Issuu on Google+


THE NEWSPAPER OF THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA SINCE 1979


Chestnut Stuffing

BY: Lisa Stephan (adapted from: wholefoodsmarket.com)

-10 slices White Bread, cut into large cubes -4 oz. Butter -1 Yellow Onion, chopped -2 Shallots, minced -2 Ribs Celery, chopped -3 tbsp. Sage Leaves, slivered

-2 tsp. Dried Thyme, crumbled -1 3/4 c. Roasted Chestnuts, chopped -1/4 c. Dried Cranberries -1 c. Chicken Broth

Method: 1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Toast the bread pieces in a single layer on a baking sheet in the oven for 20 minutes. 2. In a large skillet, melt the butter and sautĂŠ the onions, shallots, celery, sage and thyme until vegetables are soft. 3. Add the chestnuts and cranberries and sautĂŠ for another 2 minutes. Add this mixture to the bread pieces ad toss together. 4. Stir in chicken broth and season with salt and pepper. Bake in a covered casserole dish for 15 minutes. 5. Remove cover and bake an additional 15 minutes.


10

Pot Luck

LA PAPILLOTE

AOS Graduating Class of December 2, 2011 Miles Brown Bryan Chernauskas Brian Oliveira Samuel Kaminsky Cameron Miranda Jacob Dufreche

Culinary Arts Group #2 Justin Petrilli Christian Czernicki Andrew Sherman Amanda J. Beame Kamil Moore Sam Watkinson Reuben Asaram Arturo Rivas Blain Webster

Eric Jenkins Robert Willis Richard Graham Tomas Duran Philip Powers Ethan Neustadt Zach Phillips Anne O. Alexander

Baking And Pastry Group #3 Markie Barnes

Gabriela Scharfenberg

Naomi Bechtel Katie Fry Emily Anderson Priscillam Aragon Andrea Marciniak

Sammy Searle Richard Morgan Caitlin Keefe Joseph M. Aranda Kyle Bartone Danielle Waldron

AOS Graduation Speaker: Michael Cimarusti Michael Cimarusti’s mastery of seafood cookery and his knowledge of fish and seafood have earned him international recognition and countless accolades as executive chef and owner of Providence in Los Angeles, CA. Since its inception, Providence has consistently been ranked among the best restaurants by leading critics and publications. It garnered a coveted James Beard Foundation nomination for “Best New Restaurant” in the United States, was included in Esquire magazine’s “Top 20 New Restaurants,” and was named one of the “World’s Top New Restaurants” by Travel + Leisure. In addition, Gourmet called Providence one of the “Top 50 Restaurants in the U.S.,” and in 2009, the restaurant was awarded two Michelin stars. Chef Cimarusti’s passion for and curiosity about food was ignited at a young age by his grandmother, and he knew early on that he wanted to be a chef. As a teenager, he began his culinary journey with a stint as a dishwasher, and then as an apprentice at a bakery and pastry shop. He went on to work in the professional kitchen of a small restaurant in his hometown before heading to The Culinary Institute of America. Upon graduating from the CIA with high honors, Chef Cimarusti landed a job with celebrated chef Larry Forgione ’74 of An American Place in New York City. Chef Forgione was an inspiration to the young Cimarusti because of his use of organic American ingredients. Wanting to hone his classical French cooking skills, Chef Cimarusti next began working at the New York City institution Le Cirque. There, he learned reverence for quality ingredients and refined technique under noted chefs Sottah Khunn and Sylvain Portay. His time at Le Cirque led him to Paris, France, where he apprenticed at Michelin-rated Arpège and La Marée. When Chef Cimarusti returned to New York, his reputation earned him an invitation by the Maccioni family to serve as the opening chef at their new venture, Osteria del Circo.

