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Volume 32, No.16

BY: Stephanie Kirkland, AOS Culinary

What’s better than a group of friends venturing out on a lazy Sunday into the nearby farms of the Hudson Valley? Well, when asking the majority of foodies among us, there is hardly any comparison. I have been to my fair share of you-pick orchards and pumpkin patches deep in the tides of fall, but I was curious of our rich surroundings. I wanted to find a couple of places you could check out for yourselves, even before the glory of fall comes back around. Packing into the car and heading south for just over a half an hour brought us out to Barton Orchards in Poughquag, NY. As we pulled into the lot, a friend had suddenly remembered that they were here once before during the fall season, and recalled picking apples and pumpkins. However, that wouldn’t have helped us. We were there for the late summer harvest, complete with peppers, both mild and hot, cucumbers, eggplant, squash, tomatoes, haricot verts, and raspberries. The first of this seasons’ apples were also ready to be picked just a few weekends ago. Surely, those eager men and women wanted a glimpse into the pies and fruit bowls that are sure to be on their kitchen tables

Pretty in Peach

sooner than I can say. It was complete with a small market, offering traditionally made jams and pastries, as well as a petting zoo of sorts complete with the silent favorite of the group, pigs. Naturally, Barton Orchards offered us the kind of entertainment that brought out college students, but also young families and city dwellers. I could see what the curiosities of my friends were as they all went different ways on the farm. Some went to get apples, while others stuck with grabbing veggies and berries, and they were enjoying themselves. Before we knew it, our little

yellow wagon was filling up and we were ready to head to our next destination. Next, we came back past school, and headed north on Route 9 to Fraleigh’s Rose Hill Farm in Red Hook. They were already down to the last of their summer harvest, and were only offering you-pick You-pick farm at dusk peaches and apples. We were there for the peaches, and had the best time eating, I mean sampling, the white and yellow varieties while roaming through the peach trees, filling up a half of a bushels’ worth to bring back to campus. For the last stop on my list, we went to Brittany Hollow Farm, owned by CIA’s Professor Mosher, where there you can pick your own flowers for $10, bucket of water not included. It serves as an honest policy, where you deposit your money into a small money box, and continue on your way, grabbing scissors or shears at the flower stand, along with your bucket of water in which you put your selected blossoms in. Roaming through the patch we each tried to perfect our own little bouquet to add together as a master arrangement. We even found some hidden talents; florists were hidden among our chef coats. After the longest day of picking I’ve seen yet, I would have to say that the meal we all contributed to at the end of the day was fitting for the exhausted group; a jumble of pasta, where a debate of whether it was to be covered with sauce or gravy ensued, and freshly picked vegetables, was rounded out with garlic bread and sweet peach-raspberry iced tea. As we sat around the table dining on paper plates, our multicolored flowers in the distance, I couldn’t help but remember what had started out as a good morning, turned into an even better afternoon. By the time the day was through, with the veggie, peach, and flower picking behind us, all I could think was

the way we put it all together. My friends and I actively set out to make one meal with each other, by picking, laughing, and shopping for last minute ingredients along the way. A Sunday to remember, and one that we ultimately hope to replicate in the Sundays to come. As we come around the corner to the fall season, I encourage you all to check out what the farms so close to us have to offer, you may see me on a hayride or two once the apples are in a full swing and the pumpkins ready for the taking. However, if you are looking for some fruit picking a little closer to home, check out the berry patch in the back of Rosenthal Hall*. I hear they are just about ready for the taking. Stay tuned for my finds, and I hope to hear of yours. A Plethora of Peach Pickings! Photos Provided by: Stephanie Kirkland (* refer to page 6)

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LA PAPILLOTE

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From the Editor’s Desk

THE NEWSPAPER OF THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA SINCE 1979

When I think of fall, my eyes tend to veer away from the computer screen and into my stacks of magazines. Whether it be the sixSeptember 7, 2012 pound Vogue, or the local Chronogram, Bon PUBLISHER The Student Affairs Division Appetite, or W, I am always immersing myself EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jocelynn M. Neri in the fall editions. This is a time where, I LAYOUT EDITOR Sydney Estrada think, most publications shine. Maybe Anna ADVERTISING MANAGER Sue Haug Wintour created this trend, or perhaps the chill of fall air stirs up new content. Either CONTRIBUTORS way, they are my favorite. With that in mind, I searched and skimmed for Chef Freddy Brash Stephanie Kirkland the best, and the best is what writers of this edition have given. Brooke Maynard Casey Jankoski Michaela Bonds Dan Castro Right now, the Hudson Valley’s produce is flourishing. Minimal Robert Flowers Eric Jenkins Amie Valpone Bianca Swanepoel reports of crops being negatively effected has been the word and every Jeff Levine Giulianna Galiano farmers market I have been to this August featured an abundance of Matt Keene Jeremy Salamon amazing tomatoes, kale, peas, and most importantly: peaches. Stephanie Laura Glenn Samantha Lindmeier has combed through all the postings of you-pick farms to give you Vivian Jago the details of which have good crops now. If you happen to be more interested in foraging, however, Laura has some tips for you on how to avoid getting tricked by glowing ghouls (otherwise known as Jack-OCOMPACT La Papillote, the Newspaper of the Culinary Institute of AmerLantern mushrooms). We kept it local, regardless of your interests this ica since 1979, is dedicated to respecting the mission, history and values of the college. Our primary purpose is to report the fall, so consider it an incentive to get off campus for a day to explore! news of the institution to the students and other members of the campus community. We examine contemporary issues of the food service and hospitality industries to inform, challenge and develop the minds of students as they aspire to leadership roles in their chosen profession. We reflect the diverse views of the student body and provide a forum for civil discussion. Above all else, in our reporting and features, we strive to be accurate, fair, unbiased and free from distortion. Whenever we portray someone in a negative light or accuse a party of wrongdoing, we will make a real effort to obtain and print a response from that subject in the same issue. We will not plagiarize. Articles and features are expected to be independent assessments on a topic by an individual author. The views expressed are those of the author’s alone. They do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of La Papillote or its staff, nor do they represent the views or opinions of The Culinary Institute of America, or any entity of, or affiliated with the college.

FOOD REVIEW POLICY

As a valuable part of our content, La Papillote offers restaurant reviews. It is in the best interest of our readership to be honest, accurate and fair in providing information and judgment on these establishments. Reviews will reflect the writer’s opinions about the menu, atmosphere and service. Whenever possible, reviews will be conducted with complete anonymity. Permission from the restaurants will not be secured prior. All issues of La Papillote are available online, therefore, the critiqued restaurants, along with the public, can view editions at anytime on the web.

