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university of copenhagen d e pa r t m e n t o f g e o s c i e n c e s a n d n at u r a l r e s o u r c e m a n a g e m e n t

Prospect for a

metropolitan nature in

Copenhagen

landscape studio 2016


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Colophon Th e St ud i o 2 0 1 6 Andersen, Emilie Nørgaard

Falkentoft, Anna Sofia

Lecuru, Clément

Andersen, Lukas Kurt

Friis, Troels

Michl, Alexander

Andreasen, Rikke Cloos

Gaub, Emmelie Lykking Kitchell

Milner, Annesofie Feidenhansl

Bluke, Anna

Guralp, Luc

Mårtensson, Nina Jahn

Brandt, Freja Holm

Hay-Schmidt, Jonas Melanchton

Nielsen, Isanoor Djezzaz

Breitenbauch, Benjamin Alexander

Helmersen, Anne-Sofie Friis

Nygård, Lars Ove

Huang, Huiyan

Pedersen, Claes Ditlev Bach

Ignatiussen, Anne Qattanneq

Reed, Joshua Samuel

Isahakyan, Kristine

Rets, Marina

Jensen, Trine Ruø

Rosenstrøm, Emil

Korsgaard, Morten

Ross-Thompson, Victoria

Brink, Andreas Gansted Callear, Gareth Andrew Dahl, Birna Katrine Danvold, Sidsel Ding, Peng

Cu ra t io n

Peter Lundsgaard Hansen et. al.

Ed it o ria l t e a m

Emilie Kjeldsen Kjær, ekk@ign.ku.dk Peter Lundsgaard Hansen, plh@ign.ku.dk

La yo u t

Emilie Kjeldsen Kjær, ekk@ign.ku.dk Jette Alsing Larsen, jeal@ign.ku.dk

Santos Sausa Medeiros, Luis Claudio Schmidt, Zenia Mølgaard Simonsen, Rune Subtil, Rachel Sørensen, Peter Vejsnæs, Thomas Høvsgaard Vintov, Josefine Thit Houmøller Xiao, Yaming Xu, Shaobin Zhang, Yuhan

Te a ch i ng team

Peter Lundsgaard Hansen (PLH), plh@ign.ku.dk- Course responsible Torban E. Dam (TODA), toda@ign.ku.dk Emilie Kjeldsen Kjær (EKK), ekk@ign.ku.dk Jens Linnet (JL), jl@bogl.dk Martin Lysholm Hjerl (MH), martin@sted-cph.dk Carsten Johansen (CJ), cajo@ign.ku.dk (ModelLab)

S pe ci al thanks to:

Georg Boyes Fond for the contribution to Landscape Studio 2016. We are greatful for the stimulating walks, talks, lectures and discussions with the our fellow colleauges from The University of Copenhagen and offices. A special thanks to Antje Backhaus for giving us important inputs for our work in Berlin.


Foreword Landscape Studio is part of the Graduate Program in Landscape Architecture at the University of Copenhagen. The present publication is an integrate part of the course product and it documents eleven projects elaborated by 43 international students in our studios in Copenhagen and during fieldwork in Berlin. This year Landscape Studio is greatly inspired by the park system in

Boston and Brookline, Massachusetts that the American landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted designed between 1876-1895. More specifically, it is inspired by an extensive system of landscapes that later came to be called Boston’s ‘Emerald Necklace’. The landscape architect students have been asked to envision, plan and design a system of parks, wetlands, ponds, commons etc., in Copenhagen,

from the Damhus Reservoir in the north and to the Bay of Kalveboderne to the south. Much like the situation in False Bay in the 1880ties the project aims to meet the future challenges of heavy rainfall, pollution and dirty water in combination with increased water levels in the harbour of Copenhagen. The main focus is to explore the way we handle the environmental issues

that we face in our city today – and in the future. The concept of ‘metropolitan nature’ in this context is to examine the structural depth of our urban landscapes and to critically challenge the current discourses of what nature is when it is in our cities. Peter Lundsgaard Hansen, course responsible


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Table of Contents I n tr oduct i o n