Looking for a change of scenery, Chef Cimarusti headed to Los Angeles, where he worked with Chef Wolfgang Puck as chef de cuisine at the original Spago in Hollywood. He was soon recruited by the Water Grill to help refine its concept into a world-class fine-dining restaurant, and he quickly garnered rave reviews. Bon Appétit called Chef Cimarusti “a leader of the newest generation of American chefs,” and by the end of his six-year tenure at the helm of Water Grill, he received a glowing 3.5-star review from The Los Angeles Times and a point score of 28 in the Zagat Survey, making the restaurant one of the most popular destinations among Zagat voters. Chef Cimarusti’s many professional honors include being named “2010 Chef of the Year” by Angeleno magazine and being nominated as “Best Chef: Pacific” by the James Beard Foundation in 2010 and 2011. He is an Iron Chef America champion—having bested his respected opponent, Masaharu Morimoto—and was a contestant on Top Chef.

STATE

Conner Burns Allison Berris Alicia Umbrino Katie Coss Wanjiru Kihagi Ben Rubin

RI IL MA MA ME RI Ny NY PA MA LA MA NY CO DC RI NJ MA CA NY NY NY PA NY MA MA CT MA VT TX PA PA MA NH NM VA MA CO Al AL Al AL Fl MD SC NY NY NY MD NJ NY IN CA ME RI NY CA PA NJ WA AK NY NY MA MA RI NY CA FL Fl PA VA WY

Culinary Arts Group

SITE NAME

STUDENT

22 Bowen Steven Alinea George Aramark @ Fenway Park Christian Aramark @Fenway Park, Owner’s Kitchen Kyle Arrow’s Charles Atlantic Inn Robert Babbo Ristorante & Enoteca Joseph Bistro Brie & Bordeax Dustin Black Bass Hotel Michael Blue Ginger Kelsey Bourbon House- Dickie Brennans Michael Brant Point Grill Jacob Brester Inn, The Suzanne Broadmoor, The Jessica Café Alantico/American Eats Tavern Jacob Castle Hill Inn & Resort Tallulah Ama Chart House Victoria Chez Nous Bistro Nathan Chez Panisse Thomas Crew Restaurant & Bar Christopher DB Bistro Moderne Benjamin Del Posto Anthony Ehrhardts Waterfront Michael Eleven Madison Park Rachel Fancy’s Market John Fifty-six Union Christina Fine Cooking Magazine Clare Fog Island Café Saoirse Hawk Inn & Mountain Resort Kristine Hilton, Anatole, The Madeleine Hotel Hershey Christopher Hotel Hershey, Harvest Joshua Hyannisport Club Emily Indian Head Resort Kaitlyn Inn of the Anasazi Alyssa Lansdowne Resort & Spa Daniel Lineage Tyson Marlowe’s Christian Marriott Grand Hotel John Marriott Grand Hotel Jaime Marriott Grand Hotel Trent Marriott- Grand Hotel Katarina Marriott Marco island Lauren McCormick & Co Inc Thomas McCrady’s Allyson Mohonk Mountain House Dalton Old Oaks Country Club Edward Per Se David Petit Louis Bistro Samuel Plainfield Country Club Isaac Quaker Ridge Golf Club Megan Restaurant Tallent Eric RN74 Jordan Samaset Resort Brandon Shelter Harbor Golf Club Yves Slammin’ Salmon Lyndsi SLS Hotel Bazaar Restaurant Alexander St Clair Country Club Michael Sterling Affairs Mazah Sun Mountain Lodge Jared Talkeetna Alaskin Lodge Matthew Terrapin Catering Timothy Top of the Bay Matthew Topper’s Robert Topper’s @ the Wauwinet Kristen Trattoria Simpatico Amanda Turning Stone Resort & Casino Leslie Waterbar Restaurant Jenna WDW- Grand Floridian Frank WDW Kouzzina Cameron William Penn Inn Gabrielle Williamsburg Lodge, The Rebekah Yellowstone National Park Michael

Rosario Vollkommer Carpino Briggs Bucklin Kladke Fusaro Swiss Cicippio LeRocque Halel Dinoto Westmiller Hargrove Miller Norton Osborn Duffy Winslow Hanaburgh Hjelm Capozzoli Sheets Koppelman Rofrano Sanchez Wagner Stevenson Muller Todd Wellington Calderon Setzko Cryderman Scarpelli Elliot Wardwell Turner Heineke Mastroianni Teasley Famoso Galvin Burch Bayless Milbourne III Lott Dreifus Smith Lau Lundeby Brown Smith Wright Andre Scher-Carriker Resnick Motta Gobjoka Prager Lorman Dooley Cataldo Rando West Snell Filipelli Resnik Cotroneo McCloe Newman Kelly Dehring

