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BUILDING LEADERS >>TOGETHER<<

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA 速

L A S T

F R O N T I E R

C O U N C I L

ANNUAL REPORT 2010


Kevin and Jax :: Pack 543 of Villa Teresa School

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BUILDING

PA C K 5 4 3 O F V I L L A T E R E S A S C H O O L

It was just over 2 years ago when Jax Centrella joined Pack 543 of Villa Teresa School as a new First Grader and Tiger Cub. When Jax and his family came to their first meeting there were only a 5 registered Cub Scouts in the Pack. During the spring of 2008 tragedy struck Pack 543. Their main leader and Cubmaster died in a scuba diving accident while on vacation in Hawaii. Not long after Jax joined, his father, Paul, was approached to step into the Cubmaster’s role and help to rebuild this Pack. The “Midtown” area of OKC where Villa Teresa is would not normally be prime Cub-recruiting territory. That didn’t stop Paul and the other parents and boys from wanting to have a fun and exciting Cub Scout program. With a good program, more and more boys from the school wanted to join! Midtown has been “rebuilding,” like Pack 543. Businesses there have renovated buildings, or added on, or both, and through quality products and services the midtown area is now thriving. From the 5 boys at the beginning of 2008 Pack 543 of Villa Teresa now has 34 active Cub Scouts or 53% of the boys in school. That’s 35% more than the national average! David Slane said, “There isn’t a week that goes by that I don’t get a phone call or email from a parent about getting their son involved in our Cub Scout Pack.” As a matter of fact, the Pack is starting to run out of boys to recruit from Villa Teresa. That’s not stopping them! Starting in 2011 the Pack and school will “adopt” 8 boys into the program from Positive Tomorrows, a sister United Way Agency. One of the keys to any successful and sustained growth is leadership. New parents like David Slane and Vic Gonzales have joined Paul as key leaders. It just so happens that all three of these men are military service veterans and they each have skills and qualities that they want to pass on to the boys. Paul is an Air Force Gulf War Veteran. David was an Army Reservist, and Vic retired from Navy service on aircraft carriers. Their goals are to teach the youth to respect God, adults, and their country. The main focus of the Cub Scout Program is for the boys to have fun! We want the program to be exciting and something that the boys want to come back week after week. Paul stated that leadership is vital for the adults to express and display to the boys practically to help them become young leaders of tomorrow.


Joey Kinsman :: Eagle Scout

STORAGE AREA BEFORE

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STORE-ING

T H E K I N S M A N FA M I LY

Like many families today, Joey Kinsman is from a single-parent family. However, his circumstances are different than most. When Joey was four his family including his father, mother, himself and three other siblings were in an auto accident. Joey’s father, Dennis Gene Sr., died in the accident. Everyone else was injured, some more severely than others, but the event had a profound impact on his family’s life. Joey is the 5th of 6 children. The ages of the Kinsman siblings ranged from just over one year to 17 at the time of the accident. Since the accident Joey’s mother, Dottie, has raised her six children as a single parent. Joey’s older brother, Dennis Gene, Jr., at the time of the funeral was just starting to work on his Eagle Scout project. Dennis Sr. had been in Scouting as a youth, but only as a Cub Scout. He had wanted both of his sons to be able to fully experience the Scouting program. Dottie promised both of her boys that she would make sure they had the opportunity to be Eagle Scouts. Dennis Jr. did finish his project and became an Eagle. Joey just completed his Eagle project earlier this year. He has been a member of the Lawton Eisenhower High School Band for four years. During that time he noticed that the storage area for some of the band equipment was very disorganized. Joey had the idea of building a storage unit for the band hats and other field equipment instead of the band’s shoes. He gave leadership to about 25 people including other band members, family and friends from church to help tear out the old shoe storage and replace it with new hardwood cabinets customized for the hats. “Scouting taught me how to use what I was already learning at home. You have to be passionate about wanting to be a leader,” said Joey. “There has to be something that you really want to work for, and Scouting has helped me give direction to the leadership skills that I started to learn from both my mother and my church.” Joey wants to be a musician, and he knows that one of the key things to being successful is responsibility, and Scouting helped him learn that trait.