If you are like me and happen to get a little excited over the switch from bathing suits and jean shorts to trench coats and scarves, then Michaela’s trend report is worth looking into. She is a savvy and smart fashion guru that will help you adjust your wardrobe, without emptying your wallet. Also noteworthy are all of the interesting restaurants that are recommended this issue. From the dietary restricted to British comforts, we have the details! One that Giulianna wrote, is a mystery worth solving; can you guess which restaurant she is covering?

In short, it is time to get those fall clothes out and get your fill of local produce! It won’t be long now before the chill takes over.

With love & fire,

EDITORIAL POLICY

La Papillote welcomes submissions of work from students, chefs and outside professionals. The decision to print is based on the following criteria: quality of content, value of content to our readers, quality of writing, originality, objectivity, layout, and verifiability. Besides the Editor, there are two Copy Editors who read over submitted articles. Major changes will be reported to writers before the issue goes out. However, any other changes that need to be edited close to the deadline may or may not be forwarded to writers. This is due to the fact of lack of time. It is asked for writers to trust the Editor’s decision at this point during layout. Please direct all submissions to: Jocelynn M. Neri, Editor-In-Chief at LaPapillote@mycia.net

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Letters to the Editor may not exceed 250 words and they should be exclusive to La Papillote. In selecting letters, the editors try to present a balance of views. We reserve the right to edit for space, clarity, civility and accuracy, and will send you the edited version before publication. If your letter is selected, we will try to reach you in necessary cases to verify the letter’s authenticity, to clarify your motivation, to clarify your relation to the subject for our readers or to verify facts or sources. Letters to the Editor may be sent to LaPapillote@ mycia.net with “Letter to the Editor - For Publication” in the subject line. Please include your phone number.

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September 7, 2012

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BY: Chef Freddy Brash, Culinary Arts Instructor So many times in my career I was troubled by which path to take. I wondered if I should go the French classical route or stick to the Continental cuisine that I am so familiar with. I also took into account the idea of working corporate dining, thinking that it would be easier. Throughout that time I found it is not easy to come to a decision. In the old days, most graduates automatically went to French restaurants. That is what style of cooking we were taught here at school, so to improve on those techniques it was crucial to proceed to kitchens like that. An issue with that style of cooking, though, is you have to be a perfectionist and obsessive compulsive to boot, which doesn’t help matters. I did play it safe when I went on externship; I went back home to Jersey and worked at a local club so I could live with Mom and Dad. This was fine at the time, as I learned when I was there. Sometimes I think that I should have pushed myself and gone to the big apple, but that was too scary a feat. Fear is a funny thing, it does push me and motivate me but it has held me back from taking some risks in life. My friend Raj Brandston, who is a CIA graduate, also worked at the French restaurants in New York City and then moved to Los Angeles. He worked at a company that prepares meals that are delivered to homes. It was a healthy diet plan that, as he explained to me, produced thousands of meals every

week. In short, it is important to realize that you never know where you might work or where your interests lie. Another friend, Hernando Hoyos, worked with us for many years at La Mangoeire then branched off to Aquavit. In the end it really elevated his career. Now, Hernando works as a personal chef in the Hamptons and cooks a lot on the beach. We did so when I visited him last summer and, I must say, to BBQ right on the beach is a spiritual experience in itself. Another interesting story about a chef is of Brian Gildersleeve who never went to culinary school and worked right along side of me and many of my CIA colleagues in all those French restaurants. After some time he did some self-searching on his vacations to Monasteries. He still remained a cook, though, once the monks found out his hidden talents in the kitchen. Somehow he would always end up in the kitchen again. My friend Daniel Gendron, who is a graduate, worked in Italian, French and American restaurants for many years before coming to the Hudson Valley. He now has a catering company in Rhinebeck and will soon be opening a small 10 seat restaurant, which is a dream come true. What I am sharing with you, chefs of the future, is that your externship and career lie ahead of you and what path to choose might come easy to some, but not at all to others.

Fear is a funny thing that could push us, but if you know it’s fear preventing you from taking that next step then fear is foolish. Something to think about! Photo: http://1.bp.blogspot.com

BY: Giulianna Galiano, BPS Culinary, bestcookingschoolblog.typepad.com

(Picture Clue…) Photo Provided by Giulianna Galiano

NYC Restaurant #1 Nestled in the Upper West Side is a superb eatery that is well noted for their charcuterie and quality service. As the taxi dropped off Jocelynn Neri and I at the entrance of the restaurant, we were a bit baffled as to where the entrance was. Amongst the numerous outdoor tables, there was a slim pathway to our destination. A narrow, clean opening marked the direction to our cozy booth against the wall of a bunch of paintings showcasing blush prints of wine. A modern touch, the ceiling was curved, almost resembling a wine cellar. A large community table was towards the back of the restaurant while the bar was full of ritzy New Yorkers ordering cocktails after work in-between the large bottles of wine decorating the counter. Jocelynn and I were greeted within five minutes by a young, jazzed up server who seemed very enthusiastic about his work. Ironically, Jocelynn knew a friend that worked at the restaurant and we didn’t know what the kitchen had planned for us. Our server assured both of us that we would be served an intermezzo or extra plates here and there throughout the meal. The bread served was fresh and warm, with soft butter. The server was also very considerate about the allergies and dietary restrictions at our table, but didn’t really substitute the bread choice for a glutenfree option. Anyway, we glanced over the wine list and I selected a soft, blush rosé wine to start off with. Jocelynn wanted champagne but unfortunately, there was none in stock to order by the glass. Instead, our server suggested a fine cava, which made for a pleasing substitution. The special menu for the evening consisted of specific meat cuts and charcuterie from a whole hog (from nose to tail). Not too overwhelmed by the choices, Jocelynn and I decided to order a small charcuterie plate, steak tartar and pork belly from the menu. Our taste buds were watering, craving delicious pork after a long day of traveling to the city. In fact, I had to stop myself from eating a dirty water hotdog on the way over.

The charcuterie plate was delightful in each and every way. I am not a fan of liver whatsoever, but the chicken liver was mild and creamy, soft in texture, with hints of fat. The pickled carrots and mushrooms were tender to the bite and were spiked with pungent vinegar. The beef cheek pâté and country rabbit terrine were luscious. The rabbit resembled the flavor of chicken noodle soup since it was mixed with carrots and celery, a warm bite of sheer comfort. As for the steak tartar, the presentation reminded us of a 1985 wedding banquet, a bit tacky with romaine hearts sticking off the plate dotted with capers. However, the creamy emulsion along with the bits of raw steak made for a scrumptious bite. The pork belly was a bit soft in texture and sinewy, probably due to the quality of hog butchered, but the warm potato salad meshed well with the meat. As for dessert, we were a bit hesitant to ask our server what we should order, thinking the Chef would be bringing out some goodies. In the meantime, our after dinner drinks were served, the one cocktail a bit too sweet for a daiquiri, but the wine on the house, not too sweet and reminiscent of a mild Tokaji. Dessert was fabulous. The colors on the plates were vibrant and we weren’t quite sure what each dish was because the elements were so intricate. The macaroons were very similar to the ones of Chef Migoya’s design at Apple Pie Bakery, but petite in size. The restaurant indeed took care of us, buying our dessert drinks and bringing luscious, sweet treats to our table at the end of the meal. Last but not least, the service was helpful in pointing out a great bar for after dinner drinks. The bathroom was properly decorated as a wine cellar you would find in France. We did not feel ashamed at all dropping money on this restaurant, for the experience in itself was enjoyable and memorable. After all, isn’t that what fine dining is about? Feeling lucky in knowing which restaurant Giulianna reviewed? Email lapapillote@mycia.net to find out!


