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LangleyAdvance Your community newspaper since 1931

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Breaking news, sports, and entertainment: www.langleyadvance.com

Audited circulation: 40,026 – 28 pages

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Workers are assembling styrofoam pieces of various shapes and sizes for the Mufford Overpass. Work continues on it and other sites in the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Project around Langley and Cloverdale.

Murder

Body shocks Port Kells neighbours

Police are releasing few details after a man’s body was found in a car in a quiet residential area of Port Kells. by Heather Colpitts

Michelle Carduner

604-657-3790

michelle_carduner@telus.net https://www.facebook.com/ MichelleCardunerRealEstate

Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

The Integrated Homicide Team has taken over the investigation of a man’s body found in a car at 189th Street and 92nd Avenue early Tuesday. The Surrey RCMP found the man’s body at about 9 a.m. It was inside a vehicle and early investigation suggested a homicide. “We are in the early stages and although

the cause of death will have to be confirmed through autopsy we can say that this incident does not appear to be a random act,” said Cpl. Dominic Duchesneau of IHIT. IHIT held a press conference at about 4 p.m. on Jan. 21 and only gave out preliminary details. Duchesneau said more information will be provided during the course of the investigation but for now the police aren’t releasing more. The police would not say the man’s approximate age or ethnicity.

Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance

The Integrated Homicide Investigation Team (IHIT) took over the case.

Duchesneau said the police believe they have an identity but wanted to confirm it and notify the man’s family. On Wednesday morning, IHIT announced it was still not ready to release more information. The car was abandoned on a narrow dead-end road in the residential neighbourhood of large, semi-rural properties. “I’m in shock,” said nearby resident Karen Polson. A resident for 15 years, she’s always felt safe in the neighbourhood but has noticed that it’s changed in recent years.

continued on page A8…


A2

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014

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UpFront

LangleyAdvance

What’s

online

Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion proposal is being checked out by Langley Township staff, with an eye to dealing with alignment issues, reducing impacts on public property, and protecting the environment. The study was ordered by a motion passed by council on Monday, directing staff to determine the most appropriate role the Township could play in an upcoming National Energy Board (NEB) public hearing. Kinder Morgan Canada is proposing to twin the existing Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby. The pipeline runs through the north of the Township. • More online

RCMP Supt. Derek Cooke was the guest speaker at Tuesday’s Langley Chamber of Commerce dinner at the Coast Hotel.

News

Cooke at Chamber

Superintendent Derek Cooke, Officer in Charge of the Langley RCMP detachment, gave Langley’s business community some insight about policing in the community. Cooke spoke at the Langley Chamber of Commerce monthly dinner Tuesday at the Coast Hotel ballroom. • More online

Community

CBC at McBurney Downtown Langley is getting the full treatment from CBC Radio on Friday, Jan. 24. Rick Cluff and the Early Edition gang start the day, “dark and early,” 5:30-8:30 a.m., in Langley City, broadcasting from the newly renovated McBurney’s Coffee and Tea House. Broadcasts go all day on various local topics. • More online

LangleyAdvance.com

7:15 vs Chilliwack

Thursday, January 23, 2014

The Memory

Proposal studied

Click

Fri, Jan. 24

A3

Mental health

News

for community

GAME DAY

Sitting with his wife Kylee and son Grayson in his Langley City home, Jeff Lapierre held a photo of his brother Trevor, who took his own life on Oct. 23, 2010. A fundraiser is being held in Trevor’s honour this Friday at the Fox and the Fiddle Pub on the Langley Bypass.

Remains

A fundraiser in Trevor Lapierre’s memory takes place Friday. by Troy Landreville sports@langleyadvance.com

O

n a wall near the front door of the Langley City apartment that Jeff Lapierre shares with his wife Kylee and their nine-month-old son Grayson is a framed photo of a young man, his head down, strumming a guitar. Etched across the photo are the italicized lyrics from the band Soul Asylum’s smash 1992 hit Runaway Train. The guitarist in the photo is Jeff’s brother Trevor, and the song was Trevor’s all-time favourite. Runaway Train was played at Trevor’s funeral in October 2010.

Family devastated

A

t approximately one o’clock in the morning of Oct. 23, 2010, Trevor quietly slipped out of his bed. He told his girlfriend that he was going to the bathroom. He never returned. A few hours later, a scream filled the Brookswood home that Trevor shared with his parents and younger brother Brad. Trevor’s dad, Bob, discovered the body of his third-born son in the rec room. Trevor took his own life, the night before a planned 80th birthday celebration for his grandfather. He was 23. He left behind his brothers Jeff, now 31, 32-year-old Derek, 25year-old Brad, and parents Bob and Maureen. While there was a four-year age gap between himself and Trevor, Jeff said he was very close to his brother. They shared the same interests and just seemed to click. “There wasn’t any real signs [that Trevor was going to take his own life],” Jeff reflected Saturday, a few days away from the second annual The Memory Remains, a fundraiser benefit-

Troy Landreville Langley Advance

ing the Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre of B.C. All proceeds from the Friday, Jan. 24 event at The Fox and the Fiddle at 19530 Langley Bypass will be donated to the centre in Trevor’s memory. Leading up to his suicide, Trevor seemed to be turning his life around. He had been attending A.A. meetings for his drinking and was trying hard to get a handle on his anger issues. Trevor and his girlfriend were in a committed relationship and he had a stable job with a local plastic fabrication manufacturer. “When he wasn’t drinking, he always seemed happy,” Jeff said. “There was no signs of depression; no one thought he had any sort of feelings like that.” Trevor’s death left his family, including Jeff, in total shock. “I never, ever, saw it coming. His life was going pretty good which is why it came out of left field,” Jeff reflected. “Really, it brought on a lot of guilt. You feel guilty you didn’t see it coming, you couldn’t do anything to help prevent it.” A couple days before his death, Trevor told his doctor that he was mad all the time, and didn’t want to be that way anymore. He took his first two doses of antidepressants the day before his death, but their effects didn’t factor into his suicide, according to a coroner’s report. Following his brother’s death, Jeff took a week off work to allow himself time to grieve. A few days after Trevor’s suicide, Jeff found himself in his brother’s bedroom at their parents’ home. “I was just sitting by myself and I broke down,” he said.

As well as honouring Trevor’s “That’s when it really, really memory, this is why this second sank in.” omorrow night, the annual fundraiser so important to Lapierre family is once Jeff and his family. again hosting the fundraisThe first Memory Remains er in support of the crisis centre. fundraiser, held in June 2012, The crisis centre has opersold out, and featured former ated since 1969 and helps Vancouver Canuck Mason people through three core proRaymond. grams: 24/7 distress phone It raised more than $7,000. services; online distress Canucks forward Dale Weise is services (YouthInBC.com, scheduled to take part in Friday’s CrisisCentreChat. fundraiser. ca); and comWeise will sign munity educaSuicide warning signs autographs and tion. have his picture • Sudden change in behaviour Through taken with fans. (positive or negative); the event, the Mental illness • Apathy, withdrawal, change in Lapierre family and depression eating patterns; have channeled is something • Unusual preoccupation with death their grief into that has affected or dying; helping others the entire • Giving away valued personal who may be Canucks organpossessions; contemplating ization with the • Signs of depression such as suicide, and death of former moodiness, hopelessness; help their famCanuck Rick ilies catch some Rypien on Aug. • One or more previous suicide of the warning 15, 2011. attempts; signs. Like Trevor, • Recent attempt or death by suicide Funds go dirRypien commitby a friend or a family member. ectly into the ted suicide. Source: Canadian Mental crisis centre’s Reminiscing Health Association teen program, about his Jeff explained. brother, Jeff said “They have volunteers that go Trevor was a really nice guy who to schools and they help teach loved being around kids, and teens how to not only deal with adored his nephew Keith. depression thoughts, but they “He actually talked about workalso teach them how to recognize ing with, maybe, at-risk kids,” that stuff in their friends and Jeff said. “He really loved chiltheir family,” Jeff said. dren.” he $30 tickets to Friday’s oung people are the hardevent are extremely limest hit by suicide. According to the ited, with only about 20 Canadian Mental Health remaining as of Jan. 18. For Association, suicide is among the ticket information call Kylee at 778-888-4036 or Maureen at 778leading causes of death in 15- to 848-5436. 24-year-old Canadians, second For more about the crisis centre only to accidents, and that 4,000 or to make a donation online, people die prematurely each year visit www.crisiscentre.bc.ca. by suicide.

T

T

Y

Langley Christian School Open House Tuesday, February 4th • 9am–noon & 7–9pm Preschool and Elementary (K-5) 22930 48th Ave.

Middle (6–8) and High School (9–12) 22072 48th Ave.

For more information

Call: 604.533.2118

Email: development@langleychristian.com


A4

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014

Aldergrove

TWP housing plan fought Join us and invest in the health of our community. Diane Thornton, President & Thelma Boileau, Treasurer The Langley Memorial Hospital Auxiliary, Proud supporters of our new maternity centre

The expansion of maternity services will provide the family-centred care for which Langley Memorial Hospital is well known.

Help us raise the remaining $1.5 million by March 31, 2014.

Make your gift today. Call 604-533-6422 Online at lmhfoundation.com Visit us at Langley Memorial Hospital 22051 Fraser Highway Langley BC V3A 4H4

Developer Mike O’Neill was one of the speakers at the Jan. 20 public hearing on the Township’s housing development in Aldergrove.

Why is the Township building single family homes, residents ask. by Heather Colpitts

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

Langley Township heard a lot about its proposed lots in an undeveloped plot of Aldergrove land. Township council held a public hearing on Jan. 20 about rezoning the land to allow for a 61 home subdivision, and plenty of people rose to voice their concerns. The Township was presented with more than 200 signatures on a petition opposing the project in the 27500 block of 28th Avenue. Langley owns the land and wants to put on single family homes (61, seven of which have coach houses). The development would include 40 per cent of the 19.1 acre site set aside as conservation area, such as a buffer zone along Bertrand Creek and in the southeast corner. The land abuts the border between Aldergrove and Abbotsford. The northeast corner of the site was once a lagoon. It was the site of the

Heather Colpitts Langley Advance

Township’s water treatment plant and the former site of the sewage treatment plant. The engineering department declared the land surplus and is working on ensuring it’s compliant with remediation requirements so it can be rezoned. Township was told that the site contains lots of low value trees with the growth being 40-50 years old. About two thirds of the trees are evergreens. Based on Langley School District estimates, the homes would add about 100 kids to local schools, where is capacity. One speaker complained about the stench of the standing water while another said she hadn’t noticed a smell and saw wildlife using the area. Teacher Jessica Horst said she would like to see the area left in its nat-

ural state so the public can continue to use it as a park. She noted that schools have environmental clubs and curriculum. “This forest is very easily accessible,” she said of nearby Aldergrove schools. She added that with the aging population and a lack of housing options for seniors, any development should be seniors’ housing. Trevor Nicholson noted that once the area is developed and paved, it will change the water table and drainage. Lee Hollaar suggested the Township, to boost density in Aldergrove, look at creative development. “Why would we want to add more single family dwellings when, in fact, we’re looking for something with higher density?” he questioned.