Proje cts

Colophon

2

F o r e wo r d

3

C u r a to r ia l

7

A n i nco m p le te m a n ife sto fo r L a n d sca p e S tudi o

8

R o o min g

13

P r o s p e ct fo r a m e tr o p o lita n n a tu r e in C openhagen

14

H a r r e s t ru p Co mmo n s Group1

18

C r o s s in g Co mmo n Gro u n d s Group 2

20

H a r r e s t ru p Bo w Group 3

22

S t r a nd e d Gro v e s Pa rk Group 4

24

Ve s t pa rk e n Group 5

26

Vi g e rs le v F o lk e p a rk Group 6

28

M e t r op o lit a n Re s e rv e Group 7

30

C o p en h a g e n F o re s t – 1 0 0 .0 0 0 n e w t rees Group 8

32

B r a i d Pa rk Group 9

34

E d g e Pa rk Group 10

36

C l e a n a n d Ea t G r o u p 11

38


Curatorial Landscape Studio aims to explore the conceptual and the real-life qualities of the landscape that stretches from the Damhus Reservoir and down to the Bay of Kalveboderne in Copenhagen. As course responsible I have curated the studio workspace and design program.

The title ‘Prospect for a metropolitan nature in Copenhagen’ has been chosen in order to enable a wide range of creative design techniques and for the purpose of integrating different knowledge fields. The title also aims to address an on-going discussion about nature in the city.

In Landscape Studio we curate the workspace in order to enable ‘the meeting of minds and the sharing of ideas’ in contemporary design and to overcome the duality between scientific and artistic work. To cope with the information flow that is ever increasing we have introduced the workspace as a silent teacher by actively engaging in arranging and rearranging the physical room of the design studio.

This phenomenon I have named ‘rooming’ and by that referring to the spatially anchored ‘nudging’ and ‘curating’ within an exhibition-like work environment made by teachers and students. Thus working at the intersection of physical space and teaching practices where ‘we create as we speak.’ Peter Lundsgaard Hansen, course responsible


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An incomplete manifesto for 1. Allow others to change how you see. Open your eyes and see, listen, and observe the sketches and drawings in front of you. The prerequisite for a moment of SeeChange: openness and imagination: of what happened just before this moment of change and what could happen next. Note: the paradox that as a rule the group is wiser (the see better) than the individual, but if the individual starts to listen (too much) to the group, the effect crumbles (vanishes).

5. Draw everything. You will discover so much more. Do not wait. Only then can you turn off layers and simplify. Continuously shift between sketch, model, ACAD, Ai, Ps and Id. 6. Great ideas are often banal. What initially looks or sounds like a mistake or even banal may very well lead to new and surprizing recognition if you don´t keep it at arms length. 7. Rooming. Respect the studio because the studio should reflect the design. Use the studio and its educational space actively as a silent teacher. Arrange and rearrange the workspace in intervals that correspond to the design process.

11. Ideas need work like a flower needs water. Even a half good idea can become great when it is worked with and a great idea will surely dry out if you think it is good enough.

12. Mediate. Work in many medias – you will see more and you will not get stuck so easy.

2. Forget about the good, bad and ugly landscape. It destroys creativity. Remember the Garden of Eden: even paradise has snakes and bad apples. So, when you design landscapes you also make new mistakes for future generations. Make them interesting mistakes!

with it. It has great potential to be misunderstood and blow up in your hands. Go from many to few. 20. Ideas are generic. The idea you have now is the child of the design conversation you had yesterday and the parent of the design conversation of tomorrow. 21. Repetition and the magic moments. Draw it again, say it again, write it, and build it again and then again – until the moment where the plan or model starts to talk back to you. Yes, things can talk if you let it. You will never be alone again. 22. Next time. Try to do the exact same drawing or model again. But this time use other textures, fabrics and materials. Hybridize the last model with the one you have now and turn it into the next model/ plan. And the write on it.

13. Don´t run because you are busy. Walk and you will get there quicker. 14. Kill your concept. A concept can be so strong that it will destroy the design thinking. Know when to say goodbye and move on. 15. Make mistakes in the studio now. If you hide the not knowing for later then what are you here for?

3. Working models are more important than presentation models. If you wait until the end and build a presentation model – you must remember that it will probably be presenting all the flaws you have made by not letting the design process be driven by working models. 4. Make your work fun. Plan ahead, be organized and take responsibility. It is the only way to allow your selves to take time off and relax, listen to music, drink latte and read a good book. Clean up your studio worktables once a week. It clears the head and you might find something – and it reduces fire hazards.

and having one in collective design is zero. The beauty is that ideas travel and if you are great you will recognize (see) an idea, embrace it and make it even better. Share it before you loose it.