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LA PAPILLOTE

BY: Jeff Levine, j_levine@culinary.edu Hyde Park, NY, August 29, 2012: The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) is now serving only fair trade coffee to students and staff at the Hyde Park, NY campus of the World’s premier culinary college. For years, the not-for-profit CIA has served fair trade sourced coffee at the five restaurants on campus. Now a custom fair trade organic “Chef’s Blend” coffee is being used in all the student and staff dining facilities as well. Fair Trade @ The CIA, a new student club on campus, raised awareness of this issue among fellow students, faculty, and staff over the past few years. Through those students’ efforts, the college’s food purchasing department sought out purveyors who could provide fair trade coffee in the quantities required on a college campus. “Fair trade farms are vital to the success of our expanding industry and integral to what we teach our students,” says Anthony DiBenedetto, manager of food purchasing. “We want to contribute to the long-term success of these farmers in tropical climates just as we have been doing for decades with local producers in the Hudson Valley. As leaders in the industry, this action by the CIA makes a huge statement.” DiBenedetto negotiated a deal with Chris’ Coffee Service to get the fair trade organic coffee at the same price as the coffee previously served on campus. That’s a big savings for a campus that uses 300 pounds of coffee a week in its student and staff dining facilities. “The CIA has immense buying power and influence. We knew that if it chose to purchase fair trade coffee it could make a noticeable impact in the fair trade coffee market,” says senior Claire Ryan, president of Fair Trade @ The CIA. “Our organization combines students’ passion for food with their interest in social justice. The success of this project shows what students can achieve with the right level of commitment and organization.” The CIA also uses free trade pineapples, bananas, and other produce, along with chocolate and tea, as available. Photo: http://chieforganizer.org

Intercollegiate Fall sports are here and three of the CIA’s most dominate teams have headed back to work. Captains Rob Chambers and Pierre Mewissen look to send the men’s soccer team back to the championship game to handle some unfinished business from last year. This year they have started off on the right track with a 5-0 win over The King’s College in their first game of the season. Entering only their second season as a varsity team, the women of the CIA’s volleyball team are looking to defend their tournament championship from 2011. The last fall sport starting is the cross country team. Both the men and women are hoping to continue on with the success they had last season. Come out and support you’re classmates as they look to dominate the league with another successful season! Intramurals Flag Football is starting this September! Make sure to sign your team up in the Rec Center before the deadline. With the amount of interest we’ve received so far its turning into a very exciting and competitive season.

BY: Dan Castro, BPS Culinary The Culinary Institute of America hosted the volunteers, and candidates, as this turned out to be Certified Master Chef exam this past August, which at least a sixteen-hour day. The first part of the day will be the last time for eight years. The reasoning was international day where chefs had to make three behind this, according to Chef Brad Barnes, test dishes: Osso Bucco Milanese (Braise Veal Shank), administrator, is that the American Culinary Fricassee of Pork with Pizokels (similar to Spatzle) Federation would like to expand the horizons of the and Paella Con Verduras (a Spanish Rice Dish). examination. After this initial four hour window, Chefs were given One of the possible locations for the next CMC a half hour break, but then had to go back later for Exam is the Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena, CA. the second part which is cooking from the final By expanding the horizons of this examination, it market basket where each protein and vegetable had provides the same opportunities for students in the to be used. new test location that the students from Culinary As one watches the exam, the ideal of perfection Institute have, such as networking or a potential job is tested. What is perfect to the candidates? What is after graduation in exchange for sacrificing school perfect to the chef-judges? As an assistant, each plate days in order to assist the chef-candidate earn the turned out beautifully, but it was a minor part in the title of Certified Master Chef. overall judging, as other factors went into it as well, The Certified Master Chef exam is a seven-day such as organization and flavor. grueling test, both physically and mentally. Each In the end, only one chef out of seven attained day has its own segment, testing the candidate’s the title: Chef Jason Hall, from Florida. Those who backgrounds throughout their careers. On the first joined his victory were the CMC Judges, as well as day, chefs were given a choice to pick three market the apprentices and the general assistants who were baskets for the nutrition segment. The goal here is to behind the scenes. Chefs Ryan Baxter and Paul develop a four course meal with only 1,000 calories Kampff, who both cooked in the final day did not with a balance of 15-20 percent protein content, get the title immediately. However, they were given 45-60 carbohydrate content and 25-30 percent fat a second chance to redo it on a specified time and content. It became a difficult challenge, as portion date. Time and ability will tell them if they get the sizes and seasoning level were important to consider. title or not. Title or none, there is a silver lining The second and third days were focused on Garde in each of the chef’s experience. After all, a cook Manger and the Chefs were given a twelve-hour knows how and a chef knows why. window to prep and a three-hour window to present. Another challenge here for the Chefs was plating their showpieces in humidity, which can ruin the chemise on their trays. After this day, despite each candidate presenting beautiful plates, half of the Chefs were eliminated. The fourth day was dedicated to Classical Cooking, based off Auguste Escoffier’s book, Le Guide Culinaire. Here, each chef was given a set of proteins (tenderloin/monkfish or rack of lamb/ cod), and had to design a menu based off the book. Some of the dishes included Consomme aux Quenelles a la Moelle, and Cabillaud Crème au Gratin. Among the audience were several Certified Executive Chefs, who are one step below the CMC title. They perceive that this part of the test is most difficult, and that whichever candidates passed are nearly guaranteed the title. The fifth day was dedicated to freestyle. They were given a market basket, but the Chef’s took this opportunity as a chance to show their creative cooking, showcasing their styles of specialty. The sixth day was dedicated to international cooking, as the chefs were assigned dishes that were designed to celebrate a festive occasion. Some of these include Matambre (Rolled Stuffed Flank Steak), or Cantonese-Style Steamed Fish. Day Seven was dedicated to baking and pastry. The basic premise during this portion was to demonstrate basic proficiency in certain areas such Chef Hall and Student Shaza Banna as plated deserts, puff pastries, and quick leavened Photo by: Dan Castro products. The final day was stressful for apprentices,


