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LangleyAdvance Your community newspaper since 1931

Breaking news, sports, and entertainment: www.langleyadvance.com

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With two of her completed clay cats on display, Fort Langley Artists Group (FLAG) member Margo Harrison hand-built a feline sculpture from a lump of earthenware clay Oct. 5 at the Langley Centennial Museum. Find out more about Saturday artists demonstrations on page A17. Troy Landreville/Langley Advance

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How much should it cost to sit down downtown? by Heather Colpitts

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

Langley City will spend $30,000 on 14 new benches for the downtown. The funds will come from what Councillor Dave Hall calls the council “slush fund” or the Enterprise Fund, a $150,000 fund for council to spend. “In reality it’s slush fund,” and now that the end of the year is coming up, there’s a race to get it spent, Hall said. During the Oct. 7 council meeting he scoffed at the price tag of $1,785 per bench. “I’m a little gun shy,” he said. “We approved $9,000 for stick signs [as part of the City’s wayfinding strategy].” The benches cost $1,350 with the rest going to installation and a contingency. That had Hall questioning why installation would cost so much considering it’s work done by City staff. Administrator Francis Cheung explained that extra funds are

needed because the work is outside the normal staff duties. Hall was also critical of the City using Enterprise Fund money for benches but wouldn’t cover defibrillators for community facilities, which prompted point of order criticism from Coun. Gayle Martin. “I really take offense,” she said. Martin said Hall was implying that staff were spending a whim and trying to use up the money. The Enterprise Fund still has about $99,000 in it for this year. Hall said there was no prior notice that this spending decision was coming before council and should have been dealt with during budget deliberations. During the summer, council walked the downtown to see what should be fixed, refurbished or replaced. The 50 items on the ‘to do’ list included moss/weed growing behind sidewalks, missing bricks in sidewalks, new decorated bicycle racks, graffiti on streetlight standards, and unsightly areas. Fourteen benches were also put on the list and staff consider it more economical to replace them versus refurbishing them. Martin asked whether the

CRANBERRY FESTIVAL Saturday, Oct. 10 in Fort Langley

benches have additional pieces that prevent people from lying on them. Staff will look into options.

“Without any dividers on them, it probably looks very homey to someone,” she said.

Kwantlen Polytechnic University

School cheques faked Someone is using counterfeit cheques to rip off a Langley university campus. by Matthew Claxton mclaxton@langleyadvance.com

A local fraud artist has ripped off Kwantlen Polytechnic University for about $11,000 over the last two months. From August to September, someone has been cashing forged payroll cheques from the school at local cash stores and payday loan outlets. The forged cheques are of high quality, said Cpl. Holly Marks, a spokesperson for

the Langley RCMP. Passing bad cheques was once a much more common crime, but it has been overtaken by credit card fraud in recent Fraud suspect years. Wanted Police have a surveillance photo of the person who was cashing the cheques, but have been unable to identify the person thus far. Anyone with information is being asked to call the Langley RCMP at 604-532-3200, or to leave an anonymous tip, all CrimeStoppers at 1-800-2228477 (TIPS).

Check out all the activities at the annual celebration on page A18.


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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

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2 Thess 3:16 “May the Lord of peace himself give you peace at all times in every way.”


What’s

online

Experience Layar Some pages in today’s edition of the Langley Advance have been enriched with Layar and contain digital content that you can view using your smartphone.

How it works:

Step 1. Download the free Layar app for iPhone or Android. Step 2. Look for pages with the Layar logo. Step 3. Open the Layar app, hold the phone above the page, and tap to scan it. Step 4. Hold your phone above the page to view the interactive content.

Today, find Layar-enhanced news content at: Page A8 – Editorial cartoon Page A15 – Grave Tales

Put a Lid on It, now on YouTube.

Community

Video stars hot

The B-shift crew at Langley City Fire Rescue has found a catchy way to drive home the message of fire safety during Fire Prevention Week Oct. 6-12. They’ve made a video called Put a Lid on It, sung to the Beyonce tune Put a Ring on It. It’s on the City website and YouTube. The firehall also has an open house Thursday evening. • More online

News

Thief tackled

An employee tried to tackle a man who grabbed cellphones from a display case at Future Shop on Oct. 7. Just before 10:30 a.m., a man wearing a black hoodie and sunglasses walked into the store and approached the cellphone section. Almost immediately, alarms went off, said Cpl. Holly Marks, the spokesperson for the Langley RCMP. • More online

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LangleyAdvance.com

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Kicker puts the boots to cancer

A former professional football player set a goal of kicking 300 field goals on Saturday, with proceeds helping families that are battling cancer. by Troy Landreville

tlandreville@langleyadvance.com

Josh Collins wasn’t going to let a stomach bug stop him from giving cancer the boot Saturday in Walnut Grove. The 32-year-old Langley resident spent part of the morning throwing up at home, the aftermath of what he figured was either a bug or something he ate the day before. Undeterred, Josh wasn’t going to call in sick for a unique fundraiser held in his dad’s memory. A former Arena Football League kicker, Josh suited up for the Birmingham Steeldogs, Cincinnati Jungle Cats, Everett Hawks, and Fresno Central Valley Coyotes over a five-year career, before a career-ending knee injury dashed his hopes of potentially playing for the Seattle Seahawks. These days, Josh works full time while raising four children, but is still kicking field goals for a cause very close to his heart. On Oct. 5, he set a goal of kicking 300 balls through the world’s largest inflatable uprights set up in the Walnut Grove Commerce Centre parking lot. Proceeds from the event, in partnership with Body Smart Health, go to the Ron Collins Foundation, whose mission is to raise funds to cover families’ costs while battling cancer. “I still feel weak,” Josh “I’m going to [kick] said, around until my body shuts noontime down.” Saturday. “But the show must Josh Collins go on. I’m going to [kick] until my body shuts down.” Josh has first hand experience with the struggles a family faces, both financially and emotionally, while fighting the disease. His dad Ron was not a smoker but battled lung cancer, before losing his fight with the disease on April 8, 2009. “It was devastating,” Josh said. “He was my biggest fan and one of my closest friends.” During the ordeal, Josh’s mom had to work full time while taking care of his dad, and it took a huge toll on her. “We searched all across North America for help,” Josh said. “There’s not much out there. Kicking Cancer and the Ron Collins Foundation are going to change this.” According to Josh, the average family battling cancer ends up $50,000 in debt. Josh has become a crusader helping families cope with the financial struggles that

With his threeyear-old daughter Cali as the holder, Josh Collins was about to successfully kick a field goal in the Walnut Grove Commerce Centre parking lot. All proceeds from his field goal kicking fundraiser went to the Ron Collins Foundation, whose mission is to raise funds to cover families’ costs while battling cancer.

Troy Landreville Langley Advance

come with fighting cancer. And he’s not alone. During the fundraiser the father of four had his family on hand to cheer him on including his wife Sarah and children Braedon, nine, Cali, three, Maysa, two, and Mikaiah, three weeks. In fact, Cali bravely volunteered as the holder. This isn’t the first time Josh has used his kicking talents for the foundation. Over a 48-hour span in August 2012, Josh kicked 1,955 field goals from the 35 yard line, for a total of 68,425 yards.

“That’s the equivalent of running six-anda-half marathons,” he noted. This year, he hopes to set a Guiness World Record by kicking 4,000 field goals in front of over 1,000,000 people across six Canadian cities to help families in their fight against cancer. His effort started in June and wraps up this month. To donate online or to check out Josh’s kicking schedule this month, visit www. kickingcancer.ca. You can also find the foundation on Facebook at facebook.com/kickingcancer.ca.

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Thursday, October 10, 2013

Township For the week of October 10, 2013

dates to note

LangleyAdvance

www.tol.ca

Page

20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 | 604.534.3211

public programs and events

The Township of Langley Civic Facility and Operations Centre will be closed Monday, October 14 for Thanksgiving Day. Wednesday, October 16 | 7 - 9pm Community and Transportation Safety Advisory Committee Civic Facility Salmon River Committee Room Thursday, October 17 | 7 - 9pm Agricultural Advisory Committee Civic Facility Salmon River Committee Room Monday, October 21 | 7 - 11pm Public Hearing Meeting Civic Facility Fraser River Presentation Theatre Township of Langley Civic Facility 20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 604.534.3211 | tol.ca

langley events centre Coming Events Langley Rivermen Junior A Hockey Sat Oct 12 7:15pm vs. Surrey Eagles Wed Oct 16 7:15pm vs. Chilliwack Chiefs Sat Oct 19 7:15pm vs. Penticton Vees Sun Oct 20* 2:00pm vs. Pr. George Spruce Kings *Skate with the Rivermen following the game

Valley West Hawks BC Major Midget Hockey Sat Oct 12

10:15am vs. Vancouver Canadians

TWU Spartans University Sports

The Township of Langley is giving residents a chance to properly dispose of hazardous materials from around their homes and to recycle small appliances and electronics.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The annual Household Hazardous Waste Plus Recycling event will be held:

Dates: Saturday and Sunday, October 19 and 20 Time: 9am - 3pm Location: Operations Building Address: 4700 - 224 Street Cost:

FREE to Township residents. Proof of residency required.

Paint, batteries, pesticides, cleaners, and chemicals will be safely disposed of by hazardous waste professionals.

PLUS: Electronics, small appliances, mercury thermostats, and smoke detectors will also be accepted and recycled. Household quantities only. To enquire about larger quantities contact 604.532.7300 prior to the event.

• • • •

Engineering Division 604.532.7300 opsinfo@tol.ca

7:00pm vs. Eastern Washington U 2:00pm vs. Eastern Washington U

Antifreeze Ballasts Batteries (all) Bleach Brake fluid Concentrated acids Darkroom chemicals Fluorescent lights/bulbs Furniture stripper Herbicides Insecticides Motor oil Oven cleaner Paint and thinners Pesticides Propane fuel tanks (empty) Solvents Swimming pool chemicals Toilet bowl cleaner Transmission fluid Turpentine

PLUS

For more information, visit tol.ca/hhw.

Men’s Hockey Fri Oct 18 Sat Oct 19

Acceptable items:

Electronics Mercury thermostats Small appliances Smoke detectors

public notice Property Tax Exemptions Notice is given that the Township of Langley will be considering 2014 property tax exemption (with provision for exemption at a maximum of 10 years at a time) for the following properties. Estimated taxes are shown for 2014 and for the following two years as required in Section 227 of the Community Charter.

Township of Langley – Property Tax Exemptions – 2014

Holiday Festival on Ice Friday, December 6 • 7pm

featuring Kurt Browning, Elvis Stojko, Joannie Rochette, Holly Cole, and more.