Rusty Shriver :: Apprentice Rank Sea Scout

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GATTA

SEA SCOUT SHIP 131

When people think of sailing and open water, Oklahoma is not something that normally makes the top of the list. That doesn’t mean Oklahomans don’t love the water. As a case in point, there’s Sea Scout Ship 131. This is a group of seven young men and women ages 14 to20. They love the water! And Sea Scouts, which is a part of the Venturing Program of the Boy Scouts of America, gives them many opportunities to be around, over, and in the water. Ship 131 has been chartered for ten years by Lake Hefner Boat Owners Association, and in that time there have been many young people who have been a part of the program. The Ship’s activities almost always involve a boat. If you ask Kenna Green, Skipper (main adult advisor) to the ship, she’ll tell you, “If you want to be part of a team sailing a 26-foot sailboat, you must have leadership skills. It doesn’t matter if you’re helmsman, lookout or sail handler, you have to be able to lead and give direction to others.” The Quartermaster Award is a test of a youth’s tenacity and endurance. The Quartermaster is equivalent to the Eagle Scout Rank, and specifically requires the Sea Scout to: • Plan, develop and demonstrate leadership to others in a service project involving your ship and at least one other group. • Serve as an officer for at least 6 months or serve as an activity chair for three major events • Lead a cruise by taking command of a vessel of not less than four Sea Scouts for at least 40 consecutive hours, including all preparations, drills while underway, and remaining underway for an extended period during darkness.

Ship 131 has Scouts working toward their Quartermaster Rank. Like becoming an Eagle Scout, it is a rare and challenging journey. But in the process they get to enjoy the boats, water and lake environment. Just like many other Scouting methods, sailing and aquatic activities are used to prepare the youth for life. The boat maintenance, water safety, environmental respect and people skills they learn will help them mature into responsible adults. “I can’t think of a better way to prepare these young men and women for life than being part of this Ship,” said Kenna. “They mature and life takes them in so many different directions. The results are wonderful!”


Dr. Hal Yocum :: 2011 Distinguished Eagle Scout

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UPPING

DR. HAL YOCUM: COLONEL, PHYSICIAN, EAGLE SCOUT

Hal Yocum was drafted into military service after medical school. As a Captain, he was obligated to serve 2 years. Instead of returning to civilian life he “re-upped” his service to the US Army. He retired from service in the Army, as a full Colonel, after 27 years, 12 active-duty and 15 in the reserves. His service in the Army and later in life as a physician is punctuated with leadership. But when asked about his leadership experiences he said, “You don’t think, ‘I need to go be a leader,’ you just do it. You just think about the needs of your community and get involved.” Scouting started to impact Hal early in life. Growing up in a small town, Scouting afforded Hal the opportunity to get involved. Hal wasn’t an athlete, but he got to do the stuff he wanted to do: going camping and hiking. He discovered needs and served in areas from camp staff to the Order of the Arrow. Through practical experience Hal found out, “I can do it,” and that he could get people to work together pretty well. During medical school Hal continued to find needs. “If there was a problem, you get involved and try to make a difference.” So, he got involved in student government. He also was in the College Scouter Reserves and worked on the Training Committee to bring Scouting to disadvantaged youth. “Scouting gives youth practical opportunities to find out about problems. Then they have to solve them. The process of solving the problems is what develops leadership traits in young people.” After his military service Hal got involved in the County Medical Society in Colorado. He wanted to help with issues we still grapple with today, how to make healthcare more affordable and get tort reform. Under President Clinton he worked at both state and national levels to try and shape a better health insurance plan. Hal also served for 27 years on the BSA’s National Health and Safety Committee. Today he is shaping tomorrow’s leaders as a Clinical Asst. Prof. of Orthopedic Surgery at the OU Health Sciences Center. Summing up his service as a leader, Hal said, “You get experience as a kid, and you just ‘become’ a leader.” He evidently became a good one, because in 2011 Hal is being honored as a Distinguished Eagle Scout. An honor only given to about 2,000 Eagle Scouts, out of over 2 million, since the award’s inception in 1969.


