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LARA RIVERA

portfolio | landscape architecture


The following catalogue represents some academic and professional landscape projects and samples of writing and art practice to show a wider range of experience. Included projects span various scales of study from regional systems to small detailed interventions.

CONTENTS City Delta 4 Galvin Lawn: Reconnected

26

Lathrop Homes Masterplan

32

IIT Rainworks 38 Details Study 42 Illustrative Samples 46 Writing Samples 50 Front Cover: Calumet River and Lake Clay Model Left: Steel Worker’s Strike Memorial Plaza Model

Painting 52 ResumĂŠ 58


Water Park for play and stormwater capture Wetland Area Orchard

Market Plaza and Pavilion

Outdoor Classroom

Aquaponics, Hydroponics and Commercial Greenhouses

Restaurants, Retail and High Density Housing

Training C

Eco-Underpass Agriculture Show Garden and Tool Shed

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City Delta Runner Up: Schiff Foundation Fellowship, Art Institute of Chicago The City Delta is a neighborhood system that uses water and nutrient waste to stimulate economic and social development in Chicago. Instead of depositing valuable elements into rivers and landfill, the delta can be used as a model for urban revitalization in blighted neighborhoods. The delta is formed by accumulation and sedimentation of nutrients, combined with abundant water supply. Enriched soil and resulting products are a catalyst not just for food production but the industries, economy and culture that arise out of it. The City Delta taps into existing infrastructures for waste and water management, such as sewer and water systems and alley pick up and delivery sites, to redistribute resources locally. 22 acres of private and city owned vacant lots surrounding a derelict commercial corridor are reconfigured to support a cluster of indoor agribusiness, water intensive industries, food processing and food service industries.

Center

Waste Treatment Center

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WATER AND NUTRIENT SYSTEM WASTE

Mississippi Delta Nutrient Pollution The Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone is fed by sewage and agricultural nutrients from the Mississippi River basin. Even though the city of Chicago doesn’t produce agricultural runoff it is still contributing the most nitrogen and phosphorous pollution in the state, from poor wastewater treatment standards and inadequate flood prevention.

Mississippi Delta Sediment Plume

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Regional Water System Apart from the annual loss of billions of gallons of Lake Michigan water, Chicago’s centralized water management infrastructure still cannot prevent an average $132 million in basement flooding damages. Impervious surfaces and the deep tunnel stormwater system also prevent recharge of groundwater reserves, the fastest depleting water source in the region.

Biosolid Waste

City Delta

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REINTEGRATING SYSTEMS FOR PRODUCTIVITY

Integrating Infrastructure The current configuration of regional food and water infrastructure is managed and regulated separately. Exploiting beneficial linkages in these systems can convert the one-way traffic of waste into a more efficient and less damaging cascaded system of use and reuse.

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Integrating Stakeholders This diagram illustrates system integration at a local level including existing factors at the test site (East Garfield Park). Cooperative investment between ground-level stakeholders and the larger regional infrastructure provides economic opportunity to various private entities, and cost savings for public agencies. Initial investment in this site specific framework will attract long term residents to the delta.

City Delta

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OPPORTUNITY AREAS

Selecting a Test Site Areas of declining population south and west of the city present an opportunity to re-purpose vacant areas for the future needs of citizens, based on improved quality of life, local entrepreneurship and fostering unique and positive neighborhood identity.

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NEIGHBORHOOD CONTEXT

City Delta

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KEY COMMUNITY INSTITUTIONS

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DELTA ZONES AND LAND USE PLAN

City Delta

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THE DELTA CATALYST

EAST GARFIELD PARK MICRO-SEWERSHED

Adapting Old Infrastructure Sewer flows in East Garfield Park create a micro-sewershed basin. The city’s sewershed is made up of many microbasins that flow into interceptors and on to large centralized wastewater treatment plants. The City Delta intercepts sewer and organic waste flows at a smaller neighborhood treatment center. Neighborhood food and yard waste are collected via the current alley pickup system and included in the process. Treated water and organic material can then be locally redistributed for water and nutrient intensive uses. Sewer flows from the delta area can be used by delta systems farther down the sewer chain system.