Baking and Pastry Group STATE

Culinary Arts Group #1

Welcome Back Returning Externs

CA ME NH MI MA NJ NY VA NY VT DC NY AL CT MA NY MA NY NY

SITE NAME

STUDENT

Absinthe Pastry Madeline Alotta Brownies Jennifer Balsams grand Resort, The Gabrielle Bit of Swiss Amy Boarding House, The Devante Bobolink Dairy & BakeHouse Clara Bridgewaters Christopher Colonial Williamsburg Matthew DB Bistro Moderne Zabrina Equinox Resort Hotel Kathryn Four Seasons Hotel. Wash. DC Sarah Garrison Golf Club Amy Marriott Grand Hotel Annmarie Max Downtown Nicole Old Inn on the Green (Southfield Store) Erice Sweet Karma Desserts Stephanie Top of the Hub Nancy Westchester Country Club Aja Winged Foot Golf Club Bradley

Bowman Buys Hatch Rubin Melton Krueger Brescia Calise Kunkel Tagg Amer Moth Queale Sheldon Bradley Zauderer Swift Robinson-Hess Alagna


POT LUCK

December 2, 2011

11

BY: CODI CLAUSEN, AOS CULINARY BY: ERIC JENKINS, BPS CULINARY

Classic Holiday Desserts. Photo By: myfrenchcountryhome.blogspot.com

The time has finally arrived, that special time of year where friends and family find themselves coming together and sharing a great feast. These recipes should give a jumpstart for the good old holiday menu! Pesto Garland is a baked bread brushed with a rich green pesto that in the end, resembles a Christmas wreath. It is great as an edible decoration for your home involving a bit of art and craft. Pesto Garland Dough: -2 ½ tsp. Yeast -1 ¼ c.Warm Water -3 c. Bread Flour -2 tsp. Salt Pesto: -¼ c. Pine Nuts -2 cloves of Garlic -1 bu. Basil -3 tbps. Olive Oil ½ c. Parmesan For Garland: Straight method- Add yeast and warm water in a bowl and in a separate bowl add bread flour and salt. Add the flour mixture into the yeast mixture. Proof until twice the size, punch it and knead the dough. Roll into a rectangle, spread with pesto and roll back up. Connect ends into a circle and make 1 inch separated cuts halfway into the dough and twist forward until it lays out like a spiral. Proof again and brush with olive oil, bake at 400 degrees for about 10 minutes then 375F for 20-25 minutes. For Pesto: Puree, add oil, fold in cheese. Ahh this recipe brings back memories. Bouche de Noel is essentially a rich, yet sinfully delicious chocolate log that will bring your festivities to a wonderful finish. Those lucky enough to be a part of your holiday feast will be hounding you to make this dessert again for months! Bouche de Noel Ganache Frosting: -10 oz. Chocolate -2 ¼ c. Heavy Cream -1 tsp. Vanilla Extract Meringue Mushrooms (optional): -3 ea. Egg Whites, room temperature -¼ tsp.Cream of Tartar -½ c. Sugar -1/3 c. Powdered Sugar Simple Syrup: -¼ c. Water -¼ c. Sugar -2 tsp. Vanilla Extract Dough: -1 c. AP Flour -¾ tsp. Baking Powder -¼ tsp. Salt -4 ea. Eggs -2/3 c. Sugar -1 ¼ tsp. Vanilla Extract For Ganache Frosting: Heat the cream and chocolate over a double boiler. Add in vanilla extract and cool. For Mushrooms: Beat whites and cream of tartar until foamy on medium low speed. Add granulated sugar slowly while beating. Increase the speed to high and beat until soft peaks form. Sift in powdered sugar and fold in. Place mixture in a piping bag with a round tip. Pipe mushrooms and bake at 225F for 50-55 minutes. Flip over and bake for a final 15 minutes. For Simple Syrup: Boil for two minutes and cool. For Bouche de Noel: Whisk dry ingredients together and reserve. Beat eggs for 2 minutes until pale and thick, add sugar and vanilla and beat for 3 minutes. Sift dry ingredients over eggs while folding gently. Spread mixture on sprayed and lined pan and bake 350F 13-15 minutes. Turn out product on powdered sugar lined parchment paper while warm. Remove the bottom paper and roll quickly to cool then unroll to sprinkle simple syrup and spread with frosting. Reroll and spread outside with remaining frosting and decorate garnish with meringue mushrooms.

