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Alexander Smith Portfolio, 2013

Address: 143 Whitney St, Blockhouse Bay, Auckland 0600, New Zealand Phone: 09 626 7564

Mobile: 021 0240 3855

E-mail: amsmith@orcon.net.nz


Clay Pit Park, New Lynn An Investigation into Light, People and Public Space Sight is one of our most valued senses, being the primary way in which most people experience the world around them. And light is essential to it. This project arose out of an interest in how light and its affect on the public perception of a space may be used to inform the design of a new public park planned for New Lynn and ensure its utilisation throughout the day and year. Extensive studies and modelling of the fall of sunlight and shadow upon the future park site were conducted as well as an intensive investigation into the areas visual character, both during the day and at night. What resulted was a design that satisfied stakeholder requirements, using previous sun studies to guide the layout of the parks key features, its event lawn, orchard, stormwater lake, playground and pavilion being located to make the best use of the sun and shade falling on the site.

CLAY PIT PARK: FINAL CONCEPT MASTER PLAN

In this final Concept Master Plan, Light has played a role in the determining of the park’s layout, the generation of land and structural forms in relation to each area’s intended function and the interpretation of the site’s industrial ceramics past through the choice and treatment of materials.

KEY FEATURES A-A’ MAIN PATHWAY

A

4m wide with clay paver bands in a mid grey cement to reduce glare and light pollution. An Entrance square and character Gateway Structures define each end.

ORCHARD: 1500, SEPT 21ST Located to receive maximum annual sunlight and the benefit of the Lakes warmer microclimate, the Citrus and Feijoa Orchard’s system of Outcrop or Sawtooth like ramps will reflect further sunlight on the shaded side of the trees growing within, improving flavour and yield of fruit. The walls inset forms and shaded bands of tan bricks interpret the areas overwritten industrial past and the strata of the clay pits.

B-B’ SECONDARY PATHWAY 3m wide with glare reducing mid grey cement paving, an Entrance Square and Character Gateway Structures. A bridge carries the walkway across the reshaped storm water lake.

B

1 2

1 EVENT LAWN An adaptable grassed area intended to accommodate small public events such as concerts and film evenings through its seating structures and flexible lighting system, arranged around a dark backdrop of shady Pohutukawa trees.

2 ORCHARD

3

5

Comprised of hardy Citrus and Feijoa Trees, accommodated in ramp like structures intended to reflect sunlight back onto the trees, boosting the crops sweetness and quality. Integrated Seating in the aisles.

3 STORM WATER LAKE Retains the developments stormwater for sediment settlement while providing visual amenity through it’s changing reflective surface. Deciduous Plane trees will shade the water and accompanied by lighting, provide changing reflections throughout the day, night and year.

B’

4 PAVILION+SOUTH LAWN

4

A new 17m high Red Brick Chimney marks the structure and park within its surroundings, orienting visitors, while Open Verandahs provide shelter from the summer sun and winter rains. Solar power generation via roof panels, an Information centre, Toilets, Equipment Storage and a Cafe are included within the structures design.

5 PLAYGROUND Scale:1:350

A’ N

Built with a Quarry theme, the playground could include daytime shadow making toys and moveable coloured light spotlight toys in the evening. A border of deciduous Plane trees provides summer shade to the the edges seating areas in the summer, while admitting the sun’s warmth in the winter. Cuts in the colourfully planted hill landforms light the paths edge at night.

See the more at: http://www.tumblr.com/blog/landsmith http://issuu.com/landsmith

Sept/Mar, 1500


The consideration of light also permeated the design of each of the key features, with the colours, textures and forms developed to best express the areas historic and quickly vanishing industrial character, with lighting, shadow, contrasts, reflections key tools Lights functional potential was also considered, the design of the orchard’s saw tooth planter beds intended to reflect sunlight onto the trees to improve their crop. The generation of solar energy using the pavilion’s roof, the paving materials chosen to reduce glare and a lighting plan intended to cut light pollution are further examples of this.

The selection and location of new trees and seating was also dictated by seasonal preferences for sun and shade. Deciduous varieties used to shade the playground walkways and seating in the summer months let the sunlight through in the short days of the winter.


Down to the Reef, Meola Reef Responding to Seal Level Rise on a Sensitive Site If sea levels rise between 2-4 m as some predict the effect upon the urban fabric of Auckland will be deep and far reaching. This long term design strategy aims to protect Meola Reef, a closed coastal landfill, from erosion and the resultant toxic disaster with new sea walls/public promenade leading to a future water transport opportunity at the tip of the reef. The opportunity is also taken to better integrate Westmere with Pt Chevalier though this shared recreational asset.

