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Written by Lapasrada Sevikul


Great Storyteller Paul Harvey “Hello American! I’m Paul Harvey! Stand by for news!,” these familiar words may help you recall memories of a talented man who owned a lot of radio programs that were broadcasted on 1,200 US radio stations and reached to approximately 24 million audiences a week, a socalled radio legend, Paul Harvey. Paul Harvey was originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma. He was born on September 9, 1918, and solely raised by his mom. His dad, who was a policeman, was killed in the line of duty in 1921. Harvey had been involved in broadcast industry for more than 75 years. He started his career when he was fourteen. He joined KVOO in Tulsa by his high school teacher’s recommendation. Moving to Chicago in 1944 where he continued his career at ABC affiliate WENR and worked there ever since. His best known radio series, The rest of the story, which consisted of stories offered as little-known or forgotten facts on a variety of subjects with some key elements held back until the end, began in 1946 as a part of the postwar employment program Jobs for G.I. Joe and finally became its own spot in 1976, which continued its broadcasting for 30 years till it was off-air in 2009 after Harvey’s death. His name has been in many of America’s hall of fames. He was Salesman of the year, Commentator of the year, Person of the year, American of the year as well as was elected to the National Association of Broadcasters National Radio hall of fame. But most of all, he was an influential personality not only in broadcast industry but one of the great salesmen in American history. With his spellbinding voice and a bit of exaggerated pronunciation, he was truly a trustworthy product endorser. He always made every product sound like something ones must have. The reason he certainly knew he could sell products was that he tried all products by


himself, he trusted in every product he was going to read a spot of it. He never took a spot for a product that he didn’t have direct experience. The distinctive points of Harvey were his catchphrases, for instance, “Hello Americans, I'm Paul Harvey. Stand by for news,” which he always used at the beginning of the program or “Paul Harvey, Good day” that was usually used to end his spot, recognizable voice, extended pause and the ability to unveil mystery timely as in his the rest of the story series. All of them were unique and always compelling. Furthermore, in terms of his commercial spots, he saw it as another kind of audio arts. His sophisticate sense in word using and story construction was terrific. He was thoughtful of who his audiences were. Words that were carefully selected and messages that were neatly constructed fostered each product and eventually created purchase action. Harvey’s storytelling techniques are timeless, they still work in the present time. People love mysteries and even more when they are fact. The rest of the story series met the audiences’ need very well. Moreover, his catchy words and tonality are key triggers that catch audiences’ attention. In these times that consumers have a lot of choices, the rise and fall in one’s career could judge in a very short period of time. The faster and better the audiences can recognize you, the longer you’ll stay in the industry. Having said that, it is very crucial for all rookies to learn from Harvey’s works because they contain a lot of useful techniques a good communicator should have. Every work that he produced are crafted. He always chose quality over quantity of money, a lot of research, fact check and listeners’ point of view toward his upcoming topics had been repeatedly done before putting his works on air.


In my perspective, Paul Harvey’s life represents two words, perseverance and integrity. He had truly persevered. Through the hardship of his career path starting from doing menial labor, he spent almost 5 years to become a program director at KVOO and took over 10 years to own a radio program, Jobs for G.I. Joe, on WENR. He had never given up. He was also a man of integrity as Traug Keller, president of ABC Radio Networks, said that he had to bring 30 advertisers that wanted to get on Harvey’s show for just only one to be chosen. Harvey’s rules were that he must have used it and believed in the product. Therefore, all commercial words were really from consumer’s point of view. Being honest to his audiences was his way of work. He surely was a talented man but he also practiced so hard to become where he was. Every step of production, he had hands-on experience. Above all, he loves his job more than anything and when ones put their love in everything they do, an outcome is always worth it. “Work is the most fun of all. I’ve done it for such a long time that I don’t think I could be retained”, said Paul Harvey during the interview with Radio Ink Magazine in 2006. And now you know the rest of the story, Paul Harvey is one of the most beloved person in all American hearts. He had put a lot of contribution to the country, a good exemplar for new generation storyteller. He was a good researcher and consumer analyst, a great writer and also a persuasive person whom I think today’s digital storytellers could keep as a role model. And up until now, I don’t see any storyteller with a similar style as him. You wouldn’t be forgotten, Paul Harvey. “Good day!”

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References • Paul Harvey. (2014, February 6). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18:54, February 20, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php? title=Paul_Harvey&oldid=594249999 • The Rest of the Story. (2014, January 27). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18:55, February 20, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php? title=The_Rest_of_the_Story&oldid=592663863 • Smith, R. (2009). Radio fans mourn paul harvey. Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http:// www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=101321350 • Pratt, L. Harvey, paul. Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http://digital.library.okstate.edu/ encyclopedia/entries/H/HA044.html • Howard, J. (2006). Paul harvey: A legend looks back. Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http:// www.radioink.com/Article.asp?id=1036324&spid=24698 • Associate Press, T. (2009). Paul harvey obituary. Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http:// www.legacy.com/ns/obituary.aspx?n=paul-harvey&pid=124718819 • Levine, K. (2009). Paul harvey... good day. Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http:// kenlevine.blogspot.com/2009/02/paul-harveygood-day.html • Shinkle, K. (2001). Radio broadcaster paul harvey his optimism keeps listeners tune in. Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http://news.investors.com/management-leaders-in-success/ 030501-345794-radio-broadcaster-paul-harvey-his-optimism-keeps-listeners-tuned-in.htm • Pein, D. V. (2013). "The rest of the story" with paul harvey (subject : Lee harvey oswald). Retrieved 02/20, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT_WVliPMAA


• BlackOp, R. (2013). The rest of the story - paul harvey. Retrieved 02, 2014, from http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng11P1J4iYM • ABC News, T. (2009). Remembering PAUL HARVEY | legendary radio broadcaster |. Retrieved 02, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jivF03JahHU

Great storyteller paul harvey  

Analysis paper about the well-known storyteller, Paul Harvey from my graduate school class.

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