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The low hum of honey bees in flight hangs over Shelley Armstrong’s rural Langley property. Her path to becoming one of Langley’s growing number of beekeepers has passed from family tradition to hobby to full-time profession. Now she passes on her expertise, and provides more hives to an industry that’s been hard hit over the past few years. On a warm weekday in late May, Armstrong was at work in her yard, checking out hives for queens and drones, pulling away excess wax comb, and preparing to rebuild hives to create nuclei for new hives. She worked calmly, picking up the rectangular frames with her bare hands. While she wears a beekeeper’s hood, she prefers to work bare-handed to get a better feel for the hives, so she can be gentler. She also uses smoke to keep the bees docile. The smoke works in two ways,

Armstrong said. First, bees instinctively retreat from smoke, and move to eat honey in case they have to flee from a hive-destroying fire. Secondly, it blocks the spread of the chemicals bees release when they’re alarmed or have just stung someone. A sting on her thumb doesn’t slow Armstrong down, as she calmly scrapes it out and keeps working. Thursday, May 29, is the Day of the Honey Bee in B.C., marking 156 years since the first domesticated bee hives were brought to this province. Bees are an ancient domesticated animal, and many people have beekeepers, or apiarists, in their family tree. Armstrong’s work with bees started with her grandfather, a beekeeper in England. “As a really young child, I loved the smell of his honey house,” said Armstrong. She studied biology at university in Ontario, including bees, but it wasn’t until 2006, when she and her husband bought their Langley home, that she felt ready to start keeping a few hives. It started with a few, but the numbers increased.

The Langley Advance is proud to be a sponsor of the upcoming Spirit of the Coast journey…

“It’s hard to stop,” Armstrong said. It had been 10 years since she had worked with or studied bees in university, and Armstrong said even as a hobbyist, she had some catching up to do on the field. She took courses at the Honeybee Centre in Surrey and through SFU’s Bee Master course. Then in 2009, she lost her job and her first son was on the way, and she was looking for something she could do closer to home. Expanding her hobby to a job beckoned. “It just sort of happened,” she said. She wanted to do something she genuinely loved with all her heart, Armstrong said. Now Armstrong keeps 50 active hives on her property, with between 60,000 to 100,000 bees in each hive. Some beekeepers raise bees for the honey, others truck them from farm to farm to provide pollination services to the many berry farmers in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley.

continued on page A4…

A team of canoeists, including Fort Langley’s Brandon Gabriel, departs Sunday on a 90-day expedition to Alaska. The trek’s aim is to bring awareness of the life that exists along the B.C. coastline, and awaken people to the need to preserve it. See story on page A3.


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A2


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Community

Not typical golf

Zany golf-based games are in store for the June 8 Langley Lodge second annual Golf Challenge which offers up a chance to win a cruise. Last year’s golf challenge offered the opportunity to ring the bell and win a car and this year, to change things up a bit, a cruise is the major prize and rumour has it that the distance for the hole in one shot is shortened. • More online

Seniors at last year’s library celebration.

Community

Seniors celebrated

The Muriel Arnason Library in Willowbrook is welcoming seniors at a special event June 3. The library and Langley Senior Resources Society have teamed up for Seniors Appreciation Day. The event runs 1-3 p.m. Enjoy refreshments, a display of some of the newest large print titles, and enter a book draw. • More online

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Thursday, May 29, 2014

A3

Environmental awareness

Fast waters pose challenges

The public is invited to help send off a team of adventurers Sunday on a threemonth 1,300-km trip to Alaska. by Roxanne Hooper rhooper@langleyadvance.com

The mighty Fraser River is flowing much faster than expected, causing some hiccups for organizers leading up to the imminent Spirit of the Coast canoe journey. Regardless, all paddles will hit the water around 1:30 or 2 p.m. on Sunday as adventurer Chris Cooper and his core team of three canoeists – including Fort Langley’s own Brandon Gabriel – begin their three-month, 1,300-kilometre trek to Alaska. Following a private breakfast and canoeblessing ceremony hosted by the Kwantlen First Nation on Sunday morning, this “lifealtering” excursion will begin with a public send off from the Bedford Channel in Fort Langley. People are invited to gather in the Bedford Landing Waterfront Plaza to hear some of the speeches and give the adventurers a “proper” send off. That event is expected to run from around noon to 1:30 or 2 p.m., Gabriel explained. View On a journey like this, it is customPhotos ary to give thanks to the nations whose Reg Messr photo with territory they are passing through, so Brandon Gabriel hasn’t set foot in this canoe, the Chief of the River, since he finished painting it in 2011. their journey starts with a brief stop across the Fraser River at the Katzie First While Cooper has been focused on with social media to help promote the jourNation. safety issues, equipment needs, and ney in advance and during the trip; and he Band members, including chief Susan other the logistical aspects of the will use his expertise with a brush to actually Miller, are expected to trip’s preparation, Gabriel has also paint the seats in the canoe during quiet be there for a drumbrought his talents to bear. times on the trip. Layar ming and brief exchange The professional artist and This journey is designed to bring awareness or before the Spirit team Kwantlen First Nation member has to the life that exists along the B.C. coastline online heads off again to been putting his past event-organand awaken people to the need to preserve it Kwikwetlem. izing experience to work in coordinin all its splendor. In total, the canoe journey ating Sunday’s official launch and the First But it’s about much more for Gabriel, who along the B.C. coastline is Nations ceremony; he’s using his proficiency sees it as an unparalleled growing experience Chris Cooper expected to take 86 days. – a challenge that he’ll look back on and Pitt Meadows adventurer Joining Cooper and Gabriel, measure everything else against. on this trip will be Kye Admittedly, Gabriel is excited and nervous Valongo, a fellow outdoor enthusiast from about the impending departure. Orkney, Scotland, and videographer Don “Four more sleeps,” he said Wednesday, Jonasson from Anacortes, Wash. then chuckled. A number of other supporters will join Who is he kidding. the team for short periods of time, including “I’m not sleeping. I’m not sleeping well, at Cooper’s wife Barbara. least… I’m worrying because I want everyIn the days leading up to the launch, thing to be a success… unfortunately that Cooper said there’s still so much to do to switch I have in my head doesn’t really go ready for the excursion, including a scouting off,” Gabriel said. trip down the river to Vancouver on Saturday He won’t rest until he gets in the water to figure out how fast the water is moving and begins to paddle. and what snags and other hazards might be “That’s when I’ll rest,” he said. in store. • More: www.langleyadvance.com, search “Gabriel” Brandon Gabriel

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A4

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New beekeepers face steep learning curve …continued from page A1

Armstrong primarily works on creating new hives for others, breeding new queens and drones. She’ll casually pick up the male drones from her hives – they have no stingers – and she admires their big eyes and fuzzy abdomens. At this time of year, she’s rearing a lot of queens, said Armstrong. Like all beekeepers, she also collects honey, selling some of it but keeping a great deal for her family or giving it away to friends. “We call it the universal currency,” she said. Because she’s a beekeeper, her yard abounds in flowers, most of them wild. “I deal with my yard around food for the honeybees,” said Armstrong. “I won’t let my husband cut the grass when the dandelions are blooming.” From the perspective of the provincial Ministry of Agriculture, and hundreds of farmers around B.C., the most important factor in beekeeping is making sure there are plenty of both bees and beekeepers around for years to come. Because numerous crops rely on bees for pollination, a major concern in recent years has been colony collapse disorder, in which hives seem to simply empty out or die off, particularly over the winters. Scientific studies have pointed to a number of factors, including parasitic mites, but most new research has pinned a good portion of the blame on certain insecticides used on commercial crops, especially a category known as neonicotinoids. With the threat of a loss of pollination, supporting bee health has become a more important issue than ever before. Working to help beekeepers are organizaMatthew Claxton/Langley Advance tions like the Langley Shelley Armstrong uses smoke while Bee Club, of which Armstrong is the treasworking on her hives. urer. It has around 150 members and regularly meets in a local church. In addition, the community of beekeepers tend to help one another out, mentoring people new to the hobby or the business. There are also various bee education programs that run at colleges and universities including at Kwantlen Polytechnic. Armstrong mentioned the support of the Ministry of Agriculture’s bee inspectors, which provide free support services to beekeepers, and the Animal Health Centre provides diagnostics on bee health. All that support, formal and informal, is there for a reason: there’s plenty of room for new people to enter beekeeping. As many municipalities around the region have loosened their regulations on keeping back yard hives, more amateurs are getting into the game. “It’s not cheap,” said Armstrong. A starter hive costs roughly $350 to $500, she said. The first jar of honey out of a hive is often the most expensive the beekeeper will have ever eaten, she noted. Then there are the troubles fending off colony collapse disorder and the other issues that plague bees. But for those who go professional, there is a real market, particularly in pollination. Provincially, about $250 million worth of agricultural production every year depends on bee pollination. Fruit, berries, and canola crops in particular need bees to thrive. “Certainly there’s a shortage of bees come pollination time,” said Armstrong. Some farms bring in bees from Alberta, but smaller farmers are the ones most in need, as they have the fewest resources. Armstrong said there’s a place for smaller beekeepers to enter the market to work with them. For those looking into the hobby or field, she says there’s no substitute for hands on knowledge. “You learn a lot by doing it,” she said. She recommends beekeeping courses as well as talking to existing apiarists. “There’s a lot to know, it’s a steep learning curve,” said Armstrong. She’s still keen to welcome more people to the world of beekeeping, however.


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

A5

Labour dispute

Teachers go out again June 2 View

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Local public schools were behind pickets Tuesday.

Langley Lodge 2nd Annual

Video & Photos

by Heather Colpitts

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Rotating teacher strikes came to Langley public schools May 27, along with B.C. Teachers’ Federation president Jim Iker. He was at Langley Fine Arts School at breakfast time before hitting another half dozen schools around the region during the day. It gave him a chance to talk to teachers on the picket line.

Layar or online

Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance

Langley School District sites were behind pickets on Tuesday as part of rotating strikes taking place around B.C. Strikes continue next week. Teachers were on picket our the pickets. lines at schools and School The BCTF executive met District sites, such as the Wednesday and opted to bus barns, from before 6 continue rotating strikes. a.m. to after 7 p.m. so that Langley will be out June 2. continued on page A6… CUPE workers could hon-

North Aldergrove

Truck mangled in train crash

A driver survived getting clipped by a train in North Aldergrove. by Matthew Claxton mclaxton@langleyadvance.com

A pickup truck driver is lucky to be alive after colliding with a train Wednesday morning near the Gloucester industrial area in eastern Langley. The truck’s front end was mangled by the train, at 60th Avenue and 272nd Street, but the cab remained largely intact.

The road was closed temporarily until the truck was towed. According to both Langley RCMP and Township assistant fire chief Bruce Ferguson, the driver and the engineers on the train were not seriously hurt. Ferguson said the driver suffered only minor injuries. It was the second non-fatal collision between a car and a train in Langley this month. Earlier, a woman was airlifted to hospital with serious injuries after colliding with a train at a crossing on Smith Road near Glover Road.

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A6

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Court

Richard bail fought

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The man accused of three counts of attempted murder after allegedly torching his estranged wife’s home may apply for release on bail next month. Andre Richard has been charged with a 13 offenses, including arson, assault with a weapon, break and enter, and arson. It is alleged that Richard attacked his family home on April 2, harming both his wife and daughter. He was under court orders to stay away from the house at the time. The house was gutted by fire, but his wife, daughter, and son escaped the flames. Police immediately began a manhunt for Richard, even while suspecting for a time that he might have died in the fire himself. Richard was arrested in Fernie in southeast B.C. on April 3, after a driver reported an erratically driven vehicle. He was brought back to the Lower Mainland to face trial, and at his initial court appearance, he consented to be remanded in custody rather than immediately asking for bail. When a suspect consents to remaining in custody, they can ask for bail at a later time. Richard is now scheduled for a fix date hearing for June 13 for a show cause appearance. That’s the first possible step in applying for bail, known technically as judicial interim release. A bail hearing is unlikely for June 13th, but could be held later in the month or during the summer. So far, the Crown has not heard from Richard’s lawyers that they will apply for release. If there is an application, the Crown will argue that he should be kept behind bars awaiting trial. “We will be opposing the release of the accused,” said Samantha Hulme, a spokesperson for the B.C. provincial Crown.

Teachers claim support …continued from page A5

June 6th, 2014 (Friday) 10am - 4pm @ Holeshot Motorsports Call 604-882-3800 to book your ride www.holeshotracing.ca 8867 201st Langley, B.C.