See the entire project at: http://issuu.com/landsmith/docs/down_to_the_ reef_meola_reef Meola Reef

Westmere

Recreat ion a t en lC

Pt Chevalier

re Western Springs


Inception Lane, New Lynn An Experiment in Generative Design In this research project, Generative and Parametric Design Processes were used via Rhino Grasshopper to investigate a variety of different ratios in land use types in near real time and to a high degree of accuracy. When applied to a new urban lane in New Lynn’s Clay Pits Development this enabled a variety of options to be explored from which the best fit option could be selected for further detailing and the creation of a laser cut model. INCEPTION LANE: SELECTED OUTCOME

ALEX SMITH 1347248

INCEPTION LANE: PROCESS

CLAY PIT PARK

ALEX SMITH 1347248

1d

SCALE 1:250 1a

NORTH

1b

1c

1e

1d

3a 4a

2a 2b

3b

2d

RHINO GRASSHOPPER DEFINITION 4-5 STOREY APARTMENTS

LANE VARIATION: VERGE WIDTH 4.25 M Details: 32 Car Parks Road Width: 22.83 m 10 Amenity Areas

Rational for choice: This output achieves the best ratio between the Through the use of angle parking an optimum specified parking, public amenity, water treatment number of parks is achieved while amenity space and vehicle and pedestrian transit uses. is secured for use by adjacent shops on the sites south and for stormwater treatment to the north.

4b

2c

1. DEFINE SOUTH SIDE OF ROAD

2. DEFINE NORTH SIDE OF ROAD

1a. Offset lines define widths 1b. Divisions define Amenity Areas 1c. Define Parking segments 1d. Mathematical Angle Parking spacing generator. 1e. Parallel Park Definition 1f. Switch between parking types

2a. Offset lines define widths 2b. Line Divisions define Amenity Areas 2c. Divisions define circles, which generate points of intersection with verge line. After Culling to a pattern Parallel parks are defined. 2d. Rain Garden Shape Generator

3. DEFINE PAVING PATTERNS

4. DEFINE LAND USE ZONES

3a. Paving Pattern generated through dividing a surface linked to the maximum dimensions of the road into points, then applying a regular shape centred upon them. 3b. Paving Pattern as above, but for Pedestrian Areas.

4a. Curve Unions merge parking bays and road curves to define the vehicle area of the lane, then subtracted from the total lane area to define the pedestrian zones. 4b. Zones and Paving patterns are previewed to illustrate variations.

See the entire project at: http://issuu.com/landsmith/docs/gen_laneway_-_ inception_lane

INCEPTION INCEPTIONLANE: LANE:PRODUCTS, PRODUCTS,LANE LANEVARIATIONS VARIATIONS Max NO NofO of Amenity Areas Max Amenity Areas

Maximum NO NofO of Parking Spaces Maximum Parking Spaces

Maximum NO NofO of Rain Gardens Maximum Rain Gardens

Large Amenity Zone Size Large Amenity Zone Size

Minimal Road Width Minimal Road Width

South Verge Width 3.50 South Verge Width 3.50

South Verge Width 4.75 South Verge Width 4.75

South Verge Width 5.50 South Verge Width 5.50

21 21 CarCar Parks Parks

34 34 CarCar Parks Parks

34 34 CarCar Parks Parks

36 36 CarCar Parks Parks

14 14 Amenity Areas Amenity Areas

12 12 Amenity Areas Amenity Areas

10 10 Amenity Areas Amenity Areas

Road Width: 23.00 m m Road Width: 23.00

48 48 CarCar Parks Parks

24 24 CarCar Parks Parks

34 34 CarCar Parks Parks

40 40 CarCar Parks Parks

ALEXALEX SMITH 1347248 SMITH 1347248

6 Amenity Areas 6 Amenity Areas

10 10 Amenity Areas Amenity Areas

Road Width: 22.43 m m Road Width: 22.43

Road Width: 22.50 m m Road Width: 22.50

ALL ALL TO 1:750 SCALE TO 1:750 SCALE


Carbine Creek, Mt Wellington Reconstructing Carbine Creek E’

d e Roa

Place C

D’

C

A A’

C’ B

Road B’

Carbin

E

Timaru

By softening the current streambed and adapting a current overflow path for a covered section of the stream, a naturalistic waterway may be recreated, remedying the loss of natural aquatic habitat and ecosystem connectivity in the area, while also providing a needed recreational asset for the local workers and nearby residents.

e Carbin

Draining a 270 Ha catchment, including Sylvia Park, numerous roads and industrial estates, 57.5% of Carbine Creek’s catchment is impervious to rainwater. The result is transformation of what was once a small stream into a heavily engineered channel needed to cope with large volumes of fast flowing stormwater it receives today.


A planted riparian zone established along the steam will provide a measure of treatment for the water entering it, along with opportunities for leisure via a new public walkway to the Tamaki River. Engineered structures, such as the ramped Gabion basket retaining walls will provide opportunities for access and interaction with the water as well as their functional purpose, while additional stormwater treatment on the nearby streets and private property will help to improve visual amenity and the water quality in Carbine Creek and the Tamaki River.

See the entire project at: http://issuu.com/landsmith/docs/carbine_creek_ presentation http://issuu.com/landsmith/docs/alex_smith_carbine_

creek



Portfolio of Alex Smith, 2013