September 7, 2012

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BY: Vivian Jago, AOS Culinary As September approaches, it is time again for the second annual Food is Life: Sustainable Conference. After a successful first year, the Culinary Institute of America has chosen to hold another conference this fall to promote, “knowledge regarding dynamic issues of sustainability in the field of culinary arts and sciences.” To do so, the CIA will host a farmer’s market, school lunch challenge, and pig roast on Sunday, September 23, 2012. Although this year’s event will be shorter than last year, lasting only one day, it will still be filled with many activities and opportunities to learn about cooking and eating sustainably. Students will have the opportunity to purchase produce, meats, and dairy from the Farmer’s Market on Sunday morning. Featuring local product, students will have the opportunity to talk with farmers to learn more about where their produce and meats are coming from and have the chance to develop relationships with farmers and businesses in the area. In the afternoon, after the Farmer’s Market, will be the School Lunch Challenge. The competition will take place in the Student Recreation Center. The teams will be competing to produce healthy and delicious meals for school children, on a limited budget, and following nutritional guidelines from the FDA. They will each present their dishes to a panel of judges that includes Tim Cipriano, Ann Cooper, Marydale Debor, and Susan Grove. The winning team will win a $400 cash prize as well as gift certificates to local restaurants. To finish the day, multiple student clubs will be hosting a pig roast. This fantastic meal will feature the use of Caja China Cookers, and dishes from multiple clubs. SACE will be providing a whole roast pig, charcuterie, and a variety of side dishes. Other clubs, such as the Brew and Mixology Clubs, will be serving beer and soft drinks. The Baking and Pastry Society will serve desserts, including apple crumble, chocolate chip, and cinnamon cookies. Plates will be available for $5, beer for $3 and soda for $1. The Reckless Road Band will also be featured Sunday night playing classic rock cover tunes. Taking place on the lawn behind Rosenthal, this year’s Food is Life: Sustainable Conference is certain to be a success. Stop by to pick up produce for the weekend and get a great dinner for only $5. Enjoy the fall weather and all it has to bring by stopping by this year’s Sustainable Conference!

BY: Brooke Maynard, ACF Team Leader, MIT at Caterina de’Medici Chefs, restaurateurs, and students from all around the world are getting geared up for a rigorous season of competition. A season that takes more time and money than most can afford. So why is the competition circuit still alive and strong and what are the benefits? From personal experience I can attest to the education and career benefits of competition, regardless of the cost benefits of winning. In late summer, 2010, I entered my very first competition for Grey Poupon in Chicago. After two more busy years and an additional eight competitions, I now look forward to the excitement early fall brings. This is the time to discover other competitions that are arising and who will be the new competitors to watch. One popular place where the competitive flock is the New York Food Show. It is an annual display of baking, pastry and cold food platters of many kinds that shows many dimensions of creativity over a span of three days. Many do this show for the pride and the gold medal, while others do it for the annual tradition. Some join in because of the need to push themselves to new heights. It is what we do as chefs, even the inexperienced ones. Most recently at the CIA, we have seen Chef Jason Hall successfully attain his Certified Master Chef certification, Chef Rich Rosendale win gold at the Bocuse d’Or and Rose Weiss win gold at the Bocuse d’Or commis competition. Not only are

these major accomplishments in their lives, but also pinnacle points in their careers. As a result of their success, they have become figureheads of people that many culinarians look up to and set their goals to be like. Very soon here we will send Daniela Vazquez Monge to Valladolid, Spain to compete in the International Tapas Competition! While in Spain,

The Student ACF Team 2011 Photo Provided by: Brooke Maynard

she will have to complete 15 plated tapas competing against 14 other students from around the world. Last year while I was in Valladolid competing in this competition, I had not yet competed overseas and

was nervous and anxious about finishing. Despite a few hurdles, I managed well. I learned to always have a back up plan and a lot about how a student competition can be executed properly. A competition team that is on a more gradual scale, and one that is more applicable to us as students is the Jones Dairy Farm student team. This is a team that competes in student ACF competitions. I joined this team 2 years ago and not only has this team given me some of the most useful competition experience at CIA and a handful of mentors that I look to for advice about almost anything, but it has taught me how to work with a team. Months of meetings, training, organization, practices, critiques and a lot of coffee all lead up to two hours of cooking. When we are in the kitchen, it has to be a perfectly choreographed dance floor. Being a part of the student team has made me more efficient every day and has taught me how to make every measured step count. When being judged on every move you make you are forced to be almost perfect. Paying attention to details as important as if there’s a speck of parsley on the countertop makes you strive to be cleaner and more efficient in everything you do. This style of cooking begins to apply to growth in the kitchen and is something that constantly evolves.

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CENTER SPREAD

BY: Michaela Bonds, BPS Culinary

LA PAPILLOTE


September 7, 2012

BY: Robert Flowers, AOS Culinary As the temperature falls outdoors this autumn, the heat continues to billow in the kitchen. In modern times, the culinary industry has grown, surpassing the restaurants and the chefs on the TV screen; the culinary craze, or more appropriately, crave, has overflowed into the homes of viewers and diners, pushing interest into the kitchen and it seems that almost everyone today is a foodie as a result. Everyone seems to want to be like the professionals with their toques. The couch potatoes have turned to making mash potatoes and cookbooks have been serving a new purpose in the kitchen; no longer bound to the dusty house library, the books are actually being used. Nathan Myhrvold and the Modernist Cuisine team, who hold the key to unlocking the secrets of modern cuisine, have recognized the rise of the home cook’s enthusiasm. They have realized the potential of the athome cook and decided to open the door for them to employ the ingredients and techniques of today into the home kitchens of tomorrow, or more accurately, October. On October 8, 2012, Modernist Cuisine At Home will be released in North America. While everybody may want to be a cook, not everyone has the resources or dedication to do so. Myhrvold has created a book for the home and professional cooks alike. Now all can learn modernist cuisine from the comfort and familiarity of their own kitchen and create a premium meal. Using Myhrvold’s roadmap, home cooks will be guided around less than conventional home appliancessuch as immersion circulators, centrifuges, and rotorstator homogenizers- if such pieces haven’t made it to their countertops by now. Myhrvold assures that Modernist Cuisine At Home isn’t a copout that admits to the surrealistic nature of the first addition. However, he insists it is a tool that will make cooking a reality for the greater masses, simplifying, but by no means “dumbing down” modernist cuisine. It is a more accessible and manageable version of its predecessor, weighing in at only 456 pages, 1,982 less than the original series, and only costing $140, a steal compared to the $625 that