Z S T I Q S N O W M A N F T I S F C Y K

S B E E R T C C O A T B G C P R L E E F

Q E F A O C O C N G K V I I E E A E A U

N X G P P A L X N K I C C J C T N P E V

I C E S K A T I N G L E S A A A N P J T

S E V O L G Z J R E D L C N L E E I H O

M K Y D S E G E S A X S A U P W L T O K

O I F R E T T I P N N P R A E S P L Y N

E D T R E R O P M O O F F R R H A R N F

F T F T O P L O W B B W J Y I I J P I A

S N A F E E P S B H L J B Z F V A T A H

U H M N C N T I E D A I R O S E M R J F

N O O I R O S A L H N G Z C A R A W Y Q

C L D V R E R G D S K N H Z T R S D E D

L E P M E T B E L R E I E M A H D L Q N

R L Q J H L V I B E T D H C G R G I F E

D E C E M B E R H T S D W I E G D R N D

X G S K I I N G A N Q E E O U E O K L G

E K A L F W O N S I P L W N N S L O D I

N A G G O B O T K W S S S T T S C F V N

BLANKETS BLIZZARD BOOTS COAT COCOA COLD COMFORTER COZY DECEMBER FIREPLACE FLANNELPAJAMAS FLEECE FREEZING FROST GLOVES HAT HEARTH HIBERNATE ICESKATING ICICLES

JANUARY MITTENS SCARF SHIVER SHOVEL SKIING SLEDDING SLEET SLEIGH SLIPPERY SNOW SNOWBOARDING SNOWFLAKE SNOWMAN SNOWSTORM SNUGGLE SPICEDAPPLECIDER SWEATER TOBOGGAN WINTER

BY: STEPHANIE KIRKLAND, AOS CULINARY More than often, inspiration comes to me from out of the story starts with a priest going to visit an elderly the blue, when I’m not expecting it. This happened woman on her death bed, but don’t worry! This is again, oddly enough while sitting at when it starts getting good. church. The stories and jokes that So she says to the priest, “Father, I my priest tells to the congregation would like to be buried with a rosary in one every Sunday morning to tie in hand and a fork in the other.” “A fork?” he with particular readings are rather asked. “Yes, I have worked hundreds and cheesy and dull, for lack of a hundreds of church dinners and banquets, better word. But by coincidence, enough to know at the end of the meal, or fate, I happened to go home when everyone was told to keep their forks, to Pennsylvania for the weekend it was regarded as the best part of the whole and shared that particular Sunday meal. Because by being told to keep your morning with my family at church. Photo By: amuonphotography.com spoon, that meant only one thing. Jell-O While thinking about all of the was on the menu, or pudding, if you were ridiculous stories or jokes there were to come, I heard lucky. But by being told to keep your fork, you knew the starting of a tale that made me smile, and in turn that homemade pies and cakes were the next in line. thought I would share with all of you, hoping you get Yes Father, I’d like to have a fork in my hand to let the same result. Now not to put a damper on anything everyone know that the best is yet to come.”