Tickets on sale now! 1.855.985.5000

Vancouver Stealth NLL Lacrosse The Vancouver Stealth (NLL) are coming to the LEC. Reserve your 2014 season tickets – call 604.882.8800. The Langley Events Centre is located at 7888 - 200 Street For ticket information, contact Langley Events Centre 604.882.8800 • langleyeventscentre.com

Name

Folio

Address

2014

Estimated General Taxes 2015 2016

Community Halls, Charitable and Non-Profit Organizations Basketball BC Community Living Society Fraser Health Authority Langley Association for Community Living Langley Gymnastics Foundation The National Trust for Land and Culture (B.C.) Society Salvation Army - Gateway of Hope Governing Council of the Salvation Army in Canada Tourism Langley Association

0766735062 0758918004 0765930067 0076211112 0766735044 0461111000 0598211008 0766113000 0767012019

210 - 7888 200 Street 8983 216A Street 8521 198A Street 104B & 105B,4059 200 Street 180 - 7888 200 Street 6764 224 Street 3111 272 Street 19733 96 Avenue 110 - 7888 200 Street

$ 3,544 $ 1,058 $ 295,072 $ 4,201 $ 21,070 $ 1,340 $ 15,042 $ 36,750 $ 2,993

$ 3,899 $ 1,163 $ 324,579 $ 4,621 $ 23,177 $ 1,474 $ 16,547 $ 40,425 $ 3,292

$ 4,280 $ 1,277 $ 356,299 $ 5,072 $ 25,442 $ 1,618 $ 18,164 $ 44,375 $ 3,614

Darlene Foxgord Manager, Revenue and Tax Collection 604.533.6029

Township continued...


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A5

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Crime

What’s the most important thing in your life?

Booze lifted from Aldergrove pub

You!

Three young bandits perpetrated the latest liquor store rip-off.

mer in which thieves grabbed expensive bottles of vodka and bolted, in one case attacking a store clerk. In this case, there was no confrontation with the staff. by Matthew Claxton All three suspects are described mclaxton@langleyadvance.com as being in their early 20s. Two are Caucasian and the other man may be The latest in a string of brazen liquor First Nations.The first man had short store thefts that started in the summer blond hair and wore a black sweater and has hit a popular Aldergrove pub. jeans, the First Nations man was slightly On Sept. 24, at about 5:45 p.m., three taller and wore men entered the a black sweater Fox and Hound and track Pub’s beer and pants. There wine store in was no descripthe 26400 block tion of the third of 32nd Avenue, man’s clothing. said Cpl. Holly Anyone with Marks, spokesinformation on person for the the theft can Langley RCMP. call the Langley The men RCMP at 604grabbed an 532-3200, unknown numSuspects in a cold beer and wine store robbery in Aldergrove on or to leave ber of liquor Sept. 24 were pictured by surveillance cameras. an anonymbottles and simous tip with ply ran out the back door. CrimeStoppers, call 1-800-222-8477 This follows thefts in the Langley City (TIPS). and Willowbrook areas over the sum-

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Township

www.tol.ca

Page

For the week of October 10, 2013

road closure

public notice

Legislative Services 604.533.6100

Starting October 15, 210 Street will be closed from Worrell Crescent to 72 Avenue for approximately one month. Starting November 1, 72 Avenue will be closed from 208 Street to 210 Street for approximately two months. 72 Avenue closed from 208 Street to 210 Street starting November 1

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The Township of Langley’s Economic Development Department presents the 3rd Annual Langley Economic Forum: Date:

Thursday, October 24

Time:

11:45am - 3:30pm

Location: Langley Events Centre, Banquet Room Address:

7888 - 200 Street

Free lunch will be provided.

210 Street closed from Worrell Crescent to 72 Avenue starting October 15

210 ST.

72 AVE.

Langley Township Economic Forum

Titled Livability in Langley, the event will include guest speakers Dan Burden of the Walkable and Livable Communities Institute; Cameron Muir, Chief Economist for the BC Real Estate Association; and Lance Jakubec, Senior Market Analyst for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

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RSVP is required by October 17. Register by: Email: econdev@tol.ca Phone: 604.533.6152 or 604.532.7548

Crush Cres.

ES (Detour Route) .

Economic Development Department 604.533.6084

Use Social Media to Connect with the Township of Langley

Worrell Cres. (Detour Route) Gate Open

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Volunteering is a great way to get involved, provide input on important issues, and make a positive contribution to our diverse and growing community. The Township is presently seeking volunteers for the following Council Advisory Committees: • Agricultural Advisory Committee (one-year and two-year term positions available) • Community Participation, Infrastructure, and Environment Advisory Committee (two-year term positions available) • Community and Transportation Safety Advisory Committee (two-year term positions available) • Economic Development Advisory Committee (one-year and two-year term positions available) • Heritage Advisory Committee (two-year term positions available) • Recreation, Culture, and Parks Advisory Committee (two-year term positions available) • Seniors Advisory Committee (two-year term positions available) • Youth Advisory Committee (two-year term positions available) A description of each Advisory Committee and an application form is available on the Township’s website at tol.ca/committee. Please complete the application form and attach a letter and a brief resume indicating which Advisory Committee you wish to serve on. Current Advisory Committee members are welcome to reapply. Committee application reviews will be scheduled during the weeks of November 13 to 22, 2013 with members of Council and staff liaison representatives. Applicants will be notified after Council has made their appointments in early December. Deadline: Monday, October 21, 2013 Online: tol.ca/committee Email: legservicesinfo@tol.ca Mail: Deputy Township Clerk Legislative Services Department Township of Langley 20338 - 65 Avenue Langley, BC V2Y 3J1 Fax: 604.533.6054

public programs and events

Temporary Road Closures: 210 Street – Worrell Crescent to 72 Avenue and 72 Avenue – 208 Street to 210 Street

208 ST.

2014 Council Advisory Committee Appointments

20338 - 65 Avenue, Langley V2Y 3J1 | 604.534.3211

The Township of Langley offers the following options to use social media to keep up-to-date with all that is happening in the community.

Township on Twitter

Follow us on Twitter and get real-time information: twitter.com/langleytownship

Find Us on Facebook

Like us! Look for the Township of Langley at facebook.com/langleytownship These closures are required for construction of the East Langley Water Supply. Local and business traffic access will be permitted during construction. For more information about this project visit tol.ca/elws. We appreciate your patience. Engineering Division 604.533.6006 enginfo@tol.ca

Make Payments Online

Save time – pay a municipal ticket or renew your dog licence or business licence online at tol.ca/onlineservices

Be Our Eyes and Ears

See a problem that needs fixing when you are out and about? Use your smart phone to let us know: tol.ca/report

Stay in the Know

Get the latest information on road closures, open houses, and Council meetings sent straight to your email. Sign up at tol.ca/eAlerts

After-Hours Emergency Contact 604.543.6700


A6

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

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For great deals on ENERGY STAR® appliances, visit powersmart.ca/deals. Court system

‘Natural person’ is convicted of tax evasion

A judge ruled that tax evasion is not “natural” for a Langley locksmith. by Mike Hager

Special to the Langley Advance

A Langley man has been ordered to pay a fine of $214,323 and complete 150 hours of community service after evading taxes on $1.1 million he earned from his security and locksmith business, according to a judge. The Canada Revenue Agency announced Monday that David John Barrett was also handed an 18-month conditional sentence at Vancouver Provincial Court recently after pleading guilty in July to one count of tax evasion totalling $285,765. The CRA said Barrett failed to report more than $1.1 million in income from his company Citiloc Systems Ltd. on his personal tax returns during a six-year period ending in 2010. The agency said it started

investigating Barrett after but the income belongs to the another case linked him to natural person and therefore is Paradigm Education Group. not subject to income tax. Paradigm’s Chilliwack-based Paradigm sold books and founder Russ Porisky was DVDs, and offered fee-based ordered to pay nearly $275,000 seminars that promoted in May 2012 and Porisky’s view sentenced to fourthat an individual “Why did they [Canada may be either a and-a-half years in prison for natural or an artiRevenue Agency] evading taxes and ficial person. allow so many people counselling others “It’s not someto be roped in by this to do the same. thing that’s new, Porisky promotbut it’s certainly organization?” ed the “natural something that’s David John Barrett person” theory of not worked for taxation, which people,” CRA holds that a person doesn’t have spokesman Bradley Alvarez said. to pay taxes because the govern“Which is why we highlight ment labels them as an “artificial the fact that it’s a dangerous person.” road to go down for an indiThe natural person performs vidual because they’re opening the labour required to earn themselves up to prosecution.” income, and the legal person Since a landmark Ontario court is the legal entity the federal case in 2000, 23 people across government creates through the the country have been convicted issuance and use of SIN numfor using the strategy to evade bers. taxes and about 23 more cases Natural-person advocates are before the courts, Alvarez maintain that the legal person added. has to file an income tax return, Contacted after the rul-

ing, Barrett said he attended so many people to be roped a Paradigm course and then in by this organization? They brought the tax strategy up with knew about it in 2003, because his lawyer and accountant, who Paradigm people wrote letters to told him it was legal. the CRA asking the question and “Nowadays when you mention they never got an answer.” the word ‘natural person’ or any Alvarez said he didn’t know of this stuff they go ‘Oh, well when the agency first began you’re crazy to be doing that!’” investigating Paradigm and its Barrett said. “Hindsight is 20/20 students. right? But, back when I brought “I don’t have specific details that to them, which was more with respect to his investigation, than 10 years ago or eight years but what I can tell you is there ago, there was no knowledge of has been information about this it. sort of thing for a long time on “They shrugged their shoulour website and as well as that, ders and said ‘I don’t know, we the law is quite clear,” Alvarez don’t learn that said. stuff.’” “If you earn “If you earn income in Barrett said he income in Canada, that income made a mistake Canada, that but also is quesincome could be could be subject to tioning why the subject to income tax.” CRA took so long tax – that’s clear.” Bradley Alvarez to start investiA news release gating Porisky’s from Alvarez group. encouraged “Why did they wait six years people to visit the CRA webto bust this Paradigm thing if it site to read about common tax was in fact illegal and a fraud?” myths. he said. “Why did they allow - Mike Hager is a Vancouver Sun reporter

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Round & round Riders taking part in the RSVP ride, which stands for Ride from Seattle to Vancouver and Party, headed up the spiral bike ramp to the Golden Ears Bridge in August. The ride passed through Langley and Fort Langley this year. John Evanochko/Special to the Langley Advance

City council

Box removal bandied Newspaper boxes can be a magnet for trouble, according to one City councillor.

during the skyrocketing growth of commuter papers, many of which have since been discontinued. The boxes brought in a $25 per year fee to the City which has about 40 of them. Coun. Teri James said after seeing boxes be a problem for many months, by Heather Colpitts she took photos about two months ago, hcolpitts@langleyadcvance.com and the owners were contacted. Nothing Langley City is giving the owners of has been done to fix the graffiti, vandalnewspaper boxes on public property a ism and trash issues. time limit to remove them or pay to get “They’re just an ongoing problem,” she them out of the public works yard. said. Council got into a debate on Oct. 7 over Surrey has banned newspaper boxes on how to deal with boxes public property and others that have been covered are considering it, noted “They’re just an in graffiti and had their City administrator Francis papers strewn about. Cheung. ongoing problem.” The City receives about “We ban enough things Teri James $1,000 in revenue from already in this town,” said the box owners but staff Coun. Jack Arnold. contend that the costs to deal with the Coun. Gayle Martin countered that the problems exceed that. boxes are now just clutter. Council decid“Why would you just bump up the cost ed to repeal the bylaw allowing the boxes per newspaper box?” asked Councillor and will notify owners. They will have a Dave Hall. time limit to remove them or have to pay. The City brought in a policy on newsThe Langley Advance does not have such paper boxes on public property in 2005 boxes in the City.