• More at langleyadvance.com

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014

A5

Police

Is it you in the photos? Someone has lost an album of photos in Langley City. by Matthew Claxton mclaxton@langleyadvance.com

Langley Mounties are trying to find the rightful owner of a photo album. The album was found on the edge of a vacant lot around 201st Street and Michaud Crescent in early January, said Cpl. Holly Marks, spokesperson for the Langley RCMP.

It was found by a passerby who dropped it off at the Langley City Community Police Office. One of the photos shows the words “Vanessa + Jeff do Mexico,” written in sand, but there are no other markings to indicate who owns the photos. Police are asking the public to look at the photos from the album, and if they know the people or can help find them, call the Langley RCMP at 604-532-3200.

RCMP want to return a photo album found in Langley City to its rightful owner.

Nobbs announces for federal race

by Heather Colpitts

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

The Pirate Party has a Langley-Aldergrove candidate for the next federal election, coming in 2015. Craig Nobbs, who previ-

ously ran for the party in the 2011 federal race, is among the six Pirate Party members running in ridings across the country. The long-time Langley resident is running in the newly drawn LangleyAldergrove riding. Due to changing population, the ridings were redrawn so Langley is now part of two ridings, LangleyAldergrove and Cloverdale-

“The Place to Be!” 2014 FINANCIAL PLAN OPEN HOUSE

Federal politics

Another person has stepped forward to run in the federal election.

City of Langley

Langley City. The Pirate Party calls itself a “federal political party focused on thoughtful information policy reform, genuine democracy, civil liberties, and the freedom of the internet.” Find out more at www. pirateparty.ca. The party is in the midst of a leadership election being done online during January and February.

Home Equity Line of Credit

The City of Langley will be hosting a Financial Plan Open House on Wednesday, February 5th at 6:30 pm at the Langley City Hall (20399 Douglas Crescent). The 2014 Financial Plan currently has a gap of $593,250 between total revenues and planned expenditures which would equate to a 2.71% increase in property taxes to balance the budget. Including utility rate increases, the impact on an average multi-family home (assessed at $206,032) would be an increase of 1.00% or $13 and an average single family home (assessed at $462,557) would see an increase of 2.71% or $72. City Council will be holding a Committee of the Whole meeting at 7 pm on Monday, February 17th in the Council Chambers where a public presentation of the Financial Plan will be made. Following the presentation, there will be an opportunity for the public to share their views with City Council on how the shortfall should be addressed. Additional information can be found on our website at www.city.langley.bc.ca

2014 Financial Plan Summary Revenues: Where does the City’s money come from? From Property Owners: • Property value taxes • Water user fees • Sewer & Drainage user fees • Garbage and recycling user fees From other sources • Gaming proceeds • Government transfers • License and permits • Investment income • Other miscellaneous Total Revenues

Last Year 2013

This Year 2014

$21,856,465 4,030,835 2,970,560 1,014,360

$22,785,750 4,225,535 3,046,240 1,014,360

5,750,000 1,813,765 668,420 364,400 1,106,090

5,750,000 1,725,355 700,420 364,400 1,143,230

$39,574,895

$40,755,290

Expenditures: How is the City’s money spent? Policing Services 10,065,385 Fire Services 3,758,830 General government services 3,672,160 Water 3,208,335 Recreation, Culture and Community Services 3,147,405 Engineering and operations 2,564,085 Sewer & Drainage 2,512,310 Parks 1,664,775 Garbage and recycling 1,014,360 Development services 922,510 Other Protective services 825,365 Fiscal Services 6,219,375 Total Operating Expenditures

$39,574,895

10,317,425 3,918,460 3,757,090 3,368,035 3,279,585 2,609,970 2,559,590 1,743,635 1,014,360 927,840 794,880 6,464,420 $40,755,290

Operating Expenditures does not include an allowance for amortization of tangible capital assets.

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The capital construction expenditure budget, not included above, is $22,665,225 for 2014 and is funded through transfers from reserves. Within this budget is $14,300,000 for a new Community Centre and $3,662,000 for the replacement of infrastructure along the 200 Street corridor.

www.city.langley.bc.ca


Bob Groeneveld EDITOR

A6

Thursday, January 23, 2014

editor@langleyadvance.com

Our View is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at Suite 112 6375 - 202nd St., Langley, B.C. V2Y 1N1 The Langley Advance is published on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and is delivered to homes and businesses in Langley City, all areas of Langley Township, and Cloverdale.

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Matthew Claxton Heather Colpitts Troy Landreville

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Opinion

Ryan McAdams PUBLISHER rmcadams@langleyadvance.com

LangleyAdvance

Disease grows as victims fade

It’s a devastating disease that destroys not only its direct victims, but wreaks havoc on entire families. It’s progress is often slow and always relentless, eventually leaving caregivers to watch helplessly as loved ones turn into shells of their former selves – personalities and memories fade into oblivion, often with episodes of confused, violent behaviour accompanying the heart-wrenching metamorphosis. Despite the best efforts of researchers – Canada is an international leader in the field – only modest gains have been made in understanding Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. While there are now treatments that can slow or delay the disease’s destructive progress, there is neither a cure nor even a clear road towards a cure. There are up to 70,000 British Columbians – and their families – living with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias, and as the baby-boomer population continues to age, that number is expected to grow at an increasing rate. The situation is not unique to B.C. The problem is global, and is considered a developing epidemic by many. January is Alzheimer Awareness Month – a chance to share information and increase awareness about the degenerative disease. Because symptoms of Alzheimer’s and dementia can vary greatly among patients and can progress very slowly, it is often a confusing and painful time for the patient, their family, and their friends. Awareness of the symptoms – and services available – makes it a little easier to support those diagnosed with the disease to remain active and effective members of their families and their communities. Provincial officials offer more information at: www.gov.bc.ca/connect. Locally, the annual Walk for Memories is an opportunity for victims, caregivers, and families to offer each other emotional support, and to raise money to fight Alzheimer’s disease. See our story, Charity walk honours caregivers, on page A8 for more about the walk. – B.G.

Your View

Advance Poll…

What’s the best way to deal with health care costs associated with tobacco smoke?

Vote at… www.langleyadvance.com Last week’s question: Did you get your flu shot this year? Vaccinate every fall.

42%

Not scared of H1N1 or any bugs.

9%

Not normally, but did with outbreak.

7%

No, just stay away from sickies Just a ploy by pharmaceutical giants.

12% 30%

Opinion

I’m not against columns, but… Painful truth

Yes, it might lead to you being called a NIMBY, a communist, a tree-hugger, a luddite. Do it anyway. I have yet to meet anyone who started a sentence with the opposite construction. Matthew Claxton “I am against development, and…” mclaxton@langleyadvance.com It would be so refreshing to hear just once. It would also, for most of us, be true. If we are very lucky in our lives, we will find I am weary, tired down to my soul of people ourselves living in a place where we can be, saying, “I’m not against development, but…” wholeheartedly, against development. Being Right now, you might be thinking to youragainst development means that you love your self, “Hey, I said that to this reporter last neighbourhood the way it is. It means you week! He’s talking about me.” have found the place where you belong. No. Last week, you were one of seven or Every crack in the sidewalk is as familiar as eight people who spoke this phrase, about the lines on the palms of your hands. The cinthree separate issues, in three different neighder-block corner store is exactly the right disbourhoods. You can join the ranks of literally tance away for a walk to get an ice cream bar hundreds of people who have said it either to on a summer’s day. The empty lot is so overme or in my presence in the past 15 years. grown, it’s no longer an eyesore I am so thoroughly sick of this phrase that I want it expunged Yes, it might lead and is now a place where you can spot rabbits. from the English language. to you being You recognize the kids who “I’m not against development, pass by on bikes, the seniors out but…” is an attempt to position called a NIMBY, walking their dogs. the speaker as a moderate, as a communist… It is entirely reasonable to someone who is not a NIMBY, as never want this to change. someone who supports the status What sort of person looks at their neighbourquo as a good producer-consumer. It’s a way hood and only wishes for change and growth of staking out a certain cultural space while and greater density? still objecting to a government policy or corIs it possible to stop change? No. The corner porate decision. store will close, the kids on bikes will graduate It implies there are some people (probably to cars, the neighbours will move, someone dirty hippies) who are against development. will eventually build a house on that vacant The speaker is not one of those benighted, lot. filthy sub-humans! No, they are a shining That doesn’t mean we can’t revel in our love member of enlightened, capitalist society. They of place. It doesn’t mean we have to accept just have a specific, singular grievance with the mantra that progress is inevitable and one little project… inevitably good. “I’m not against development, but I don’t It is not morally wrong to feel content with want condos in this neighbourhood.” the way things are at this moment in time. “I’m not against development, but I worry So please, when next you are speaking to there won’t be enough parking.” your politicians or your local reporter, drop “I’m not against development, but should this empty phrase. Maybe you are for developthat python ranch really be built on top of the ment, maybe you wish you could preserve seniors centre?” your neighbourhood in amber, inviolate. Please, everyone who reads this column, I Either way, don’t bring development into it. am begging of you, please say you really are Tell me instead why you love the way things against development. are in the place you call home. Yes, it might be hypocritical.

Letters to the editor . . . may be edited for clarity, length, or legal reasons. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication,

however names may be withheld from print upon request. Letters may be published on the Internet, in print, or both. Publication of letters by The Langley Advance should not be construed as endorsement of or agreement with the views expressed. Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic, or other forms.


Letters to the Editor

LangleyAdvance

Kinder Morgan pipeline

Bitumen endangers floodplain

Dear Editor, My family owns a 17-acre farm in Fort Langley. The Kinder Morgan expansion project plans to dissect our farm with a pipeline that will carry diluted bitumen. They are not “twinning” here. There are currently no pipelines on the property, and I would not have purchased the land had there been. We are in an environmentally sensitive area. The property is bordered by the Salmon River and another a fish bearing creek that is home to many wildlife species, including beaver, bald eagle, and Pacific shrew. The proposed route runs directly through our septic field, as well as through a large drainage pond serving several properties. It also runs above a large aquifer from which many residents draw drinking water. We have researched the Kinder Morgan company, and we believe that it is not a question of “if” there will be a leak, but rather “when.” The results of even a small leak could be catastrophic in this area. In spite of their claims of “public consultation of affected parties,” Kinder Morgan has never approached neither us nor our neighbours whose land is directly impacted. We have repeatedly requested consultation and information, and they have responded by sending third-party contractors, rather than actual Kinder Morgan employees. I am astonished that the local and provin-

cial governments would even entertain the idea of this pipeline, given the economic benefits to our province are dismal compared to the risks we take with not only the pipeline, but the increased tanker traffic in the inlet and on the coast. Karen Larson, Fort Langley Letters to the

Ecosystem sensitive

Dear Editor, I am opposed to the proposed pipeline path. It is Editor TransMountain important that Langley Township council represents our concerns and applies for intervenor process with the National Energy Board. The proposed path is a floodplain that is a sensitive ecological system. Robert R. Adam, Walnut Grove

Send the bill to Kinder Morgan

Dear Editor, Kinder Morgan has done an impressive public relations campaign, but it is overwhelming. Who can review a 15,000-page Kinder Morgan document (I tried) to determine how it will relate to their community? Township council should participate on our behalf, by hiring or appointing qualified staff, and send Kinder Morgan the bill. Natal Cicuto, Langley [Note: Fuller versions of these letters and others are online at www.langleyadvance. com. Click on Opinion.]