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Steve Mason Stephen Friot and Jeff Woolsey


STRUCTURE

GAYLORD SERVICE CENTER AND LAURA FIELDS SERVICE CENTER

During this year the Boy Scouts of America celebrated its 100th Anniversary with the theme “Celebrating the Adventure, Continuing the Journey.” For the Last Frontier Council of the Boy Scouts of America the year has been one of planning and preparing for the next 100 years. The Scouting program comes alive for our youth because of the leadership provided by thousands of outstanding adult volunteers in positions that range from the Council Executive Board, District Committees, and of course the most important of all, those that work directly with our Scouts. As the Council Key 3, we established early in the year some objectives to gauge our progress toward making the best Scouting experiences available to the young people of our community: 1. Achieve the National Boy Scouts of America Quality Council Status 2. Achieve our fundraising objectives by August 31 3. Initiate a Strategic Planning process for the organization 4. Re-tool current council outreach programs

We are pleased to present this Annual Report showing not only the accomplishment of these objectives, but the continual pursuit of our mission; changing the lives of young people through Scouting.

Steve Mason

Stephen Friot

Jeff Woolsey

COUNCIL PRESIDENT

COUNCIL COMMISSIONER

SCOUT EXECUTIVE/CEO


LEADERSHIP EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Steve Mason, President Stephen Friot, Council Commissioner Jim Aikman, VP District Operations Robert Eades, VP Membership James Elder, VP Program Bob Mackey, VP Properties Patrick Rooney, VP Development James Waldo, VP Administration Ed Young, Council Treasurer Tony LoPresto, Assistant Treasurer David Thompson, Immediate Past President Jeff Woolsey, Scout Executive/CEO

EXECUTIVE BOARD Dr. Matt Aguilar Colleen Bicket Gen William P. Bowden Jeff Brown James Buchanan B. Michael Carroll Scott Davis Jay Epperson Brin Fair Bill Ford Steve Foreman Gerald Gamble Harvey Hill Tom Huibregtse Gary Jones Mike Knopp Patrick Lippmann Bruce Litchfield Jim Marshall Edmund Martin Tom McCasland III Herman Meinders Dr. Michael O'Neal Phil Pippin Bob Porter

David Reid Shad Satterthwaite Randy Smith Kathleen Stevenson Tom Stevenson Douglas Stussi Brian Szymanski D. Don Vick Delbert Wilburn Alvin Williams Dr. Harold Yocum

LIFE BOARD William Coleman Vince Cotter Gen. Dale Laubach Wayne Miller Tal Oden Lindsay Peters Oren Lee Peters Thomas C. Smith, Jr. Dick Williams Wayne Woodman Pendleton Woods

ADVISORY BOARD Loyd Benson John Boulton Judge Elvin Brown Bill Burgess B. C. Clark, Jr. Dr. Floyd Coppedge William Crawford Charles Johnson E. Carey Joullian IV John Mosley Marc Nuttle Richard Oppel Jerry Orr Thomas Parrish David Pendley Marty Postic David Rainbolt Paul Schmidlkofer Joe Shockley Lee Allan Smith Bill Swisher Richard Van Dyck Donald D. Vick Norm Weber Noris Whitaker


MEMBERSHIP The Last Frontier Council serves 24 counties in central and southwest Oklahoma. Please note the below numbers are end-of-year projections.

YOUTH UNITS Cub Scouts....................................................................5,768........................................................190 Cub Scout Packs Boy Scouts ...................................................................3,506.......................................................173 Boy Scout Troops Venturers .........................................................................290..........................................................37 Venturing Crews Learning for Life ..........................................................7,510 .......................................................17 Partnering School TOTAL YOUTH............................................17,074 ................................................................454 Adult Volunteers .......................................................................................................................................................5,000 Charter Partners (Program Sponsoring Organizations) Churches/Religious Institutions .............................................................................................................................179 Civic Clubs......................................................................................................................................................................25 Parent Organizations..................................................................................................................................................35 Total Charter Partners ................................................................... 239

Over 35,000 weekly Cub Scout and Boy Scout meetings held in 2010. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited over Half a Million times by youth at meetings this year. PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS: Cub Scouts: The Cub Scout program encourages strong family relationships while developing social skills through fun and educational activities for boys grades 1-5. Boy Scouts/Varsity Scouts: The Boy Scout and Varsity Scout program introduces the patrol concept to boys 11 -18 where they learn self-direction with less parental involvement. The Boy Scouts of America's objectives of developing character, citizenship, and personal fitness are met by focusing on outdoor activities. Venturing: Venturing is a youth development program for young men and women who are 14-21 years of age. The purpose of Venturing is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Venturers get to experience a program that is fun and full of challenge and adventure.