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Transportation

A promise is a promise

Pilot survived runway bellyflop

by Rochelle Baker Glacier Media

It was only as the plane descended towards the runway for its emergency landing at the Abbotsford Airport that pilot Ryan Curr’s stomach sank. Curr, 31, was forced to make a dramatic belly landing on Friday at 4 p.m. after his Piper aircraft’s landing gear system failed to deploy. The Langley man, who has 11 years experience as a recreational pilot, had been flying circles for an hour during a flight from Pitt Meadows to Chilliwack trying to troubleshoot the problem and dislodge the jammed wheels. Curr realized he was out of options when the emergency release system, used as a last resort, failed to jettison the wheels. “I called the Abbotsford tower and spoke with the controller,” said Curr. “I told him I’d be coming out there in two to three hours and I’d be crashing on their runway.”

Curr spent three hours flying the length of the Fraser Valley to burn off the extra fuel in his full tanks. “I didn’t want to set down with a bunch of gas sitting two feet away from me in the wings,” he said. In the meantime, Curr made some difficult calls to his wife Nicola, brother Alex, and his parents. “I tried to explain that this does happen,” he said. “It was just an abundance of caution but I wanted to say that I loved them, and I was looking forward to seeing them on the ground.” His reassurance did not allay the fears of his wife and mother who “weren’t in much of an emotional place to do much talking,” said Curr. Nicola and Alex rushed to the Abbotsford airport. It wasn’t until his final exchange with the airport controller who wished him luck that Curr comprehended the gravity of his situation. “That’s when I realized I’m about to crash and my stomach dropped,” said Curr. “But I recovered a couple minutes later and did what I had to.” Recalling his training a decade ago, Curr left the cockpit door open so when the plane landed it wouldn’t get jammed if the frame twisted.

He then made a textbook emergency landing, putting the Piper down smoothly on its underside, straight and flat. “It was a normal landing,” said Curr. “I didn’t rush it and didn’t do anything different.” Sparks shot up from the underside of the plane and smoke filled the cockpit as he landed. The moment the aircraft was stationary, Curr was out on the tarmac. The waiting fire trucks raced to the scene but the Piper was largely intact and no fire broke out. Curr’s adrenaline finally kicked in as he glanced back at his plane. “That’s when the panic and shaking set in… looking at all the fire trucks,” he said. Despite the immediate shock, Curr, who works as a paramedic, isn’t planning on giving up flying. Even though his Piper, which he just acquired in August, can’t be salvaged, Carr plans to purchase a new aircraft. He has his wife’s support and she’s even agreed to go up again herself. “I’ve had that close call in my [flying] career that everybody talks about,” said Carr. “I should be good from now on.”

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West Langley Elementary principal Shawn David spent Oct. 8 in a pink tutu after he lost a bet with students. They had to sell 275 coupon books within two weeks or he had to don the unique outfit. The kids ended up selling 349 books, the highest sales in the past five years. The school and its 250 students will benefit from the funds raised which are earmarked for library books, field trips, and technological equipment. He even greeted families at the start of school in costume.

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As a Langley man prepared to crash his small plane, he called his loved ones.


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Waste management

Good place for bad stuff

Langley Township’s annual hazardous waste disposal event is coming around again.

A special event that gives Township of Langley residents a chance to dispose of potentially dangerous products and recycle other things like electronics in a safe and environmentally friendly way is being offered again this fall. The annual Household Hazardous Waste Plus Recycling Drop-Off Event will be held Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 19 and 20, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Township of Langley Operations Centre, 4700 224th St. The drop-off is free to Township residents. Proof of residency is required. Household hazardous waste items including leftover paint, antifreeze, bleach, brake fluid, motor oil, fluorescent lights, empty propane tanks, pesticides, and turpentine will be collected. Any household product with a skull and cross bones, flames, a skeleton hand, or an explosion on the label can be brought in. For the second year in a row, electronics, small appliances, batteries, smoke detectors, and mercury thermostats will also be accepted. “Electronics may not be hazardous,” said solid waste coordinator Debbie Fleming, “but they can no longer be placed in landfills, so the Township felt it made sense to accept them.” Fleming also offered a reminder that many items – such as a bag of batteries or a can of paint – are accepted yearround at local recycling facilities and bottle depots. Staff will be handing out information about local facilities during the Oct. 19-20

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Once collected, items like electronics will indeed be recycled and the household hazardous wastes will be disposed of safely. event, and more information on where to take items throughout the year can be found online at rcbc.bc.ca/recyclepedia. Because hazardous waste can be harmful to people, animals, and the environment, it cannot be poured down the drain, put in the garbage, burned, buried, or left to seep into the ground. Keeping it at home is not an option, either, which is why many people make use of the Township’s annual drop-off event. “People have come to expect it,” Fleming said. “They know that toxic products they have can be properly disposed of this way and that electronics and small appliance will be recycled.” This year, signage will be posted on the corner of 48th Avenue and 224th Street to indicate what the wait time is for those in line, and offer information on free alternative recycling sites. For a full list of items accepted at the Household Hazardous Waste Plus Recycling Drop-Off Event, visit tol.ca/ hhw.

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Bob Groeneveld EDITOR

A10

Thursday, October 10, 2013

editor@langleyadvance.com

Our View is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at Suite 112 6375 - 202nd St., Langley, B.C. V2Y 1N1 The Langley Advance is published on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and is delivered to homes and businesses in Langley City, all areas of Langley Township, and Cloverdale.

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Opinion

Ryan McAdams PUBLISHER rmcadams@langleyadvance.com

LangleyAdvance

Money means business first

In the movie Killing Them Softly, the lead character, played by Brad Pitt, offers the insight that “America is not a country, it’s business.” The same could certainly be said of Canada, even before the revelations of industrial espionage carried out on behalf of Canadian mining interests in Brazil by our national spy agency, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC). After all, the divide between the corporate boardroom and a democratically elected government like Canada’s gets pretty grey at some levels. Corporate executives hold their jobs at the behest of those shareholders who bother to vote, just as a democracy is supposedly controlled by its putative shareholders: the country’s citizens… those who bother to vote, that is. Of course, in an ideal democracy, everyone, rich or poor, is an equal partner at the ballot box, while in the corporate structure, those who have more money – or control more shares – have a greater say when a vote is taken. More importantly – and this is where the line between business and the business of government tends to get cloudy – a country’s prime assets are its people, and their well-being is the reason for the government’s existence, while in a corporation, people are just assets – and money is the ultimate goal. That distinction appears to have been lost almost entirely in Canada’s governance of late. Only science that bears financial fruit is allowed relevance. Research that dares to question the validity of the corporate view of economics is stamped out. Human rights are those that do not stand in the way of monetary gain. And now, as apparently clarified by goings-on in Brazil, even our spies have identified the national interest of Canada to be congruent with the financial interests of our corporations. When it’s only money that does the talking, it’s strictly business. – B.G.

Your View

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Vote at… www.langleyadvance.com Last week’s question: What are you most looking forward to this autumn? Cooler weather

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Opinion

Beware vampires of Connecticut! Painful truth

snake oil, and magical remedy. None of them worked. Tuberculosis was identified as the cause of consumption just a few years before Mercy’s death, but it wouldn’t be until the 20th cenMatthew Claxton tury that antibiotics would become widespread mclaxton@langleyadvance.com and powerful enough to cure most cases easily. Consumption arrived in New England in the When you think vampires, you think of 1770s, and the first known case of the vampirTransylvania and its wolf-haunted forests, you ism panic came in 1784. think of fog-shrouded Whitby on the English One of the odd things about the case is that coast, maybe of decadent New Orleans or gaswe don’t know exactly what superstition was lit London. at the base of the exhumations. The townsYou don’t typically think of 19th century folk didn’t call the evil dead they believed in New England. “vampires.” Nearby newspapers applied the Yet that is where vampirism really sank its vampire label, usually while teeth (I apologize, I’ll stop) into the deploring the superstition of North American psyche for the first It was the end their rural neighbours. Nor does time. it seem that they believed the of a string In 1892, a young woman named dead actually left their graves. Mercy Lena Brown died in a decayof vampire (Although, a lot of Eastern ing little farming town called scares… European vampire lore is vague Exeter, Rhode Island. It wasn’t on this point, too. Is the vampire much of a surprise to most, as her actually getting up and moving mother and a sister had already around, or is it projecting its malevolence?) died of consumption, and her brother was What they believed in may not have had a ill, too. But some of the townsfolk apparently marketable name. It’s not a vampire, it’s not a decided that the deaths were unnatural. zombie, it’s not even a dhampir or a revanant They pestered her father, George, until he relented and allowed them to exhume the bod- or a straight-up ghost. It might have been based on old folk tales ies of all three women. from Europe, but it might have been a comNot surprisingly, Mercy’s mother and sister, dead for years, were just bones. Mercy herself, pletely new North American superstition. That’s kind of fascinating, actually. You’d buried in the cold ground of a New England think some enterprising horror director would winter, looked relatively undecayed. She must be the culprit, decided the townsfolk. They cut be working on a 19th century TB ghost movie right now. out her heart, and burned it to ashes, mixed Of course, you shouldn’t tell any of Mercy the ashes with water and fed them to her sickBrown’s fans that she’s not a vampire. And ly brother Edwin. This, they felt sure, would yes, she has fans. Exeter has had to bolt down cure him. her headstone after it was stolen, and it’s been It was the end of a string of vampire scares the target of graffiti more than once. People and exhumations that lasted more than a cenleave plastic vampire teeth, or flowers, or tury. It was driven, it would seem by tuberculosis, notes written to her ghost on her grave around a disease that had no cure and could cut down Halloween. Sadly, none of this seems to extend to her entire families, one after another. brother Edwin. Although the whole messy Cruelly, it could take years to kill, leavbusiness was meant to cure him, he died just ing people with plenty of time to try every two months after Mercy was exhumed. possible doctor’s prescription, tonic, elixir,

Letters to the editor . . . may be edited for clarity, length, or legal reasons. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication,

however names may be withheld from print upon request. Letters may be published on the Internet, in print, or both. Publication of letters by The Langley Advance should not be construed as endorsement of or agreement with the views expressed. Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic, or other forms.