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WASTE RECOVERY FLOWS


THE DELTA CATALYST

City Delta

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Waste Treatment Center

Diagramatic System Model

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DELTA RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

trees, shrubs & groundcovers for habitat, food and protection

shaded and moist conditions in lower floodplain area under housing platforms

Leopard Frog

Spring Peeper

Marginal Wood Fern

Smooth Green Snake

City Delta

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1:5000

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Circulation and Street Profile Truck transportation can be confined to the commercial corridor with the central retail and water park areas reserved for pedestrian use only. Close access to the Eisenhower expressway makes this an ideal site for food industry ditrubution services. Water and wildlife are free to move between lots and the ground level via eco-unperpasses connecting blocks at the soil level.

City Delta

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Grow space for neighborhood nursery business. Native trees and perennials can be sold for city-wide street beautification projects and ornamental uses.

Underground pipes from treatment plant provide water to vacant lots.

Phytoremediators used to remove traces of lead paint contamination. Typical plants include blue sheep fescue, Indian mustard, common wheat, & common ragweed.

’

25

’

125

Temporary tool shed

1

20

FIRST 5 YEARS SHORT-TERM PLANT GROWTH & PHYTOREMEDIATION


EVOLUTION OF THE RESIDENTIAL LOT

Middle of lot used for long-term agriculture of fruit orchards.

Temporary growing beds on outer two thirds of lot.

45’ 35’ 45’ Food production supports small food businesses in the commercial corridor - pie shop, bottling and canning, processing, restaurants, etc.

2

5 to 10 YEARS LOCAL FOOD INDUSTRY SUPPORT

City Delta

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Roof sloped to maximize sun exposure to growing spaces & capture solar power. Caissons support new housing structures raised above ammended soil.

Infill housing replaces older housing stock.

New street profile 2 feet above grade.

3

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10 to 20 YEARS ADAPTING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR NEW INFILL DEVELOPMENT Housing ownership is limited to the structure itself & the area it occupies above its foundations. The lot is for co-operative use & protection.

Greenhouses on the south, east & west exposures are incorporated into the living space & plants are grown directly in the ground below.

Lots support 2 compact housing units that accomodate continued productive or community use of the middle zone, suitable for smaller family, or single-parent households with less time spent in the home.

Surrounding lots begin the same process as houses are eventually vacated & demolished.


Surrounding plant community matures & replaces short term agriculture. Abundant water and nutrient supllies ensure lush & healthy plant growth & restored wildlife habitat.

Public access to middle zone from side of lot. Boardwalk & stairway underpasses from the street.

Ramp from alley or street gives interior parking access. Trash pick up & compost drop off station shared between 2-4 units. Waste management via alley trash stations for ongoing trash, recycling & compostable collection. Drop off for compost from waste treatment plant.

Eco-Underpass allows movement of water & small animals between blocks.

Stairway into lot from street.

4

AFTER 20 YEARS DELTA MATURITY

Semi-detached units can adapt to include conjoined living spaces for shared family responsibilities across complex family structures.

Larger units extend sideways over lot boundaries as these no longer limit space ownership. All stormwater infiltrates in the lots without flooding basements.

City Delta

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2” 6”

30”

creatures that break down organic matter invasive plants organic matter

remnant paving urban debris + infill

2”

humus

10”

subsoil

30”

substratum

48”