The province recently offered a $1,200 signing bonus and backed its demand for a 10-year contract down to six years. Iker said teachers have just had two years of legislated zero per cent wage increases, and the offer from the province is “in reality, another two years of zeros.” “They’ve showed an unwillingness to move off the key issues of class size, class composition, and Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance specialist teacher ratios, Elementary school teacher Dunja especially since we’ve got the Supreme court decision McCrae spoke with BCTF president Jim Iker when he visited Langley in January,” Iker added. Langley Teachers’ Fine Arts School May 27. Association (LTA) president Gail Chaddock-Costello said teachers designed their job action to have the least impact on students while still putting pressure on government. In response, the B.C. Public School Employers’ Association (BCPSEA) announced pay cuts of five to 10 per cent, for the reduced workload, and that teachers were not allowed to be at the school more than 45 minutes before class and 45 minutes after class. The time limit applies to schools not closed during the four days of rotating strikes. Teachers are also restricted from supervising students at recess and lunch, and are also expected to leave school property at those times. Chaddock-Costello said that’s had a huge impact on students, noting that, because of the province’s restrictions on teachers, several school events and trips have had to be cancelled. Iker said there are key issues up in the air. While the Ministry of Education says teachers are covered for volunteer and extracurricular activities for such things as liability and WCB, there’s nothing in writing in general, “never mind during a walkout,” he noted. Despite the problems Tuesday’s job action caused parents, teachers say they still have support in the public.


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Fundraising

School foundation gala is Sunday The Grand Prix Gala runs on Sunday with fine food, prizes, horse jumping, and funds for Langley schools.

on meal programs for the schools, new technology, and innovative literacy programs,” Cairns said. Tickets for the ninth annual Grand Prix Gala are $60 each or $425 for a

table of eight and include parking as well. But, tickets are nearly sold out. Contact Cairns at 604532-1464 for more information.

A wine tasting by donation with product from 12 wineries around British Columbia will be offered in the Timerframe building at Thuderbird Show Park as part of the Grand Prix Gala.

Submitted

news@langleyadvance.com

Grab a summer frock or favourite shirt and don an amazing hat for an afternoon of horse jumping, wine, food, and prizes at Thunderbird Showpark Sunday. The Grand Prix Gala, now in its ninth year, benefits Langley schools. Organizer Susan Cairns is the executive director of the Langley School District Foundation and noted it’s an afternoon like no other. “Wear a magnificent hat or a fascinator,” she said. “A lot of people do dress up. But you see everything from summer frocks to jeans and a nice top.” No matter the attire, the event is an exciting one. It kicks off at 1 p.m. running to 4 p.m. with a variety of horse jumping events held at Thunderbird Showpark. “Thunderbird has been a wonderful main sponsor,” Cairnes added. Under the tents, gourmet hors d’oeuvres will be served along with decadent desserts. Tables are situated to allow for chatting, but the real focus is always the horses. “There are tables and people can sit at the tables and watch the show or they can move around,” Cairns said. Thunderbird is one of the top three horse jumping venues in North America and attendees at the Grand Prix are known to ooh, ahh, and gasp as beautiful animals are flawlessly guided over jumps and around obstacles. In addition to food and horse jumping, wineries will set up in the Timberframe building as a by-donation tasting room. “There are 12 different wineries this year serving premium wines,” noted Cairns. “They’re all from B.C.” Plus, there will be prizes and a silent auction. “There is a set of diamond earrings from Golden Tree Jewellers,” Cairns said. “And a trip to Port Ludlow with hotel, kayaking, dinner, and golf. There are so many great prizes.” Supporting the event means supporting Langley students in a variety of areas. “Langley Concrete and Tile, Facet Advisors, and Fred Welsh Industries are main sponsors, and are helping with our focus

ADVERTORIAL

by Ronda Payne

Twenty Years and Counting for Walnut Grove Ricky’s

F

or more than 20 years, the owners of the Ricky’s All Day Grill in the Walnut Grove community of Langley, B.C. have successfully traversed the hills and valleys of the highly competitive restaurant business, and maintained equilibrium through the ebbs and flows of the economy, all the while serving nearly three million meals to hungry loyal customers.

When asked why their family restaurant has remained so popular, franchisees Cori and Dean Scott say there has been one constant in their ever-changing universe – their customers, which they consider part of their extended family. “We learned early on that we were really in the people business,” said Cori, who manages the restaurant with her husband Dean. The Scott family opened the restaurant 20 years ago. “We’ve been here for our customers through thick and thin, celebrating graduations, marriages and births, and even sharing the sorrow of loved ones passing.” In turn, their customers have been there for them. When the Ricky’s opened here, there were few houses and a small population. But as the community grew, so did the restaurant’s business and it quickly became a neighborhood essential. Cori says the only population that has been as loyal as her customers are her employees,

some of whom have been with her for the two decades. “We were here when a few of our employees were born, and now they work with us. They are amazing and we wouldn’t be successful without them.”

We’ve had lots of laughs, shed a few tears, worked hard for our living and made many good friends. Ricky’s own history began as a pancake restaurant in British Columbia in 1962. Since the late 1970s, it has evolved into a successful restaurant franchise and a leader in the mid-scale casual dining category. The Ricky’s owned and operated by Cori and Dean is a two-time winner of the Franchisee of the Year award. Not surprisingly, this restaurant is often used as a training store for new franchisees. “They model the best practices of the chain” said Stacey Hansson, Ricky’s VP of Operations. “They never get complacent. They always keep trying to make the restaurant better and more enjoyable, both for their staff and their customers. They have high standards, but never forget to have fun.”

When planning their 20th Anniversary Celebration, true to form, Cori and Dean organized the event so they could celebrate with their loyal guests. It was very important to the Scotts that these folks knew they were appreciated for their years of patronage. The couple relies upon the Ricky’s Franchise Support Center for promotional support and to help them adapt to changes and trends in the marketplace. Their encouragement has also helped buoy their spirits at times and keep them charging ahead at full steam.

It’s been a remarkable two decades for the Scott family. “We’ve had lots of laughs, shed a few tears, worked hard for our living and made many good friends,” said Cori. “And that’s not a bad accounting for 20 years of serving our community.”

A7


Bob Groeneveld EDITOR

A8

Thursday, May 29, 2014

editor@langleyadvance.com

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LangleyAdvance

Help out your flying friends

Thursday, May 29, is the Day of the Honey Bee in British Columbia, marking more than a century and a half since domesticated bees were first brought to this province. Farmers contribute an enormous amount to B.C., from the sizeable place they hold in the economy, to their place in ensuring our food security, to their stewardship of the land for future generations. And they have plenty to fret about: weather, markets, changing tastes. One of the worries they’ve had in recent years is the decline in the number of honeybees active in North America and parts of Europe, a phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder. The decline has tapered off in recent years, but is still a concern for beekeepers and those who depend on them. With no bees, hundreds of millions of dollars worth of crops would be destroyed or reduced in value, as yields drop to almost nothing for fruit, berries, and other crops that require pollination by honeybees. Is there anything we can do to support bees, and the beekeepers who raise them? Aside from eating more delicious honey, the simplest thing may be to avoid the use of certain pesticides that have been implicated in the decline of bee colonies. A number of scientific studies have pointed towards the causes of Colony Collapse Disorder residing in the overuse of a class of pesticides, and other studies have suggested that the mites – and even the chemicals used to control mites – are part of the problem. This winter was a relatively good one for bees, with fewer hives lost over the cold months. More than any one regulatory change, simply calling on government to take the health of bees seriously, and to keep an eye on the industry, is likely to have the best outcome for bees in the long run. – M.C..

Your View

Advance Poll…

Who is right in the dispute between the teachers and the provincial government?

Vote at… www.langleyadvance.com Last week’s question: If you were graduating from high school right now, what would be your preferred option? 32% University Trades

36%

Military

10%

Look for a job

3%

Start a business

6%

Travel

13%

Opinion

Nuts and bolts of civics needed Painful truth

about with the spark plugs. So what are the spark plugs and oil filters of local politics? • Bylaws. What the heck is a bylaw? Who is it “by,” anyway? Are they trying to hide someMatthew Claxton thing from us by dressing up the word “law” mclaxton@langleyadvance.com with a prefix? Students should learn what authority their municipality has to regulate their activities, Another school year is coming to a close in especially when it comes to land use. B.C., and the kids are headed out in the world Which brings us to the next big part of the to party and look for summer jobs and start curriculum. racking up some student loan debt of their • Zoning. Zoning? You mean some bureauvery own. But have they learned enough about the way crat can tell me how high I can build, or whether I can have a business or a house on their government functions? that property? Of course, we all learn about Wait, you say it also prevents how Parliament works, and the If we’re going people from building slaughterdivisions between federal, provinhouses next to my home? Well, cial, and local governments. to talk about maybe it’s good for something. I remember visiting the B.C. zoning, we’re Zoning laws haven’t actually Legislature on a field trip when I going to been around for that long in was in elementary school, and I some communities, so field trips believe such trips are still fairly talk about can be arranged to those buildcommon. rezoning… ings that pre-date zoning rules, But the number of people who like the disco/baked goods facwill become involved directly in tory that still sits amid the fields provincial or federal politics in our of rural Langley. (Not kidding about this.) country is small, bordering on miniscule. If we’re going to talk about zoning, we’re The number of people who will become going to talk about rezoning, so that means involved in some way with their municipal governments, on the other hand, is pretty size- we’re going to dig into… • Public Hearings. able. Across the province, thousands of people This is where the rubber meets the road. turn up for public hearings, call their mayors There are a number of reasons for speaking or councillors, and get tickets from bylaw officers. It’s at the local level that you will have to to a local council, including rezonings, budget issues, and property taxes. deal with government. What are your rights when speaking to a If we’re going to add more stuff to the B.C. council? How does a public hearing work? high school curriculum (high school teachers, Can you ask questions and get answers from a you can thank me for this suggestion in letters council at one? to the editor!) we should add a course in local After 16 years of covering local councils government. from North Vancouver to Abbotsford, I’ve seen Right now, some of this is undoubtedly cova lot of people slam headlong into their lack ered in courses like Civic Studies 11 and Law of knowledge about local government. It can 12, but let’s bring it all together. be quite a steep learning curve for people who Above all, let’s make it practical. You don’t suddenly need to deal with a system about take auto shop and spend the whole year learning about the chemical structure of hydro- which they know very little. A single high school course couldn’t solve carbons and the physics behind the four-stroke the problem, but it would be a start. internal combustion engine. You get to mess

Letters to the editor . . . may be edited for clarity, length, or legal reasons. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication,

however names may be withheld from print upon request. Letters may be published on the Internet, in print, or both. Publication of letters by The Langley Advance should not be construed as endorsement of or agreement with the views expressed. Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic, or other forms.


Letters to the Editor

LangleyAdvance

Business sense

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Community

Not all teens are hooligans Newcomer impressed by Langley

Dear Editor, I am a 16-year-old. I’ve been working for a local landscaping company for about three years, and had recently cashed a $300 pay cheque which was sitting in my wallet, feeling quite heavy. I was walking around downtown Langley with my girlfriend, and we noticed a small hobby shop that looked promising. My girlfriend, Storm, and I love hobby shops like this. She is very into comics and superheroes, while I am more of a hard core Star Wars type of guy. We walked in the door and I was immediately in awe of all the things they had: a to-scale Millennium Falcon, tons of action figures; it was like my dream come true. I gravitated to a big model X-wing, and carefully picked it up, to revel in its beauty. I examined it for a little bit, while Storm was most likely off looking at an X-Men action figure of some sort. Then I carefully put it back where it was. I meandered around the shop for a bit, not quite sure what to look at next, and found myself at the front counter: a glass display case that held lots of little toys and cards and other little collectibles. I stood looking for a couple seconds before I was interrupted by the man at the

front desk. In an angry, mocking voice, he said, “Oh you think it’s really funny, ‘I’ll touch this, touch that, so funny.’” My smile left as I realized he wasn’t actually going to tell me something funny. I thought for a minute about what I could have done to spark his angry look, and why he was calling me out. I had walked into the store and looked around, just as any adult would have done. My only error was my age and appearance. I was pegged as a teenaged hooligan, merely because of my long hair and clothes. I looked up at the man, pulled out three $100 bills from my wallet, looked down at them, and said, “I guess I’ll go back to Toy Traders,” and left his store... which is really quite a shame, because I would have been back there many times to buy things for myself, my friends, and siblings, for birthday gifts and Christmas. So to other small business owners I say, when a young man or woman comes into your store to look around, do not immediately paint them all with the same brush. My creed is that everyone is innocent of being “a hooligan” until proven a hooligan. And as George Elliot said, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” Sam Romeyn, Milner

Appreciation

Capeless crusader a super hero nonetheless

Dear Editor, My hero doesn’t wear a cape. She wields love through the darkest of times, but that doesn’t mean she isn’t a proper hero. She goes to battle with the devil in all of his forms, then comes home and finds the strength to love us despite our many faults. My hero’s encounters with the devil can leave her drained; they can weigh heavily on her shoulders and crack her resolve.