Letters to the Editor

LangleyAdvance

Thanksgiving

Not all at table are thankful

heavy breasts, some may lose a leg or a Dear Editor, wing. Thanksgiving, a day to give thanks Some may not be properly stunned, and and gather with family and friends, is fall into the scalding hot water before their on people’s minds. Many, no doubt, will throats are slit. Imagine for a focus on the upcoming annual feast second if this were your dog or and their favourite trimmings. It cat – they all feel pain and sufis a tradition that is passed on to fering the same way, just like us. younger generations as well as to to the It is unbecoming for the newcomers. human species to express gratiWhile the intent of gathering tude by subjecting our fellow with loved ones with a traditional creatures with whom we share feast is a great way to celebrate, our earth to such a barbaric it’s ironic that many people will existence and death, simply for do so by killing an innocent palate pleasure and traditional animal – the turkey. Did anyone centerpieces. No matter how we bother to ask the victim if she try to cover up the depravity of this pracwanted to die for us so she can be the table tice, our souls will not be fooled. centrepiece? Why not leave behind this violent pracIt’s an odd way to show gratitude, don’t tice by trying one of the plant-based faux you think? turkey roasts, readily available at grocers? Today’s turkeys are forcibly inseminated Your body will be healthier for it, and most by having their legs clamped into metal forimportantly to the turkey, she will be grateceps. In humans, it is called rape. ful. It is a myth that animals feel less pain The Langley Herbivores is having our than humans; and no, God did not create Compassionate Thanksgiving Potluck this animals for us to eat. In Genesis, it’s called the Garden of Eden, not the Factory Farm or Saturday, 1-3 p.m., at St. Joachim and Ann Catholic Church in Aldergrove. If you wish Slaughterhouse of Eden. to participate, please email me at: pattallHumans have genetically bred turkeys to man@shaw.ca. grow breasts so large that they suffer leg and joint problems, and most cannot stand Patricia Tallman, Langley Herbivores or walk. They are debeaked at birth, without painkillers, a procedure akin to cutting Thanksgiving off our lips or fingers. The tips of their toes, including the toe nails are also cut off, without anesthesia, as well as their snoods. Dear Editor, They experience pain in their beaks, “Autumn Harvest” heads, and faces. They then languish in Colourful fall leaves surrounded the crowded conditions, and commercial turpumpkins on the dewy ground keys are routinely given antibiotics and horA crimson colour of the sky drew mones to survive the filth. many eyes to look to the east At 15 weeks, the deformed and disproCrackling beneath their feet portionate turkeys are grabbed roughly by a hard crunch was felt underfoot workers and stuffed into the transport truck. Leaves scattered everywhere colours galore Some may suffer broken limbs – that’s Bright orange like a strong hot sun the diswhere the utility grade comes in. play was enchanting to all those looking At the slaughterhouse, they are shackled Off in the distance the backdrop of the upside down in preparation for the stun mountains did not overshadow the bath. They flap in terror, and because their October thanksgiving bouquet on display. skeleton cannot support their abnormally Betsy Eadie

Letters

Editor

Bouquet on display

Appreciation

Bus drivers make positive difference

Dear Editor, Some of us seniors thought it would be a nice

idea to let the public know how much we appreciate the senior bus and drivers

Odd Thoughts

Ability to speak not ‘smart’

Dear Editor, My grandfather is the smartest man I know. I say that not to brag or waste your time, but to say I’ve never been insulted in such a way by an article. You implying that intelligence comes from the ability to speak insults all mute people, all stutterers, all non-speaking animals. If you have yet to see from my implicature, my grandfather is mute and has been for years. I’m sorry you rely on technology, but learn to redefine what “being smart” or intelligence is. It’s articles like this that have you working for a community paper and not soaring with online blogs. J. Patter, via email

Internet and phones destroying the world

Dear Editor, I enjoyed your column [No such thing as smart phones, Oct. 1 Odd Thoughts, Langley Advance], as I had a similar conversation this week about how internet/phone companies are changing/destroying our world. But it’ll take 10-15 years before more people become aware. A comment for your information is that BC Hydro is going to be charging an extra $35 per month for people to keep their old meters, starting in January. Thanks for your “odd thoughts.” Rob Williamson, via email

provided by the Langley Senior Resource Centre to transport us each Friday morning to our local Price Smart market for shopping. It has been a wonderful assistance for us that began shortly after the local IGA closed. We now also shop at No Frills, but access to another market and different choices are important for us. The volunteer drivers are extremely helpful, assisting us and our shopping carts on and off the bus. Both of the men are friendly and polite, and each has a wonderful sense of humour, so it is a pleasant journey. Several of us have notified the senior centre of our appreciation, but we think it would be helpful for others in the community to be aware of it also. Betty Reubart, Langley For more letters to the editor visit... www.langleyadvance.com – Click on Opinion.

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A11


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LangleyAdvance

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Prices are in effect until Monday, October 14, 2013 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

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Business

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A13

Health

Dealer helps deliver maternity centre

The owners of Langley Chrysler are contributing $100,000. by Heather Colpitts

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

Langley Memorial Hospital’s new maternity unit can’t come soon enough for staff. “Last week we had a full house at maternity,” noted Dr. David Chapman. Then two more women arrived, in labour. That’s why the $100,000 contribution by Trotman Auto Group and its dealership Langley Chrysler to the It All Starts Here maternity ward campaign was cause for a celebration on Oct. 8. “The entire continuum of maternity services is going to improve,” the doctor said. Mark Omelaniec is chairing the Langley Memorial Hospital Foundation maternity expansion campaign and said the foundation welcomes donations of all sizes as well as legacy contributions. The foundation must raise $5.35 million of the $11 million project and wants to have all the funds in place by the time the construction is done and the new maternity centres opens next spring.

He said it wasn’t a difficult sell when he spoke to the Trotmans about helping out. Their contribution brings the amount donated so far to $3.5 million. “We’ve been humbled by the significant level of support,” Omelaniec said. Langley Chrysler is one of five B.C. dealerships owned by Trotman Auto Group, which is made up of president Mike Trotman, and brothers Brad and Mitch. The Trotman brothers, all parents, say they are all users of the Langley hospital, as are many of their staff members and families. Contributing to health care is nothing new for the auto group and its staff. Over the past several years, the staff have held jeans Fridays and barbecues, raising about $18,000 for the hospital foundation. The $100,000 donation represents the largest charity commitment by Trotman Auto Group which also supports community groups such as DARE and sports teams. Mike explained that the company and staff opt for community-based and local causes – “a lot of stuff around children and families.” The auto group is about

to see its own family grow from its current five dealerships. “Langley Fiat is being added to the mix,” said Mike. Trotman Auto Group purchased Springman Saturn Saab, right next door on the Langley Bypass and will have a grand opening Nov. 1 as a new Fiat dealership. Mike said the deal gets the business a trained staff and an additional body shop to handle the workload.

Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance

Mark Omelaniec updated Brad Trotman, Mike Trotman and Mitch Trotman on the maternity expansion.

Friday, Oct. 11 to Monday, Oct. 14

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Shop in store and at thebay.com Cashmere and cashmere-blend sweaters exclude HUDSON’S BAY Outlet Store, 424 Fifth Lord & Taylor and items with 99¢ price endings. Women’s dresses exclude HUDSON’S BAY Outlet Store, Calvin Klein Reg. $175 and up. Men’s dress shirts and ties exclude HUDSON’S BAY Outlet Store, Hudson Room, Ted Baker, Linea In, Impuntura, Bugatti, Calvin Klein Collection, Hugo Boss, J. Lindeberg, Klauss Boehler, Pure, Robert Graham, Strellson, Van Gils, Victorinox, Zegna, Sterling, Thompson, Allegri, Andrew Marc, Sanyo, Coppley and Samuelsohn. LANCÔME: *Before taxes. Offer ends November 3, 2013. While quantities last. One gift to a customer. All selected items must be different. Values are based on our per ml and/or g price for regular-sized products. Online gift will vary. HUDSON’S BAY CREDIT CARD OFFER: Certain exclusions apply. See in store for details. Hudson’s Bay, Hudson’s Bay Credit, hbc.com and their associated designs are trademarks of Hudson’s Bay Company. Credit is extended by Capital One Bank (Canada Branch). Capital One® is a registered trademark of Capital One Financial Corporation. MasterCard and the MasterCard brand mark are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. All marks used under licence. All rights reserved.


A14

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Chamber of commerce

Rail safety and business excellence on agenda What’s in

Store Roxanne Hooper

rhooper@langleyadvance.com

Recent railway tragedies, such as the derailment in Lac-Megantic, Que. this summer that killed more than 40 people, makes rail safety in our community paramount in people’s minds. For that reason, the Greater Langley Chamber

of Commerce has invited CN Rail to provide information on rail safety in general, and along the rail corridors in Langley. Francois Boucher, general superintendent for CN’s B.C. south region, is the speaker at next week’s chamber dinner.

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The monthly meeting is Oct. 15 at Cascades Casino, with registration starting at 5 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:30. Admission is $35 for chamber members, $50 for non-members, and advanced registration is required by Friday, Oct. 11 by contacting the chamber.

Open late

Now, speaking of chamber happenings, October is a busy one for the folks at the local chamber. Tonight, for instance, they’re gathering for the monthly Open Late for Business series, where a business hosts a networking session. Today’s session, Thursday, Oct. 10, is being held at Domaine de Charberton Estate Winery at 1064 216th St.

The event – complete with a wine sampling and appetizers – runs from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. While it is free, the chamber staff ask that you RSVP.

Awards dinner

Staff are also gearing up for the 17th annual Celebration of Excellence. That event, which is used to honour excellence among local businesses, is set for Oct. 23. The awards evening provides an opportunity to celebrate Langley businesses and organizations that have made a significant contribution to the community spirit, service, and quality of life through leadership, innovation, and success, said chamber president Kristine Simpson. The event is in the ball-

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Young musicians

Two Langley businesses have joined forces in an unusual partnership that will showcase talented young musicians every weekend until March. The Wickertree, a furnishing company in the 20400 block of Langley Bypass, is working with folks at the nearby Tom Lee Music (on Fraser Highway, across from White Spot) to create a concert series every Saturday and Sunday. Here’s an example of thinking outside the box. The music store has set up a Yamaha grand piano that is in “centre court” at The Wickertree. Every weekend 12:30-2:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, there will be music performed for shoppers. It’s an innovative way to hopefully benefit all involved, especially the young musicians who may be performing in public for the first time. I like it, and it sure doesn’t hurt for the shoppers at The Wickertree, who can enjoy an enhanced ambiance.

Giving

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room of Cascades Casino, with the reception at 6 p.m. and the dinner and awards following at 7 p.m. Tickets are $75 each, and can be reserved by calling the chamber office at 604-530-6656 or info@ langleychamber.com.

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Service for the Needy is a new campaign by a local business to help out the Langley Food Bank. Holeshot Motorsports wants to donate at least 300 meals. “Anybody who has service work done in October, we’ll donate a meal,” said Alan Dekleer, with Holeshot. Dekleer was looking for a way to give back and chose to help people who need the services of the Langley Food Bank. About six years ago, the business moved from the Langley Bypass to Highway 1 and 200th Street. The business, open since 1984, deals in certain brands – Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and KTM, but services all makes. “However if people want to bring get service work done, we service all makes and models,” he said. To book an appointment and help the campaign, call 604-882-3800. People going for service are also welcome to bring along a non-perishable food or cash donation.