Please note the below numbers are end-of-year projections.

FINANCIALS STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2010 INCOME: Direct Contributions .........................................................................1,007,570 Indirect Contributions.......................................................................600,000 Activities & Other Income................................................................1,599,315 Total Income ..............................................................................$3,206,885

EXPENSES: Program Services ........................................................................2,494,053 Fundraising .......................................................................................334,568 Management and General..............................................................212,907 Total Expenses ......................................................................$3,041,528 Increase in Unrestricted Net Assets.......................$165,357

2010 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION OPERATING 2010 Current Assets Interfund Loans Land & Investments Total Assets

ENDOWMENT 2010

ALL FUNDS 2009

2010

11,644,200 26,903 5,369,966 $17,041,069

504,797 (18,924) 6,172,974 $6,658,847

13,852,912 10,372,670 $24,225,582

13,239,736 11,542,940 $24,782,676

411,185 -

78,673

274

496,638 95,000

490,132 -

Total Liabilities Unrestricted Temp. Restricted Perm. Restricted

$411,185 165,357 506,218

$78,673 5,538,735 11,423,661

$274 617,055 1,725,599 4,315,919

$591,638 5,795,661 14,052,427 3,785,856

$490,132 6,321,147 13,655,478 4,315,919

Total Net Assets

$671,575

$16,962,396

$6,658,573

$23,633,944

$24,292,544

$1,082,760

$17,041,069

$6,658,847

$24,225,582

$24,782,676

Payables Notes Payable

Total Liabilities & Net Assets

1,090,739 (7,979)

CAPITAL 2010

$1,082,760


PROGRAM ACTIVITIES & CIVIC SERVICE 24,165 hours have been given this year in community service by Eagle Scout Candidates and their teams 4,900 pinewood derby cars built by Cub Scouts and Parents 3,015 trophies or awards given to Cub Scouts at over 200 pinewood derby races Over 200 Boy Scouts attended Merit Badge University at OU in 48 indiviual merit badge sessions 1,500 trees planted by Scouts in the Centennial Tree Planting Project with the Apache Foundation and the Tree Bank Foundation of Central Oklahoma 108 local youth attended the National Centennial Jamboree in Fort AP Hill, Virginia

ADVANCEMENT & RECOGNITION 8,859 Eagle Scouts live in our council, with 209 new Eagle Scouts this year 3,658 Cub Scout Rank Advancements 1,633 Boy Scout Rank Advancements 8,712 Merit Badges earned 457 Arrow of Light Awards 209 Eagle Scouts

CAMPING & OUTDOOR PROMOTION 13,512 nights spent camping at council events 1,247 Boy Scouts from 171 Troops in Boy Scout Resident Camp 945 Cub Scouts in Day Camp 517 Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts from 76 Packs in Cub Resident Camp 987 Cub Scouts in 6 Council Family Camp Sessions 2,250 campers and visitors served by renovated kitchen at Slippery Falls Scout Ranch

TRAINING FOR LEADERS 1,259 direct contact leaders trained 214 leaders trained in basic outdoor skills in 2010 525 volunteers are advanced leader trained (Wood Badge), with 83 in 2010 234 leaders participated in over 85 different sessions of University of Scouting Over 120 total training courses held this year


SCOUT OATH On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law, to help other people at all times, to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

SCOUT LAW A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.

Scout Oath and Law recited over 200,000 times at Scout Troop meetings in 2010.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA 速

L A S T

F R O N T I E R

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LAST FRONTIER COUNCIL 3031 NW 64TH ST >> OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73116-3598 (405) 840-1114 >> www.lastfrontiercouncil.org Twitter.com/LFCBSA Facebook.com/LastFrontierCouncil


Annual Report 2010