Canada Post

Fragile people still need their mail

Dear Editor, Shifting house-to-house deliveries of mail to neighbourhood boxes will not be an inconvenience to able-

bodied people, but there should be some provision for those too old or fragile to walk. A request form for home

Beware

Daycare scam from Mexico

Dear Editor, A new take on a old scam is now circulating in Langley. A woman is contacting daycares in the Langley area, looking for childcare, pretending to be a Canadian living in Mexico, who has two children, and will be returning to Canada shortly. She will send a cheque to cover the first month, but it will be for more than the amount requested, and she will ask for the remainder back. The cheque, of course, is bogus, and the person who cashes it will be out the amount returned. Name withheld, Langley

delivery, stating the reason, attested to by a doctor’s signature, should be sufficient. But mail delivery in Canada is often pathetic: for instance, a card sent to White Rock from Langley taking the better part of a week before delivery; a cheque mailed from Langley to Lethbridge, Alta., over a week ago which has still has not been received. If you wish to get really angry, just look up the wages and pensions paid to employees of the post office. But being good citizens, we keep our mouths shut and pay our taxes. Mike Harvey, Langley

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Statewood Properties’ LEED Gold design exceeds current design standards, and will help preserve our natural environment. I see compromise on one side, but not the other. Christine Burdeniuk, Langley

Restrictions preserve way of life

Dear Editor, Fort Langley is a great place in which to live, raise a family, and watch as my grandchildren grow. I believe the current building restrictions have contributed to this. I fear that significantly deviating from these restrictions is more likely to cause harm than good, and therefore I am opposed to the Coulter Berry development. Mike McManus, Fort Langley [Note: Fuller versions of these letters and others are online at www.langleyadvance. com. Click on Opinion.]

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Dear Editor, On the one hand, the debate going on in Fort Langley is one raging throughout most of the developed world, regarding integration of new development into historical or heritage-designated communities. It is a debate that is trying to find the balance between acknowledging and preserving the past, but at the same time accommodating the needs and the creativity of the present and the future. On the other hand, I wouldn’t want to elevate what has happened in Fort Langley to the level of reasoned debate. Misinformation about the Coulter Berry project has flowed freely, as has name-calling. Lawsuits affect the livelihoods of many. The opposition actually thinks that, if the developer would only do what they want, that would amount to a compromise. A compromise is when both sides give up something to achieve an equilibrium.

A7

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A8

Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014

Environment

Firm fined Metro Vancouver took a Langley-based waste company to court.

Langley-based Super Save Disposal Inc. has been fined $145,000 for operating an unlicensed waste handling facility in Port Kells, the second time it’s been convicted under the Metro Vancouver bylaw. Provincial Court Judge Gulbransen on Jan. 16 ordered Super Save Disposal Inc. to pay the fine to the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District – one of the legal entities that is part of Metro Vancouver – by Oct. 13, 2014. Super Save Disposal Inc. – part of the Super Save Group of Companies – was charged with owning or operating a transfer station or a material recovery facility without a valid licence. Super Save Disposal Inc. continued to operate the facility for over 14 months, even after receiving multiple warnings from Metro Vancouver bylaw enforcement officers that a licence was required. Super Save Disposal Inc. entered a guilty plea.

• More at langleyadvance.com

Body found on quiet street …continued from page A1

“Our mailbox was broken into just before Christmas,” she noted. Polson has heard of more break-ins in the area slated for redevelopment. She said a condo developer asked the family to sell and there are several for sale signs in the area. The RCMP is asking the public to come forward and if anyone was in the area in the last few days. They can contact IHIT at 1-877-551-IHIT (4448) or via email at ihittipline@ rcmp-grc.gc.ca. To remain anonymous, people can use Crime Stoppers phone line, 1-800-222-8477, or leave a tip on the website at Solvecrime.ca.

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

An aging population means that Alzheimer Disease and dementias are going to affect more and more Canadians. And many of the local people affected take part in the Investors Group Walk for Memories. This year’s walk for Langley,

Five eateries hit hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance

While IHIT Cpl. Dominic Duchesneau spoke with others on the investigation team before speaking to the media Tuesday afternoon, four people left the property where the body was found.

Charity walk honours caregivers by Heather Colpitts

Police

by Heather Colpitts

Health

The annual Alzheimer walk is dedicated to caregivers.

LangleyAdvance

Aldergrove and Abbotsford takes place Jan. 26 at Aldergrove Athletic Park starting at noon. Organizers are looking forward to another year of strong community support and for the first time in the local walk’s history, a dry forecast. Despite heavy rains the first two years, the event has brought out hundreds of people and has raised $75,000 for research and support. The goal is to reach the $100,000 mark this year.

There are 23 walks in different B.C. communities as well as a virtual walk in which people can choose their own routes. Each walk is dedicated to someone impacted by Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias. Caregivers are the focus this year. This year’s honourees are Randy Bysouth and Diana Frances of Cloverdale. The couple are caregiving for Randy’s mother and a friend recently diagnosed. • More at www.langleyadvance.com

The Langley RCMP is investigating five robberies at North Langley fast food joints between December and Jan. 20. Cpl. Holly Marks said police believe the cases bear “ome commonalities leading them to believe they may be connected.” They occured at Taco Del Mar, KFC, Quiznos, and two Subways. “On each occasion, a lone Caucasian male enters the establishment and produces an edged weapon. He demands the cash from the register and flees on foot. Police believe he may, occasionally, have a female accomplice assisting by holding the door as he exits. On at least one occasion, he was seen departing in a dark coloured SUV or truck,” Marks noted. The male is Caucasian, about 28, with some facial stubble and blond hair. He’s 5’11” and thin. The male being sought by police often wears dark clothes or grey sweats. “At each of the robberies he has usually masked his face in some way,” she added. Thankfully no one has been injured and the only threat of violence has been the production of the weapon. The Langley RCMP would like to hear from anyone with information on these crimes. Call the RCMP at 604-532-3200. To remain anonymous, contact CrimeStoppers. Call 1-800222-TIPS (8477), go online to www. solvecrime.ca, text BCTIP and your message to CRIMES (274637)or go to the Facebook page at www.facebook. com/metrovancouvercrimestoppers.


Business

LangleyAdvance

Networking opportunity

Thursday, January 23, 2014

A9

World women leaders converge What’s in Store Roxanne Hooper

rhooper@langleyadvance.com

An Australian business woman known for championing gender equality and narrowing the wage gap between those men and us women-folk, will be in town this week addressing what’s expected to be a huge gaggle of women at the BMW dealership. Freda Miriklis hails from Melbourne and is the president of the International Federation of Business & Professional Women. Well, as I’ve mentioned in this column before, a chapter of this 84year-old organization – better known as BPW – has been formed right here in Langley. And to help celebrate the creation of that group, Miriklis – the youngest president in the organization’s history – has been asked to attend the Langley chapter’s charter Freda Miriklis meeting happening Friday evening. BPW international prez She’ll be joined by BPW Canada’s president Cara Cote of Saskatchewan, as well as other members of the international group – some travelling in from Mexico, Switzerland, Argentina, Africa, the U.S., as well as Sydney, Australia. In addition to all the out-of-province guests, local chapter organizers are expecting women from across the Lower Mainland to attend the wine and hors d’oeuvre reception happening Friday, Jan. 24, starting at 6 p.m. at BMW Langley, 6025 Collection Dr. (the corner of Glover Road and the Langley Bypass). Tickets are $40 and must be purchased in advance at 604-309-7808 or by email: bpwlangley1@gmail.com.

Britco growing its presence up north

I’ve been remiss in not mentioning a cool little deal reached between Langley’s own Britco – you know that group off Glover that makes and ships modular buildings around the world – and members of the aboriginal community in Prince George. Through this partnership announced last month between Britco and the Lheidli T’enneh nation, they will establish a joint venture modular building rental and workforce accommodation business for the nation’s traditional territories as well as other areas of development in Northern B.C. With half of its approximately 1,000 employees located in B.C., Britco’s growth in recent years has been the result of the investment in the energy sector in Western Canada. In 2013, Britco opened a modular building rental business branch office Mike Ridley in Prince George and has seen its Britco president business in the region expand significantly. This partnership takes that growth a step further, said Britco president Mike Ridley. “We are excited about working with Lheidli T’enneh – this is a powerful partnership. Lheidli T’enneh is a nation that is business savvy and our partnership will generate a lot of value for our customers, community partners, and other stakeholders,” Ridley added, noting that under the terms of the partnership, Britco will also be working with Lheidli T’enneh to provide them with jobs and skills training opportunities in the construction trades.

And the winner is…

Well, I can start by telling you it wasn’t me. Turns out the lucky winner this time out is Langley resident T.C. Kasikci.

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Congrats to this local guy who won the grand prize in Nufloors 40th anniversary dream vacation contest. Entries were accepted throughout last year for the prize worth $10,000. December was the deadline, and Kasikci’s name was drawn from thousands of entries. He accepted the prize at the Nufloors store last week, Jan. 16, and was congratulated by the entire Nufloors crew. Admittedly, I’m jealous. Likely the biggest trip myself and my sweetie will be taking this year is to Vegas to celebrate our 10-year wedding anniversary. If only I’d won… this is where those thoughtful bubble appears over my head in a pictures, and you see me dreaming of a luxury cruise to Alaska. Oh well, maybe next time. In the meantime T.C., enjoy! Remember, I’m short and could possibly be squeezed into a steamer trunk for easy transport to some exotic destination – in case you were considering taking me along.

Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance

T.C. Kasikci (centre, holding a cheque) of Langley won a $10,000 dream vacation in the Nufloors 40th anniversary contest.