ArtsCulture & LangleyAdvance

Halloween

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A15

Grave Tales spins stories of Fort’s ghostly past

Ghoulies and ghosties aren’t strangers to Fort Langley.

of Hawaiian workers to the fur trade, or how a Catholic cross came to find a home on a Protestant church. The other type of tales are typically handed down by Matthew Claxton orally, and include sightmclaxton@langleyadvance.com ings of a wide variety of As one of the first places ghosts. European traders and setAs one of the oldest tlers set up shop in B.C., buildings in the area, the Fort Langley has its share Fort historic site itself has of ghostly stories. more than its share of Every year, tales of strange apparitions. burials, murders, sudden Nette Plant is one of the deaths, and spooks are three parks workers, with shared by interpreters with Christa Hanson and Amn the Fort Langley National Johal, who will be guiding Historic Site. visitors around the village, The Grave Tales Historic and she does have a few Walking Tours start on favourite stories. Oct. 12 and run to Oct. 30. The mysterious death The storof Louis ies are Rabasca roughly “His skeleton was dug was never divided into fully up by accident.” two types. solved. It Nette Plant First, might have there are been a the genuine murder, or historic tales and facts that a suicide, Plant said. the park interpreters will He suffered a further share with visitors as they indignity after his death. guide them around the vil“His skeleton was dug lage. up by accident,” she said. At cemeteries and historA crew building a rail ic buildings, they will talk bed dug into a ridge near about some of the early the Fort and three skelsettlers and First Nations etons tumbled out. One residents of the area. of them was identifiable The tales include those as Rabasca because of the that are somewhat grisly HBC blanket in which he’d – like an early murder, or been buried. a grisly medical procedHer other favourite ure endured by an HBC tale involves the story of employee – along with a ghostly woman heard tales of First Nations burial screaming upstairs in the practices, the importance big house of the Fort.

Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance

Nette Plant will lead visitors into the bastion at Fort Langley, a building where the windows allegedly sometimes open or close by themselves at night. The Grave Tales events will for the first time have a youth component this year. A separate tour, from Oct. 26 to 30, will start at 6 p.m. and will be for those younger than 17. Geared towards teens, they must still be accompanied by a parent. The change came about

by popular demand, said Nancy Hildebrand, the Fort’s director of marketing. “We found quite View a few people under 17 were interested in going on the tour,” she said. A lot of adults were asking if they could bring their teenaged chil-

dren, she said. The tour will be similar, but with a slightly shorter walk. The tour has with proved popular in the past, with up to 1,000 people taking time to go for the tour last year, Hildebrand said. Both versions of the tour conclude with a bonfire at

the Fort, including a hot drink and snacks. The adult version of the tour costs $15.10, the youth tour costs $11.70. For tickets to the adult tour, go to www. ticketweb.com, while for the youth version of the tour, call to make an advance reservation at 604-513-4799.

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A16

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR NEWSPAPER, YOUR LIFE.

National Newspaper Week October 6-12, 2013

Community newspapers

Growing from history to future Newspapers keep evolving with the communities they serve – as they always have. by Bob Groeneveld editor@langleyadvance.com

The Langley Advance doesn’t look much like it did in the 1930s – no community newspaper that’s been around that long does. For one thing, we didn’t have websites back then. We didn’t have Facebook pages or maintain Twitter feeds. And we certainly didn’t have Layar’s “augmented reality” buried in our pages. We keep changing, growing with our communities, but you will continue to count on us to provide you with your community’s news. Community journalism will remain with us as long as we are human beings. Before predicting the future of community newspapers, you need to look back… certainly back before the Langley Advance came into existence 82 years

ago… before lead type and printing presses churned out community announcements, local news reports, and advertisements for local businesses. The story goes back before Gutenburg built the printing press that changed – but did not create – modern communication. Indeed, the vast majority of common folk would not be literate today if it weren’t for Gutenberg – although, nearly all of what was printed on his press for common people – in the context of community news, at least – was political cartoons… because so few people could read in the 1400s. Official, trustworthy news was presented by town criers and local clergy – the community news reporters who became the writers and editors of the newspapers that eventually sprouted up all over, as people started realizing the communications possibilities of Gutenberg’s press. But the roots of modern community journalism go a long way back beyond Gutenberg and town criers – so far back that we really have to guess at what

might have been the first hunter/gatherers from “news” stories. 25,000 years ago. Some archaeologists Community journalhave come to the concluism is much more than sion that the drawings on the notices of upcomthe walls of the Lascoux ing charity barbecues caves in France – and that you find in our others – are actually Websites and electronic media have become an extension of the Community Links hunting stories – stories pages. It’s much more newspapers that continue to keep their communities informed. in picture form, passed than news reports about along to inform fellow hunters car crashes and follies of local Middle Ages reverently penned, where and how to stalk and kill politicians. It is more than how with baroquely perfect letters the best meat-providing animals. on vellum, their current affairs well – or how poorly – a local They probably were news storbusiness – or the entire local – which became our history. ies, with details of heroic or economy – is doing. Today, reporters have digital particularly productive hunts, or It’s not just about the murders cameras and write their stories maybe they were feature stories, committed, or the perpetrators with electronic tools. outlining the neighbourhood’s caught, or the police work in But whether they are written seasoned hunters’ most successbetween. It’s not about the good on a cave or pyramid wall or on ful techniques, explaining how things people do, and it’s cera dusty scroll or in the newsyou, too, could bring down a tainly not about the bad things paper on your doorstep – or on mighty musk ox or a five-point they do. the viewscreen of your iPad or buck. It’s about all of those things – maybe projected on the inside Like today’s community jourand in being all of those things, of your skull from an implanted nalists, the artists were capit is much more than all of them. microchip – the stories are all turing the events of their day Community journalism is the essentially the same, and they and writing them on the cave community communicating with always will be. walls… just as Egyptian priests itself. And community newsThey are the stories of our chronicled the feats and accompapers have been – and continue existence as a community plishments of each Pharaoh’s to be – at the heart of that com– whether the community is generation and wrote them on munication. Langley, or an abbey in norththe walls of his (or her) crypt… Community newspapers identiern Germany, or the capital city just as monks and scribes of the fies us. of ancient Egypt, or a tribe of

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Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance

Demonstrations

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A17

Nature

Check out visual artists at work New park dedicated An artists group celebrates two decades of creativity in Fort Langley with an exhibit at Langley Centennial Museum. The inside of Langley Centennial Museum is decorated with local art throughout October and into early November. The Fort Langley Artists Group (FLAG) celebrates its 20th anniversary with Passages and Reflections: A Unifying Retrospective of FLAG, 19932013 at the museum at 9135 King Street. The exhibit runs Sept. 19 to Nov. 3. The show features 2D and 3D works from 23 artists, including 19 current members and four founding members, including

Margo Harrison, who is both a founding and current member. Artists demonstrations are being held on Saturdays up to Nov. 2. Evolving from the group “Artists At Work” in 1993, FLAG has worked to promote Fort Langley as a centre for the arts and to raise awareness of works produced by local artists. Over the past 20 years, FLAG has held close to 60 shows at their gallery in Fort Langley’s CN Station. Almost all of these shows have challenged FLAG members to produce work based on a theme. This past Saturday, Oct. 5, Harrison put her sculpting skills on display, starting with a lump of earthenware clay and handbuilding a cat sculpture Also this past Saturday, Beverly Lawrence created animals in clay using sculpting and slabs.

Upcoming demos include: • Saturday, Oct. 12: Vivian Harder and Robin Bandenieks. Both artists use oil paints, but paint in two distinctly different styles using different methods of getting the paint onto the canvas. • Saturday, Oct. 19: Mary-Ann Snell, watercolour, and Alison Philpott who does detailed coloured pencil drawing of stones using layering and blending. • Saturday, Oct. 26: Kathleen Gaitt, mixed media on paper, and Marguerite Whelton, watercolours. • Saturday, Nov. 2: Candice Perry Moen will be conducting a dry point printmaking workshop using non-toxic inks and Plexiglass and a small printing press. Donna Leavens will show how useful pen and watercolor are for creating plein air works. Louise Swan will add “realism to your paintings” using either oils or acrylics.

Music

Visiting quartet performs the masters The music school hosts a renowned quartet this month.

Masterpieces by German composers Beethoven and Brahms are the basis for the

Oct. 19 concert by the New Oxford String Quartet. The Langley Community Music School (LCMS) show in the Rose Gellert Hall starts at 7:30 p.m. “The audience will hear two big

masterpieces written by German giants, Beethoven and Brahms,” said Elizabeth Bergmann, artistic director concerts for LCMS. The group’s repertoire spans works over more than 200 years but the quartet also makes a

special point to promote Canadian composers and will include such works in the show. Tickets are $30 for adults, $25 for seniors, and $20 for students. For tickets call 604-5342848. The Rose Gellert Hall is at 4899 207th St.

Lynn Fripps Park will official open Oct. 15. The memory of a Langley woman who was dedicated to children, the community, and to improving the lives of those with cancer will live on in a new park which is being named in her honour this month. Lynn Fripps Park will be officially opened by Township of Langley Council at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15. The park is located next to the new Lynn Fripps Elementary School, at 21021 81A Ave. in Willoughby. “Lynn was an outstanding, optimistic community volunteer who was committed to improving the lives of those around her,” said Township Mayor Jack Froese. “She made a huge impact on our community and we are pleased to be naming this park in her honour.” Fripps was a member of the Aldergrove Community Enhancement Society, Aldergrove Revitalization Committee, Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society, and was instrumental in forming Aldergrove Neighbourhood Services. A wife and mother of three, she was involved in her children’s school and local sports team and coached

swimming. She was passionate about environmental protection and promoted breastfeeding education. In 1999, Fripps was diagnosed with breast cancer. She poured her energy and talent into improving life for others in the same situation, doing extensive fundraising for the Candian Breast Cancer Foundation and the Canadian Cancer Society. She also created the Shower of Thanks Campaign, encouraging those with the disease to send notes of appreciation to cancer researchers. Fripps passed away in October of 2005 but her efforts to improve the quality of life for residents in the Township of Langley continue to be remembered throughout the community. Her family, friends, and members of the public are encouraged to attend the opening of the new Lynn Fripps Park, which will serve the community and commemorate Fripp’s contributions for generations to come. The new Lynn Fripps Park features two soccer fields, a softball diamond, and a children’s playground. It shares hard court surfaces with Lynn Fripps Elementary School, which was also named in her honour when it opened in September of 2012.

National Newspaper Awareness Week is the perfect time to celebrate a community partner as wonderful as The Langley Advance! But truly, their contributions to the residents and businesses of Langley are appreciated year-round. We have worked with The Langley Advance for many years, and have built a strong relationship based on dependability and results.The customer support we receive from the Advance team is matched only by the tremendous value we receive for our advertising dollars. The Good Life section each month is a fantastic resource for seniors in Langley, reminding us all of the joys and laughter we share at any age.And as a business in North Langley, we find the twice-monthly Walnut Grove Marketplace a terrific way to tell our neighbors about events here at Chartwell Langley Gardens … like our annual Senior Star competition and our popular Christmas Craft Fair. From all of us here at Chartwell Langley Gardens Retirement Community,THANK YOU to The Langley Advance for 82 amazing years of service to the Langley community!