It isn’t fair that someone so incredible has to flirt with evil so often; she shouldn’t have been forced to be a hero. Despite her pain, her radiant smile lights up a room and she continues on. My hero has sacrificed her life and sanity to put us through ours, despite the trials we continue to face. Though we don’t always show it, we are thankful for everything she has given up with us in mind. Julia Roccola, Brookswood

the design of pathways and that I am new to the area, green space throughout, they are welcoming. They and connecting different show interest in me, by neighbourhoods; it is a real asking questions and givbalance in a growing ing suggestions on city, and I commend things to see and do. Letters those who have put I’ve embraced a lot to the the thought and work of those suggestions, into providing this and benefited by for the community. doing so. My highest praise One such suggesEditor tion led me to check is kept for the people who live here. out the Langley Whether walking on a path, Newcomers Club. They are sitting at a coffee bar, doing a group of women with business or shopping, young the goal to connect with and old, people here have people by taking part in been open, friendly, and various outings, sharing helpful as I imagine a small experiences, getting support, town to be. and making friends where When they have learned you live. I have found it a rich experience, as I have walked, gone to the movies, GoGo Grandmothers bowled, and enjoyed good conversation with several of the members. I am writing this simply Dear Editor, to say a heartfelt, “ThankOn behalf of the Langley GoGo Grandmothers, we want you,” to a beautiful and to thank Ronda Payne for the much-appreciated article on friendly community that I our Rant [Get it off your chest to help kids, May 1, Langley now proudly call home. Advance]. Lori-Ann Mark, Langley The Langley GoGo Grandmothers group would like to thank everyone for the publicity and support for our recent For more letters Rant at St. Dunstan’s Anglican Church in Aldergrove to help to the editor visit... raise funds for grandmothers in Africa. www.langleyadvance.com It was a wonderful success, and enjoyed by all. – Click on Opinion. Mary Kozak, Langley GoGos Dear Editor, Just over three months ago I moved here, nervous about living in what I would call a big city. I am one who has been known for getting lost, and I imagined myself feeling very isolated and lonely living here, and happily, this has not been the case. I enjoy the outdoors and have walked all over the streets of Langley and Surrey, discovering so many interesting places, surprisingly without getting lost, though I have to admit some of my walks ended up longer than I anticipated. I have been impressed by

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Ride for Doug

Langley boy at heart of motorcycle fundraiser A 200 km motorcycle ride, starting and finishing in Langley, will raise funds to help a local boy and others living with muscular dystrophy. by Troy Landreville

tlandreville@langleyadvance.com

Theresa Wiebe Photography

Doug Penner, 11, is the inspiration behind Ride For Doug, an annual fundraising motorcycle ride that raises funds in the quest to find a cure for muscular dystrophy. The 2014 ride sets off at 1 p.m. this Sunday, June 1, from South Langley Church, 20098 22nd Ave. The Langley boy has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation

A happy-go-lucky Langley boy is the inspiration behind an annual motorcycle ride that raises funds in a quest for a cure for muscular dystrophy. Ride For Doug, in honour of Doug Penner, takes the motorcyclists on a 200-kilometre journey along the roads of Langley, Abbotsford, and Mission. This year’s ride, set for Sunday, June 1, begins

and ends at South Langley Church at 20098 22nd Ave. with two “leg-stretching” stops along the way. At one stop, riders will be treated to cookies baked by Doug’s 14-yearold sister Samantha and her grandma. Registration is from 12:30 until the convoy leaves at 1 p.m. The plan is for riders to return to the church in time for a 5:30 p.m. barbecue, joined by friends and family of both Doug

tory roadblocks (http:// and the riders. They’ll theracetoyes.org/). celebrate with burgers “One of the results… and door prizes, and will was the relaxation of share some information about a disease that threat- the FDAs stance towards drugs like this,” Cam said. ens to progressively steal “Many voices can accommore and more of Doug’s motor function and muscle plish much when raised together.” strength. Those collective voices Eleven-year-old Doug also send a message to has Duchenne Muscular Doug, the Penner family, Dystrophy (DMD). and other DMD families “His strength and balance are a small fraction of that they are not alone. what his peers have,” shared his dad Cam, who is organizing and promoting Ride For Doug. “This makes it difficult for him to keep up with his friends, and significantly limits the types of activities he can enjoy. Imagine spendTheresa Wiebe Photography ing your day with The 2013 Ride For Doug involved 110 10-pound weights riders, raising more than $35,000 for on your wrists and Muscular Dystrophy Canada. Since 2009, ankles, and how that would change everyDoug Penner (on the back of the bike), thing from the way has ridden at the front of the motorcycle you brush your teeth, convoy for the entire ride. to the speed you “The community is go up the stairs to your standing with them, taking class.” Doug has “probably seen up the cause, fighting for a cure when we don’t have more medical specialists than the rest of us see in a the strength to do so ourselves,” Cam said. “When lifetime,” Cam said. Doug turns around in his There is no cure for seat and looks back at the DMD. Most children mile long line of bikes ridwith Duchenne’s are in a ing with him – riding for wheelchair by nine or 12 him – he can save that years of age. memory.” Doug is beating this Last year’s fundraiser curve, thanks to steroid was a record-breaking treatment. He had also event, with 110 motorbeen on a promising new cycles and more than trial drug which his family 350 people at the barfelt made a tremendous becue, and raising more difference in Doug. than $35,000 for Muscular During his two years Dystrophy Canada. on the drug, Doug Doug was a big part of underwent at program the fundraiser. He has of weekly injections and ridden at least part of the intense monitoring at BC route since 2008, when he Children’s Hospital. was old enough to ride the “Through it all, he was final leg. And from 2009 incredible,” Cam said. onwards, he has ridden at “We noticed that Doug the front of the pack for was not following the the entire ride. typical decline for his age, He was also one a proand seemed to be building lific “mingler.” Doug’s endurance.” upbeat attitude brings Last fall, the drug comriders and supporters back pany sponsoring the trial halted the study and trans- year after year. “[Doug] has a sharp, yet ferred ownership of the subtle, sense of humour,” drug to another company. Cam said. “He loves mech“We never did find out anical things, figuring out the full reasoning why, how they work.” but it seemed to involve a Motorcycle rider or not, lot of regulatory politics, you can donate online at big pharma investment, RideForDoug.com, or bring and a lot of unknowns,” donations to the ride or Cam explained. Only in barbecue. Cam appreciates the last couple of weeks has the family learned that advance registrations, so he can plan effectively, but the new company plans to riders and barbecue attenstart a new trial with the dees can simply show up drug this fall. with their donations. Doug’s family hopes he Riders are asked for a will be included again. $20 registration fee (payThere has been a noticeable at the ride), which is able difference off of the waived if they have fundmedication, Cam said. raised in excess of $50. Ride For Doug gives a All riders’ registrations voice to the urgent need, include the barbecue, and Cam said. barbecue attendees enter In April, 100,000 people by donation at the door. signed a White House petition to pressure the • More at www.langleyadvance.com, FDA to relax some regulaclick on ‘Community’


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A11

Robyn and Ryleigh

Organizers arranged Langley talent for Denim and Diamonds. by Heather Colpitts hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

The Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation is lucky to have snagged top talent for its Denim and Diamonds fundraising gala on June 7. Karen Lee Batten and the singing sisters Robyn and Ryleigh will perform. But these country gals have lots of irons in the fire right now. Stephano Barberis photo

Karen Lee Batten

Karen Lee Batten

Charity

Boot scootin’ and diamond diggin’ Denim and Diamonds is in aid of the Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation. by Ronda Payne news@langleyadvance.com

It’s not quite diamonds in the rough, but there will be the chance to dig for diamonds at the Langley Memorial Hospital Denim and Diamonds gala June 7. According to Errin Young of the hospital’s foundation, searching for diamonds is definitely a chief component of the event. “The Diamond Dig is the big fundraiser of the evening,” Young noted. For $20 participants can take their shot (or three chances for $50) at digging for a $10,000

valued diamond jewelry piece courtesy of Creative Goldsmiths and Hall Constructors. Always a great opportunity to dress up, the gala is the perfect event for black tie and bling, but paired with boots or flat shoes, Young advised. “It’s being held in the indoor riding ring at the High Point Equestrian Club on their crushed gravel surface,” Young said. The Saturday night event will kick off with complimentary cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner served at 7:15 p.m. “It’s family style,” Young noted. Platters of food are served to each table with guests able to take how much of each dish they want. A highlight of the evening is the live auction, not to mention the competi-

tion inherent in the silent auction. Prizes are diverse and range from sports ticket packages to a Whistler experience to a backyard barbeque party, and more. Live entertainment will be provided by Langley’s very own Robyn and Ryleigh as well as BCCMA award winner Karen Lee Batten. Funds raised will support the purchase of urgent, life-saving equipment for the hospital. The hospitals program directors and unit managers come up with the suggested equipment and the hospital’s leadership team determines the purchases. “We have an ongoing list of the priorities,” Young explained. With close to 350 guests expected, there are only a few tickets left. Find out more at www.lmhfoundation.com/gala.

June 7, 2014 is

After filming a music video in the northeast corner of Langley last week, the local singer is prepping for her June 5 album release party for Cause a Scene. It takes place at the Fan Club on Granville Street. The video is for Life Worth Living which is set to drop June 3 and is the second single from Cause a Scene. “It’s such a feel good song and one that reminds me every day about what really matters in life. We all live crazy busy lives and it’s kind of like the quote we have all heard for years ‘don’t forget to stop and smell the roses’. That’s what this song is about, life flies by and it’s the time we have with our family, friends, memories we share, places we get to see – whatever makes you really happy. That’s what matters,” Batten told the Langley Advance. Not that she’s following that advice right now, being crazy busy. “I love it though, I love travelling, meeting new people, and most of all, performing,” she said. “I leave on a cross Canada TV/radio tour next month, and have lots of shows this summer.” That’s what matters to her. And the gala is one of her shows. “It will be such a great night for a great cause,” she said. She’s also booked for the second Gone Country – The Twins Cancer Fundraiser in late July, hosted by Chad Brownlee and Brett Kissell. As Batten continues to work on

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her country music career, she’s finding more acceptance. There’s the fan support but also local businesses are wanting to sell her recordings. “It really amazes me how great of a community this is, and I am proud to say I live here,” she said.

Robyn and Ryleigh

Langley’s Gillespie sisters, just off a performance at the Cloverdale Rodeo on the May long weekend, will be putting out new music in June. They wrote the material in Nashville recently, a trip they contend was a game changer. “We co-wrote with some amazing writers and came home with a few new songs. We loved it! It was our first time there but definitely not our last,” said Ryleigh. Next these Brookswood Secondary grads are showcasing their talents for their hometown fans at the Denim and Diamonds Gala. That’s a fundraising event for the Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation. “Very excited to be a part of this one,” Ryleigh said. The funds raised are used by the Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation to purchase equipment. The foundation’s most recent campaign was an expansion of the outdated maternity ward. They, too, are musicians on the go having also done shows around the Pacific Northwest and Alberta since last year and more on the way. On June 12, they are at the Hard Rock Casino for Country Nights.


A12

Arts & Culture

Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

A13

Next production

Call sent out for big autumn cast Auditions for Langley Players’ fall show are being held on June 8 and 9. by Roxanne Hooper

Diane Gendron photos

rhooper@langleyadvance.com

L

Langley Players’ production of Light Sensitive (above) won a number of awards, including set decoration, while veteran actor and stage hand Mike Busswood (inset) of Langley City earned the best acting award with Surrey Little Theatre.

angley Players’ own Mary Renvall is putting the call out for one of the largest casts in recent memory. She’s looking for 11 people, seven women and four men, to star in the community theatre group’s fall production of Cocktails at Pam’s. And although summer hasn’t yet arrived, Renvall – in her capacity as production manager – is calling on potential candidates to try out. Auditions are being held at the Langley Playhouse, 4307 200th St. on Sunday, June 8, from 1 to 4 p.m., and on Monday, June 9, from 7 to 9 p.m., with callbacks on June 11. The comedy, written by Canadian playwright Lemoine Stewart, is set in 1965 when lead character Pam proves it’s not easy being the perfect hostess. The play is being directed by Dave Williams, who is seeking an ensemble of actors aged 25 and older. There are no appointments for auditions. Actors will be seen on a first-come, first-served basis. It is a non-equity production, and actors are asked to bring a resume and headshot to the audition where they’ll be asked to do a cold read from the script, Renvall said. Those interested can show up for auditions, or ahead of time contact the director, Dave Williams, at da4419@telus.net, or Mary Renvall at maryrenvall@ gmail.com. Scripts are available from the director, upon request. The show runs Oct. 16 to Nov. 15, with possible holdovers running to Nov. 22.