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Modernist Cuisine demanded. Myhrvold is adamant that the production of Modernist Cuisine At Home is not a negative reflection of Modernist Cuisine and that the book wasn’t created to make up for an inability to move first publication. He says, on the contrary, that Modernist

Cuisine continues to do well but was intended for a smaller audience and leaves a larger crowd of home cooks hungry, scrambling to accomplish improvised recipes from within the set, and thusly he and his crew wrote a book that would demonstrate how to do just that. I recall a discussion that reverberated among a CIA classroom. The debate stood on the premise of whether or not books of the Modernist Cuisine caliber, including those from renowned chefs and restaurants, such as French Laundry, Ad Hoc At Home, and Alinea, were more than a philosophical luxury. Some argued that though

BY: Laura Glenn, BPS Culinary What is the smell of fall for you? Is it crisp apples, spicy cinnamon, or damp leaves? For me, nothing is as evocative of the beginning of fall then the smell of apricot. Not the fruit, mind you, but the bright yellow fungus that is often considered king of wild mushrooms: Chanterelles. Chanterelles begin to blossom in late summer and can continue into November. There are many varieties and they offer the novice mycologist a special opportunity. They are arguably the most delicious wild mushroom, with a unique flavor and a bright apricot scent, and are very easy to identify. However, I say this with a caveat: they are very easy to identify once you have become familiar with their look-a-like. To most mycophagists, the difference between yellow chanterelles and Jack-O-Lanterns, their most similar imposter, are as obvious as the difference between a pear and an apple. Without any research, though, they can be mixed up. It is crucial to study before hunting for Chanterelle, as the JackO-Lantern is poisonous. However, there are several clear differences and the thoughtful mushroom hunter can easily master the Chanterelle. Chanterelles are unique in that they do not have gills in the way that most mushrooms do. Instead, they have fat ridges that take the place and run from the stem up to the lip of the mushroom. There, they fork into several vein-like lines. The difference

the book was grand in size, inundated page by page with beautiful, high resolution photographs rarely seen anywhere else and framed within a durable showcase, it was nothing more than a showpiece. It was said that if one could even get a hold of it, considering releasing a grip on a hefty $625 in exchange of the book set, it was unlikely that home cooks had the tools or finesse to turn the ink into a saucy dish, even with the instruction provided. Right in time for the fall season, this new novelty will offer user-friendly recipes ranging from wings to roasts. While there are no turkeys on this table of contents, other recipes to practice before Thanksgiving are mac and cheese, soups, custards, and pies. Modernist Cuisine At Home strives to teach what we are taught as CIA professionals: improvisation. It demonstrates with the same large and vivid photos as in the first edition how to transform what you have into what you want, adeptly using whatever tools and ingredients you have on hand. The book does suggest the reader own some reasonable equipment, but Nathan Myhrvold says that his new book also teaches you how to maximize the features of the tools you already own. One lesson the book has also reminded me of is the need to remember who your audience is, remember who you are teaching, and remember who you are cooking for. Avant garde presentations of exotic flavors and ingredients are a noble way to dish out your talent, but not if your diners are unwilling, or even unable, to digest what you have set before them. Sometimes, you cannot cook just what you like to cook, but you must cook what the guest will eat, whether it be in the “classroom”, the industry, or sometimes at home. Modernist Cuisine At Home will not be released until October 8, but in anticipation of a great demand the Modernist team has made the book available for preorder. Photo: media.lehighvalleylive.com

*Editors note: it is against school policy to pick wild forage on campus grounds. Refer to page 68 of your student handbook for details. between a gill and ridge might be confusing, but gathered, lay out the mushrooms you want to dry once you have seen images comparing the underside on a sheet pan. Set the oven at the lowest possible of a Jack-O-Lantern (which has gills) and a yellow temperature (150-200˚F) and leave the tray in over chanterelle, the difference will be clear. The Jack-Onight. Anyone who has an oven that runs hot would Lantern’s gills are thin and tightly packed, compared benefit from leaving the door open during the to the broad and spread out Chanterelle ridges. The process. The dried mushrooms store for months and Jack-O-Lantern also has the curious oddity of being are easily reconstituted. Some avid mushroom lovers very bioluminescent and a hillside can be found believe that the dried mushrooms have a superior glowing on a proper night. Though these imposters flavor to raw mushrooms. are deadly, the image of the mushrooms glowing Chanterelles are a unique joy of the fall season, green in the dark is surreal and a real treat for anyone and with a modest amount of research most anyone who camps in the woods often. can easily find, and enjoy, their own harvest. Despite their prize status, Chanterelles can be Jack-O-Lantern, the tricky imposter! surprisingly common. I often find them as I walk Photo By: wildmanstevebrill.com from Roth to the Rec Center*. The Hudson Valley is full of them, and during their peak season I find them on nearly every walk. The only hardship is that the individual mushrooms have a short life so once one blooms, it must be picked within a day or two to be prime condition. The mushrooms are a favorite of bugs and wild animals, too, and any left on the ground for too long will become damaged. Fortunately, they will bloom many times throughout the season and any period soon after a heavy rainfall is sure to turn up a good crop. Chanterelles can often be found in large groups The real deal: Chanterelle and since they dry so easily, heavy harvests can Photo By: mushroomthejournal.com be stored well. Once the bountiful crop has been


LA PAPILLOTE

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BY: Jeremy Salamon, AOS Culinary No more oversized fountain drinks? A prohibition on salt? Pizza as a vegetable? 0Why ask yourself these questions? Because we are in the middle of a political food fight; just don’t paint a picture of politicians battling each other with baguettes! This fight is a campaign to better benefit our health...or is it? Recently, Mayor Bloomberg has waged a war against obesity. According to the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, about 34% of New York adults are overweight and 22% are obese. In his efforts to repair the issue, Bloomberg is campaigning against the consumption of big gulps, or any fountain drink over 16 ounces. The law would affect restaurants, delis, movie theaters, stadiums and even food trucks. It’s great to see our government concerned about our health but many have wondered if this infringing upon our rights, and freedom of choice. In a recent NY1-Marist poll 53% of New Yorker’s were against the ban, 42% agreed that the so called big gulps should be banned and half had never heard of a drink large enough to ban. In a recent interview Bloomberg stated, “This is something we think we have the legal authority to do. We¹re not taking away anybody’s right to do something; we’re simply making it different for them in how they do it.” Against these words, protesters took to the streets in the “Million Big Gulp March” back in July. Chants demanding, “drink free or die!” echoed through the city park. The ban could be in effect after 3 hearings, one of which took place in July. Although the size of a New Yorker’s soda may be reduced, the flavor won’t be affected. However, soon enough, residents may find that their food is lacking a certain seasoning. Brooklyn Lawyer Felix Ortiz proposed in the recent Assembly Bill 10129: “No owner or operator of a restaurant in this state shall use salt in any form in the preparation of any