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A10

Community

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Disease and nutrition

LangleyAdvance

Rotation helps keep vegetables healthy

T

he easiest and most inexpensive way to improve your food garden is crop rotation – making sure each plant group grows in a different spot from where it spent the previous year. It confuses and starves over-wintering pests – when they emerge in spring, their food supply is gone. Crop rotation also reduces fungal diseases. For instance, tomato blight spores spend winter months in the soil and re-activate when watering splashes infected soil up into tomato plants. Though blight spores can drift from tomatoes in neighbouring gardens, transmission over a distance is chancier, and depends on summer rain. But avoiding planting tomatoes where tomatoes were before is not the whole story. Potatoes, eggplant, and peppers belong to the same family (Solonaceae) and can also catch tomato blight, though peppers are less susceptible than potatoes. Other plant families have their own diseases and pests which they transmit to

their relatives in the same family, but not to members of other families. One such family includes cabbages, radishes, and turnips. Beans and peas also share familial relations. Onions, shallots, and garlic are in another family group. Beetroots, carrots, and parsnips are all related. Squash, zucchini, and cucumber share another family grouping. Each family has its own susceptibilities to various infections. To people with very little space, such as a two-container veggie garden, crop rotation is challenging, but even a two-year rotation is better than nothing. Luckily, there are ways of improving it. You could change the top few inches of soil each year, and move one container further away from the other. An alternative is growing a different food family each year for three or four years. Most vegetables now have containerfriendly compact forms.

A three-year crop rotation can be manageable if compost is added to garden beds each year – though a four-year rotation is better… or even five years, if potatoes and tomatoes can be added into the rotation cycle. Because it’s really easy to forget where vegetables were planted, it helps to draw a rough sketch of your veggie garden. Then add plant names in their previousyear places. It’s helpful to add the names during the year, before you file it away. It will help when you want to figure out rotation for the coming year. Gardeners whose veggie garden is inground don’t necessarily have to add lashings of compost or manure yearly in every food-growing spot. Adding more compost to food crops is seldom a mistake – but it’s hard to make enough compost and very easy to use it all too quickly. That’s why it’s worth knowing that

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to amarrison@shaw.ca

In the Garden by Anne Marrison

some crops help feed other crops. Peas and beans absorb nitrogen from the air and store it in little root nodules which enrich the soil for later crops. Cabbages and other leafy crops love growing in nitrogen-rich soil, so they are a good choice to follow the peas and beans (plus compost, if possible). Root crops are good for the thirdyear spot, because most aren’t big eaters. They can include turnips, carrots, parsnips, and beets. But if beets are grown for leaves, as well as roots, you get better leaves with higher-nitrogen soil. Crops that need rich food include squash, tomatoes, cucumbers, corn, asparagus, kale, and all of the cabbage family.

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ArtsCulture &

NEW 1,200 sq.ft. Willow Conference Room Available

LangleyAdvance

How to win

A pair of tickets to the upcoming production of Becky’s New Car Two lucky readesr each win a pair of tickets to the play at Surrey Little Theatre

How do you win?

• Like us on the Langley Advance Facebook site, find the posting about Becky’s New Car, tell us why you want to attend this play and you’re automatically entered to win. Preference is given to Langley residents. Postings must be received prior to 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 28, and the winner will be announced on the Facebook page later that afternoon. No staff or family of the Langley Advance or Glacier Media are eligible. This giveaway is restricted to online participants, 19 years or older only.

Community Theatre

Fort actor drawn to Becky script

A local credit union executive dabbles in theatre in his spare time. by Roxanne Hooper rhooper@langleyadvance.com

T

erry Thomas might spend his days firmly planted in an office chair, serving as a vice-president for Envision Financial. But, all his nights and weekends lately have been spent walking around on stage, running lines, and rehearsing scenes in preparation for next week’s debut of Becky’s New Car. Like many in the community theatre realm, this 43-year-old Fort Langley resident enjoyed his involvement in theatre during high school and university. But when he became a pappa he had to forgo the theatre world to “focus on my family when my [two boys] were young,” he said. After a 15-year hiatus, however, Thomas has returned to the theatrical fold with a vengance. Since coming back in 2008, he’s performed in two productions with Langley Players, two shows with White Rock Players, and is now working on his second with Surrey Little Theatre (SLT).

Langley’s Philip J. Hale and Terry Thomas star alongside Cindy Peterson Good, fellow Langleyite Ken Boyd, Harry Pering, and Robyn Bradley in Becky’s New Car. ‘The script [for Becky’s New Car] was totally unique,” Thomas said, explaining what drew him to the SLT audition. “The play has a lot of interaction with the audience and is written in a unique and frenetic way that really drew me to the characters. The writing is often serious and funny in the same line,” said the local man who was selected to play Becky’s husband. “Joe Foster is the husband of Becky and finds himself faced with a choice: lose your wife or confront a difficult situation head on,” Thomas explained. Much like the man Thomas become in real life, his character Joe is level headed, sees the rational side of things, and is quick to find the funny side of a situation. And this production, without

question, has its funny side, Thomas elaborated. “Every play has funny parts and there are so many that are written into the script – but sometimes just a look from a character is all it takes to bring the rest of the cast to their knees, there is a scene in this play like that – I can’t tell you the scene, but it involves throwing wedding rings into the ocean,” he shared. “As an actor, you appreciate a good cast and this show has that, but it also has a great director and technical crew – it is a very complicated show and we are lucky to have great people behind the scenes.” One of those behind-thescene people, director Marko Hohlbein agrees with Thomas that this play is a “great deal” of fun.

This play, written by Steven Dietz, focuses on Becky as she follows her road along many twists and turns, examining her dreams and passions along the way and steering toward choices that she hopes will bring her happiness. “We are engaged with Becky right from the start as we get to know and love her,” Hohlbein said.” Like many, she finds herself wanting more than her mundane reality. She is presented with an opportunity for a new existence and slides unwittingly into a double life. Sit back and enjoy a ride on the highway of life.” Thomas plays along side award-winning actor Robyn Bradley (Becky), as well as two other Langley residents, Philip J. Hale and Ken Boyd. There are also actors from Burnaby, Port Coquitlam, and Surrey sharing the stage. Becky’s New Car runs Thursdays to Sundays from Jan. 30 to Feb. 22 at Surrey Little Theatre, 7027 184th St. in Surrey. Show times are 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Plus, there are 2 p.m. matinees on Sunday, Feb. 9 and 16. Tickets are $15. For reservations, people can call 604-576-8451; email reservations@surreylittletheatre. com; or go to www.brownpapertickets.com.

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Thursday, January 23, 2013

A11

Auditions

Three men sought to be ‘farmers’ Surrey Little Theatre holds auditions for the spring showing of The Drawer Boy. by Roxanne Hooper

rhooper@langlayadvance.com

A

ward-winning director and designer June Ainsworth is hunting for three good men. She needs a young man in his 20s, and two more roughly between the ages of 55 and 65, to play farmers in Surrey Little Theatre’s upcoming adaptation of The Drawer Boy. The younger man will play a member of a theatrical troupe, all of which are working and living on Ontario farms, collecting ideas, and information in order to write a play. The two older men will play Ontario farmers who grew up together, went to war together, and now farm together. With intentions of entering this play in the regional theatre competitions being held in Chilliwack in May, co-producer Diane Gendron of Langley explained that those involved will be expected to make a more significant commitment of time than normal. She noted the play will be performed at Surrey Little Theatre from April 17 to May 17, with three matinees (April 27, as well as May 4 and 11). Plus, it will be performed again during the Fraser Valley Zone Festival competition during the week of May 18 to 24. And, if the play wins the regional competition, the actors will be required to perform at Mainstage Festival (the provincial competition) in Kamloops between July 4 and 12. If there are a few talented actors out there who are still game to be a part of the SLT production, Gendron invited them to attend the upcoming auditions. Auditions for The Drawer Boy are being held on Sunday, Feb. 2 and Monday, Feb. 3, at 7 p.m. at Surrey Little Theatre, 7027 184th St. (just across the Langley-Surrey border) in the Clayton Heights area of Surrey. For more information about the characters and to review sides before the audition, people can contact stage manager Cathe Buswood at mikbus@ telus.net.

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A12

Arts & Culture

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

Theatre

Thursday, January 23, 2014

MORTGAGES

Week-long festival boasts wild ride for TWU audience

A

mara Gelaude turns 20 next week, just as the curtain goes up on a series of student written and directed plays at Trinity Western University. The Langley psych major is just one of dozens of TWU students gearing up for New Generations, a week-long annual theatrical festival being held at the school. Gelaude plays Maya in the production of Feminist Fan Club. New Generations is a “fast, furious, funny play festival” boasting three brand new shows playing back-to-back every night, explained School of the Arts, Media+Culture theatre chair Angela Konrad. “New Generations is grassroots creation at its best, and for the first time in several years, every play in our 2014 festival is an original, student-written script,” Konrad said, noting that it features a new generation of playwrights, directors, and actors who are working feverishly to prepare the one-week explosion of live theatre. “Tickets for New Generations are always in high demand, because of the unique opportunity to be part of something so fresh and intimate. It’s a treat for our audiences to witness stories told for the very first time, with all the creative energy of tomorrow’s powerhouse arts professionals,” she said. New Generations plays from Jan. 28 to Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday, Feb. 1. Tickets range from $8 to $15 with special Tuesday/matinee discounts. For tickets, visit www.twu.ca/theatre or call 604.513.2121, ext. 3872.

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How to win

A pair of tickets to the TWU’s New Generations festival! Two lucky readers will each win a pair of tickets for one of the three festival plays

View With

David Foxwell | 604-530-4141

4 BEDROOM + DEN Did You Know...

How do you win?

• Like us on the Langley Advance Facebook site, find the posting about New Generations, tell us why you want to attend and you’re automatically entered to win. Preference is given to Langley residents. Postings must be received prior to 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 28, and the winner will be announced on the Facebook page later that afternoon. No staff or family of the Langley Advance or Glacier Media are eligible. This giveaway is restricted to online participants, 19 years or older only.

to explore new ideas and network with other artists, thereby developing their craft. Some move on to pursue other opportunities,” Wakefield said. “Further study, teaching, showing their work in Vancouver or applying their art practice in other fields. This alumni show is a welcome opportunity for members past and present to reconnect, generate discussion and share new work.” “People often walk in to the gallery, and inquire about favorite artists who were members here in the past,” he said. “We always look forward to seeing the artists again, and it’s a wonderful opportunity to see where their creativity has led them.” The opening reception for Auld Acquaintance III will be held Friday, Jan. 24, from 7 to 9 p.m., at 9048 Glover Rd. More information, including hours, at www.fortgallery.ca.

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T

Mortgage Term

Nancy Foster | 778-229-5054 | nfoster@mortgagegrp.com

Art gallery

his month, a number of Langley artists are reunite to reminisce and to show off their recent works. Fort Gallery is hosting its aptly named Auld Acquaintance III exhibit in the artist-run gallery space in Fort Langley. The show opened Wednesday, and continued through Feb. 9. Auld Acquaintance III presents eight artists who at one time were all members of the gallery. They are Jennifer Chew, Rick Forbes, Bruce Giesbrecht, Scott Gordon, Fiona Moes, Claire Moore, Suzanne Northcott, and Shari Pratt, said Fort Gallery chair Bob Wakefield. “For many artists the Fort Gallery provides a safe, supportive space in which

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Eight popular past members of the Fort Gallery are being welcomed back for a special exhibition.