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A18

Arts & Culture

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Community events

LangleyAdvance

Cranberry Festival is this Saturday – sweet Berry sales, goodies, kids fun and performers are on the bill. by Heather Colpitts

hcolpitts@langleyadvance.com

The Cranberry Festival organizers are trying to make it easier for the public to get around this year by having shuttle services to and from various pickup points. Why, because an event that attracts thousands of people into a small area also means there are parking limitations. There are shuttlebus

pickup/drop-off points at Walnut Grove Secondary and at Trinity Western University. There will be four buses travelling between these sites and the festival which runs 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12 and is organized through the Fort Langley Business Improvement Association. Users will be dropped off at either Francis and Glover Roads or on 96th Avenue. “Both locations will have a bus ready by 9:30 a.m. for guests. Each location will have approximately 20 minutes between pick-ups,” explained Eric

Woodward, one of the organizers. There is also a mini-bus doing runs between the festival and Langley Fine Arts School which has offered up its parking lot for public use during the festival. “The last bus will leave Fort Langley at 4:30 p.m. for all locations,” Woodward noted. That means one less issue people have to deal with so they are free up to enjoy the annual celebration to the tart and tangy berry. And will there be berries. “We have about 7,500

pounds provided by Ocean Spray again this year,” he noted. In addition to fresh berry sales in front of the Fort Langley Community Hall, there will be lots to do, see and eat. There are more than 70 vendors at the marketplace and entertainment throughout the day. The performers list for Saturday includes: • Scott Mackenzie Band & Stonehenge • Happy 2 B Hear • The Horvat Family • The Flying Ritas • The Seabillys • Michaela Gallant & Sandor Hah

In Honour of International Newspaper Carrier Day on October 12, 2013 The Langley Advance would like to thank all our newspaper carriers for making an important contribution to our community. We value the work you do!

• Tallya & Cornel Dyke • The VIDOS • Emma & Vic Alves • Amanda Marino • Mackenzie Kuettel • Savannah Quinn • Earl Taylor The pancake breakfast kicks off the day at 8:30 a.m. on Church Street between Mavis and Mary Avenues. There are kids activities in the area between Mary Avenue and Glover Road. As well, the Fort Langley National Historic site has half-price admission that day as well as heritage activities. Berries from this fort were shipped to help scurvy-ridden gold prospectors in the 1840s and 1850s. There will be canoe

NEW

races on the Bedford Channel. A good place to watch is Marina Park. The Fort Wine Co. will also be sampling new vinegars and jellies, Sky Helicopters is offering aerial tours of the cranberry bogs and Fort Langley (for a minimum fee of $20) and lots of local businesses will have their cranberrybased products available at the marketplace. When it’s time to take a load off, head to St. Andrew’s United Churchh, 9125 Glover Rd. The church has a luncheon of roast turkey on a bun with cranberries, as well as hot dogs, home baking and fall flowers from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 12.

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Remember our heroes... Remembrance Day Do you have someone close to you who has served or is currently serving in the armed forces? We would like to recognize their extraordinary sacrifice and inspiring efforts in our Annual Remembrance Day feature November 7th, 2013.

SAM

PLE

Albert Harold Leader Aug. 20, 1947 - Aug. 15, 2010 Born in Vancouver, B.C. Proudly served with the Canadian Scottish Regiment. Enlisted Sept. 15, 1939. Was wounded in France on Aug. 15, 1944. He was sent to England to recoup & was shipped home on the Lady Nelson the end of Feb. 1945. Received his discharge May 1945. Rank Sgt.

Please send a photo along with name and pertinent information before November 1, 3:00 pm to: REMEMBRANCE DAY PHOTOS c/o Langley Advance #112-6375 - 202nd St., Langley, BC V2Y 1N1 or email photo to: bcoulbourn@ langleyadvance.com

Photos on file from previous years will be published again this year space permitting. Photos submitted may be used by the Langley Advance at our discretion


today’shomes LangleyAdvance

Real estate

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A19

Housing sales bounce back to near normal levels

Langley saw a lot of houses change hands over the past month. by Matthew Claxton

mclaxton@langleyadvance.com

Housing sales and construction were steady or increased in September compared to recent months in the Lower Mainland. The sales of every type of housing in Langley was up this September compared to the same month a

year ago, with some types of housing seeing large increases. For example, 103 detached houses sold last month, compared to 66 a year earlier, and 70 townhouses sold, up 133.3 per cent from the 30 that sold in 2012. While the number of houses and condos sold was slightly down from August, the sale of townhouses spiked so much it was up more than 20 per cent from the previous month. According to the Fraser

Valley Real Estate Board, sales activity numbers are edging closer to “typical levels.” Regionally, there were 1,131 home sales processed through the Multiple Listing Service in September from Delta to Abbotsford and Mission. “It is good news however, it’s important to put the increase into context,” said Ron Todson, president of the FVREB. “Our home sales in September went from the worst in 10 years to just below our 10year average.”

Construction workers are building new townhouses and condos in Willoughby.

Troy Landreville Langley Advance

He said first time homebuyers may be just now returning to the market after the federal government tightened mortgage insurance restrictions about a year ago. Despite the increase in sales activity, prices were relatively stable in most areas, and the aver-

age price for all types of housing actually dropped by 1.1 per cent, from $487,660 to $482,203 over a year. The housing market is still considered to favour buyers over sellers, according to FVREB statistics. Home construction

remained stable compared to last year in the Vancouver region, which includes Langley. The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) said there were 1,731 homes of all types that started construction last month, compared to 1,716 last year.

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TRILOGY CLUB UNVEILING CELEBRATION ON OCT. 26TH NOON - 4PM. Don’t miss out on the unveiling of the 9,369 sq.ft. Trilogy Club! Enjoy live music in the New York Pub Style Lounge and live demonstrations in the Chef Kitchen. Plus get a chance to win a $500 Shopping Spree for Willowbrook Mall, $250 for Best Buy plus 20 other great prizes. RSVP today!

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*Prices and incentives are subject to change and may be withdrawn without prior notice. 8 ready to move-in homes are in phase 1 and 2. 35 homes under $220,000 are in phases 1, 2 and 3. You must be present at the time of draw to claim a prize or the next name will be drawn. E.&O.E. Sales and Marketing by Fifth Avenue Real Estate Marketing Ltd. www.fifthave.ca


A20

today’shomes

Thursday, October 10, 2013

LangleyAdvance

Questions & Answers

Terrace demands low, hardy hedge Dear Anne,

I

Bullying damages our kids.

Do something about it. CIBC and United Way are preventing bullying. Join us. uwlm.ca/preventbullying

Eva, via email

t would be useful to check with your neighbours who have similar south-west exposures and find out what winters are like in your location. Do their planters ever freeze? Are there high winds from the west? Is your building very close to the coast? There are some evergreen flowering, fragrant shrubs (like ceanothus) which would surely tempt you, but it needs a warm, sheltered spot. The sides of containers are very vulnerable to freezing, and containerized plants need to be one zone hardier than ones planted in the open garden.

In the Garden by Anne Marrison

Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@shaw.ca

Box (Buxus microphylla) usually grows three to four feet tall, is dense, and needs little pruning. It likes sun, but needs watering in dry spells. There are many varieties of box, but B. microphylla is one of the hardiest. Junipers should also do well in your situation. Most are very hardy and drought-resistant. Some are dwarf. Some other evergreen shrubs don’t meet all of your criteria, but are so nice you might be tempted. Cotoneaster dammeri is evergreen and dense, and its white flowers in spring are followed by red berries. Normally it’s about 30 centimetres (one foot) tall, but there are taller forms. Another which you might like so much that you decide to plunge for a one-foot hedge is Daphne cneorum. Pronounced “neeorum,” its common name is the Garland Flower.

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“I recently moved into a top-floor Vancouver condo with a lovely terrace which faces west and south, making it extremely hot. “I shall have a planter of about three metres (10 feet) length and 60 centimetres (24 inches) depth. “What type of budgetpriced hedging would be suitable? I need something evergreen, heat-tolerant, with dense growth, but not in constant need of pruning, and having a maximum height one to 1.2 metres (three to four feet). “Scent/flowers would be a miracle addition.”

Bob Groeneveld/Langley Advance

Lavendar can be useful as a low containerized hedge, adding both bright colour and a beautiful scent. It produces hugely fragrant pink flowers, has small evergreen leaves, spreads to a metre or slightly more across, and is prairie-hardy (Zone 2). It’s likely to end up overflowing the sides of the planter. It is so popular, that it’s usually the most inexpensive of the daphnes. Some daphnes are taller. Daphne retusa grows about 60 centimetres (about two feet) tall. It has very fragrant pink-purple flowers in spring, followed by red (but poisonous) berries. Santolina is an herb with non-edible fragrant foliage. It’s a bushy evergreen shrub (some kinds are green-leaved, others grey). This can grow to about 45 centimetres (a foot and a half) in good conditions. It’s a drought-resistant sunlover which would need pruning about once a year. Santolina’s flowers are borne in yellow clusters. Other sun-loving,

drought-resistant herbs include sage and taller forms of lavender. Even rosemary ‘Hardy Arp’ might work in your location. It must be ‘Hardy Arp’ however, which is said to be root-hardy to Zone 6. Frankly, the rosemary is a long shot. But it is very fragrant and flowers in spring. Sage and rosemary need frequent pruning, but both can be useful in the kitchen. Bamboo is another possibility. I have seen it grown very successfully in containers, but you’d need a dwarf, clumping kind. Bamboo would enjoy the sun, but would need a lot of water in summer. It would need root pruning every few years. I hope this has given you a few ideas, Eva. The box and juniper are the most fuss-free. Spring is the time when all these plants will be easiest to find.

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Thursday, October 10, 2013

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

DS 1ST N E 3 R ER E F B OF CTO O

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HELP GET KIDS INTO THE GAME!

P.K. SUBBAN Montreal Canadiens Defenceman and Hyundai Hockey Helper

Last year Hyundai Hockey Helpers helped over 1,800 kids get in the game and is working hard to help even more this year. Visit your local Hyundai dealer in October to help get a kid into the game. Join us online and take the Hyundai 1,000 Puck Challenge to improve your game AND help kids in your community play hockey.