mychorrizae soil mite depleted substratum

burrowing animals tardigrade bacilli

Soil Profile: Current Condition

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soil nematode

Soil Profile: Mature Condition


MIDDLE ZONE ACCESS

Street

Alley

City Delta

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Ca

GALVIN LIBRARY

C Cc Ca

Gt Gt

M

Q Gt

Gt

Ca

CROWN HALL

MODEL SHOP

high water line low water line low water line

C

Gt Ad

Ad No

No Gt

Fs

Fs

Cc

Ca Cc

HVAC Ca Fs

Ca Ca

Cc Gt

Cc

Cc Gt

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SITE PLAN


Limestone Facing Concrete Retaining Wall

I-Beam Post

Limestone Paver

Limestone Facing

GALVIN LAWN: RECONNECTED 2011 The Galvin Lawn and adjacent parking lot separate two major buildings of the IIT architecture school by over 400 feet. This design proposes a paved walkway surrounding a reflecting pool which fluctuates with the tides and seiches of nearby Lake Michigan. Low water levels reveal 2 distinct pools and high levels form one body of water. The design incorporates the ideas of Mies van der Rohe’s and Alfred Caldwell’s original campus plan: a calm, spacious, wooded field supporting the long, horizontal figures of Mies’s buildings. Hedges and screening walls for the HVAC and parking expose no interior corners maintaining the free flow of space. Retaining Wall Detail

Screen Wall Detail


High Water Condition

Low Water Condition

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2%

slo

pe 2%

5%

8’ slo

pe

Slot Drains Open

5%

Slot Drain Open

slo

pe

8’ slo

pe

Slot Drain Closed

Reflecting Pool Section

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PERSPECTIVE VIEW TOWARD LIBRARY AND CROWN HALL - HIGH WATER 30


PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SOUTH GROVE - LOW WATER 31


LATHROP HOMES MASTERPLAN

Main road divides site in two

No river access - north side

Sloping, wooded edge condition - north side

Unsafe bike and walking path

12’ drop to water at sea wall - south side

Superblock layout blocks neighborhood access to riverfront

EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS

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2012


ACCESS AND CIRCULATION PLAN

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Power Station - Microbrewery

New Highrise Condo New Highrise Condo

Boulevard and double-sided parking configuration

1 2

Frail Care Center

O CAG

CHI

Sunken Lawn

R

RIVE

Senior Social Garden

Diversey Avenue

Boardwalk Plaza

4

1

Water Taxi

3

5

Gabion Bank 2

Kayak Launch Terraced Lookout

3

Dog Run

4 5

Playground Mound and Boardwalk 0’

50’

100’

200’

400’

SITE PLAN


RIVER EDGE

Senior Social Garden Comfortable lounge chairs and tables, Raised planting beds for easy interaction

1

Road access and Parking set back from Riverfront Lawn and Playground Sunken lawn games observed from surrounding shady banks. Natural materials, topographic playground surrounded by benches

Key Bike Zone

River Bank Grassy banks retained with reclaimed red brick from demolition of 4 buildings

2

Bridge Underpass Boardwalk is narrowed and raised over the water, passing under the road bridge and then over the kayak launch to rejoin the ground at the terraced lookout

Pedestrian Zone

Plantings of wetland species suitable to expected levels of seasonal inundation

3

Lawn and Play Area Overlooking the river and kayak launch. Great for picnics and small ceremonies with a sunset view

4

Existing 4-story units renovated for mixed income housing

Terraced Lookout

Woodland Walk Narrow boardwalk winds through exisiting wooded bank leading to planned extension of riverfront access 0’

8’

16’

32’

5

64’

96’

SECTIONS


Boardwalk Plaza: A convergence of people, walkways, bike paths, water taxi and bus stops.

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Boardwalk Plaza: Intersecting directional patterning of wood and brick conveys a sense of orchestrated movement.

River Bank: Alternating stair and ramp access to variable height boardwalk. All areas of the plan are universally accessible.


Boardwalk: Cantilevered from existing seawall. Gently slopes between stair and ramp access bringing user nearer or farther from the water surface. Rest benches extend from angled river bank.

Access Boulevard: Bisects superblock campus plan for fluid integration of residents, surrounding population and riverfront. Pedestrian and bike zones in the median.

Outlook: Boardwalk bridges over kayak launch and lands at outlook area. Terraces step down into the water, planted with wetland species adapted to applicable immersion depths.

STUDY MODELS


IIT RAINWORKS

Gateway Terrace Garden

First place winner: 2012 EPA Campus RainWorks competition.

21,000 ft3 of water infiltrating within a 48 hour period.

This group project was a collaborative effort between landscape architecture, civil engineering and architecture students. I proposed this design in partnership with architecture student, Bernardo Loureiro, and it was fully developed by the whole team for submission. I lead the design development team and design & construction of the site model.