On stage

Thespians scoop up set awards

A troupe of Langley theatrelovers brought home bling from a regional theatre competition. by Roxanne Hooper

rhooper@langleyadvance.com

A

Langley set decorator, a veteran Langley actor, a Langley director, and the community’s long-standing Langley Players Drama Club brought home a number of top honours from this weekend’s regional theatre competitions. The Fraser Valley Zone Festival, as it’s known, was hosted in Chilliwack last week, with six groups performing plays. The competition culminated in an awards night on Saturday.

Langley Players brought home three awards for their spring production of Light Sensitive. The local troupe earned best set decoration, credited to Langley’s Vicki Nelson, Surrey’s Karen McTavish, and Pitt Meadows resident Norley Smith. It was the threesome’s first attempt at decorating a set. Langley Players also brought home the best supporting actor award, thanks to Surrey’s Reginald Pillay, and the best actress award was collected by Surrey’s Alaina Holland, an honour she shared with an actress from the Chilliwack Players Guild. The list of Langley winners doesn’t end there, however. Surrey Little Theatre scooped up two awards for their production of Drawer Boy, and both of those were earned by Langley residents.

The best set design award was won by the play’s director, June Ainsworth of Langley, and veteran Langley City thespian Mike Busswood was named best actor. The calibre of the shows was “outstanding” this year, said Raymond Hatton, the chair of this year’s Theatre BC Fraser Valley Zone event. The Willoughby resident credited that, in part, to a relatively new educational component, called the adjudicator’s tour. An experienced artistic director, Stephen Drover, travelled to the different clubs two months ahead of the competition and spent several hours watching and working with rehearsing teams. Hatton described the workshops as invaluable: “I think, without question, it elevated the quality of the productions.”

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A14

Arts & Culture

Thursday, May 29, 2014

LangleyAdvance

Township

Page

For the week of May 29, 2014

www.tol.ca

Recreation, Culture, and Parks

Sunday, June 1 Self-guided Historic Walking Tour

Langley Centennial Museum Mo - Sa 10:00am - 4:00pm Su 1:00 - 4:00pm Free

Loonie Admission

*Fit for Fellas

WGC 8:30 - 9:30am | $1

WGC 8:00 - 9:00am | Free

*Weight Room Orientation Learn to Play Pickleball WBK 1:00 - 2:00am | Free

Monday, June 2 Loonie Admission AKC

8:30 - 10:00am | $1

*Weight Room Orientation WBK 9:00 - 10:00am | Free

Water Walking

WBK 10:30am - 12:30pm | $1

*Seniors’ Yoga WBK 1:00 - 2:00pm | Free

*Weight Room Orientation WGC 8:00 - 9:00am | Free

Tuesday, June 3

Loonie Admission

Seniors’ Tea AKC

1:00 - 3:00pm | Free

Wednesday, June 4

WCB 9:00 - 10:30pm | $1

Badminton WGC 1:00 - 3:00pm | $1

Pickleball

WGC 3:15 - 5:00pm | $1

*Weight Room Orientation Plus

Art Deco Chic:

WGC 9:00 - 10:00am | Free

*Seniors’ Yoga WGC 1:45 - 2:45pm | Free

*Seniors’ Picnic and Health Fair

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Friday, June 6

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• catered picnic lunch • guest speakers • information booths • door prizes

Friday, June 6

McLeod Athletic Park Lacrosse Box Located on 57A Avenue, between 213A and 216 Streets (behind Langley Secondary School) 11:00am - 1:30pm 1/$5

*Registration required online at RecExpress.ca, or by calling or visiting your local community recreation centre.

Summer Kickoff 2014 Join our summer day camp staff for some outdoor fun and to sample many of the sports and activities offered this summer by the Township and other organizations! Philip Jackman Park

Walnut Grove Community Park

32 Avenue & 271 Street Friday, June 27 1:30 - 3:30pm

89 Avenue & Walnut Grove Drive Saturday, June 7 10:00am - 12:00pm

W.C. Blair Recreation Centre

Willoughby Community Centre

22200 Fraser Highway Saturday, June 21 12:00 - 2:00pm

7888 - 200 Street Saturday, June 14 10:00am - 4:00pm

Come by for some free family fun!

tol.ca AKC

ALDERGROVE KINSMEN COMMUNITY CENTRE 26770 - 29 Avenue 604.856.2899

LCM

LANGLEY CENTENNIAL MUSEUM 9135 King Street 604.532.3536

WCB

W.C. BLAIR RECREATION CENTRE 22200 Fraser Highway 604.533.6170

WGC

WALNUT GROVE COMMUNITY CENTRE 8889 Walnut Grove Drive 604.882.0408

WBY

WILLOUGHBY COMMUNITY CENTRE 7888 - 200 Street 604.455.8821

WBK

WILLOWBROOK RECREATION CENTRE 20338 - 65 Avenue 604.532.3500

Recreation, Culture, and Parks General Inquiries: 604.533.6086


today’shomes

LangleyAdvance

Questions & Answers

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Fungus-harbouring insects suck Dear Anne,

“Our camellia is developing a black powdery substance on its leaves. This rubs off but is even discolouring the side of the house and the neighbouring rhododendron. The plant doesn’t seem to be suffering too much – but it’s really become unsightly. Any suggestions?”

Checking for eggs on the undersides of leaves is also helpful, in case you have scale insects, not aphids. Or you could have both. If sunlight and air circulation are blocked, sooty mold is more likely to attack.

In the Garden by Anne Marrison

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca

S

says in their catalog that the plant is hardy from zone 39. So who’s right?”

B

Sometimes the camellia has very dense growth, or perhaps surrounding trees have grown and are hogging the light. Anyway, it helps to prune off the most infected branches. Spraying will penetrate better, and so will air and sunlight. If the bush is quite small, you could pick off the most badly infected leaves. Blasts of water can dislodge many of the aphids. For generally cleaning the bush somewhat, a tablespoon of Neem oil in a gallon of water can be useful. To cut off the next generation of scale, try dor-

mant oil sprays. They can smother scale eggs. The undersides of both shrubs should always be kept clear of fallen leaves or prunings, because they harbor fungus spores that re-infect the bush in spring. That debris shouldn’t be composted. It should go to green waste. Dear Anne,

“I tried to get some asclepias (butterfly weed) from a nursery because I want to plant things that will encourage the bees and butterflies. But the woman in the nursery told me they don’t have it as a perennial because it’s not hardy. But I’m getting conflicting information because Botanus

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ooty Mold is common with camellias. The two most likely causes are aphids or scale insects. All are sap-suckers that excrete a sweet substance which coats the leaves and attracts ants which eat this ‘honeydew.’ Fungi are also attracted, and that’s what gives the honeydew its sooty colour. You’ll need to check whether ants are crawling up the trunk of your camellia and your rhododendron. If they are, it’s important to stop them. As long as the ants can get up there, your problems will continue. Garden centres sell insect-trapping substances such as Tanglefoot. They are sticky products that should be smeared on a plastic or cloth band that can be fastened around the trunks of shrubs. It should be put on so that it can be removed and discarded when necessary. All sap-sucking insects seek out shrubs with lots of tender green growth. High-nitrogen fertilizers encourage that. Balanced, slow-release fertilizers or compost make better choices.

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otanus is right. There are loads of different asclepias species. Some are tender, but most would be hardy here. Two of the toughest and most popular ones are Asclepias tuberosa and Asclepias incarnata, both hardy to zone 3 and listed by Botanus. Asclepias tuberosa is very drought-tolerant, but its deep taproots make it hard to transplant, once it’s established. It’s also slow to emerge in spring. But later, it gives a full three months of flowers from summer into fall. The bright orange forms are especially spectacular.

PORT KELLS NURSERIES

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A16

Thursday, May 29, 2014

today’shomes

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

B1

Marketplace • Aldergrove • Otter • Murrayville

LOOK

Business Profile WHO’S IN ALDERGROVE

The Hearing Station is Western Canada’s most progressive family hearing solution provider. In partnership with the leading manufacturers of hearing products, The Hearing Station specializes in providing a calm, inspired, expert hearing clinic experience that encourages the entire family to embrace their optimal hearing needs with unprecedented customer care. The Hearing Station’s Values & Guiding Principles; H.E.A.R. HELP. We believe all individuals are entitled to experience optimal hearing. Our aim is to provide unique customer hearing solutions to all individuals. EMPOWER. We can educate individuals in a friendly, supportive, simple to understand way on the benefits of optimal hearing, creating renewed self-confidence and freedom. ACT. We believe that in order to hear, we need to listen. If we have listened we will be able o provide the very best hearing solutions for our customers – proactively improving their quality of life. RESPONSIBLE. We believe in an obligation to our business, our community and our customers’ well-being to deliver the highest quality service, solutions and experience. We actively participate in events and leverage opportunities that allow us to give back and make a positive contribution. Guiding Principle... To deliver uncompromised and unconditional hearing solutions in a unique and inspired way. @Hearinghappy

THE HEARING STATION

27514B Fraser Highway, Aldergrove, BC V4W 3N5 | Tel: 604-381-4327 | info@thehearingstation.ca

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101 - 22575 Fraser Hwy., Murrayville

www.precisionautoservice.com


B2

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

You’re Invited!

LIVE MUSIC

COMMUNITY EVENT WORKING TO KEEP NATURAL SPACES IN URBAN PLACES

I N TH E LO U N G E

MAY 31ST, 2014 10AM - 3PM

JOIN US ON THE PATIO

Aldergrove Athletic Park

...in our Bavarian Beer Garden!

• Come see Harriet the Owl from 10 -11 • Hot Dogs, Cookies, Juice @12 • Games • Crafts • Face Painting

Grilled Bratwurst

Free Guided tours will be occurring at the same time at the forest itself. The address for the forest trailhead is Creekside Park (28th Ave and 274th St) just by the bridge over Bertrand Creek.

(Made locally by Bonetti Meats) on our HOUSE-MADE Pretzel Bun along with a GLASS of your favourite BEER

COME HELP SAVE OUR URBAN FOREST

$9

is’ Dor

Saturday, June 7, 2014 ~ 7pm

BBQ’NG THIS WEEKEND?

Over 20 Varieties - Smokies, Farmer Sausage & Nitrate Free Sausages world cuP soccer EN SOUV IERS/GIFTS in stock NOW!

• Portabello roasted PePPer • Greek Feta sPinach • okanaGan aPricot • curry chicken • biG Game - elk, bison, Venison

Some of the

BEST LIVE JAZZ & BLUES

• blueberry bison • cranberry turkey • German beer brats Plus much more...

in the Fraser Valley playing your favorite standards ... at

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Downtown Aldergrove

604-857-7725 BobsSteakhouse.ca

Langley’s Leading Specialty Health & Nutrition Centre

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Saturday June 14th

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2399

$

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60 Fish Gel Caps

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Enzyme Force

SAVE $ 10

• Digestive Enzyme Blend • Full spectrum plant enzyme blend that promotes healthy digestion • Prevents bloating, gas and indigestion • Reduces heartburn symptoms

2999

$

150 vegi-caps

www.prairienaturals.ca

ALDERGROVE

THRIFT STORE

NEW OUTFITS FOR

SPRING CLASSIC LOOKS FOR WORK

2699

$

So much more than a homeless shelter

All No Further Discount Regular on Sale Items! June 4th and Prices June 11th

SISU CO-ENZYME Q-10 100 mg Strength

BOB's BLUES NIGHT!

BONUS BOTTLE

MURRAYVILLE SQUARE PLAZA - 222nd St at Fraser Hwy Langley 604-539-0500 “QUALITY NATURAL HEALTH PRODUCTS WITH QUALIFIED SERVICE” HOURS: Monday thru Friday 9:30-7pm • Saturday 9:30-6pm • Sunday 12-4pm

Plus furniture, small appliances and brand new mattresses. All at fantastic pricing and all helping a great cause. Open six days a week

Located at 3111 272nd Street in Aldergrove

604.381.0055

All net proceeds from the Salvation Army Thrift Store in Aldergrove go directly to benefit the services offered by The Gateway of Hope in Langley.