TAKE THE PLEDGE AT HYUNDAIHOCKEY.CA 5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty†† 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

HyundaiCanada.com

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Sonata Limited Auto/Santa Fe Sport 2.0T Premium AWD Auto with an annual finance rate of 0%/0%/0.99% for 96/24/96 months. Bi-weekly payments are $82/$505/$168. $0/$0/$900 down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0/$0/$1,358. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,550/$1,650/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual for $16,999 (includes $500 in price adjustments) at 0% per annum equals $82 bi-weekly for 96 months for a total obligation of $16,999. Cash price is $16,999. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,550. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. !Fuel consumption for 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.2L/100KM; City 7.1L/100KM)/Sonata Limited Auto (HWY 5.6L/100KM; City 8.7L/100KM)/Santa Fe Sport 2.0T Premium AWD Auto (HWY 8.4L/100KM, City 11.0L/100KM) are based on Energuide. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. "Price of models shown: 2013 Elantra Limited/ Sonata Limited (includes $4,500 price adjustment)/Santa Fe Sport 2.0T Limited AWD are $24,849/$26,149/$40,259. Prices include Delivery and Destination charges of $1,550/$1,650/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. ΩPrice adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $10,000/$500/$4,500 available on 2013 Genesis 5.0L GDI R-Spec (on cash purchases only)/Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Sonata Limited Auto. Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. #Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). †Ω"Offers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions.

TM

Langley Hyundai 19459 Langley Bypass, Surrey, 604-539-8549 PAPERTO INSERT DEALERTAG HERE

D#30331


Arts & Culture

LangleyAdvance Langley’s best guide for what’s happening around town.

Storytime – Wednesdays to Oct. 16, 10:30 a.m.

What’s What

• Fort Langley Library 9167 Glover Rd. 604-888-0722 Storytime – Thursdays, Oct. 3-24, 10 a.m.

October 8, 2013

• Murrayville Library 22071 48th Ave. 604-533-0339 Babytime – A 30-minute session focused on speech and language skills and featuring movement, singing and rhyming with stories. Registration required. 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, Oct. 3-17.

For more of What’s What, visit www.langleyadvance.com

familyfestivities

• Cranberry Festival Luncheon – The United Churches of Langley has a luncheon with roast turkey on a bun with cranberries, hot dogs, home baking and fall flowers 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 12 at St. Andrew’s United Church, 9025 Glover Rd.

tradeshows

• Fort Langley Farmers Market: Every Saturday until Oct. 12 at St. Andrew’s United Church, 9025 Glover Rd., 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: www.fortlangleyvillagefarmersmarket.org. Info: www.bcfarmersmarket.org. • Heritage Market – The Fort Langley Heritage Market is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 14 in St. Andrew’s United Church on Glover Road. Features antiques, collectibles and crafts. Fundraiser for the church. Info: 604-888-0135.

librarybookings

Programs are free. Pre-registration is required unless noted otherwise. • Aldergrove Library 26770 29th Ave. 604-856-6415 Storytime – Children five and under and their caregivers will enjoy interactive stories, songs, rhymes, and more. Wednesdays to Oct. 16, 10:30 a.m. • Brookswood Library 20045 40th Ave. 604-534-7055

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Langley Advance 112-6375 202 Street Langley, BC V2Y 1N1 RE: The Value of Advertisements in the Langley Advance

• Walnut Grove Library 8889 Walnut Grove Dr. 604-882-0410 Storytime – Thursdays, Oct. 3-24, 11:30 a.m. eBooks and technology: Sign up for a free session on using ebooks, downloading to it and other devices and the library’s digital resources. Bring devices. 7 p.m., Oct. 10.

historyrevisited

It is with true sincerity that we write this letter in support of the Langley Advance to help recognize National Newspaper Awareness Week. Mark Anthony Academy of Cosmetology has been advertising within the Lower Mainland Publishing community newspapers for many years and continues to find satisfaction in our returnon-investment. As a school that offers a variety of comprehensive Diploma Programs in Cosmetology, we have a potential student base that extends well outside the Langley borders. Through working with the Langley Advance and the Lower Mainland Publishing group of newspapers, we have the ability to hit multiple markets, including Surrey, White Rock, Abbotsford, and Maple Ridge, within a medium that is a relevant and trustworthy source of news in each individual market. Placing our ads amongst this type of quality content also adds credibility of our products and services – one could say, “guilt-by-association.” The fact that we are seen in a wellknown publication adds weight and authority to our advertising claims. When we put an ad out, whether it is in the Langley Advance, Surrey Now, or the Abbotsford Times - we get results! By offering special discounts within our advertisements we are able to track from where our students are coming while offering them incentive and savings at the same time. We can analyze the response from the ads and can estimate that a good percentage of our students seen our brand in the newspaper. Additionally, this tracking has also assisted us in identifying pockets of opportunity we have not before suspected as potential students or customers.

• Langley Centennial Museum, 9135 King St., 604-888-3922 Artist demonstrations: Stop by the Langley Centennial Museum to meet artists as part of the Fort Langley Artists Group (FLAG) show Passages and Reflections which runs to Nov. 3. Saturday demos are noon to 4 p.m. until Nov. 3. Oct. 12: painters Vivian Harder and Robyn Bandenieks. Free.

Lastly, the physical presence of the newspaper as a tangible item I can hold in my hands means a lot to me as an advertiser and a reader. This form of news continues to offer me an experience each time I read while offering my brand the opportunity for multiple viewings through a one-time investment which ultimately leads potential students to take steps to learn more about our school.

• Surrey Museum 17710 56A Ave., 604-592-6956 Meeting – The meeting is Oct. 12 at 10 a.m. After, Ryan Gallagher has a presentation, Bill Hastings Surrey, and a collection of photos from the 1960s. Info: 604-576-9734. What’s What? listings are free. To be considered for publication in the Langley Advance, items must be submitted at least 10 days prior to the publication date. What’s What? appears in the Thursday edition and at www.langleyadvance.com.

When we need results we turn to the Langley Advance. The staff makes it easy for us to place an advertisement by being available when I need them and always keeping our goals and budget restraints in mind. Sincerely, Launie Morgan, Senior Educational Administrator Mark Anthony Academy of Cosmetology 5735-203 Street in Langley

5735-203 Street Langley, BC V3A 8A7

(604) 630-4678

info@maacademy.ca

p i h s r o W f o Your Place Apostolic Church of God (Seventh Day)

Sundays 10 am with KidStreet 20581-36 Ave. Langley 604-530-5440

Join us at our new location: 20178 96th Ave. in Langley Weekly Services: Sundays at 10am / Wednesdays Family Night at 6:45pm 604.539.9673 • riversidecalvary.com

BrookswoodBaptist.com Kids’ Club—Thursdays, 6:30-8:00pm Mommy & Me—Fridays, 9:00am-11:00

Sabbath Services Saturday 11am 24497 Fraser Hwy. 604.607.6599

Langley Gospel Hall 4775 - 221st Street

ph 604-533-0870

Langley Presbyterian Church

Family Gospel Hour every Sunday 11:30 a.m.

Sunday Mornings @ 10:00 AM

MOUNTAINVIEW ALLIANCE CHURCH 7640 - 200th St. Ph: 604-530-2662 Vietnamese Fellowship @ 6:30 pm

20867 - 44 Avenue 604-530-3454

SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 AM, 11 AM, 6 PM

21277 56th Ave | 604.530.7344

info@clachurch.com | www.clachurch.com Traslación en espanol disponible.

Join us in welcoming our new Minister, Rev. Dennis Howard. 10:00 am Worship Service with Sunday School www.langleypresbyterian.ca

Church of the ASCENSION Sundays at 11 a.m. AN ANGLICAN NETWORK PARISH

George Preston Recreation Centre

20699 42nd Avenue, Langley

7:30pm Wednesdays - Sharing & Praise

Christ College, 19533 64th Ave www.ascensionlangley.ca

778-574-6525

bishopronferris@ymail.com

To a d v e r t i s e o n t h i s p a g e … C a l l C h e r i 6 0 4 - 9 9 4 - 1 0 3 7 c g r a y @ l a n g l e ya d va n c e . c o m

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LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

October 6th - 12th

es! liv

Smo k

larms save ea

Fire PrPrevent evention Week Kitchen Fires

Put a Lid on Kitchen Fires “How often has the doorbell rung or a child interrupted you while you were cooking, causing you to forget about the chicken you left sizzling on the stove - until smoke filled the house?” Asks Captain Dave Sanders, Fire Prevention Officer, Langley City Fire Rescue Service.

Fires” reminds us that leaving cooking unattended and other unsafe kitchen practices are a recipe for disaster.

Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of three feet (one metre) around the stove.

Often when the fire department is called to a cooking-related fire, the residents tell them they only left the kitchen for a few minutes. Sadly, that’s all it takes for a dangerous fire to start. The bottom line is that

If you have a fire in your microwave, turn it off immediately and keep the door closed. Never open the door until the fire is completely out. If in doubt, get out of the home and call 911.

If this scenario or a similar one sounds familiar to you, you may want to think about Always keep an it a little more because oven mitt and a it’s likely that you, proper fitting lid a friend or family nearby. If a small member has run grease fire starts in the risk of having a a pan, smother the dangerous fire. The flames by carefully Langley City Fire sliding the lid over Rescue Service Fire the pan (make sure Prevention Officer you are wearing the often talks to people oven mitt). Turn off about the ways they the burner. Do not can stay safe in their move the pan. To homes. Too often, keep the fire from they have that talk restarting, do not after they’ve suffered a Smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. remove the lid until damaging fire. it is completely there’s really no safe period of cool. Never pour water on a “It’s my hope that people time for the cook to step away grease fire as the results can reading this article won’t be disastrous. If the fire does from a hot stove. A few key have to learn the hard way. not go out, get out of the points to remember. If I could give just one fire home and call 911. warning, I’d say - Don’t TIPS SAFETY leave cooking unattended.” If an oven fire starts, turn Stay in the kitchen when Why? Because cooking is the off the heat and keep the door you are cooking. If you must leading cause of home fires, closed. If the fire does not go leave the room even for a according to the National get out, out of the home and short period of time, turn off Fire Protection Association call 911. the stove. (NFPA). Langley City Fire Rescue Service is joining forces with NFPA and thousands of other fire departments across North America to commemorate Fire Prevention Week, October 6-12th. The theme this year, “Prevent Kitchen

When cooking food, check it regularly and use a timer to remind you. Keep cooking areas clean and clear of combustibles (e.g. potholders, towels, rags, drapes and food packaging).

A cooking fire can quickly turn deadly. “I have seen too many homes destroyed and people killed or injured by fires that could have been easily avoided. Please heed these simple safety rules” says Captain David Sanders.

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Sports LangleyAdvance

Junior football

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A25

Foster sets records as Rams cream Huskers

The Langley Rams stomped the Valley Huskers in their final game of the BCFC regular season.

