits when someone got hurt in order to help them pay their bills. My mom has always been that way, too. When someone needs help, you help them. I work out of SRP’s Tempe maintenance yard and everybody there wanted to go. I work with a bunch of guys who are tough but, when you are faced with something like this, you see a different side. There are a lot of caring people with whom I’m lucky to work. This experience made me realize how a natural disaster can affect you and possibly take a family member away. When I left, I didn’t tell a lot of my cousins that I was going. When they found out, I got a lot of calls. They wanted to check on me. All of my cousins called two or three times to find out when I was coming home. It gives you a different perspective on things. Days after Hurricane Sandy pounded the East Coast and left 1.1 million people without power and heat, a a harsh and frigid nor’easter storm arrived. Utility workers like Art Canizales with the Salt River Project (SRP) headed into the disaster zone. The 47-year-old journeyman lineman from Globe-Miami spent 16 hours a day for two weeks restoring electricity – and a bit of hope – to thousands on Long Island whose lives were turned upside down.


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Latino Perspectives Magazine December 2012