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

B3

Development

WOLF offers tours of Township greenspace The public is invited to tour a Township site in Aldergrove that’s slated for development. by Heather Colpitts

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

Free guided tours of a Langley Township site that is slated for development take place this Saturday. The Township is looking at developing the creekside forest site. It runs along Bertrand Creek from about 26th to 28th Avenue. The free tours run 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and have been organized by the Watchers of Langley Forests (WOLF), the group that fought to prevent the Township from selling McLellan Forest in North Langley. Tours start from Creekside Park, 28th Avenue and 274th Street. At the same time on Saturday there’s a forestry awareness event happening at Aldergrove Athletic Park (covered picnic area). The Township has faced opposition over the sale of the 19.1 acre Aldergrove property. The Township was pre-

Steven Hayek photos

The site once had a sewage lagoon and abuts Abbotsford to the east and the Agricultural Land Reserve to the south.

Langley Advance files

Jessica Horst spoke to the Langley Advance in the new year about wanting to keep part of the forested lands along the Bertand Creek in their natural state. sented with more than 200 signatures on a petition opposing the project. The Township plans to use funds generated from the development to fund the Aldergrove pool. The Township wants to develop the property into 61 residential lots but several residents want a portion of the land left as greenspace for public use. Councillors decided that, with Bertrand Creek running through the prop-

erty, there will be sufficient green space, due to riparian area buffer zone requirements. About 40 per cent of the site will be undeveloped due to the creek. As well, the land butts up on the Agricultural Land Reserve on the south and Abbotsford’s border on the east. The northeast corner of the site was once a lagoon. It was the site of the Township’s water treat-

ment plant. The engineering department declared the land surplus and is working on ensuring it’s compliant with remediation requirements so it can be developed. The Township was told that the site contains lots of low-value trees, with the growth being 40-50 years old. About two thirds of the trees are evergreens. Based on Langley School

District estimates, the homes would add about 100 kids to local schools but there is capacity with area schools. For the Saturday event there will be an information station informing residents about the proposed development. Residents can sign a petition in favour of stopping the development into the forest. There will be craft, game and facepainting stations

for kids. Hot dogs and beverages will be served at lunch time for free or by donation. Harriet the Owl will be there for about an hour in the morning. Visitors can have their picture taken with the owl for $5 and all funds raised will be donated to WOLF. Anyone wanting more information can contact savemclellanpark@gmail. com.

g $ummer $avings

On the Finest Retirement Living

Reserve an Avalon Suite by June 21st For Savings On: • Rent ........................... • Meals ......................... • Moving ....................... Savings Account Deposit

To find out how...... Call 604-546-3130 or e-mail: info@avalon-gardens.com then come see Mardie Wolsey Open for Tours Monday - Saturday 11 -5 22323-48th Avenue, Langley, B.C.V3A OC1 604-546-3130 www.avalon-gardens.com


B4

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

IF VISION WAS LIKE HEARING THIS IS HOW IT MIGHT APPEAR...

E

shop bc wine shop local Until May 31st

Buy any two bottles of the wines listed below and receive a

1

20/200

2

20/100

3

20/70

4

20/50

5

20/30

6

20/25

7

20/20

complimentary GoVino Unbreakable glass!* Joie Noble Blend Mission Hill Reserve Pinot Noir Church & State Viognier Hester Cabernet Merlot Quails’ Gate Chardonnay (limited) *This offer is valid until supplies last.

~ Complimentary Wine Tastings ~ Saturday between 2-5pm, May 31st - Robin Ridge Winery

E

E

E E

Visually Impaired individuals are 60% more likely to have at least a Moderate Hearing Loss Sign up for our newsletter at www.wine-emporium.com Follow us on twitter @bcvqashop.

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604-532-5388

THE HEARING STATION 27514B Fraser Highway, Aldergrove, BC V4W 3N5 | Tel: 604-381-4327 | info@thehearingstation.ca

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Home ON BEAUTI-TONE hardware Aldergrove

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A quality formula that combines the penetrating protection of on oil stain with convenient water dean up. Protects and resists cracking, peeling and blistering. *3.64 litres.

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DECK & SIDING STAIN

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27

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40

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Ph: 604-856-2411


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

B5

Canada’s Online Lifestyle Magazine

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BIG LOVE BALLS By Adrienne Matei

Proudly made in Vancouver, these giant, five-foot, hair-dryerinflatable, PVC spheres emblazoned with the word “LOVE” are perfect as an Instagram prop, good to toss in the swimming pool and ideal for use as décor at an event (suggestion: destination wedding—these big balls ship worldwide). Read more at www.vitamindaily.com

Aldergrove 900 - 26310 Fraser Hwy. • 604-607-0713

DECOR

Langley 19700 Langley Bypass • 604-534-5233

We are celebrating our

50th Anniversary in August! More details to come.

LITTLE PINK DRESS by Alexandra Suhner Isenberg

Have an idea for a great gown? Vancouver-based atelier Little Pink Dress will make your fantasy dress a reality by working with you to design and construct a one-of-a-kind gown, with your choice of fabric and trim. Read more at www.vitamindaily.com

FASHION & SHOPPING

WIN A TRIP TO HAWAII

Sunday Brunc Brunch

By Kate LeGresley

Get your orchid lei and piña colada ready—we’re giving away a trip for two to Maui! Think round-trip transport, two nights at the Westin Maui Resort & Spa and two tickets to the Ka’anapali Fresh Signature Food & Wine Festival. Aloha, vacation!

Featuring Fresh Omelettes and Crepes-made to order Eggs Benedict, Salads, Breakfast Baking and Fresh Fruit + many other delicious choices!

9:15am - 2:00pm

See contest details and learn how you can receive bonus entries at www.vitamindaily.com

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Are you having a party/ banquet/ wedding celebration this spring or summer?

Enquire about our catering options encorecatering.ca Call early for reservations. or call 604-825-0364


B6

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Tee time!

Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament • Thursday, June 12, 2014 Pagoda Ridge Golf Course • 7887 264 Street, Langley

Great way to showcase your business! Terrific sponsorship opportunity

• AB A shop • CrAnky’s Bike • Le steeL redit Union • ALdergrove C • extrA Foods • UrBAneCo • Bonetti MeAts oF • rotAry CLUB ALdergrove ter • eZe rent-it Cen ooters • hAvoC pro sC • otter Co-op

LAST CHANCE! • Hole Sponsorship: ONLY 1 REMAINING! • Hole Contest Sponsor: ONLY 2 REMAINING!

ALL GOLF SPOTS ARE SOLD OUT WAIT LIST AVAILABLE Registration & Tailgate Brunch: 9:30 a.m. Tee Off: 11:00 a.m. Format: Texas Scramble Price Per Golfer: $175 + GST Includes: • Tailgate Party • 18 Holes • Shared Power Golf Cart • Gourmet Dinner • Prizes For more information on participating or sponsorship opportunities, please contact Chantelle Bowles, at the Chamber office at 604.530.6656 or email events@langleychamber.com

SAVE THE DATE FOR MOVIE NIGHT IN THE PARK SATURDAY AUGUST 16TH

UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS BANDS PLAY: 8-12 SATURDAYS 5-9 SUNDAYS May 31-June 1: Sweet Max June 7-8: Cheek to Cheek 14-15: Long Run

REGULAR LOUNGE EVENTS Sunday • Kitchen Monday • Dance Lessons 7 to 9 Tuesday • Meat Draw from 5 to 7 • L.A. Kitchen • Euchre at 7 Wednesday • Karaoke from 7 to 11 • Kitchen Thursday • Pool at 7 Friday • Hold’Em at 7 Saturday • Meat Draw from 2 to 5 • L.A. Kitchen 3 to 7

REMEMBER HALL EVENTS ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC ALL WELCOME JUNE 6: BRANCH SMORGASBORD IN THE HALL AT 5:30 MENU: CHICKEN CORDON BLUE, MEATBALLS, POTATOES, VEGGIES, SALADS & ALL THE TRIMMINGS BEFORE DINNER FIRST CAPITAL CHORUS ENTERTAIN AT 4:45 DOORS OPEN AT 4:30 June 13: DIAMOND FOREVER TICKETED EVENT IN THE LOUNGE SEE LOUNGE STAFF FOR DETAILS June 22: GOLF TOURNAMENT AT KINKORA, SEE BAR STAFF FOR DETAILS

ALL WELCOME!

ALDERGROVE

Branch #265

Lounge: 604-856-5423 • Office: 604-856-8814 www.aldergrovelegion.ca 26607 Fraser Hwy., Aldergrove GUESTS WELCOME

like us on facebook

JAM 4

PONSORS: S G IN W O L L O F THANKS THE

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES:

DANCE BANDS

BIKE

follow us on twitter @rcl265


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

B7

SHOP LOCAL Sales & Service - Farm & Garden Equipment Commercial & Residential Service is our “brand”

Ph: 604-857-9191

www.diamondbarequipment.ca

27452 Fraser Hwy., Aldergrove

EVERY MOMENT COUNTS Wes Jamison The Jamison Real Estate Team 22424 Fraser Hwy. Langley BC

• Lawn Tractors & Mowers • Blowers • Trimmers • Tillers • Chainsaws • Pumps • Generators • Safety & Workwear

visit our website at extrafoods.ca

Hours: 8 a.m.–9 p.m. Sun-Sat #1-3100 272 Street Aldergrove, B.C.

MacDonald Realty Ltd. Direct Line 604-857-4880 www.wesjamison.com wes@wesjamison.com

Phone: 604-856-5101

BIKE

SHOP LOCAL

JAM 4

SATURDAY JUNE 14 12PM-3PM

#1-3100 272 Street Aldergrove, B.C.

SOUTH ALDERGROVE PARK - ALDERGROVE BIKE PARK

Phone: 604-856-5101 visit our website at extrafoods.ca

FREE DRAW FOR: $ HARO 300.1 BMX VALUE 430 $ 339 HAVOC CHAOS PRO SCOOTER VALUE

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Hours: 8 a.m.–9 p.m. Sun-Sat Everything for your garden

Tel: (604) 856-7756

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2014

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• Danger tree removal • Certified faller • Tree trimming and pruning hedges

• Fully insured and have WBC • Logger

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WHO WILL MAKE IT TO THE TOP? mark your online ballot at... www.langleyadvance.com/best Or watch for our in paper ballots publishing soon

1 ballot per I.P. address minimum categories to vote on:12. No facsimiles or photocopies accepted.

Sponsored by

04166489

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• Septic Fields, Pumping & Repair • Perimeter Drainage & Sumps • Yard Drainage & Catch Basins

7

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B8

LangleyAdvance

BY-PASS

Thursday, May 29, 2014

OVER 100 VEHICLES IN STOCK TO CHOOSE FROM

John Judd

ON

THE

08 DODGE NITRO LOADED 124 Km, Roof

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05 DUTCHMAN FOUR WINDS 27'

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Community connections

Band kicks off kindness Acts of kindness will be rewarded with stickers and a free concert. by Ronda Payne news@langleyadvance.com

You’ve Gotta Have Friends photos

Maxine Donald, left, and Adele Craven of Maxim Eyes were very welcoming of the You’ve Gotta Have Friends Kindness Connects initiative. “We’ve actually been out and about all week in the community,” Weibelzahl said. “We want to raise awareness about kindness and how kindness connects people. Sometimes that’s how a friendship starts.” A supply of stickers has been given to businesses and organizations who want to participate in Kindness Connects with instructions to give one out whenever an act of kindness is noticed. YGHF representatives have been from Aldergrove to Fort Langley, downtown to Brookswood and all points in between, sharing the message.

Fri & Sat: 2:00am

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The Timewalkers, a four person band, will play in McBurney Lane Friday night at 6 p.m. for a You’ve Gotta Have Friends show.

ow in its eighth year, local organization You’ve Gotta Have Friends (YGHF) is focused on creating a welcoming community, and reducing loneliness and isolation. The latest initiative to reach these objectives is called Kindness Connects and includes stickers given out throughout the Langleys and a kickoff community dance and concert with The Timewalkers. Pat Weibelzahl with YGHF explained that the promotion is a focus for the organization this year.