8. Walk, talk and make ideas. Movement foregrounds creative work. If you – or it does not move there is nothing. So make it move, build it, draw it, build it again, take it for a walk – take a walk your self.

16. Design conversation. Abracadabra means I create as (while) I speak. A design conversation is about staying connected and joining verbalized expression to physical form and it foregrounds: the meeting of minds and the sharing of ideas. The creative potential will blow your minds if you don´t let conflict, friction, delight and frustration get the better of you. 17. ----------------. Blank. For you to fill in.

9. Begin anywhere. But begin now. Get past the empty white paper/ screen/model. When in doubt (and that is okay!) – start by drawing what is already there or everything surrounding the area. This is the only way to distance your selves from a monologue and start a design conversation. (see 16 +21)

18. Sleep 8 hours. Remember to get sleep. Landscape architecture is not more important than your health. (see 4)

10. Spotting a great idea is more important than getting one. The different between recognizing a great idea

19. Use reference pictures carefully. Study it well before you use it and know what you want to communicate

23. Design by reference. We need hero landscapes. If you accept that ideas travel then someone (or something) had yours a moment ago. It with feed off you for while (just as you feed off it). Maybe it came by airplane just hours ago and made way to you this morning on the metro (was it the lady with the green handbag?). Use reference plans and drawings when you make your own plans. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, fold it, rotate it, flip it, mirror it and assemble it into your plan. It is not theft if you do it openly – it is a tribute to tradition – and it acknowledges other peoples work. 24. Design is not software. You must be able to think and create with the computer turned off. Try it! 25. Put your empty coffee cup over by the sink. And use the bins. 26. Group work. Always go for the ball never the player. The design will suffer if you start focusing on a member/actor of your team. Have morning meetings and bring cake.


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Landscape Studio * 27. Don´t start by reading. If you read too much you risk getting lost in programmatic translation and you disconnect your selves from discovering very important design matters because you know too much. Trust your creative intuition (see 9). This does not mean that you should not read, analyse or be otherwise loyal to a clients programme. Just leave it out for a little while – you will have plenty of opportunity to read. But if you start by reading you can´t shut out the knowing. 28. The power of language. Just as music has its own language (with compositioin, harmony, expression af emotion story etc.) the drawing and the model speaks its own language through the drawing. This language has a vocabulary and the landscape you imagine is full of words and spatial concepts. When you assemble it into a plan it becomes a narrative. Be observervant to what you draw and listen to how you address it – it is a powerful driver in the design process. 29. Complementarity – and the thinking hand. Design has two interrelated sides. Danish landscape architect; Stig L. Andersson refers to science as the rational, and the humanities as the aesthetic. Understanding both is necessary if we are to fully understand the given phenomenon. So your head and your hand are synthesizing this complementarity as you move your pen. 30. Distance and Proximity. When you are working in large-scale think of local detail – and when you work locally, think of the big picture. Landscape design innovation happens in a combination of context and local identity.

32. Listen carefully to what you do not say and draw. Look at the plan you have now. What is all the white? Draw that now: give it a physical body and you will probably find that this is the real project. 33. Plan your own excursions. Reality usually beats endless discussions about this and that idea. Hop on your bicycles and go to study build landscapes. Your design conversation will become more focused and decisionmaking becomes more conscious.

34. Is this the real world or school? Even professionals will make this mistake over and over again. However, it kills the core discipline of design. Yes, studying landscape design is the real thing. The project you are working on is just as real and realistic as anything else. Do not do your selves the disadvantage of an illusion that will only set you back. 35. Initiate. Give something to the con­ versation if you want something back. If you have one egg and I have one egg and you give me one egg and I give you one egg – then you have one egg and I have one egg. If you have one idea and I have one idea and you give me one idea and I give you one idea – then you have two ideas and I have two ideas (Chinese saying). Now we are in business – if only you would give me the egg too.

models, materials, vertical projection and the stop-motion broadcast onto the floor/model/table supports the basic idea that design is grounded on the act of seeing and revolves around the ability to connect vocal speech to physical form. Be a jack-of-all-trades and make it your workspace. If you do not engage it will not utter a word. 38. Bye your selves a little happiness. Invite another group to lunch or cake. Share your ideas and ask them how they are tackling some of the same issues you have difficulty solving. Know when you should use a little money on better prints and model materials. 39. Presentations are for you – not for the teachers. Communicating the work that you have now is like sketching. Every time you present your idea the language alters a little. This is important progress and it helps to identify where the idea is still weak. The design conversation involving your fellow students probably applies to you as well. So stick around!