This garden serves as a new gateway experience at the north end of the campus, announcing a more intimate landscape sequence for the pedestrian campus.

Project Participants: Anne Brask, Bernardo Loureiro, Brandon Linder, David Abad, David Wilcox, Gwendolyn Parker, Jacob Singer, Kathryn Manwaring, Rachel Doliber, Xingu Zhang, Patrick Miller, Alex Brown, Brock Auerbach-lynn

2

2

Amphitheater Garden 79,866 ft3 of water infiltrating within a 48 hour period. The Amphitheater Garden serves as a more formal gathering space for student groups, classes, presentations, talks and small performances. A series of terraces supports the organization of these events. The garden is universally accessible.

Hub Garden 31,500 ft3 of water infiltrating within a 48 hour period.

1

1

The southern portion of the garden is designed as a casual gathering space, for picnics and studying. The northern portion is designed for as a stormwater detention and infiltration garden. A series of steps leads students into the space for exploration among the garden. A series of columns are inserted in a grid as a reference to the grid plan of the campus, and as a vertical measure of water levels.

Flow Diagram: Gwen Parker

0’

40’

80’

120’

160’

SITE PLAN


SITE MODEL The acrylic layers allow a vertical reading of the ground conditions affecting water activity on the campus. Paving, soil compositions, sewer inlets, canopy cover and lidar mapped drainage areas are represented through the layers. Surface layers are modular and replaceable with each student’s proposed design interaction.

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Hub student center

Electronic Info Panel

8’ Wide Channel with overflow water planters

THE HUB INFILTRATION GARDEN

Water loving bald cypress grove

Alumni Hall

Low Seating Wall - Perforated for Water Flow Materials Palette The campus is characterised by flat grass panels with dispersed low buildings in layed out according to the 8’x8’ grid governing the entire campus. The stormwater infrastructure introduces a new, sub-grade dimension to the campus so a new material, dark slate, is used for below grade constructed elements.

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Permeable Walkway

Infiltration and Retention

Permeable Walkway

Permeable Walkway


8’ Wide Channel with overflow water planters

GATEWAY TERRACE GARDEN

Life Sciences Hall

New trees introduced to succeed mostly mature tree canopy accross campus

Vandercook Hall

Channel Overflow under walkway Infiltration

Section Diagrams: Lara Rivera, Bernardo Loureiro, Xingu Zhang Renderings: Lara Rivera, Bernardo Loureiro, Kathryn Manwaring

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DETAILS STUDY

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These drawings are from a document set for a large formal garden plan. This details the area that collects street runoff and filters it for storage and irrigation. The ring element is a modular concrete form which slowly releases water to the interior sunken garden for storage underground.

ENLARGEMENT PLAN / STORMWATER FILTER GARDEN 1/8” =1’,0”


3/8” =1’,0”

3/8” =1’,0” SECTION / STORMWATER FILTER GARDEN 1/8” =1’,0”


Pour Hole Fold Lines Foldover Tabs

Unfolded Model Cast Form

20 Module Set

Laser cut chipboard forms

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Glued and sealed with foldover tabs

Poured plaster-filled moulds

Completed plaster model of module

CAST CONCRETE STORMWATER FILTER MODULE MODEL SCALE: 1/32” = 1”


CAST CONCRETE STORMWATER FILTER MODULE


ILLUSTRATIVE SAMPLES

sections - tengchong, dominion

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS DIAGRAM autocad,illustrator, photoshop

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SITE SECTION autocad, sketchup, photoshop

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SITE PLAN autocad, photoshop