food for consumption by customers of such restaurant, including food prepared to be consumed on the premises of such restaurant or off the premises.” In other words, it’s a prohibition against salt. Any “saltbreaker” will be fined $1,000 if caught. As defenders of the white granules, chefs have taken a stand. In a 2010 statement, celebrity Chef Tom Colicchio (Top Chef/ Colicchio & Sons) said, “If they banned salt, nobody would come here anymore (New York).” Sorry East coasters, if you think California had it bad with the ban of foie gras, think again. Currently, there is no word of the bill’s progress. We’ve covered drinks and flavoring agents but now we’ll end with a trip to the Twilight Zone. Pizza is being considered a vegetable. Although its fun, as well as troubling, to fathom the thought of pizza seeds that sprout dough and toppings, is a gross misconception. Congress is out to classify tomato paste on pizza as a vegetable, though tomato is technically a fruit. Apparently, a 1/8 of a cup of tomato paste is considered to have as much nutritional value as a half cup of vegetables (or fruit). The USDA & Congress drafted a bill back in late 2011 to bring tomato paste up to par of other fruit products. Unfortunately, the bill was scrapped so you won’t find tomato paste in your farmers market anytime soon. 0To review, we cracked down on your big glup, gazed into a “no-salt” future and debunked the “pizza is a vegetable” rumor. The one thing they all have in common is a health conscience platform. Is it really bad that higher authorities want to keep us healthy? Then again don’t we have control of our own bodies and what we do with them? You decide. More than likely food laws will continue to intrigue and mystify us; so get your baguettes, pay attention and be active because we are in this food fight for the long run.

A hearty meal from Rock Da Pasta Photo By: Bianca Swanepole

Rock Da Pasta’s Humble Crumble Photo By: Bianca Swanepole

Kingston, NY

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Small Quaint Restaurant & Full Bar Excellent Clientelle and Reputation

Mayor Bloomberg discussing his new initiative Photo: breitbart.com

Premium Location for Lunch and Dinner

Fully Furnished - Turn Key Operation

(845) 417-7746


September 7, 2012

BY: Bianca Swanepole, AOS Baking & Pastry From a lifestyle-caused food desert, to an overflow of magnificent carbs, I have had my own glory in the last few days, in a mission to find gluten free alternatives. My salad bar routine has been diverted thankfully to the few local joints that have gluten free menus. And I’m not just talking about “please, no croutons” kind of gluten free. I am talking about hot dogs and some Hey Jude pasta. I think we can all agree that a sausage in a folded slice of gluten free bread is just not right, but is so good. Soul Dog is a small funky bistro in Poughkeepsie, and it has a gluten free alternative for every dish. It can be a little difficult coming to this joint, though, seeing that they are only open three days a week. With its turquoise and pea-green painted exterior, it is not that hard to miss. Inside, it has a 1950’s dinermeets-modern-picnic feel to it. At Soul Dog, you can build your own hot dog (normal or gluten free bun) with a choice of vegetarian, Applegate chicken, all beef or Italian sausage dog, and then add a choice of toppings. I recommend the coleslaw, peanut sauce and caramelized onions trio. I had been craving a hot dog since the weekend before Fourth of July and I finally got my fix. I also had the gluten free mac ‘n’ cheese. The chipotle flakes gave it a good edge, however the sauce was just a little too rich on the cheese and cream for me. We enjoyed the rest of our meal with mason-jarred sweet tea, coffee and gluten free cupcakes. I think that my dear friend, Joe Broaden, was experiencing a cupcake for the first time. He took that first bite and was immediately inebriated

FOOD & BEVERAGE

by its sweet tenderness. Soul Dog also offers a gluten free beer on their menu. Monday night I decided to take my car and leave campus again for a little mental break. Emma Davis and I drove over the Hudson Bridge to downtown New Paltz. We went to a restaurant called Rock Da Pasta. Everything oozed groovy, from the décor and music, to the menu options; it had ornaments like electric guitar bar stools and Bob Marley music setting the mood. We ordered some chai tea to begin our meal and decided to share a pasta dish. I thought the Stevie Ray-Violi looked good, but we went for the Hey Jude. Cream sauce with meaty mushrooms, caramelized onions, sweet balsamic reduction drizzled and just the right amount of garlic to round off all the flavors. Mind blowing. Gluten free of course, with a side of gluten free garlic bread (personally, I would have liked more garlic on my bread) and a side salad with their homemade sun dried tomato vinaigrette. To top off the meal was the Humble Apple Crumble, warmed up and ready with drizzled caramel sauce on top of the oat free, gluten free crust. It was, by far the best meal I have had in a while. On the ride back to campus we listened to Bon Iver; it was that emotional of a food experience. There are a few other places that can accommodate. Gigi in Rhinebeck now has a gluten free pizza crust. Domino’s has a gluten free crust also, however, they advise serious Celiacs to stay away; it is really just for the experimentalists and newbies out there. Have I had one? Heck yeah! Of course I want pizza delivered to me at midnight,

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thank you very much. When it comes to any restaurant, you should always speak with the manager or executive chef with regards to food sensitivities. Celiac is a little more serious, and so you may even want to call ahead of time and make sure that precautions are taking place, such as separate fryers, cuttings boards, pasta water and toaster. Thankfully it is becoming a wider practice and the general public is becoming more educated on the topic. Let us just hope in a few years time, while having this lifestyle, our wallets can take a breather.

Hot-diggity! A classic Soul dog, sans gluten

Curb appeal of Soul Dog Photos By: Bianca Swanepole

BY: Casey Jankoski, BPS Culinary Many of you may have noticed that fall is on its way. The leaves will start to turn lovely shades of yellow, red and orange before gently falling to the ground. The chills of a soft breeze on cool autumn nights are setting in quickly as well. While many people are feeling the pull of pumpkin on all their drinks, from coffee to cocktails, let us not forget falls other favorite beverage: apple cider! The Hudson Valley is one of the best areas to get your apple love on. There are dozens of orchards that are pick-your-own and offer a wide variety of products made with apples. Cider has a rich history in our country, going all the way back to colonial times. It was often the drink of choice because of the plentiful apple bounty available in the Northeast, and if there is something that can be fermented, people will find a way. It would not be uncommon for our founding fathers to drink cider, Tomas Jefferson even made his own. Many of us are also familiar with the story of Johnny Appleseed, traversing the country to plant orchards. Well, those apples were not exactly the eating kind; they were the alcohol making kind. They were usually used for cider or the stronger applejack. Much like beer for a majority of Europe, hard cider was drank because of the rampancy of water borne illnesses. During prohibition, many orchards switched to growing the eat-in-hand varieties of apples we know today, but just as all things old become new again, so has hard apple cider. As a part of an initiative to increase apple production in the Hudson Valley, Glynwood farms started The Apple Project. Their goal is to empower the small farmer and increase “apple entrepreneurship” by giving farmers resources to acquire new knowledge and skills, encourage the diversification of apple varieties, and create a support for the growing market of hard cider and apple based