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You’ve Gotta Have Friends photos

Mark Steensma and a staff member at George’s Meat show off the You’ve Gotta Have Friends Kindness Connects sticker. “The response has just been great,” noted Weibelzahl. “When you mention kindness, people just light up. They know it’s important and we’ve had some great conversations while we’ve been out there.” The weeklong stickering activities come to a head Friday night at 6 p.m. in McBurney Lane with a concert by the four-person group, The Timewalkers. “We thought of course it would be something we’d want to do as part of this week,” Weibelzahl said of the concert. “We’re mentioning it to people all this week and are inviting them to it.” Eli Bryan Nelson, guitarist, vocalist, and bassist with The Timewalkers noted that it is through his wife’s involvement in the community that the relationship with YGHF grew. “I’ve played for them maybe three or four times in the past,” he said. “They just decided to give us a shot. It’s a really nice, good organization that improves people’s lives.” The Timewalkers have been together formally for a little more than a year, born out of another local project. “We were involved in a project called Food Bank Tuesday,” Nelson noted. “We all had so much fun playing together, it just morphed into something where we all four played together.” The band now has a video and has produced a

CD which will be on sale at the McBurney Lane concert. “Since then [the creation of the video and the CD] it has just been incredible,” Nelson added.” Obviously good weather is the hope for Friday night. Nelson has been checking the forecast. “Chances are we’re going to see reasonably good weather,” he said. “We get a lot more people with passersby.” As a yearlong event, YGHF will visit businesses three more times to ensure stickers are stocked up, people are recognized, and the message that kindness matters is shared.

How

to win

A Timewalkers CD

One lucky reader will a copy of Live at the Blue Frog.

How do you win?

• Click on the live link in the story about the Timewalkers at www. langleyadvance.com, and tell us why you want to be entered into the draw for the CD by local musicians. You will be entered into the draw. Preference is given to Langley residents. Postings must be received prior to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 3, and the winner will be announced on the on the Langley Advance website. No staff or family of the Langley Advance or Glacier Media are eligible. This giveaway is restricted to online participants, 19 years or older only.

Follow

@LangleyAdvance on Twitter for Langley’s top headlines

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A20

Arts & Culture

Thursday, May 29, 2014

FREE MARKET EVALUATION

Langley’s best guide for what’s happening around town. For more of What’s What, visit www.langleyadvance.com

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musicnotes

• Kindness Connects – The campaign for kindness features a May 30 concert in McBurney Lane running 6-8 p.m. and featuring the Timewalkers. • Night Cafe – The Langley Community Music School presents jazz and blues standards by Alisia Lyne, Jodi Proznick, Jillian Lebeck and Jimmy D. Lane. Starts at 7 p.m. on May 30 at 4899 207th St. Tickets: $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and $10 for students.

charityworks

• Langley School District Foundation Gala – The ninth annual fundraiser is 1-5 p.m. on June 1 at Thunderbird Show Park. Tickets: $60 per person or $425 for a table of 8 (includes parking, grand prix event, hors d’oeuvres, silent auction, and prizes. Wine tastings by donation. Info: scairns@sd35. bc.ca or 604-532-1464. • Elks Pig Roast – The 14th annual Hawaiian Pig Roast starts at 6 p.m. on June 7 and includes a buffet dinner and dancing. Tickets: $30. Contact Steve, 604-510-4742 or Barb, 604-889-1160. Proceeds support Elks Children’s Charity.

tradeshows

• Langley Artisans Show – The eighth annual show is June 1, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the George Preston Recreation Centre. Sponsored by Langley Township and hosted by members of the Langley Arts Council. • Fort Langley Farmers Market – Saturdays until Nov. 22, stop by the market at St. Andrew’s Church, 9025 Glover Rd., for produce, dairy products, baking, canning, art, and more. Runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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• Langley Community Farmers Market – Each Wednesday, 2-6:30 p.m., until Oct. 8, the market takes place at the Kwantlen Polytechnic University campus courtyard where there will be produce, live music, baking, food trucks, and more.

librarybookings

Programs are free and pre-registration is required unless noted otherwise. • Aldergrove Library 26770 29th Ave. 604-856-6415 • Brookswood Library 20045 40th Ave. 604-534-7055 • City of Langley Library 20399 Douglas Cres. 604-514-2855 • Fort Langley Library 9167 Glover Rd. 604-888-0722 • Muriel Arnason Library #130 20338 65th Ave. 604-532-3590 • Murrayville Library 22071 48th Ave. 604-533-0339 • Walnut Grove Library 8889 Walnut Grove Dr. 604-882-0410

historyrevisited

• Langley Centennial Museum, 9135 King St., 604-888-3922 Art Deco fashion show – Clothing historians Claus Jahnke and Ivan Sayers have a show of 1920s and 1930s women’s fashions on June 1. Show is at 2 p.m. Tickets: $20 at 604-532-3536. What’s What? listings are free. To be considered for publication, items must be submitted at least 10 days prior to the publication date. What’s What? appears in the Thursday edition and at www.langleyadvance.com.

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Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

A21

Arts in brief

Multi-media artist shares her passion with nature S L T

he enters her studio final decay. I find hidden each day, driven messages in nature that with a desire to give daily impacts my life.” voice to what she Her show opened May calls “the secret wonders 28, and runs to June 15, of the natural world.” with an opening reception Marilyn Hunt unveiled being held this Saturday, an exhibit of her works at May 31, from 7 to 9 p.m. the Fort Gallery on at the Fort Gallery, Wednesday, where at 9048 Glover Rd. she is anxious to in the heart of the share some of her village. vividly coloured “I find a calm and textured assurance and works with fellow solace in the quiet Langleyites. bellowing from the The show, called earth, whether sky, A Melange, is an water, plant, or example of the animal life. There Marilyn Hunt multi-disciplinary are so many proartist’s works she found lessons and says are drawn from the experiences to be had from “simple and humble elenature and I have a deep ments of nature.” calling inside to re-create “I love to explore the these experiences on cangoings on in the undervas. I see my art as a way ground and underwater of “painting myself out of world of organic life,” she myself,” Hunt said. explained, noting she creates on large canvases and wood panels, with everyhe Langley Arts thing from acrylics, to oils, Council presents to wax. the eighth annual “I have always been Langley Artisans Show this drawn to the small, often Sunday, June 1, at George un-noticed details of Preston Recreation Centre, nature,” Hunt elaborated. at 42nd Avenue and 208th “My artistic mission is Street in Brookswood. to magnify these characThe show is hosted by teristics in the uninhibited members of the arts councycle from reproduction, cil and runs from 10 a.m. growth and beauty, to the to 4 p.m..

Concerts wrap up

concert coffee and commentary, led by LCMS angley Community artistic director of concerts Music School conElizabeth Bergmann, cludes its begins at 7 p.m. Concerts Cafe on Friday, May 30, Classico series this and is followed by weekend with a the concert at 8 jazz evening. p.m. The season Tickets for this wraps up with event are $15/ what organizers adults, $13/senare calling a Night iors, and $10/stuJodi Proznick Jazz Cafe of welldents, available by known songs and calling 604-534jazz standards performed 2848 or visit the school by vocalist Alisia Lyne – a website www.langleyLangley native – as well as music.com. The event is bass players Jodi Proznick, being held in the school’s pianist Jillian Lebeck, and Rose Gellert Hall at 4899 guitarist Jimmy D. Lane. 207th St. The traditional pre• More: www.langleyadvance.com

Art Deco duds

hey’ve rounded up clothing from the 1920s and 1930s and now clothing historians Claus Jahnke and Ivan Sayers are showing them off at another fashion show hosted by the Langley Centennial Museum. The show, 2-4 p.m. on June 1, features Art Deco fashion. It’s one of the few fashion styles that mirrored other art of the time such as architecture and even furniture making. The more simple, straight garments were a

reaction against the previous era of tight corsets, exaggerated curves and tailored garments. The clothing items presented will contrast what was happening on the world’s fashion scenes in Paris and Berlin with what would have been worn on the streets of Langley Prairie. The fashion show caps a museum exhibit that opened May 10 to show how fashions reflected the political and social upheaval of the time. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased by contacting 604-532-3536 or museum@tol.ca.

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A22

Arts & Culture

Thursday, May 29, 2014

LangleyAdvance

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Works by local artist Trish Clarke-Jennings are featured in a show at ABC Fine Art Gallery through June.

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A Langley painter draws inspiration from Georgia O’Keeffe and Emily Carr for her floral works.

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MONEY CARD: *Receive one $15 Money Card with every $50 (before taxes) you spend at Home Outfitters now through June 19, 2014. Redeem one $15 Money Card with every $50 (before taxes) you spend at Home Outfitters between June 20 – July 10, 2014. Limit one card for every $50. IMPORTANT CUSTOMER INFORMATION: SELECTION & BRANDS WILL VARY BY STORE: All colours, patterns and styles may not be available in all stores. RAIN CHECKS AND SUBSTITUTIONS: If an advertised item is not yet available we will offer you your choice of a comparable substitution, (if available), or a rain check. In some instances (e.g. special purchases, power buys, clearance items, bonus with purchase or seasonal items) quantities may be limited, selection may vary by store and substitutes or rain checks cannot be given. Home Outfitters Outlet store at Hwy. 401 & Weston Road, may not have all offers in this flyer. Contact store for details or visit http://www.homeoutfitters.com/en/storelocator.html. Home Outfitters reserves the right to limit quantities. ■ 4.3 H14 All references to regular price are to Home Outfitters’ regular price product and does not include already reduced, clearance, Smart Buy, signature deals and items with .95 & .98 price endings unless otherwise specified. All prices in effect Now through Sunday, June 1st, 2014, unless otherwise specified.

doing needlework, painstakingly creating images one stitch at a time. “I can see how it’s influenced me, because I get really picky,” said ClarkeJennings. She finally switched over from holding a needle to holding a paintbrush, out of frustration. “I came to the conclusion I don’t like counting,” she said of the process of carefully watching your fabric and stitches. “This is so much freer,” she said of her painting. She was exposed to paintings first at her greatgrandmother’s home, where she had a clear memory of seeing a large painting hanging in the living room. After that initial fascination and her decision to give up needlework, it was a friend’s invitation to take a class on learning to draw that finally got her involved in the art world 32 years ago. Clarke-Jennings took classes at Kwantlen Polytechnic and the Academy of Art, and she began working on her own. “A sketchbook, you can take with you anytime,” she noted. Some of her biggest artistic inspirations are three women: Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo, and British Columbia’s Emily Carr. Jumping between art forms, Clarke-Jennings said she often interprets paintings in metaphors drawn from music. “Every one of those ladies painted in a different musical style,” said Clarke-Jennings. Carr’s majestic deepgreen West Coast trees are “symphonic,” while O’Keefe’s paintings of flowers and New Mexico are “jazzier.” “It’s like I could hear music while I was looking at these paintings,” she said. She listens to music

while painting, and often changes songs to suit the mood for the work in progress. The huge red flower in her current show was painted with Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah. Clarke-Jennings painted for many years while working with her family running a Langley import business. Sometimes she could get lost in the process, she said. “You just go into this zone, and the next thing you know, it’s way later than you thought,” she said. “It’s nice when you can get to that place.” The show runs June 1-30 at ABC Fine Art Gallery in downtown Langley. The show, like her painting career, began in a roundabout way. A conversation at the Bloomin’ Artists Gift Gallery in Langley City led to a suggestion of making some prints to sell, with proceeds to the Canadian Cancer Society. She went to ABC Fine Art owner Toby Malek, who shows work by local artists and makes prints. After he saw the pieces considered for prints, she was offered the show. He said he wants to foster the local art community in Langley, and is hosting a solo show each month at his gallery, each one with a specific theme. In light of the works and the print sales for the Cancer Society, the theme of June’s show will be hope, Malek said. The prints will be up for purchase at both Bloomin’ Artists and at McBurney’s Coffee & Tea House. To see all 30 paintings, spanning five years of Clarke-Jenkins’s work, visit the ABC gallery, at 20573 Fraser Hwy. A reception for the exhibition will be held June 5, from 5-7:30 p.m. This is Clarke-Jennings’s second solo show.


Business

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Food bank

Family event kicks off drive What’s in

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rhooper@langleyadvance.com

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A Langley business coach is on cloud nine this week, after earning national accolades among her industry peers. During a ceremony at the Marriott Pinnacle hotel in Vancouver last Thursday, Beverlee Rasmussen was named the 2014 International Coach Federation business coach of the year. “When I first started helping small business owners officially six years ago, I didn’t even want to call myself a coach. I didn’t really know what to call me,” she recounted. She settled for “business consultant” and headed off with her “wellplanned out agendas and timelines.” She quickly learned she had tools to help a business, but what she was missing were tools to help the people owning the business. Rasmussen needed to learn how to coach, and that she has done, obviously very well, given these accolades. “It’s a pretty big honour,” Rasmussen said. Kudos!