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WRITING SAMPLES

ARTIFICIAL November 2011 “Artificial” refers to the man-made objects of the world, usually made with the intention of resembling nature and often falling short in that respect. Artificial is the antithesis of natural or genuine and tends to carry the weight of disappointment we may have in our own inventions. Much that is artificial is an attempt to transcend nature, to be better than the real thing, an improvement rather than a substitute. An artificial heart prolongs a life when the natural one will not. Artificial insemination creates life where it may not happen normally. Artificial intelligence performs tasks beyond our natural abilities. But the more common pejorative term comes from things that fail to transcend or improve nature while unabashedly pretending to do so. Artificial flowers, artificial flavor, artificial breasts are blatantly deceptive but also stunningly inferior to the real thing. They are insincere and divorced from any purpose they may have originally had but continue to persist and evolve on their own trajectory increasingly removed from nature. The Artificial in this section can perform multiple functions, unlike their naturally occurring materials. A tree-house provides the qualities of both tree and house while retaining their core benefits and becoming something better. Rock-candy on the other hand looses all function as rock and maintains all function as candy, which begs the question, “why the rock?” It’s rockiness is a deception with the revelation of the lie built into its function. The Aha moment comes in recognizing its artifice and is further enhanced by the qualitative distance between rock and candy. The Artificial pervades our lives to such an extent that we are able to recognize and exploit the ironies it presents as the object itself. The Artificial in this section are a range of objects with varying degrees of separation from nature while always holding nature as their muse.

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MANIFESTO May 2012 “Before I built a wall I’d ask to know What I was walling in or walling out, And to whom I was like to give offense.” - Robert Frost, ‘Mending Wall’ (1914) Landscape architecture as a profession draws practitioners from very diverse areas of expertise. Landscape architects in the United States typically graduate from an MLA program but may have undergraduate degrees in an unrelated profession. The scope of landscape architecture is so large that almost any field of interest can be applied to its practice. If you consider what defines a landscape, where it begins and where it ends, you could find yourself in the domain of geology, agriculture, history, sociology, urban planning, fine art, architecture, ecology, engineering etc. Basically it is everything that is “out there” in the shared realm of public space or the exposed outside. What’s more, everything “out there” is already a byproduct of millenia of use, change, evolution and reuse. There is no original or untouched landscape. Instability is built into any concept of landscape and it is always a living and moving phenomenon. When landscape has no clear beginning or end how can we determine the parameters (and perimeters) of our work? In the normal course of landscape development we tend to deal with the spaces in between already defined places. Landscape is perceived, if it’s noticed at all, as a recessive void containing things that have been discarded, discounted and displaced by the structures that contain our lives. But there is no such thing as empty space however derelict or featureless it may appear to be. Programming demands placed on public space are denser than ever. Urban landscape architecture particularly is becoming an activated system of places rather than pockets of passive space retreating from the city as the poor cousin of a fictional “original nature”. The perception of landscape is changing from a scenic to a relational experience. Today’s landscape user is capable of embracing the scenic with the landfill and sewerage that more often runs through or under it. This is our reality and to lie about it perpetuates the belief that it has simply nothing to do with us. Systems of phytoremediation, urban agriculture, vertical gardens, photovoltaic and hybrid tech etc., becoming visible in public places mark an important shift in thinking about landscape. A patchwork of buildings and lots is not so disjointed or alienating if the fragment you stand on bares evidence of belonging to a larger system of effective action. This is distinct from a site being a microcosm of a larger scale ecosystem because the fragment serves as

a genuine component of an open system, not as its representative. Site boundaries aren’t arbitrary, (they are a factual constraint), but defining site as per the established dimensional basis is short sighted considering the trajectory of that thinking thus far. Rivers will flow where they flow, people will go where they go, but the way they do it is how landscape facilitates a transformation beyond conveyance from A to B. More than anything, landscape architecture is increasingly engaged with the rapidly changing dynamics between rural and urban, local and global. Different scales of systems run through each site but the urban landscape functions on too many levels to effectively activate every one of them at each project site. Attempting to locate and manifest each trail of meaning in a site’s design risks turning it into nowhere. Place-making, at the human scale, is still the central role of landscape architects with real people for clients. Having an identity allows users to recognize themselves within the context you have activated though the design. But this kind of identity isn’t fixed and can’t be conveyed as it is in the traditional scope of rendered images and models. These are important but performative, seasonal, ecological and other time-based aspects of landscape must be communicated in the design process too. If our aim is to draw connections over time and between distant entities, we must understand how those connections will be understood. As hard as it is to anticipate the trajectory of change in the landscape, even with GIS and predictive analysis modeling, it is even harder to anticipate the subjective milieu of every reader of the landscape. The passive reader can be drawn in as an active participant, or not. It is not for us as landscape architects to decide, only to provide the platform for the possibility of that choice. The usable space that we offer up to people is a direct indicator of how we feel about them. Respect can be demonstrated in honesty about the material and historical facts of landscape, availability of options and sensitivity to different modes of experience. Landscape architecture can be an open-ended system of simultaneous encounters out of which an identifiable sense of place can emerge. The design is the catalyst for the process that will unfold from the introduction of a field of possible outcomes.