A13

FOR THE WEEKEND JAN 25TH & 26TH

Sat 2-4pm 2716 Carriage Ct Brian Kirkwood $539,000 Sat 1-3pm 27139 34A Ave, Anne Stromsten $449,000 Sat 12-2pm 20420 54 Ave, Sara Ashcroft $124,900 Sun 1-4pm 4643 220 St., Pete Laws $649,900

S

D L O

Open Plan, Vaulted Ceiling Fully Finished Basement JEFFRIES BROOK $588,800

David gives back to the community by personally supporting the Langley Animal Protection Society (LAPS), Langley Stepping Stones Society and other local organizations.

Learn More About David at www.HouseFindBC.com Follow

@LangleyAdvance on Twitter for Langley’s top headlines

CLEARANCE EVENT 50% OFF

RIES ESs fiSnaO C C l. A L AL *All sale

$200 REBATE 50% OFF IN-STOCK DRAPERY HUNTER DOUGLAS

on our entire selection of in-stock drapery fabrics. Save an additional 25% off the fabric price when ordering custom made products. Off the lowest ticketed price.

Purchase 3 Duette® honeycomb shades with PowerRise® and receive a $200 rebate. Also, when you purchase any number of these additional shades, you’ll receive an extra $50 for each additional shade.

CALL TODAY for your Free In-Home Consultation LANGLEY-Clearance Centre 291-6922 ( 604 ) 539-8544 Sale Ends February 28th. All Sales Final.

www.arlenes.com


A14

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014

Meet Our New Stylist

DOWNTOWN

h haia i rr

Michelle

Colour or perm with cut and style $55 New Customers Only! Hair colour or perm starting at $40 Colour or perm with cut and style $55 LONG HAIR EXTRA $10, perms excludes Hair colour or perm $40 spirals LONG HAIR EXTRA $10 Highlights with cut and style $85 Kid’s Haircut $5.99 Women’s Haircut $12 Men’s/Women’s $10 Eyebrow ThreadingHaircut and Waxing $5 Expires 2014 ExpiresFeb. Dec.15th, 7th, 2013

#107-20542 Fraser Hwy. DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

604-514-8886

DAILY LUNCH SPECIAL Rice & Pad Thai with your choice of Gaeng Gai, Chicken Curry, Chicken Ginger or Vegetarian

899

$

*Lunch Special subject to change without notice

Home of Langley BEST THAI FOOD • www.annemythai.com

Downtown Langley Awaits You | downtownlangley.com Receive

15% OFF

When you present this coupon. *One coupon per person. Expires March 31, 2014

4

$ 50

NEW SUSHI RESTAURANT DOWNTOWN LANGLEY! GNGR001704019 Awaiting Review-Sales

Lee’s Sushi Momo Japanese Restaurant (Sushi Momo) is going into its fourth month in Downtown Langley. Owner, Ian Lee handpicked this 1,700 sq. ft. location at the beginning of the Fraser Hwy one-way strip, excited to be a part of uniqueness that this area of Langley City has to offer in the form of quaint shopping and community interaction through arts and other entertainment throughout the year. In no way is owning a restaurant a new endeavour explored by Ian. Having studied the Art of Sushi in Korea at the Tokyo Sushi Academy in his earlier years, Ian has spent the last 12 years in North spen merica introducing quality, Amer dable sushi in several affordable municipalities including Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Kitsilano; in addition to some time spent in Nor Northern BC and as far south as ellevue, Washington. Bellev

Salmon, the main emphasis at Momo is to prepare the perfect dish - serving affordable freshness in healthy quantities with beautiful colours and artistic presentation specific to EVERY order.

The newly renovated restaurant offers a clean and vibrant environment with ample space to make your overall experience comfortable and enjoyable every time you visit.

Although, very essential, a Japanese dining experience is not just about the food preparation but also about the environment in which it is served. Ian employs 7 staff members in this 34 seat restaurant to give every customer that comes through the door professional and hospitable service whether you are dining in or taking food out.

Open 7 days a week from 11:00am – 10:00pm, the restaurant offers a different daily lunch specials each day for $6.95 + tax. You can view the full menu for Sushi Momo Langley on UrbanSpoon.com. Receive a 5% discount on any takeout order over $15 when paid with credit card or debit, or receive a 10% discount on any takeout order over $15 when you pay with cash.

Japanese dining should be an “overall experience,” says Ian and this is whole mission of Momo Sushi. Using only organic vegetables and both Atlantic and Sockeye

Sushi Momo is at 20437 Fraser Highway, beside Frosting Cupcakery, in Downtown Langley City. Online find the restaurant at UrbanSpoon.com or call 604-427-0552. Open every day 11:00am to 10:00pm.

DID YOU KNOW…

lb.

20534 Fraser Highway Langley 604.532.5226 www.1fish2fish.ca

Valley Pharmacy Ltd. Operating As Valley Everygreen Pharmacy

Valley Evergreen Pharmacy

20306 LOGAN AVE. • 604-534-7718 CHICKEN SOUVLAKI DINNER WITH ½ DOZEN PRAWNS

served with rice pilaf, roasted potatoes, greek salad, tzatziki & pita bread.

ONLY

ra Stop by fotune up e m a fr FREE ! ANYTIME

$16

95

(Dine In Only)

LIVE Music Every Fri & Sat!

20080 FRASER HWY. www.KostasGreekRestaurant.com

Flu Shots Now Available Mon - Thurs 10am - 5pm

20577 Douglas Crescent Langley • Phone: 604.534.1332 STORE HOURS: Mon. - Fri. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Sat. 9:00 am - 5:00 pm CLOSED Sun. & Holidays “PHARMACARE, MSA NET, D.V.A.”

DISCOVER TIMELESS TREASURES GNGR001703257 Awaiting Review-Sales New things are always happening! Thousands of Quality Antiques, Collectables and Décor! Come In and Find Out.

LANGLEY ANTIQUES

20241 Fraser Hwy., Langley • 604-530-2687 • Hours: Monday - Sunday 10:00 am - 5:30 pm www.langleyantiques.ca • info@langleyantiques.ca LIKE US

• Age-Spots/Pigmented Seborreheic Keratosis • Ruby Points • Milia

PREPARE

GNGR001703203 NOW FOR Awaiting Review-Sales

• Broken Capillaries/Blotchiness

SPRING

• Cholesterol Deposits Around Eyes • Skin Tags

CALL TODAY!

604-533-3319 or 604-836-6105 5570 - 204th Street

irinasbeauty.ca or ShopLangley.com/innasbeauty

Super Buffet • Newly Renovated • Licensed •Chinese Restaurant

GNGR001703260 ALL YOU CAN EAT Bring this ad to get

15% OFF!

Awaiting Review-Sales

LUNCH $12.95 Mon. - Thurs., 10:30am - 2:30pm Ask about LUNCH $14.95 Fri. - Sat., 10:30am - 2:30pm our lunch membership DINNER $16.95 Mon. - Thurs., 4:30pm - 8:30pm Special! DINNER $19.95 Fri. - Sat., 4:30pm - 8:30pm Children under 3 eat FREE • Kids 3 - 6 yrs 75% off Seniors 25% off • Students with I.D. 15% off

604.427.3399

super-buffet.ca 5744 Glover Rd., Langley

Gl

Log an Ave

Fr as er Hw y

ov

Rd E er C astle re sc igh en t

Super Buffet 56th Ave

206 St.

604-530-9531

Downtown Langley Awaits You | downtownlangley.com

SKIN BLEMISHES

Have peace of mind when you ride.

$69

GNGR001703294

It is really permanent, SAFE, non-invasive and relatively painless.

Every New Bike Purchased at Cap’s Langley includes 1 Full Year of Complimentary Tune-ups!

(Beside Frosting Cupcakery)

www.cvoh.ca | #101-20611 Fraser Highway, Langley | 604-510-5142

lb. reg. $2899

EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR EMBARRASSING

BIKE REPAIR IS OUR SPECIALTY!

20437 Fraser Hwy., Langley

*Purchase from a select group of frames. Price includes single-vision lenses. Other lenses, lense enhancements and multi-focals are extra. Cannot be combined with any other offer or on readers or non-prescriptionsunglasses. + If you find a lower advertised price on an in-stock new identical item from an Authorized Canadian dealer, now or within 14 days of your purchase, just show us the price and we will match it. See in-store for details.

2749

Honest Food is the Philosophy at Momo

OPEN EVERYDAY 11:00am to 10:00pm

Bring in this ad to receive a complete pair of single vision glasses* for only $69.

Offers expire Jan. 31/2014

!(*%!#"

Now offering FREE Bike Inspections.

604-427-0552

$

each

downtownlangley.com& ) $ * ' ) $ *

20187 56 Ave., Langley • 778-278-7878

Any bill for 2 or more ppl. over $30. Dine in only. Bring this ad.

Downtown Langley on the one way across from Salt Lane

No additives or fillers

BUY 3, GET 1 FREE

Style • Color • Texture • Length

Langley Hair Studio

WILD JUMBO EAST COAST SCALLOPS

WILD SALMON BURGERS

With more than 600 unique shops, services, restaurants and attractions located in our beautiful downtown, there’s always something new and fascinating to discover in Downtown Langley.

Get what you want.

A15

Langley’s Finest Fresh Seafood Market Wild • Sustainable • Chemical Free

AWAITS YOU

solutions LANGLEY’S MOST AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE

10% OFF

Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014


A16

Arts & Culture

Thursday, January 23, 2014

LangleyAdvance EVERY SAT & SUN 10AM-6PM

ALL CHECKOUT LANES

OPEN GUARANTEED†

what’s fresh

Spend $200 and receive a

FREE

!