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Langley’s Beverlee Rasmussen (right) was given the national business coach of the year award last week.

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Hats off to the team at Save-On-Foods in Willowbrook for their efforts on Saturday to Help Hunger Disappear. The Campbell Soup company of Canada launched the seventh year of the national hunger program last week, is aimed at creating awareness and driving food donations for local food banks. As part of that effort, Campbells joined forces with the team at the 64th Avenue Save-On-Foods to host a fun food drive kickoff this past Saturday. The results, said the store assistant manager Brent Taylor, were heartwarming. As the weather warms up, donations to the Langley Food Bank (like all food banks across Canada) tend to decline, but thankfully this event alone helped generate about $500 and a small pickup load full of food. The six-hour family-oriented event in front of the grocery store included free car washes with the purchase of food bundles for the food bank, a children’s amusement area complete with bouncy castles, balloons, and facepainting, and a barbecue with all proceeds to the food bank. “Everyone was really appreciative,” Taylor said. “What kid doesn’t love a bouncy castle, and I think everyone loved donating to such a good cause.” The Help Hunger Disappear food drive continues locally at the Willowbrook Save-On store until June 6.

Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Thursday, May 29, 2014

Business

Township

www.tol.ca

Page

For the week of May 29, 2014

Tuesday, June 3 | 7 - 9pm Heritage Advisory Committee Civic Facility Salmon River Committee Room Wednesday, June 4 | 7 - 9pm Economic Development Advisory Committee Civic Facility Salmon River Committee Room

disposition of lands

Notice of Proposed Disposition of Township Lands

Notice is hereby given of the intention of the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Langley, pursuant to Sections 26 and 94 of the Community Charter S.B.C. 2003, c. 26, to sell Township owned land, the particulars of which are as follows:

Township of Langley Civic Facility 20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 604.534.3211 | tol.ca

langley events centre

Thu May 29 8:00pm vs. Burnaby Lakers Sun Jun 1 5:00pm vs. Nanaimo Timbermen Thu Jun 5 8:00pm vs. Coquitlam Adanacs

Langley Intermediate Thunder BCILL Lacrosse Sun Jun 1 2:00pm vs. Port Coquitlam Saints

PID: 013-224-859

20 AVE Legal Description:

PID: 013-224-859 – Parcel “A” (Plan With Fee Deposited 23211E) Legal Subdivision 9 Section 15 Township 7 NWD

Civic Address:

None – 19900 block of 20 Avenue

Property Description: The property is approximately 2 acres and is zoned SR-2 Purchaser:

Tasic Developments Ltd.

Selling Price:

Eight hundred twenty-five thousand dollars ($825,000) to be applied as a credit toward the Township of Langley’s purchase of 20239 - 84 Avenue. Scott Thompson Manager, Property Services Department 604.533.6138

Notice of Proposed Disposition of Township Lands

Notice is hereby given of the intention of the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Langley, pursuant to Sections 26 and 94 of the Community Charter S.B.C. 2003, c. 26, to sell Township owned land, the particulars of which are as follows: Legal Descriptions: Civic Addresses:

PID: 029-204-178 Lot B District Lot 320 Group 2 NWD Plan EPP29003 None – corner of 260 Street and 84 Avenue

Property Description: The property is approximately 5 acres and is zoned RU-3. Purchaser:

Trinity Western University

Selling Price:

Five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000)

Langley Thunder WLA Lacrosse The Langley Events Centre is located at 7888 - 200 Street

Stage 1 Lawn Sprinkling Restrictions are in effect from June 1 to September 30 for all municipal water system users throughout the Metro Vancouver area, including the Township of Langley. Lawn sprinkling is only allowed:

Residential •

4:00am to 9:00am • Even addresses - Monday, Wednesday, Saturday • Odd addresses - Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday

Non-Residential • 1:00am to 6:00am • Even addresses - Monday, Wednesday • Odd addresses - Tuesday, Thursday • 4:00am to 9:00am • All addresses – Friday For more information visit tol.ca/WaterRestrictions. Engineering Division 604.532.7300 enginfo@tol.ca

Saturday, June 7

Time:

10 to 11:30am

Place:

Corner of 201 Street and 102 Avenue

Official opening ceremonies will take place at 10am. Following the opening, the public can walk or bike the new trail, enjoy activities and light refreshments at the ceremony location, and view the Fraser River and the surrounding landscape from the Golden Ears Bridge. Parking is available at the ceremony site, but guests are encouraged to bike to the site along the new Trans Canada Trail route, from Edgewater Bar at Derby Reach Regional Park. Edgewater Bar is about five kilometres away from the ceremony location and the bike ride will take 20 – 30 minutes. Guests can also walk the new, easy section of the trail, which will take about 90 minutes. A shuttle service will be also be available to transport guests to and from the ceremony location and Edgewater Bar at Derby Reach. Shuttle service starts at 9:15 am and runs every 15 minutes for pick up and drop off. Parks Design and Development 604.532.7350 Fraser Valley Regional District

Langley Demonstration Garden Summer Programs

The Langley Demonstration Garden has a busy summer planned!

An educational facility operated by the Langley Environmental Partners Society in partnership with the Township of Langley, the Demonstration Garden is located in the Derek Doubleday Arboretum in the 21200 block of Fraser Highway. It is open year-round to demonstrate sustainable gardening techniques and staffed weekdays from May to August. This summer, a number of fun and informative events, activities, and programs will be held and the public is encouraged to take part.

Willow Structures - Saturday, June 14, 11am - 1pm: Learn

how to harvest, plant and weave willow cuttings to produce fences and a variety of other living structures. Please RSVP at least one week in advance.

Backyard Composting - Saturday, June 28, 11am - 12pm: 84 AVE

For ticket information, contact Langley Events Centre 604.882.8800 • LangleyEventsCentre.com

Stage 1 Lawn Sprinkling Restrictions

The Township of Langley and Metro Vancouver invite the public to attend the official opening of the new Canyon to Coast/Trans Canada Trail Connection between Derby Reach Regional Park and Golden Ears Bridge.

Picnics in the Park - Thursday, June 26, 5 - 7pm: Bring some sandwiches and join us for an evening of garden tours and live local folk music. Barbecue by donation.

PID: 029-204-178

Wed Jun 4 7:45pm vs. Coquitlam Adanacs

public notices

Trail Connection Official Opening: Derby Reach Regional Park To Golden Ears Bridge

Date:

Coming Events Langley Junior Thunder BCJALL Lacrosse

public programs and events

The event will be held on International Trails Day:

Thursday, June 5 | 7 - 9pm Community Participation, Infrastructure, and Environment Advisory Committee Civic Facility Salmon River Committee Room Monday, June 9 | 7 - 11pm Regular Council Meeting Civic Facility Fraser River Presentation Theatre

20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 | 604.534.3211

200 ST

dates to note

LangleyAdvance

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Make black gold in your own yard! Learn what type of composting is a good fit for your needs, and how to quickly produce rich organic fertilizer from yard trimmings and kitchen scraps. Please RSVP at least one week in advance.

Registration is open for Eco Explorers kids’ day camps! For more information and to register, contact: Required Condition: Registration of a covenant for conservation purposes and a statutory right of way for public access. Scott Thompson Manager, Property Management Department 604.533.6138

public notice Public Water Supply Permit: Location Change The location for obtaining a municipal Public Water Supply Permit is changing. Starting June 1, 2014, this permit can only be obtained from the Township’s Operations Centre, located at 4700 - 224 Street. For more information contact: Engineering Division 604.532.7300 opsinfo@tol.ca

Langley Environmental Partners Society garden@leps.bc.ca 604.546.0344

Japanese Knotweed Roadside Control Strategy

Japanese Knotweed is an invasive species whose root system has the potential to ruin home foundations, roads, parking lots, sewerage, and water main infrastructure. The Township of Langley is working to eliminate the threat of this invasive plant. You may see markers along various roads identifying where Japanese Knotweed is located. Do not remove the plants or mow these areas. Improper removal of the plant could result in the plant reproducing rapidly or spreading further.

The Roads Department is spraying a mild herbicide to control the Japanese Knotweed. The removal process will take several treatments and inspections throughout the year. After the roots are killed, the plant stock will be removed and discarded safely. For more information on the roadside control program, contact: Engineering Division 604.533.6006 tol.ca/invasive

Township continued...


Business

Township

Page

20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 | 604.534.3211

public open house

road closure

Latimer Neighbourhood Plan

On April 29, 2014, Township of Langley Council adopted a new, temporary bylaw to regulate, prohibit, and impose requirements on tree clear-cutting in Brookswood/Fernridge. Bylaw 2014 No. 5071 was enacted on an interim basis so that Council, in consultation with the public, could consider amending the Brookswood/Fernridge Community Plan or creating a permanent tree bylaw. Under the new bylaw, no one (including land owners) can remove more than 8 trees or 20 per cent of the trees on a parcel of land, whichever is less, until the bylaw is repealed.

The Township of Langley is holding an open house to present the draft Latimer Neighbourhood Plan. Residents, property owners, and business owners of the community are encouraged to attend the open house and provide input on the plan. Date: Time: Place: Address:

Thursday, June 5 4 to 8pm Langley Events Centre – Banquet Hall 7888 – 200 Street

196 ST

A partial road closure will be in effect on Gloucester Way southbound from 56 Avenue at the 26500 block. The full-time, temporary closure is scheduled to begin Monday, June 2 and will continue until Monday, July 21. The closure is required for the construction of a new storm sewer. A detour route is outlined on the map.

84 AVE

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Temporary Road Closure: Gloucester Way Southbound

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The plan provides a more sustainable neighbourhood through provision of:

Tree Bylaw Boundary

The bylaw only affects properties in the geographic area outlined in the Brookswood/Fernridge Community Plan (see map) and does not apply to land within the Agricultural Land Reserve or land being used as a farm operation. Trees can still be removed if they are blocking sightlines under the Township’s highway and traffic bylaw or if they are in an area approved by provincial regulation for a septic field or water well. Trees may be removed if necessary for the construction of a building, if approved by a development permit, development variance permit, or building permit issued by the Township of Langley. Trees can also be removed if they are hazardous, as certified by an arborist, or in case of an emergency, if certification is received by the Township Engineer within 30 days of the cutting. The prohibition is being taken very seriously and those who are convicted of violating the bylaw by damaging or removing protected trees face a fine of not less than $500 and not more than $10,000 per tree. Specific details and the entire Interim Tree Clear-Cutting Bylaw 2014 No. 5071 can be viewed on the Township’s website at tol.ca, under About the Township/Bylaws/All bylaws. To report a tree cutting incident in the Brookswood/Fernridge area, call the Township’s Tree Protection Hotline at 604.532.7520. For more information contact: Bylaw Enforcement 604.532.7551 bylaw@tol.ca

Protect Pollinators and Grow Healthy

Pollinators help provide one in three bites of our food supply! Pollinators are in decline because of pesticide use and loss of habitat. You can do your part to help save pollinators by reducing your use of cosmetic pesticides.

outreach@leps.bc.ca 604.546.0338 tol.ca/growhealthygrowsmart

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Motorists are advised to plan alternate routes and allow extra time to reach their destination safely.

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Tree Clear-Cutting Prohibited in Brookswood/Fernridge

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www.tol.ca

For the week of May 29, 2014

public notices

Thursday, May 29, 2014

264 ST

LangleyAdvance

• a range of housing opportunities and choices • walkable neighbourhoods • necessary commercial support services for the neighbourhood in the form of mixed use • preservation of open space, natural beauty, and critical environmental areas • a variety of transportation choices • modified road grid network • high quality design and architecture • innovative energy conservation solutions Background information on the Latimer Neighbourhood Plan is available on the Township’s website at tol.ca/latimer. Community Development Division 604.533.6034

public programs and events Private Well and Septic Seminars

The Township of Langley, in partnership with Langley Environmental Partners Society, is hosting two free seminars on proper private well and septic systems maintenance.

The seminars will be held upstairs in the Murrayville Fire Hall, 22170 - 50 Avenue: Private Well Seminar Date: Thursday, May 29 Time: 7 - 9 pm Septic Sense Seminar Date: Thursday, June 5 Time: 7 - 9 pm For more information or to RSVP contact: Erin Enns Water Wise Program Coordinator Langley Environmental Partners Society 604.546.0345 water@leps.bc.ca

Local area residents and businesses will have access during the road closure. Please note the work is weather dependent and the construction schedule is subject to change. Visit tol.ca/roads for an updated construction schedule. We appreciate your patience. Engineering Division 604.532.7300 opsinfo@tol.ca

public programs and events Backyard Composter Truckload Sale Curious about composting?