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PAINTING

‘Interior’ 2003 20” x 20” oil on canvas


‘Orange Tree’ 2001 28” x 28” oil on canvas 53


‘Dyptich’ 2001 40” x 80” oil on canvas


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Greenland 20” x 24” oil on canvas Left: Untitled, 2008 12” x 16” oil on canvas

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RESUMÉ CONTACT email: lararivera@me.com phone: 312.890.9608

EDUCATION 2014 2001 1997

MLA, Illinois Institute of Technology MFA, Glasgow School of Art, Scotland BAFA, University of Cape Town, South Africa

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES 2007 - 2011 Self-employed artist 2006 - 2007

Assistant Curator and researcher for Artlogic, South Africa. Proposal and development of the Joburg Art Fair. Tasks included: research, proposal writing, fund-raising, producing large-scale exhibitions and projects for artists, event organizing, sponsor presentations.

2004 - 2006 Director of Franchise Art Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa. Curated exhibitions and managed the daily functioning of the gallery, including sales, press releases, contracts, installation of shows, graphic design, documentation, marketing. INTERNSHIPS 2014 Design Workshop Inc. (6 months) Project and competition SD & DD, site analysis, masterplanning, document production, illustratives, RFP and interview preparation. 2012 Wolff Landscape Architecture (2 months) (construction documents, planting plans, 3D modeling, rendering and layout for presentations, research, tree tagging.) 2010 2010

Limebarb costume design (3 months) Redmoon Theater costume and build shop (2 months)

AWARDS 2014 2014 2012 2011 2001

Runner Up - Schiff Foundation Fellowship for Architecture and Design ASLA Excellence in the Study of Landscape Architecture Honor Award 1st Prize Winner - EPA Rainworks Challenge, Small Institution catagory Dean’s Scholarship, IIT College of Architecture Darklights Commission for Tramway - Glasgow, Scotland


SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2014 2009 2008 2007 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1998

SKILLS

-Schiff Foundation Fellowship Finalists, Art Institute of Chicago -Crossing, solo exhibition at Estudiotres art gallery, Chicago -Home Show, as featured artist for the inauguration of trickhouse.org -Visiting artist talk, School of the Art Institute of Chicago -Cover image for Denver Quarterly, literary journal, fall issue -Gallery of Forking Paths, group exhibition, Chicago Artists’ Collective -Salem Art Works residency, New York -Bag Factory residency and exhibition, Johannesburg, South Africa -ABSA Atelier, national competition finalists’ exhibition, Johannesburg -Pond, group show, Gibson Street Gallery, Glasgow, Scotland -Eye-level, solo exhibition, Tramway, Glasgow -De Biennale van de Een Minuten, group show, Sandberg Institute, Amsterdam -Diplomatic Immunity, group show, Times Square Gallery, New York -Interim, group show, Macintosh Gallery, Glasgow, Scotland -Solo exhibition, Dorp Street Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa AutoCAD+Civil3D, Adobe CS, Rhino, ArcGIS, MS Office, OSX, freehand drawing, model building, writing, video editing

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

ASLA Water Environment Federation

REFERENCES Mary Pat Mattson Assistant Professor University of Illinois Phone: 312.567.3230 Email: mpm1@illinois.edu

Jon Brooke Design Workshop Office Director, Chicago Phone: 312.404.7935 Email: jbrooke@DesignWorkshop.com

Peter Osler Director of Landscape Architecture Lawrence Technological University Phone: 248.204.2877 Email: polsler@ltu.edu 59


Lara Rivera Portfolio 2015  

landscape architecture

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