CLUB PACK®

no name® chicken wings

assorted varieties, frozen, 2 kg

$24.98 value

! Spend $200 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a free CLUB PACK® no name® chicken wings. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $24.98 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/ or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, January 24th until closing Thursday, January 30th, 2014. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 125654

4

10000 04510

selected varieties 103728 3700084847

8

300 mL

992989 38151918150

2/$ OR

3.99 EACH

7

11

555914 7940020983

97

361000 5545133430

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

12.99

Dove 1 x 90g, Sunsilk hair care 355 mL or Lever 2 x 89g bar soap

1

236607 / 471457 / 392955

00

ea

3 338782 1204404039

98

1,000

97

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

13.99

178825 5800030221

757332 84105800549

1

ea

198 g, selected varieties

2

ea

AFTER LIMIT

Edge or Skintimate shave gel

00

465720 3700088912

4.99

Irish Spring 2 x 90g or Soft soap refill 340 mL

selected varieties

selected varieties

LIMIT 4

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE Simple moisturizer 125 mL and face wipes

varieties

Clairol Age Defy hair colour

selected varieties and sizes

6

Dove 2 x 355 mL or Clear 2 x 381 mL haircare selected

Vidal Sassoon hair colour

Old Spice shampoo or conditioner

Herbal Essences Naked shampoo or conditioner

00

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

3.16

unless we are unable due to unforseen technical difficulties

8

97

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE Pond’s facial moisturizer 2 x190 mL or towellette 2 x 30’s

5

528536 6565691814

97

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

7.29

great brands, low prices

George’s Special Dry Skin cream

Degree men bonus pack 2 x 85 g or women bonus pack

Q-tips cotton swabs

Slim-Fast powders 530 g, bars 6 x 60 g or Ready to drinks

9

736617 / 593812 7940035088

410430 6565691580

648466 6840020140

2 x 48 g

450 g

182595 812786001

97

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

13.99

exact™ hot lemon relief cold powder 10’s or chest congestion syrup 250 mL

4

282160 / 932947 6038307982

98

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

6.49

4

97

ea

Depend protective underwear 10-58’s or Poise bladder control pads 27-66’s selected varieties,

11 456626 3600019701

73

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

17.99

1170’s

6

8 x 295 mL, selected varieties

97

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

8.77

Kotex pads 14-24’s or Lightdays liners 40-64’s, selected varieties

3

ea

607320 / 575053 / 608351 3600003021

00

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

3.92

Prices are in effect until Thursday, January 30, 2014 or while stock lasts.

6

97

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

10.97

Centrum Pronutrients 70/120’s selected varieties

5

925878 6210709032

97

ea

LIMIT 4 AFTER LIMIT

8.49

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.).We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time.

Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.


Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

A17

Thursday, January 23, 2014

EVERY SAT & SUN 10AM-6PM

ALL

CHECKOUT LANES

OPEN GUARANTEED† unless we are unable due to unforseen technical difficulties

broccoli buches

Spend $200 and receive a

product of USA 734098 4060

.96

Lokan mandarin oranges

714700 33645

.58

/lb

1.28 /kg

8

88

3

2/

00

00 OR

.88 EACH

Lipton Yellow Label tea

selected varieties, 100-200 g 179787 6840011270

98

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

5.78

NEW

store hours

in effect in many locations Please see online for details.

1

Every week, we check our major competitors’ flyers and match prices on hundreds of items*.

OR

1.68

6 lb bag

EACH

Gala apples

4

98

5

88

5.49

1L

234534 5796100022

7

LIMIT 4

4.48

1 kg

47

AFTER LIMIT

13.49

7

¢ per

litre**

in Superbucks® value when you pay with your

Or, get 3.5¢per litre** in Superbucks

®

9.97

AFTER LIMIT

1.67

97

ea

Enfamil A+, Gentlease A+ or Enfapro A+ infant formula selected varieties, 550-663 g

26

43

793792 56796000495

ea

value using any other purchase method

**Redeem your earned Superbucks® value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard® or President’s Choice Financial® debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. Superbucks® value expires 60 days after date of issue. Superbucks® value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. Superbucks® value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. Identification may be required at the time of redemption. See Superbucks® receipt for more details. ® Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. ©2014. † MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

LIMIT 12

1

ea

AFTER LIMIT

3

ea

499706 5963175553

LIMIT 4

47

ea

EACH

selected varieties, 35’s

376569/ 943624 5800031186

LIMIT 4

OR

2.67

Lysol disinfecting wipes

Speed Stick Gear antiperspirant/deodorant, 76-85 g, body spray, 113 g, Irish Spring Gear bar soap, 6x90 g or shower gel, 443 mL

963633 6335001622

Fuel up at our gas bar and earn

17.59 /kg

selected varieties, 700 g

Knorr chicken broth mix

7

.98

/lb

Black DIamond cheese bars 557864 6820086541

98

SunRype pure apple juice

small

AFTER LIMIT

88

2/

98

ea

4.14 /kg

white or whole wheat, pkg. of 12

2

ea

/lb

Bakeshop dinner tray buns

247817

7

88

233907 46038302245

live Dungeness crab

ea

LIMIT 2

3

in-store

701562 33383007472

AFTER LIMIT

87

baked fresh

product of Canada or USA, extra fancy grade

189278 79878244505

217574 7976325133

3

433187

selected varieties, 567 g

200 g

$24.98 value

551065 209662797

O’Tasty dumplings

Six Fortune nama udon noodles

assorted varieties, frozen, 2 kg

quarter

product of China, 200 g

201378 6207900001

ea

no name® chicken wings

fresh chicken leg

package of 32, 580 g

809084 69574700246

3

ea

Hong Kong Bakery almond cookies

raw shrimp

white, headless, shell on , frozen, 500 g box

CLUB PACK®

Spend $200 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a free CLUB PACK® no name® chicken wings. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $24.98 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, January 24th until closing Thursday, January 30th, 2014. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 125654 10000 04510 7 4

!

snow or snap peas

product of China

5/

FREE

!

®

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

29.98

Prices are in effect until Sunday, January 26, 2014 or while stock lasts.

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavou colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable fam requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupo must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All righ reserved. © 2014 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors a determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT T LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered pri to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, siz and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determine solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discoun obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


A18

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

What’s

What

nightlife

Langley’s best guide for what’s happening around town. www.langleyadvance.com

• Bob’s Steakhouse, 27083 Fraser Hwy., 604-671-8948, www. bobsbarandgrill.ca. Bruce Coughlan of Tiller’s Folly performs with fiddle champ Nolan Murray on Jan. 26 for a Robbie Burns supper. The piping in is at 6 p.m. sharp. $10 per person (includes cock-a-leekie soup and a wee dram of whisky for a toast).

theatrestage

• New Generations: The School of the Arts, Media + Culture theatre festival of student works runs Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. The public is welcome. Tickets are from $8-$15. Info: www.twu. ca/theatre or 604-513-2121 ext. 3872.

librarybookings

Programs are free. Pre-registration required unless noted otherwise. • Muriel Arnason Library #130 20338 65th Ave. 604-532-3590 Family Literacy Day – Celebrate literacy 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. with activities at the library. Enter a draw for a book basket. Refreshments served. Free. Drop-in. Babytime – Stories and activities 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28. • Murrayville Library 22071 48th Ave. 604-533-0339 Jigsaw puzzle contest – Sign up and be put on a team or bring your own for the contest Jan. 25. Register in advance.

•historyrevisited

FAREWELL VANCOUVER OFFER

Buy 6 tickets get 6 tickets * FREE! Certain conditions apply *

“A VISUAL FEAST! STUNNING!” Vancouver Sun

LAST CHANCE • Final show February 2 Under the White Big Top • West est of the Village on False Creek 1.866.999.8111 • c a v a l i a . n e t

tick free tickets tick must be equal or lesser value. *Valid on new purchases only, cannot be combined with any other promotion. Minimum purchase of 5 adult tickets,

• Fort Langley National Historic Site 23433 Mavis Ave., 604-513-4777 • Vive les Voyageurs: Experience the rich French-Canadian culture with French-Canadian food, activities like finger weaving, voyageur songs, and other cultural activities. Listings are free. To be considered, submit items at least 10 days prior to the publication. What’s What? is in the Thursday edition and at langleyadvance.com.

movie listings Colossus Langley

BIG Screen! BIG Sound! BIG Difference! 200th St. & Hwy. 1 • 604-513-8747

Showtimes always available at 604-272-7280. All auditoriums are THX certified with dolby digital sound. Colossus also features stadium seating and birthday parties.

Showtimes for Friday January 24, 2014 to Thursday January 30, 2014 47 RONIN 3D (PG) (VIOLENCE) CC/DVS FRI-SUN 10:05; MON-THURS 9:50 FROZEN (G) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 1:45 FROZEN 3D (G) CC/DVS FRI-SUN 4:30, 7:15; MON-THURS 4:20, 7:00 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG) (VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEOFRI-SUN 12:10, 3:35, 7:05, 10:20; MON 4:00, 10:30; TUE-THURS 4:00, 7:15, 10:30 I, FRANKENSTEIN 3D (PG) (VIOLENCE,FRIGHTENING SCENES) ULTRAAVX FRI-SUN 12:55, 3:20, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45; MON-THURS 4:35, 7:30, 10:15 THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (G) (COARSE LANGUAGE,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SAT 1:35, 4:35, 7:25, 10:20; SUN 1:35, 7:25, 10:20; MON-WED 4:20, 7:05, 10:00; THURS 4:00, 10:45 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT (PG) (COARSE LANGUAGE,VIOLENCE) FRI-SUN 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30; MON-THURS 4:55, 7:35, 10:30 THE HOBBIT:THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG) (VIOLENCE,FRIGHTENING SCENES) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 1:05 THE HOBBIT:THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG 3D (PG) (VIOLENCE,FRIGHTENING SCENES) FRI-THURS 5:00, 9:00 SAVING MR. BANKS (G) (COARSE LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 1:10, 4:05, 7:10, 10:05; MON-THURS 4:15, 7:10, 10:05 RIDE ALONG (PG) (COARSE LANGUAGE,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 12:40, 3:10, 5:40, 8:10, 10:40; MON-THURS 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 ANCHORMAN 2:THE LEGEND CONTINUES (PG) (COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE,SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENE,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 10:15; MON-THURS 9:55 THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (18A) (COARSE LANGUAGE,SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENES) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 12:00, 4:00, 8:00; MON-THURS 4:00, 8:00 AMERICAN HUSTLE (14A) (FREQUENT COARSE LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTIONED FRI-SUN 12:35, 3:45, 7:00, 10:10; MON-THURS 4:10, 7:20, 10:25

THE NUT JOB (G) FRI,SUN 1:00; SAT 11:10, 1:00 THE NUT JOB 3D (G) FRI-SUN 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00; MON-THURS 4:25, 7:20, 9:40 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: CORIOLANUS () THURS 7:00 DEVIL’S DUE (14A) (COARSE LANGUAGE,FRIGHTENING SCENES) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:25, 10:45; MON 4:25, 7:45, 10:05; TUE-THURS 5:10, 7:45, 10:05 LONE SURVIVOR (14A) (FREQUENT VIOLENCE,COARSE LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25; MON-THURS 4:30, 7:25, 10:20 GISELLE FROM THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE () MON 7:00 HER (14A) (COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SAT 1:15, 4:30, 7:35, 10:35; SUN 1:15, 4:30, 10:35; MON-TUE,THURS 4:30, 7:30, 10:25;WED 7:30, 10:25 HER (14A) (COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) STAR & STROLLERS SCREENING WED 3:00 12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A) (VIOLENCE,COARSE LANGUAGE,SEXUAL VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTION & DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO FRI-SUN 12:15, 3:30, 6:55, 10:15; MONTHURS 4:05, 7:10, 10:15 NEBRASKA (PG) (COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) FRISUN 12:50, 4:10, 7:05; MON-THURS 4:10, 6:55 AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY (14A) (COARSE LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTIONEDFRI-SUN 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10; MONTHURS 4:25, 7:25, 10:20 I, FRANKENSTEIN: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG) (FRIGHTENING SCENES,VIOLENCE) FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; MON-THURS 4:05, 7:00, 9:45 PHILOMENA (PG) (COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) CLOSED CAPTIONEDFRI-SUN 12:05, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00; MON-TUE,THURS 4:15, 7:05, 9:55;WED 7:05, 9:55 PHILOMENA (PG) (COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) STAR & STROLLERS SCREENING WED 3:00 WWE ROYAL RUMBLE - 2014 () SUN 5:00 THE SMURFS (G) (VIOLENCE) SAT 11:00


Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

Langley Centennial Museum

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Nazi Games spotlighted

Exhibit features the 1936 Olympics and politics of the time.