Then mark your calendar for the third annual Backyard Composter Truckload Sales Event. For only $25, purchase a backyard composter and receive a free “kitchen catcher,” a small container for your kitchen scraps. The first 30 residents also get an aerator. The complete deal is valued at $110! Date: Saturday, June 7 Time: 9:30am - 2:00pm Place: Entrance of Langley Costco Address: 20499 - 64 Avenue This deal is only open to Township of Langley residents. Cash or cheque only. Home delivery is available. To learn more about composting, visit tol.ca/composting. Engineering Division 604.532.7300 opsinfo@tol.ca

Mosquito Control Hotline

Metro Vancouver has created a Mosquito Control Hotline for Township residents. Culex Environmental, the regional mosquito control contractor, will log and respond to all mosquito-related calls and visit sites if requested by the public.

Calls can range from concerns about standing or stagnant water on private or public land or neighbouring property, Fraser River floodwaters, adult ”biting mosquitoes,” or “spraying or fogging.” Also, remember the 4 Ds: Drain – your property of standing water Dusk/Dawn – take extra care Dress – cover up and wear long sleeves Defend – use repellents when appropriate Mosquito Control Hotline 604.872.1912

After-Hours Emergency Contact 604.543.6700


Sports LangleyAdvance

A26

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Tournament play

Blitz live up to the name at nationals tourney

A U17 girls volleyball team proved recently that it is one of Canada’s best.

Langley’s Fraser Valley Blitz U17 girls volleyball team earned attention and accolades at a national championship in Edmonton in May. The Blitz finished fifth out of 96 teams at the Canadian National U18 Girls Volleyball Championships, held at the University of Alberta. The Blitz’s fifth place result was a significant achievement considering that they went into the championship ranked 27th, and they’re playing up a year, in the older and stronger U18 Division 1/Tier 1 age bracket, Langley’s FVVC U17 Blitz girls volleyball team huddled to with two of their players playing discuss strategy during a game at the recent Canadian national up two years. championships, where they finished fifth out of 96 teams, while The tourney brought together playing up in the older U18 age bracket. 96 teams from most provinces to compete in multiple divisions push ourselves and our physical While and tiers. and mental development,” Blitz the top two Three other Fraser Valley head coach David Carrasco said. teams would Volleyball Club (FVVC) teams “The team worked very hard advance to also attended the event and for each other, gelled as sisters, the top tier all placed well, including the and we finished strong, which for day two, U18 girls who won bronze in gives the players and us coaches their goal U18 Division 2/Tier 1, the U17 a positive feeling for next year was to win boys who won gold in Division when we will play in our own the pool. After the match scores 1/Tier 2, and the U18 boys who age bracket,” were calculated, the Blitz won finished fifth in Carrasco the pool based on the number of Division 1/Tier 1. coaches with sets won. “The team worked The competitive TWU, coached The second day saw the Blitz very hard for each club season went at the University power-pooled with two top well for the U17 of Manitoba, and Alberta teams along with local other.” Blitz, who played coached girls club rivals, the Coquitlam Ducks. David Carrasco up against older teams in Manitoba It began with a win over U18 teams all seato provincial and another Pandas team that went son including their sister team, nationals championship titles, so to a third tie-breaker set, with the FVVC U18 Altro. his experience helped the team. the Blitz coming out on top in a The Blitz placed in the top On day one of the competiconvincing 15-2 win. three in several tournaments and tion, the Blitz won two of three An important second game finished fourth at the B.C. provmatches, with wins over the was won convincingly by the incial championships after being Royals from Saskatchewan, and Blitz over Calgary’s Cougars 25edged out for the bronze medal the pool’s top seed, the Pandas, 22 and 25-15. by the Victoria Titans, who from Edmonton. This solidified their placement earned the silver medal at the Their one loss came against in the final top eight for the recent national championships. Montreal’s Celtiques, which left playoffs Sunday, but they had “We discussed it as a team the Blitz in a three-way tie in the one last game against the Ducks. and decided to play up a year to pool. The Blitz were seeking payback.

All season, the Blitz hadn’t beaten the Ducks, who hold previous multiple provincial and national championship titles. The match started with an exciting 25-23 set win for the Blitz. As champions often do, the Ducks bounced back in the second set with a 25-20 win, leading to a third tie-breaker set. This final set swung back and forth until the Ducks pulled ahead and won 15-9. The loss to the Ducks left the Blitz to face the Cobras from Manitoba in the quarter-final playoffs on day three of the tournament.

The Cobras were ranked fourth of 96 teams coming into the championship. “The way we played all weekend, and the resilience the girls showed in some games where we had to come from behind for the win, made the team believe they were capable of going all the way,” assistant coach Lauren Carrasco stated. No stranger to big game pressure, Lauren Carrasco (O’Reilly) played with TWU, Team Canada, and professionally in Europe so her experience and calm helped the Blitz deal with the psychological pressures of the moment, which is often the deciding factor in big games like this. The match began with the

Cobras racing out ahead with an early lead but the Blitz battled back to make the game very close to the end, however the Cobras came out on top with a 25-23 win. Heading into the second set the Cobras were careful not to be overconfident against their younger adversaries, as the Blitz had defeated several top teams all weekend, so they continued their consistent and exceptional play and got the second win over the Blitz 25-21. The loss ended their championship run and left the Blitz feeling saddened until the coaches reminded them that they finished fifth out of 96 teams while playing a year up. Another bittersweet consolation was that the Cobras went on to win the championship with a win over the Victoria Titans that, based on the 25-18, 25-18 score, appeared an easier win than when the Cobras faced the Blitz. After the match, the Blitz players commented, “we came together as a new team this year and all season we worked hard, developed our skills, and played well. We dug deep, believed in each other, and rose to new heights. We didn’t win a medal but our fifth place finish in Canada at an older age bracket is golden to us.” The talent of the players, most of whom are over six feet tall, is substantiated by the fact that three of them are already committed to university teams and the rest of the players are in discussions with university coaches about their university and volleyball futures. The team includes: Paige Bergen, Nicole Chevrier, Laura Findlay, Emma Kastelein, Cara Keturakis, Angelica Kilberg, Karah Kostamo, Brooke Mothe, Brie O’Reilly, Cassidy Pearson, and coaches David and Lauren Carrasco.

Hockey

Girls, give ice hockey a go Saturday at Sportsplex Learn about local girls hockey opportunities. Girls who may have wanted to try hockey but

didn’t think they could handle joining a team can try out the sport Saturday. The Girls, Come Try Hockey! event is at the Sportsplex rink, 20165

91A Ave. Girls ages five to 17 can give hockey a go in a fun atmosphere. No experience is necessary and the event is host-

ed by the Langley Girls Ice Hockey Association. The event runs noon to 1:30 p.m. and is free. Skates will be provided and there are some hel-

Some choices are hard.

mets for the girls to use, but organizers suggest bringing a hockey or even bike or skateboard helmet, if possible. Those who decide this

is the sport for them can find out about registration for the fall, which is open. For more information can go to www.langleylightninggirlshockey.com.

Some are easy.

@craftsmanshops • craftsmancollision.com


Sports

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Renew Your Health! 100% ORGANIC ACACIA FIBRE!

The North Langley Blue Jays battled at a rain-soaked peewee baseball tournament in Vancouver last weekend.

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CerebrumTM is a revolutionary product that will increase your cognitive performance by 10% for a 6 hour period after taking it. Cerebrum™ also contains the brain boosting essential fatty acid DHA, derived from fish oil.

Bronze game rained out North Langley hitters blasted four out-of-thepark at a tournament. A ill-timed spring soaker put a halt to the North Langley Blue Jays’ fun last weekend. The team, mostly of 12year-old players as well as two 10-year-olds and a pair of 11-year-olds, piled up runs at the weathershortened Vancouver Minor Baseball Presidents Cup peewee AAA tournament May 22-25.

Before the event was interrupted by rain on Sunday, the North Langley squad took home honours as top defensive team and top offensive team after out-scoring their collective opponents 49-19. After going unbeaten last Friday and Saturday, the Blue Jays’ lone loss was an 8-7 setback to the Gibsons White Sox on Sunday morning. They were set to play the Vancouver Jays in the bronze medal game, but it, along with the gold medal contest pitting the White

Sox against the Cloverdale Cardinals, was rained out. For the Blue Jays, the tournament was marked by strong pitching and defence, along with a record four out-of-the park home runs. The Blue Jays include Joey Yeomans, Alex Crone, Dylan Frayne, Sensho Hung, Elias Blum, Nick Sarrazin, Keagan Novis, Tyler Harrison, Jaxon Wood, Isaiah Peters, Jesse Nielsen, and Caleb Kaufmann. The team is coached By John Yeomans.

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A28

Recreation

Thursday, May 29, 2014

History

LangleyAdvance

What’s your favourite vintage Model, eh?

by Troy Landreville

tlandreville@langleyadvance.com

While Mike Breed may not be Langley’s principal guru of Model A vehicles, he’s certainly one of them. The secretary of the Pacific Model A Club has 11 Model As parked on his sprawling Brookswood property, six of which he owns. He restores, shows, and has a general passion for the Ford models, manufactured from late 1927 to 1931. Need a question answered about a Model A? Breed will likely have the answer you’re looking for, as a pair of 90-year-old residents of Pennsylvania recently found out. While visiting the state, Breed and wife Lil drove through a little town, where he caught a glimpse of the front end of a Model A parked inside a stone shop with its door open. His interest naturally piqued, Breed quickly introduced himself to the two men. Breed learned that the

car was purchased, brand new, by the grandfather of Photos one of the men, and had been sitting in a barn built by the grandfather a century ago. Layar or And it turned out, these online two seniors were in a pickle. They were trying to get the car up and running for use in the area’s Memorial Day Parade last weekend. “They were having trouble timing it, so I was able to take the time to show them how to get it timed and do it for them,” Breed said. “They were tickled pink with the idea that somebody would stop and help them out. It worked out well.” A 73-year-old transplanted New Zealander who Troy Landreville/Langley Advance arrived in Canada in 1962, Mike Breed is a Model A aficionado, and has nearly a dozen of the cars parked on his Brookswood property. Breed bought his first Model As were originally manufactured between 1927 and ’31. Model A in, he figured, Model A Sunday the shop].” Model As. same with us.” “1956 or The “Oh, restoration, preBreed likes the fact that ’57.” What: Model A car show vehicle at serving them, keeping Model As are simple, “I started Who: Organized by the the shop in them on the road, and also meat-and-potatoes type of with the Pacific Model A Club Hamilton, having a ton of fun driving collector cars. Model As When: Sunday, June 1, 10 N.Z., hapthem,” he said, about his “The Model A was when I was a.m. to 3 p.m. pened to be passion for the vehicles. actually a family car, with 14 years Where: BC Farm Machinery a Model A, “It’s something you grow an affordable price for old, workand Agricultural Museum, and Breed up with. The kids these family people,” Breed said. ing at the 9131 King St. in Fort Langley also drove a days, they’re looking at The two-door Model A local shop,” Model A to what their folks had when was designed in a way Breed school. they were little, and that’s that parents could put shared. “At But it’s not just raw nos- what they’re looking to their kids in the backseat 15, I started my five-year talgia that draws Breed to restore, and that was the and not worry about the apprenticeship there [at View with

www.langleyadvance.com

The secretary of the Pacific Model A Club has several such cars.

doors “flying open,” Breed said. In its heyday, a twodoor Model A right off the assembly line would set you back about $460, according to Breed. “That was affordable to a man working in the ’30s,” he said. Breed said he does a lot of restoration work while lending his mechanical expertise to members of other Model A clubs as well as private owners. One such car, a 1930 Sport Coupe that Breed said he did a full restoration on, belonged to a man who has since passed away. “I had to panic to get it finished because he had cancer, and I wanted to get it together, for him to drive it, which he did,” Breed said. “It’s now owned by his widow, and she does not have a place to keep it, but I do.” Breed will be showing one of his cars at the Pacific Model A Club’s 26th annual show Sunday at the BC Farm Machinery and Agricultural Museum. Model A Sunday runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the museum, 9131 King St., on June 1.

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Thursday, May 29, 2014

A29


A30

Thursday, May 29, 2014

LangleyAdvance


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

A31

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A32

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Langley Advance May 29 2014  

Langley Advance May 29 2014

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