THE ALPHABET OF FLAVOR

An Exploration of Random Culinary Trends, Facts, Ingredients, and Information. BY: GONZALO GOUT, BPS CULINARY

Some Interesting Numbers... -We have 4 subscribers on issuu.com that are involved in the industry -5 readers have bookmarked our newspaper on their internet -There were 254 “unique page views” of our August issue on November 26th, 2011

Visitor Webpage Overview From 10/29-11/28: Blue= 91.30% New Visitors (105) Green= 8.70% Returning Visitors (10)

Photo By: silkroadspices.ca

Used in the Middle East as a flavoring in baked goods, mahleb is ground black-cherry pits. The cherry stones are cracked to extract the seed kernel, which is about 5 mm in diameter, soft and chewy on extraction, but ground to a powder before use. The flavor is similar to a combination of bitter almond and cherry. It a traditional flavoring in Greek Christmas cake.

Photo By: wine-searcher.com

A favorite aperitif in its native Spain, especially in the south, manzanilla is a light, extremely dry sherry. It is thus, a fortified wine made in a typical Solera system. Manzanilla usually comes from the marshlands of San Lucar in southern Spain. It’s served cold, often to accompany seafood or other tapas, and is commonly used in savory sauces as well.

Which Edition is Being Most Read? Purple= August Issue Blue= November Issue

Photo By: japanesefoodreport.com Photo By: californiachilicookoff.com

Highly regarded as a hangover cure, this one-potmeal is particularly popular in northern Mexico and Southwestern USA. It’s a hearty, spicy soup made with tripe, calf’s feet, chiles and seasonings. It’s usually garnished with lime wedges, bowls of chopped chiles and onion and served with hot tortillas.

Japanese for “water-simmered,” referring to a onepot dish consisting of chicken pieces and vegetables, such as Chinese cabbage, negi and mushrooms stewed in a simple stock with other seasonings. The dish is served from the pot at the table along with various condiments such as Ponzu, radishes, green onions, ginger and lemon. It is traditional of the Kyushu region of Japan.

Photo By: en.bestpicturesof.com

Also called ceriman and Mexican breadfruit, this unique tropical-American fruit looks like a narrow, foot-long pinecone. The thick, green skin has hexagonal scales that individually separate and pop off as the fruit begins to ripen. Inside, the ripe, off-white flesh is formed in segments correlating to the skin’s pattern. It’s creamy-smooth and resembles firm custard. The flavor is sweet tart and reminiscent of pineapple with touches of banana and mango. If underripe, however, the monstera has an off-taste and an irritant that will inflame both mouth and throat. In the United States, the monstera can be found in California, Florida and a few other locales that have produce markets specializing in exotic fruit. The monstera should be ripened at room temperature until the scales pop off and expose the luscious fruit, which is best plucked out and eaten plain with a spoon or fork.

Chef Nicole Roarke and her mother, cookbook co-author, Mary Elizabeth Roarke, are seeking recipes for the sixth book in the Random House Country Comfort Cookbook series, Cooking Across America! The book will feature recipes indigenous to specific regions highlighting locally available cuisine as well as the surrounding cultures that influenced them. If you are interested in having a recipe published, please send it to: CountryComfortCookbooks@gmail.com. by 01Jan, along with your name, title, city, state and website. All recipes will be credited to the contributor. * It is optional to include details about the origin of your recipe as well as the people and places that inspired it (limited to 150 word count). To see the other books please visit: http://www.randomhouse.com/book/search/ search.php?title_subtitle_auth=Country+Comfort+%2 B+recipes&x=40&y=21--

Chef Talk Trivia Photo By: onlineluxury.wordpress.com

It is a restaurant in Errenteria, Spain with 3 Michelin stars. It’s Chef, Andoni Aduriz, who recently visited the CIA, apprenticed at El Bulli among other places. In 2011 the restaurant was voted as the 3rd best restaurant in the world (San Pellegrino Top 50). Aduriz uses the term technoemotional cuisine to describe applying science to traditional Basque cooking. They source 95% of their ingredients from around 60 miles and do not use any cream or butter. The name of the restaurant comes from muga eta haritz, basque for “the oak at the border” between Astigarraga and Errenteria.

What is the Indian version of clarified butter, similar to Beurre Noisette, called?

Email your answer by December 14th to lapapillote@mycia.net to enter for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to the CIA bookstore! Winners with the right answer will be selected by lottery.


La Papillote 12-2-11