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ith the Winter Olympics just around the corner, Langley Centennial Museum launched two new exhibits last week, one about the 1936 Berlin Olympics and the other about the Holocaust. The exhibits have travelled from the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre and will be at the museum in Fort Langley until March 16, announced curator Kobi Christian.

Boycotting Games

The 1936 Olympics were held in Nazi Germany and situated at a critical juncture between Adolf Hitler’s election as chancellor and the outbreak of the Second World War, Christian said. The world faced a decision about whether to participate in these controversial Games. Canadian athletes, particularly young Jewish athletes, were caught in a dilemma. Should they follow their dreams to the world’s greatest athletic competition or should they boycott the 1936 Olympics? “These exhibit sheds some light on some of their stories, and puts the 1936 Olympics into context,” Christian said.

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Curator Kobi Christian hanging an exhibit panel. The larger of the two exhibits, More Than Just Games: Canada and the 1936 Olympics brings together photos, documents, film clips, and memoirs to tell the little-known story of the Canadian boycott debate and Canada’s participation in the 1936 Games. It deals with themes of racism and moral decisionmaking with an emphasis on the experiences of individual Canadian and German-Jewish athletes who made difficult decisions about participation. The exhibit also shines a spotlight on the untold story of Matthew Halton, a respected Canadian journalist who wrote critically about the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1936, and includes rare footage of the Canadian men’s basketball team, of Berlin during the Games, and of Canadian athletes aboard a ship on their way to Berlin.

City of Langley “The Place to Be!”

NOTICE TO DOG OWNERS

The 2014 Dog Licences, for all dogs over the age of six months, are now due and payable. Dog Licence renewal forms were mailed to owners of dogs on record and fees may be paid up to February 3, 2014 at the lower rates. ALL FEES INCREASE EFFECTIVE February 4, 2014.

Licence Fees are: Male/Female Neutered Male/ Spayed Female

On or Before February 3, 2014

On or After February 4, 2014

$64.00 $32.00

Reduced Fees for Seniors age 65 or over: Male/Female $32.00 Neutered Male/ $16.00 Spayed Female

$84.00 $42.00

$84.00 $42.00

Proof of Spaying/Neutering Required Replacement tags are $10.00 each. All mail must be postmarked or received by February 3, 2014 to be processed at the lower rates. Please direct payments and enquires to the: Finance Department - City Hall 20399 Douglas Crescent Langley, BC V3A 4B3 Phone (604) 514-2800

Politics and sports Meanwhile, Framing Bodies: Sport and Spectacle in Nazi Germany explores the relationship between sport, politics, and propaganda at the Games. The regime’s physical ideals were projected onto the world stage during the XI Olympiad, and the exhibit looks at how bodies that were considered “Aryan” were portrayed, and how the Nazis viewed and regulated those who were excluded. The museum is also holding a symposium on the Holocaust in Langley on Thursday, March 6, featuring a Holocaust survivor. For information or tickets, call 604-532-3536.

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A19


A20

Thursday, January 23, 2014

International celebration

Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

Robbie Burns night brings talented singer home

B

Tiller Folly’s own Nolan Murray and Bruce Coughlan will be perform at a Burns supper in Coughlan’s hometown Sunday.

ruce Coughlan, singer, songwriter and founding member of The Tiller’s Folly, returns to his hometown of Aldergrove this weekend to help celebrate Robbie Burns Day. Coughlan will be joined by North American fiddle champion Nolan Murray in entertaining at an annual Burns sup-

per at Bob’s Steakhouse Sunday, Jan. 26. “We are also proud to have Central Valley Community Pipe Band Major Steve Gallagher piping in the haggis and Major Ian Newby to address it,” said restaurant owner Bob Long. “And along with the performances of Bruce and Nolan the evening promises to be filled with great music, poems and of

Township

www.tol.ca

Page

For the week of January 23, 2014

dates to note

Township of Langley Civic Facility 20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 604.534.3211 | tol.ca

langley events centre Coming Events Vancouver Stealth NLL Lacrosse Sat Jan 25 7:00pm vs. Edmonton Rush Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame Night

Langley Rivermen Junior A Hockey Fri

Jan 24 7:15pm vs. Chilliwack Chiefs

TWU Spartans University Sports Basketball Fri

Jan 24 vs. Thompson Rivers University 6pm Women’s 8pm Men’s Sat Jan 25 vs. Thompson Rivers University 5pm Women’s 7pm Men’s Fri Jan 31 vs. Brandon University 6pm Women’s 8pm Men’s Sat Feb 1 vs. University of Regina 5pm Women’s 7pm Men’s

Men’s Hockey

Fri

Jan 31 7:00pm vs. Simon Fraser University

Valley West Hawks BC Major Midget Hockey Sun Jan 26 3:30pm vs. NorthWest Giants Sun Feb 2 3:30pm vs. Fraser Valley T’birds The Langley Events Centre is located at 7888 - 200 Street For ticket information, contact Langley Events Centre 604.882.8800 • langleyeventscentre.com

road closure

public open house Traffic Calming Open House: 50 Avenue Fronting Langley Fundamental Elementary School

Temporary Full Road Closure: 83 Ave between 208 Street and 209A Street A temporary full road closure will take place on Tuesday, February 4 and Wednesday, February 5 on 83 Avenue between 208 Street and 209A Street to complete water main installation works. 84 84Avenue AVE.

Detour Route Detour Route 83 Ave. Avenue closed 83 Closed

83 AVE.

N

83 Avenue

ENG14-050

Traffic control will be on site and signed detour routes will be in effect. Motorists are advised to plan alternate routes and allow extra time to reach their destination safely. We appreciate your patience and cooperation as this new infrastructure is installed in our community. Engineering Division 604.532.7300

public notice 2014 Community Grants

The Township of Langley annually awards grants to non-profit groups and organizations serving the Township and its residents. Application forms for the 2014 Community Grants including Capital Improvement Grants are now available: • On the Township’s website at tol.ca/grants • At the Township of Langley Civic Facility, Customer Service counter, 2nd Floor NEW THIS YEAR: We've gone green! Applications can now be completed and submitted online. Visit tol.ca/grants to submit your paperless application today. Paper copy forms will still be available at the Township of Langley Civic Facility, Customer Service counter, 2nd Floor, and can be returned to:

Community Grants: communitygrants@tol.ca Capital Improvement Grants: capitalgrants@tol.ca Deadline: Friday, February 28, 2014 David Leavers Director, Recreation, Culture, and Parks 604.533.6158

Wednesday, February 5 5:30 – 8:30pm

Place: Address:

Langley Fundamental Elementary School Gymnasium 21789 - 50 Avenue

public notices

80 80Avenue AVE.

Or submitted via email to:

Date: Time:

Engineering Division 604.533.6006 langleyfundamental@tol.ca

Detour Route Detour Route

David Leavers, Director, Recreation, Culture, and Parks Division Township of Langley 20338 - 65 Avenue Langley, BC V2Y 3J1

The Engineering Division will host an open house to provide information on the traffic calming process and present traffic calming design options for 50 Avenue fronting Langley Fundamental Elementary School. Residents will be asked to fill out a questionnaire that will help the Township of Langley develop a preferred design option for traffic calming measures in this location.

Property owners and residents are encouraged to attend the open house and have their say about the traffic calming process.

211 ST. 211 Street

Monday, February 3 | 7 - 11pm Regular Council Meeting Civic Facility Fraser River Presentation Theatre

20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 | 604.534.3211

208 Street 208 ST.

Wednesday, January 29 | 7 - 9pm Youth Advisory Committee Civic Facility Salmon River Committee Room

course… food” Long added. Long has hosted a Burns supper for more than a dozen years in Aldergrove – boasting it as an international celebrations of sorts given that he is of ChineseAustrian decent, but born in England on Robbie Burns Day. Admission is $10. Seating is limited so reservations are a must at 604-671-8948.

Unauthorized Secondary Suite Enforcement

By law, all secondary suites located within the Township of Langley must have a building permit and be inspected for compliance with the current BC Building Code and Township of Langley bylaws, policies, and enactments. On March 4, 2013 Council amended Bylaw Enforcement Policy 02-009, allowing the proactive enforcement of unauthorized secondary suites to bring them into compliance. Property owners with unauthorized secondary suites that have been constructed without a building permit must bring their property into compliance with all secondary suite regulations or be subject to fines of up to $500 per day and/or other enforcement action. For information regarding secondary suite regulations or to report an unauthorized secondary suite, visit tol.ca and look under Building and Development. Permit Licence and Inspection Services Department 604.533.6018 cdinfo@tol.ca

Report a Problem Online

• Noticed a pot hole that needs fixing? • Storm sewer blocked in your area? • Streetlight burned out on your road? The Township website has an online feature for reporting these types of non-emergency Public Works-related service requests from your home or office. To complete an online Service Request, visit tol.ca. Go to Services & Contacts and click on Report a Problem. The Service Request is easy to use; simply fill in a few fields and click on the Submit button. Public Works emergencies should be reported directly to the Township. Phone 604.532.7300 between 8:30am and 4:30pm, Monday through Friday, or phone 604.543.6700 after hours. Engineering Division 604.532.7300

It’s All Fun and Games From Here!