spirits. Two of the programs that are initiatives of The Apple Project is the first ever Cider Week, from October 12-21 in New York City and the Hudson Valley, where there will be a range of events and restaurants focusing on the excellent beverage of cider and derivatives. The second project is the Hudson Valley Cider Route. This is a collective resource where you can see where the local farmers are that are making both sweet and hard cider, where you can pick your own apples, and where heirloom apples are grown. New York State is the second largest producer of apples in the nation, with an impressive production of 29.5 million bushels annually. For cider production, different varieties are used than what would normally be used for eating. Those for pressing have a very high sugar, acid and tannin content, which is not pleasing to consume raw. There are over 100 types of cider apples that are categorized into four types of cider apples: sweets (low tannin, low acid), sharps (high acid, low tannin), bittersweets (low acid, high tannin), and bittersharps (high in acid, high in tannin). Many ciders are blended to achieve a perfect balance of acid and tannin. There are several orchards making traditional hard cider in the area, probably the most well known is Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery. Most famous for its Doc’s Draft Hard Apple Cider, this location has certainly built a reputation for itself. Warwick Valley opened the first new distillery in the Hudson Valley since Prohibition in 2001 and today Doc’s Draft Hard Cider and American Fruits Distillery are well known around the country, available for distribution in 14 states and ship nationwide. They currently carry three types of cider: their original hard apple cider, a pear cider and a raspberry flavored apple cider. Their original apple

cider received a gold medal in the Hudson Valley wine competition and 85 points from beer advocate. A hidden treasure for hard cider is located just up the road in Red Hook, Montgomery Place Orchards & Annandale Cidery. For over 15 years, husband and wife, Doug and Talea Fincke have been making hard cider. For the past 8 years, they have had the opportunity to share it with the public, for sale from their farm stand along Route 9G. They use over 60 varieties of heirloom and commercial cider apples grown on land that had been used for apple trees over two centuries ago. All the cider is made in small batches, annually producing only about 2,000 gallons. This local treat is available at the orchard, Montgomery Place Orchards market, Luna 61 and the Black Swan Pub in Tivoli, Gigi’s of Rhinebeck and Swoon Restaurant in Hudson. Cider, with its rich history, is making a fast comeback. When many of us think about cider, we imagine the sweet, sticky beverage that is common to drafts this time of year, but with a little bit of digging, cider has so much more to offer. This drink is not only delicious, but the farmers need our support. The Apple Project has some great resources to start exploring cider makers in the Hudson Valley. So get out there and find a cider just for you, after all, ‘tis the season! Resources: appleproject.glynwood.org wvwinery.com/cider/ mporchards.com


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Provided by: Shelly Loveland, Coordinator

President & CEO: International Foodsevice Manufacturers Association Larry Oberkfell is President and Chief Executive Officer of the International Foodservice Manufacturers Association (IFMA). Founded in 1952, IFMA is the leading worldwide trade association representing food and non-food companies that sell products to the foodservice industry. Its membership includes industry giants such as Kraft, Kellogg’s, Cargill, and more than 200 other manufacturing companies. Before taking on his current position, Mr. Oberkfell was IFMA’s Chief Operating Officer, was a member of the board, and served a term as chairman of the board in 2002. His many leadership roles in the food industry have

included president or CEO for public and private corporations ranging in size from food technology startups to companies with several billion dollars in annual foodservice sales. His expertise spans the frozen, refrigerated, and dry products markets, as well as each of the nine segments of the foodservice industry. Mr. Oberkfell’s foodservice career began in 1982, as a marketing manager at Buffalo, NY-based Rich Products Corporation. In 1992, he joined the Orval Kent Food Company, a supplier of refrigerated foods. He held a variety of positions before rising to become president and CEO. Mr. Oberkfell later was named president and COO of Anchor Food Products, where he helped take the company to the number two spot in the retail frozen snack category in just two and a half years. He went on to become chairman, president, and CEO of SureBeam Corporation. There, he supervised the company’s development into the leading provider of electron beam food safety systems and services for the food industry in the

United States. In 2005, Mr. Oberkfell was named president of Schwan’s Global Home Services, Inc. after joining the company in 2003 as president of its bakery and food service divisions. Before joining IFMA, he was an operating partner of San Francisco, CA based private equity firm GESD Capital Partners and executive chairman of Milton’s Holding Company: a bread and cracker company in San Diego, CA. Larry Oberkfell is also a well-known personal contributor, having served on numerous foodservice industry committees and corporate boards. The industry has recognized his many achievements with honors such as the 2001 IFMA Key Person Award, which celebrates his “exceptional record of activity and high level of commitment to the association.” He was also named Executive of the Year in 1998 and Executive of the Decade in 1999 by Refrigerated & Frozen Food magazine. He has a master’s degree in business from St. Louis University and an undergraduate degree in marketing from the University of Missouri.

AOS Graduating Class of August 17, 2012

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POT LUCK

September 7, 2012

BY:Eric Jenkins, BPS Culinary

ACORN APPLE AUTUMN BACK TO SCHOOL BALE OF HAY CHESTNUTS CHILLY CIDER COBWEB COLD COOL CORN CORNUCOPIA CRANBERRY FALL FALLING LEAVES FOOTBALL GOURD HALLOWEEN HARVEST HARVEST MOON

F W O R C E R A C S M A I Z E S N H Q T

O H L E A V E S Y A W E U W E S I M A H

O V A E G A M R E T Y E D V R F Y O W E

T Y B Y P O R B S Q T N A I A A C U N S

B G C P S E U E A L R E O L R N K O F G

A P L O B T P R I L L L L M I Y S E M Y

L E W N B T A U D G E O O A M A A M I I

L Z A N E W Q C N K C O R O E I N H U J

N R M M F A E I K P I H F S C L S D P E

C O B R U I L B U T D C N H Y H H R X Q

H E O T C L H M R S E S E F A M J S E U

R S U M A X P D E E R O E U L Y D P M P

J M A F T K L L D V M T W C E O D I D F

N I L U I S U O I R Z K O H A M Y D D C

H A Y N Q N E C P A V C L I F R Z E V W

H U P N C S D V S H S A L L S X R R L M

P I N E C O N E R M M B A L Q X O S L I

E N I K P M U P G A T Q H Y Q W Q W H G

A I P O C U N R O C H N R O C A D E P D

N R O C X C H E S T N U T S A O R B R T

HAY HAYRIDE HAYSTACK LEAF LEAVES MAIZE PERSIMMON PINE CONE PUMPKIN PUMPKIN PIE QUILT RAINCOAT RAKE SCARECROW SEASON SEPTEMBER SPIDER SPIDERS WEB SQUASH