League (15) record for most sacks in a single season. His CJFL record-breaking 16th sack of the season came on the final play of the game. The record has a special place in the heart of Kirby, who doubles as Langley’s defensive line coach. by Troy Landreville “Everyone knew there was tlandreville@langleyadvance.com a possibility [for the Canadian To Ted Kirby, there is no such record to be broken] and for it thing as a mean-nothing game. to happen on the last play of The Langley Rams head coach the game, the whole team went bristled a little at the suggescrazy. They went nuts,” Kirby tion that Saturday’s game at said. “He’s a captain, he’s a Chilliwack’s Exhibition Stadium leader, and he’s such an unselfagainst the Valley Huskers – the ish player.” final contest of the B.C. Football So unselfish, Foster told Kirby Conference regular season for that he didn’t care about the recboth teams – had little impact ords. one way or another. “He puts the team on his The junior Rams entered the back,” Kirby said. “He puts a day with a 6-3 record and were ferociousness into every play. going to finish third in the BCFC He’s an amazing kid, on and off standings, no matter what the the field.” outcome. And when Foster picked off an They had no chance of catching errant pass and started on a 70the frontrunning VI Raiders from yard journey to the end zone late Nanaimo or Okanagan Sun from in the second quarter, he had a Kelowna, who both entered the convoy of teammates by his side weekend with 7-2 records. to block for him. And with identical 2-6-1 marks “Evan, for a defensive lineman, going into their respective regular is an extremely in-shape man, season finales, but at the end of both the Huskers the run he was and Kamloops hoping for oxy“Getting confidence Broncos were far gen,” Kirby said. back in our players… behind the Rams. Foster also I considered it one of The Rams did added two solo as expected, tackles, three the most important hammering the assisted tackles, games of the year.” Huskers 59-24 and one forced Ted Kirby in a game highfumble to his lighted by a pertotals. formance for the “It was one of ages by star defensive lineman the most dominating defensive Evan Foster. performances ever,” Kirby said. And Kirby couldn’t be happier. Foster wasn’t the only member “It was a very meaningful game of the Rams’ front-four who ran for us because we didn’t perform an interception back for a touchvery well off against VI,” Kirby down on the day. said, referring to the Rams’ 22Brandon Klein also accom12 home field loss to the Raiders plished the feat, picking off the the previous Saturday, Sept. 28. ball and taking it 25 yards to pay “Getting confidence back in our dirt. players… I considered it one of On the season as a whole, the most important games of the there were several standouts. year.” Kicker Steve Thomas booted a Kirby added, “That’s the ques35-yard field goal and added five tion: do you rest guys or do converts against the Huskers. you go in [to the playoffs] with He easily led the BCFC in points momentum? It didn’t matter who with 102 (20 more than the secwe played, we were going to go ond leading point-getter, VI kickin and play as hard as we could, er Ryan Jones), field goals with and show that we’re ready to 14, and converts with 49. execute in the playoffs.” Running back Kyle Albertini led Plus, records were at stake. the league in rushing yards with With four sacks, Foster broke 838. both the BCFC (previously 12.5) Quarterback Jahlani Gilbertand Canadian Junior Football Knorren finished fifth in the

Langley Rams defensive back Steven Martinez tracked down Valley Huskers receiver Cody Vinnish during Saturday’s B.C. Football Conference game at Exhibition Stadium in Chilliwack. Vinnish finished with seven receptions for 132 yards in a losing cause as the Huskers fell 59-24 to the Rams to finish off the regular season. Paul J. Henderson Glacier Media

BCFC in rushing with 571 yards on the ground, and led all players with 12 rushing touchdowns. He also threw the ball for 1,945 yards and 21 touchdowns. Looking back at Saturday’s game, the Rams led 17-0 after the first quarter, 38-17 at halftime, and 52-17 after three quarters of play. The teams scored seven points each in the final quarter. Nathan Lund ran the ball for 179 yards and three touchdowns. His longest run covered 91 yards. Receiver Kyle Pich caught two touchdown passes while fellow pass-catcher Malcolm Williams hauled in one touchdown reception. Pich has recovered from a shoulder injury and is, Kirby said, “one of the most talented receivers we have.” Backup kicker Matt Riley saw game action, kicking one field goal and three converts.

Post-season upon us

The Rams will travel to Kelowna’s Apple Bowl to take on the Sun on Sunday, Oct. 13 in the BCFC semifinal. The Sun and Raiders both won over the weekend and finished with 8-2 marks, but the Raiders had a better points for/against ratio during the season series between the teams, which secured them top spot. Meanwhile, this Sunday marks the Rams 25th consecutive playoff appearance.

Historically the Rams play well If the Rams win this Sunday in Kelowna, and have won more in Kelowna, then it’s back to games in the Apple Bowl than Caledonia Park in Nanaimo on any team in league history. Oct. 19 (barring a Kamloops The Rams and Sun have a long semifinal upset win over the playoff history. Raiders on Sunday) for a repeat The teams went head to head of last year’s BCFC championship in the BCFC championship game game. for six straight seasons, 1990In the event the Rams win the 1995, with the Rams winning Cullen Cup (BCFC title) again, four of the contests. they would travel east for the The Sun beat Jostens Canadian the Rams 13-1 semifinal on Oct in the 1995 title 26 against the game and won Ontario Football the next four Conference playoff games champion. between the two A win in the teams, all B.C. Jostens game semifinal matchwould put the ups. Rams back in the The Rams and national chamSun returned to pionship game the BCFC chamfor the second pionship game year in a row. in 2005, when The title game the Rams scored will be played on the final play Nov. 9 at the of the game to home of Prairie take a 31-27 Conference Langley Advance files victory at the champions from Evan Foster is now both the B.C. Apple Bowl. Saskatchewan. Football Conference and Canadian The last Kirby isn’t Junior Football League record-holder playoff game looking that far for most quarterback sacks in a between the ahead. His and season, with 16. teams was the his team’s sole 2011 B.C. semifocus is the Sun. final in Kelowna, again going “There’s no tomorrow,” he down to the final seconds when a said. “If we win, we get to play Sun two-point convert attempt to again; if we lose, we’re going tie and force overtime was denied golfing. I can’t get to Kelowna by the Rams’ defence. soon enough.”

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A26

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Minor football

Sports

LangleyAdvance

Bears blanked by Meadow Ridge visitors

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There were quite a few bright spots in North Langley peewee squad’s 12-0 loss to Meadow Ridge.

While they came out on the short end of a 12-0 score, the North Langley Bears put in a full effort against Meadow Ridge Gold Knights in peewee football action Saturday at McLeod Stadium. Another strong defensive performance from the Bears led by Jacob Evans and Jedakai Hurley kept the game close right to the end. The momentum changed several times and the halftime score was 6-0 for the Knights. The Bears’ offence was having a hard time finding much room to move but Brian Pol and Marcus

North Langley Bears quarterback Jaxon Stebbings was about to hand the ball off to running back Brian Pol during peewee football action Saturday at McLeod Stadium. The Bears were blanked 12-0 by the visiting Meadow Ridge Gold Knights. Stang had some great blocks and runs. Jaxon Stebbings made a couple of nice completions and Jesse Nielsen had a few impressive kick returns. Junior bantam Bears There was little to cheer about during the Bears 54-7 loss to the Abbotsford Falcons Saturday afternoon.

The Falcons used a punishing ground game to hammer a Bears team that was missing several key players to injury. The Falcons scored touchdowns on each of their first three possessions and never looked back. The lone bright spot for the Bears was Pablo Wigwigan’s spectacular 80-yard kickoff return for a touchdown in the second quarter.

Charlie May then connected with Connor Hurley on a nifty pass in the end zone for a successful convert. Flag Bears The Bears played Ridge Meadows on home turf over weekend. Langley won its first game 41, with Ryan Middleton, Cole Blaschuk, Sam Sieben, and Ben Evans scoring touchdowns. Keane Herd and Tristan Todd helped the defensive line hold off the opposition. It was a standoff in the second game, with the contest ending in a 2-2 tie. The Bears Rylan Middleton caught a pass for one touchdown and Tyson Craig ran for the second major. Kai Blaschuk was solid in snapping the ball.

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Sports

LangleyAdvance

University women’s volleyball

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A27

Spartans near perfect in pre-season play

Host TWU finished with a 4-1 record during the West Coast Classic.

The Trinity Western University women’s volleyball team’s pre-season long win streak came to an end around midday Sunday at the Langley Events Centre. The Spartans fell in four sets to Calgary’s Mount Royal University Cougars in their final game of the West Coast Classic at the LEC. Scores were 25-23, 29-27, 20-25, and 25-14. TWU took 6-0 pre-season and 4-0 tournament records into the game following its thrilling five-set win over the York Lions Saturday at the LEC. The evening victory capped a winning Saturday for the Spartans, who swept Thompson Rivers University (TRU) in three sets that afternoon.

With her team trailing 11-6 in the fifth set against York, Spartans setter Lauren Moncks went to the serving line and, quite literally, served TWU to a win. With Moncks at the line, the Spartans earned nine straight points to pull out the five-set win. Scores were 25-15, 24-26, 25-20, 25-27, and 15-11. “We’re learning how to communicate better and some of the flaws came out against York,” Spartans coach Ryan Hofer said, following the match. “But we learned a little bit about the things we need to improve upon. Sophie Carpentier played really well tonight as did Alicia Perrin, who was playing on the right side. It was great to see the team work through the challenges of being down by a deficit in a fifth set. I’m really proud of the toughness and resolve they showed.”

Sports briefs

Earlier in the day, the Spartans picked up a 3-0 win over TRU. Scores were 25-19, 25-12, and 25-12. “We had a good win over TRU this morning, and it was a good opportunity to cycle players through the lineup and gel as a team,” Hofer said late Saturday. The Spartans will now prepare for their regular season opener Oct. 25 when they will host sixtime defending CIS champion UBC. Game time is at 6 p.m. at the LEC.

Troy Landreville/Langley Advance

Troy Landreville/Langley Advance

Trinity Western University Spartans middle Katelyn Devaney and setter Lauren Moncks celebrated a point against the York University Lions at the Langley Events Centre on Saturday.

Trinity Western University Spartans outside hitter Chelsea Wand kept her eyes on the ball just before delivering a serve against the York University Lions on Saturday, during the West Coast Classic women’s volleyball tournament.

The 18th Annual

Hoops camp at WGSS The Walnut Grove Secondary Gators are once again hosting basketball clinics for boys and girls between the ages of five and 17. The Gators senior boys are the defending B.C. Triple A champions. There are three clinics, being held Oct. 14, 25, and Nov. 8. The players will be grouped by age and skill level. Organizers will be capping off spaces to ensure meaningful coach-to-player ratios. The clinics at Walnut Grove Secondary will be run by experienced basketball coaches Mike Cohee, Mark Hodgson, and members of the WGSS Gators

senior boys team. Each participant is required to bring a water bottle, basketball, reversible jersey, indoor basketball shoes, and snack Anyone interested can email wgssgatorsbasketball@gmail.com and be sure to include your child’s age. As well, organizers are also offering discounts for attendance at multiple clinics.

Langley Cribbage League Scores as of Oct. 3 Harmsworth 21, Murrayville 15 Milner 22, Fort Langley 14 Langley 21, Willoughby 15

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A28

Thursday, October 10, 2013

LangleyAdvance


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

A29


A30

Thursday, October 10, 2013

LangleyAdvance


LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

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A31


A32

LangleyAdvance

Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Langley Advance October 10 2013  

Langley Advance October 10 2013

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