The 2013-2014 Fall-Winter Leisure Guide is now available online. Visit tol.ca/guides. Recreation, Culture, and Parks 604.533.6086

After-Hours Emergency Contact 604.543.6700


Sports LangleyAdvance

Junior A hockey

Thursday, January 23, 2014

A21

The Langley Rivermen have yet to suffer a regulation loss in 2014. by Troy Landreville

sports@langleyadvance.com

Judging solely from the shot totals in the third period, the Surrey Eagles had no business beating the Langley Rivermen late Sunday afternoon at South Surrey Arena. The opening 40 minutes were close, with the Eagles leading 32 after two periods of play. But the ice was tilted towards the Surrey end during the final frame, even though the Eagles took a 4-2 lead on a Chase McMurphy goal with 10:49 to go in regulation. The ’Men outshot the Eagles 21-3 in the third period. The Rivermen tied the game at 4-4 courtesy of an even strength goal from Tyson Witala at the 10:59 mark and a power play marker from James Robinson with 4:45 to go. During the first overtime period, the Eagles fired the only two shots on goal, and Nathan Renouf scored on one of them to lift the home team to victory. “We played a pretty solid third period but 20 minutes isn’t

enough,” Rivermen head coach Bobby Henderson said. “Their [the Eagles’] defence played hard and kept our guys to the outside, and they capitalized on their chances, offensively.” That said, Henderson was impressed with the Rivermen’s stick-to-itiveness, allowing them to rally in the final frame and earn an overtime point. “I thought they showed pretty good character,” he said. “It would have been easy to roll over on that one, but the guys battled and fought back from being down by two [goals]. They showed pretty good resolve.” Defenceman Charlie Pelnick, who notched his first of the season with a hard slapshot that whizzed past Eagles’ goaltender Devon Fordyce, and Jakob Reichert scored the other Langley goals. Henderson called Pelnick’s goal “gravy” for the solid, stayat-home native of Cary, N.C., who now has a goal and seven assists to go along with 78 penalty minutes in 42 games. “He’s a meat-and-potatoes, physical type guy who’s a strong, shutdown defenceman,” Henderson said, of Pelnick, a 6’4” 215-pound blueliner headed to North Dakota to play NCAA Div. 1 hockey starting in 2015.

Linesman Nick Bilko moved in to separate Langley Rivermen forward Jackson Waniek from Trail Smoke Eaters defenceman Dylan Bowen, who found himself in an awkward spot Saturday at the Langley Events Centre. Troy Landreville/Langley Advance

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Trail Smoke Eaters goaltender Dustin Nikkel peered around a screen created by Langley Rivermen forward James Robinson Saturday at the Langley Events Centre. Robinson notched an assist in the Rivermen’s 3-2 overtime victory. Rivermen 3, Trail Smoke Eaters 2 (OT) Saturday at the Langley Events Centre, the Trail Smoke Eaters’ didn’t play like a team that has a BCHL-worst 9-31-2-3 record. In a tight game, the teams traded goals before Langley’s Austin Azurdia won it by scoring 1:21 into the four-on-four overtime period. The goal was Azurdia’s second of the night after he gave the ’Men a 2-1 lead 1:26 into the third period. The Smoke Eaters’ Dylan Bowen tied the score on a Trail power play at the 7:59 mark of the final frame. Henderson said the Smoke Eaters, under the guidance of head coach Nick Deschenes, who joined the team on Oct. 28, played a smart road game. “Trail is a team that made a lot of moves at the [BCHL trade] deadline and that gave other guys an opportunity to step

up,” he said. “They are a muchimproved team.” Langley’s Will Cook scored the only goal during the first period. A minute and 35 seconds into the second period, Trail’s Joel Webb made it 1-1 with a power play marker. The goal came with Reichert sitting in the penalty box after being slapped with a roughing minor at the very end of the opening frame. Langley goaltender Lyndon Stanwood made some solid stops among his 17 saves on the night, to pick up his sixth win of the season.

Still rolling

The Rivermen have yet to lose in regulation time in 2014 and rode a six-game win streak going into Sunday’s game at South Surrey Arena. They lead the BCHL’s fiveteam Mainland Division with a 28-12-1-5 record, have already

clinched a playoff spot, and are tied with Powell River for most points in the league, with 62. The Langley juniors have 10 games to go before the end of the 56-game regular season and their quest from the start of the campaign remains the same. “That was our goal coming out: winning a regular season championship,” Henderson said. The Rivermen’s month-long point streak will be tested this weekend. On Friday, they host the Chilliwack Chiefs (10-31-1-3) at the LEC. Game time is 7:15 p.m. The next day, they travel to Duncan to play the Cowichan Valley Capitals (17-26-1-1 at press time) at the Island Savings Centre, with a 7 p.m. opening puck drop. Sunday afternoon, the Rivermen wrap up their weekend in Victoria, where they will take on a Grizzlies team that boasts a solid 28-11-3-2 record.

ALWAYS BUYING · WE PAY CASH Want to know your rights?

A New Mandate The Representative is now able to provide advocacy for young adults (up to age 24) who have developmental disabilities and are eligible for CLBC services. If we can assist you or someone you care for, contact the Rep:

www.rcybc.ca 1-800-476-3933 Follow

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www.langleyadvance.com

’Men edge Smokies, lose in OT to plucky Eagles

@LangleyAdvance on Twitter

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A22

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Amateur boxing

DON’S eek Deal of the W

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LangleyAdvance

Pugilists set to trade leather at Coast

Don Henshall

#3212

Sports

The next instalment of the Clash at the Cascades is going to be a show to remember, says the amateur boxing event’s matchmaker and organizer Dave Allison. The 12-bout card takes place Friday (Jan. 24) inside the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre ballroom. Clash’s 26th installment features a B.C. super welterweight championship bout pitting North Burnaby’s Ron Pryce, who is moving up from the welterweight division, against champion Josh Wright. Langley’s Matt Lee was expected to be in action, but an opponent wasn’t

found for him in time for the event. B.C. cruiserweight champion Ken Huber is scheduled to face 18-yearold Palvir Atwal in a four-round nontitle bout. In other action, Garrett E. Halicki of Port Kells will take on Marcus Baptiste of Vancouver’s Action gym. Langley’s Tammara Wolf will be in action against Judith Pelletier of Kamloops in the 140-pound female division. Amanda Pack of Langley will tangle with Alexandra Blight of Madkatz Boxing club of Kelowna. Allison, who is also the manager of the Langley City Boxing Club, says his club is in a “rebuilding mode” and will have a lot of Langley boxers in the ring for next month’s Clash. Allison still trains some boxers but leaves most of the coaching to his

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son, James. “Jamie has a good crew up and coming, and it will show by summer,” the elder Allison said. “It takes a long time to develop boxers.” He added, “Friday’s card is stacked with some really good fights and a balance between youngsters and veterans.” A team from Saskatchewan will also be involved in the show. Marcus Hume, the top-ranked super lightweight in B.C., is training in Langley for a short while and is preparing to take on Abbas Shah, the No. 1 super lightweight boxer in Saskatchewan. This is an all-ages event with those ages 12 and under admitted free. Tickets are available at the door starting at 7 p.m. Bar service is available.


Sports

LangleyAdvance

Junior B hockey

FR RY ENTPRE-GAME

The night after dousing the Ridge Meadows Flames in convincing fashion, Aldergrove was upended by the North Vancouver Wolf Pack.

sports@langleyadvance.com

The North Vancouver Wolf Pack’s power play packed a lot of punch Saturday night. On the strength of a trio of power play goals in the third period, the Wolf Pack pulled away from the visiting Aldergrove Kodiaks en route to a 5-1 victory at the Harry Jerome Rec Centre in North Vancouver. The Wolf Pack cashed in on three of their six man advantage opportunities. “We did a lot of good things, [but] I thought they did a pretty good job of shutting us down,” Kodiaks head coach Brad Rihela said. “We couldn’t get momentum. It was one of those nights.” Rihela added, “They’re a good hockey team, over there. Give them credit: they played a real solid defensive game and did what you have to do to get two points.” The Wolf Pack’s Spencer Quon tallied the only goal of the first period. At the 2:13 mark of the second frame, the Wolf Pack’s Mitchell Crisanti scored to make it 2-0. Stephen Ryan notched his league-leading 35th goal of the season 6:20 into the middle frame to narrow the visitors’ deficit to one goal. The Kodiaks came unraveled when it came to penalties during the final frame, and the Wolf Pack took full advantage with power play goals from Marcus Houck, Trevor Maclean, and Otis Goldman. The Wolf Pack outshot the Kodiaks 16-6 during the third period and 29-20 overall. Even with the loss, the Kodiaks, at 28-6-2-1, are the top team in the Pacific Junior Hockey League. They lead the PJHL’s Harold Brittain Conference as well as the entire league with 59 points. The Tom Shaw Conference-leading Richmond Sockeyes are nipping at their heels, with 57 points on the strength of a 26-4-3-2 record. With Saturday’s win, the Wolf Pack improved to 24-10-1-2 and sit second in the Tom Shaw, six points back of the Sockeyes, who are riding a 15-game win streak. Kodiaks 8, Ridge Meadows Flames 0 Friday’s game at Planet Ice Maple Ridge featured a shutdown, meltdown, and ultimately, a beatdown. The Kodiaks’ team defence completely shut down the Flames’ offence,

limiting the hosts to a measly 11 shots on goal. The third period saw the meltdown, with the Flames unable to keep themselves out of the penalty box and the Kodiaks seizing the opportunity by adding four power play goals to their totals. When the final buzzer sounded, the beatdown was complete, with the Kodiaks skating to an easy 8-0 win while levying 50 shots on goal. Ryan added to his PJHLleading point totals with a pair of goals and two assists. Spencer Unger and Elvis Jansons also scored twice for the Kodiaks, with Spencer McHaffie and Jonathan Philley scoring the other Aldergrove markers. The Kodiaks led 2-0 after the first period, 4-0 after 40 minutes of play and added four more in a third period in which they outshot the Flames 20-2. In total, the Kodiaks had 13 power play opportunities and scored on four of them. Rihela said the shot totals were somewhat misleading, especially considering the Flames were missing a couple of key players from their lineup. “They are a good hockey team,” he said, regarding a Ridge Meadows team that sits at .500, at 16-16-2-3. “I don’t know if the shots were a huge indicator. We had a lot of opportunities on the power play, and on the power play, our team is dangerous.” Kodiaks 3, North Vancouver Wolf Pack 2 (double OT) Spencer McHaffie potted the winner 33 seconds into the three-on-three double overtime period to lift the Kodiaks to victory last Wednesday (Jan. 15), capping “Harry Hunt Appreciation Night” at Aldergrove Arena. Trailing 1-0 after the first period and 2-0 after North Vancouver’s Houck found the net 11:51 into the second period, the Kodiaks erased a two-goal deficit by scoring the final three goals of the night. Ryan tallied Aldergrove’s first goal 13:02 into the middle frame to narrow the deficit to 2-1. Then, at the 5:23 mark of the third period, the Kodiaks’ Philley tied the score at 2-2. The Kodiaks controlled play, outshooting the Wolf Pack 50-26. Rihela said the Kodiaks scratched out the win for Hunt, a well-liked photographer who was in attendance.

“Harry’s such a huge part in our community and it was amazing to see everybody coming together for him,” Rihela said. “From the coaching staff to the players, it was awesome to pull one out in overtime. The fans were unbelievable that night.” ICE CHIPS: The Kodiaks hosted the Port Moody Panthers last night (Wednesday, Jan. 22) at Aldergrove Arena. Results were not available due to Wednesday afternoon press deadlines.

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National Lacrosse League. Vancouver. EE

Kodiaks suffer rare loss by Troy Landreville

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Thursday, Januar y 23, 2014

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LangleyAdvance

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