BY: Samantha Lindmeier, AOS Culinary This past Friday evening, I embarked on my first trip home from college for the weekend. In order to do so, I had to go into New York City, by myself, for the first time ever…I was so excited! I arrived at Grand Central Station and I was enraptured by the beauty and architectural wonder that was before my eyes. Then I felt someone shove into me and I was snapped out of my fog. I quickly found my way out to the street as I smiled to myself. This is my favorite place in the world, and I finally got to experience it by myself and on my own terms. I was practically walking on air when I heard my stomach growl. That was when I decided it was time to find some dinner. But the question was, what did I want to eat? There are so many wonderful cuisines in the city that I couldn’t wait to try, so I set off in search of the best. I was walking down 45th street when I looked up and spotted my destination. Across the street the British flags were waving. As I crossed, I giggled to myself with glee at the finding of such a great looking spot. I have grown up loving British cuisine and Britain itself because my family is from England. I was so excited to eat the food of my heritage once again. When I finally made my way to this place the sign read The Cock and Bull Gastro Pub. When I walked in, the first thing that hit me was the noise. There were men and women drinking and laughing after a long day of work, which was to be expected. There was a bar, which covered almost all of the downstairs, as well as a staircase, which led up to the tiny dining room. A lovely British woman took me upstairs and sat me in one of the best seats which overlooked all of the action. They had seats for all kinds of folks; cozy little corner seats for couples, tables for lone travelers, like myself, to overlook everything, and even bigger tables for larger parties. My waiter came over and smiled at me, offering me a drink. I told him I would stick with water and he nodded in response. We chatted for a bit before he took my order. I had it in my head that I would eat a very traditional English meal of Bangers and mash (sausage with mashed potatoes served with carrots and an onion gravy). After ordering, I took in the scenery. There was a football (or soccer, as we know it) match

playing on the television downstairs, and in the background, I could hear the Beatles slipping through the stereo. I felt myself relax as I saw all of the wonderful British foods pass by while waiting for my food to arrive. I looked at the plate and was very pleased with what I saw; the mashed potatoes were placed in three clumps with a large piece of whole sausage, which was browned to perfection, placed on top. Three pieces of small whole carrots with the tops still attached sat on the side, and the gravy was lightly placed on top of that. It smelled heavenly as I quickly dove in. The taste was so simple and yet so perfect. You could clearly taste all of the work that went into this

dish and the freshness of the product. I finished my dinner and then my waiter offered dessert, which of course I could not pass up. I decided on the Banoffee pie, which is a chocolate tart of sorts, filled with a cream and toffee filling, with a hint of banana flavoring in the mix. It was so unique and absolutely delicious! After finishing my desert, I paid and tipped my waiter. He walked me out and even gave me directions since I wasn’t exactly sure where to go. I had such high hopes for this pub when I first walked in, but they were completely blown away. The people were friendly, the food was great, and the atmosphere was incredible! I already have plans to go back within the next two weeks and I can already taste the bangers and mash awaiting my arrival! Samantha’s Favorite! Photos Credit: misticrock.blogspot.com

Chia Teff Salad with Lemon Scallion Dressing

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Photo By: currymahal.biz

Vindaloo [VIHN-dah-loo] Specialties of central and southwestern coastal India, Vindaloos are the most mouth searing of the curry dishes. The complicated roasted spice blend on which they’re based can contain any of various ingredients including mustard seeds, cumin seeds, ginger, peppercorns, fenugreek seeds, cloves and coriander seeds. Red chilies are a must, and tamarind concentrate is favored. Vindaloo sauce is typically combined with meat and served with rice.

Photo By: theseasonalgourmet.ca

Photo By: foodsubs.com

Vegetable Marrow Cultivated in England, this green, oval summer squash can grow to the size of a watermelon. It’s closely related to the zucchini and can be cooked in any manner suitable for that vegetable. Because of its bland flavor, vegetable marrow (also called marrow squash) is often stuffed with a meat mixture. It’s available in limited supplies in some specialty produce markets during the summer months.

Vermicelli [ver-mih-CHEHL-ee] Italian for “little worms,” the term, in the kitchen, refers to pasta shaped into very thin strands. Vermicelli is much thinner than regular spaghetti.

Photo By: clubandresortbusiness.com

Véronique [vay-roh-NEEK] A term describing dishes garnished with seedless white grapes. One of the most popular of these dishes is sole Véronique — fillet of sole poached in white wine, covered with a white sauce and garnished with white grapes.

Photo By: crebro.net

varak; varaq [VAH-ruhk] Edible, gossamer-thin sheets of pure silver or gold that for centuries have been popular decorations in India for specialoccasion desserts, confections, nuts and rice dishes Photo By: giverecipe.com

Verjuice [VER-joos, Fr , . vehr-ZHOO] An acidic, sour liquid made from unripe fruit, primarily grapes. Verjuice is used in preparations like sauces and mustards to heighten flavor, much as lemon juice or vinegar would be employed. Not widely used since medieval and Renaissance times, Verjuice is now coming back in trend for many dishes. Though it is occasionally available in specialty gourmet shops, Verjuice is extremely difficult to find in the United States.

Vacherin [vash-RAN ] A dessert consisting of several crisp meringue rings stacked on top of each other and placed on a meringue or pastry base. Alternatively, the rings may be made with almond paste. This “container” may be filled with ice cream or crème Chantilly and/or various fruits.

Photo By: thekitchn.com

Photo By: blog.serialcooking.com

Vol-au-vent [vawl-oh-VAHN ] Said to have been created by the famous French chef Carême, a Vol-au-vent is a puff pastry shell that resembles a pot with a lid. It can be small (individual-size) or large (6 to 8 inches in diameter). The pastry is classically filled with a cream sauce-based mixture, usually of chicken, fish, meat or vegetables. The puffpastry lid is set on top of the filling. This dish may be served as an appetizer or an entrée. The term Vol-au-vent, “flying in the wind,” refers to the pastry’s incredible lightness.

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Vichyssoise [vihsh-ee-SWAHZ, VEE-she-swahz] A rich, creamy potato-and-leek soup that’s served cold, garnished with chopped chives. In this country it’s often mispronounced as, “vinsch-ee-SWAH.”

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Velvet hammer A rich, creamy cocktail made with Cointreau or Triple Sec, Tía María, heavy cream and sometimes brandy is added. The mixture is shaken with ice and strained into a cocktail glass. The result is smooth, but potent.

9.7.12  

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