42. Remember. The idea you have worked on in the framework of a nineweek design studio will travel with you to your next course and the next design conversation you have. 43. Access. It is something we give each other. So when your group members give it to you it is a gift worth returning. For landscape architecture acces is everything.

40. Take shortcuts. Do it because it makes sense – not because you are lazy. 41. Laugh. Bruce Mau is right. It´s good for us and it indicates that we are still receiving more energy than we are using. Some people cry and that is fine too.

36. Present the idea – don´t sell it like real estate. A well-formulated idea can speak for it self. Keep the fireworks for some other occasion.

31. Make money. Never trust someone who says landscapes are mere expenses. It is idiocy and you must help him or her.

37. Engage in the Studios. The workspaces we create are defined by ducttape on the floor and a vertical projector. They combine skill-based analogue design practises and advanced digital techniques to create a hybrid studio method with multiple authors. Inside the workspace, physical proximity to

*Using Bruce Mau´s ”An incomplete manifesto for growth” was initially inspired by the Danish writer and poet Søren Ulrik Thomsen´s poems ”Det værste og det bedste”. Thomsen was inspired by Charles Bukowskis´ ”the worst and the best”.


#7 Plan your own excursions


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Landscap

e Planning

The studios called Versailles and Skallingen are places where a ladder across a duct tape boarder (on the floor) marks a special workspace. This 3x5 m square is on the floor of Ver-

sailles, Model Lab and Skallingen and is the experimental territory of Harrestrup River. In this zone we can mix and experiment with matter that normally seem non compatable – ex. fit-

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2013

STEE LSC APE PROC ESS DIAR

Landscape architec Steel - Frederiksvær ture students k in the city of

The unique historical site that de- Until to Arresø and Roskilde the end of June dents Fjord, 60-65 the will from Denmark hind the be working and the stu- tion. and the main pedestrian - transformation intensively world canal The aim street to teachers has drawn with a The overall of Frederiksværk. attention innovative is to work and researchers The University with both dents dairy, design how Frederiksværk and traditional tions where question from upload Consequently of Copenhagen. formed is urban in a design for their work, they each week solucan be the University organized a sustainable orthers process transthemes; within the a planning in Frederiksværk. process and to showto share with has following Throughout in Frederiksværk. laboratory the overall 1. The of Landscape the course correspondstheir work. projects at team The student water and connection between One spread will be researchers architects, teachers of work. to one the competition a supplement week of the Copenhagenfrom Sustainable the urban environment. The Universityand show In the end, group to later this that takes this paper how the 2. The landscapes. will follow year. port their of place urban and sup- from analysing students have will work. mutual The studio relations. spaces and their gone and cept in reational Climate week one, entail space. and rec- hearch and plete masterplan travel, to having a con3. resrange of a work into Access posal in and design com exemplaty and identity. a lona, Spain. prosites in wide throgh the end of BarceFrederiksværk. their journey This paper will work as the stu-

#7 Rooming

2016

Landscape Planning 2013

Y

STEELSCAPE PROCESS DIARY

L a nd s c ap e Pl an n i ng 2 01 3

STEELSCAPE P R O C E SS DI ARY

Landscape architecture students in the city of Steel - Frederiksværk The unique historical site that de- Until the end of June 60-65 students from Denmark and the world to Arresø and Roskilde Fjord, the will be working intensively with a - transformation of Frederiksværk. hind the main pedestrian street The overall design question is and the canal has drawn attention how Frederiksværk can be transto teachers and researchers from formed within the following The University of Copenhagen. themes; Consequently the University has 1. The connection between the organized a planning laboratory water and the urban environment. in Frederiksværk. The student Sustainable landscapes. projects will be a supplement to 2. The urban spaces and their the competition that takes place mutual relations. Climate and reclater this year. reational space. 3. Accessand identity.

tion. The aim is to work with both innovative and traditional solutions in a design for a sustainable urban process in Frederiksværk. Throughout the course at team of Landscape architects, teachers and researchers from The University of Copenhagen will follow and support their work. The studio entail travel, reswork into a wide hearch and range of exemplaty sites in Barcelona, Spain. This paper will work as the stu-

dents dairy, where they each week upload their work, to share with orthers and to show the overall process of their work. One spread corresponds to one week of group work. In the end, this paper will show how the students have gone from analysing and a concept in week one, to having a com plete masterplan and design proposal in the end of their journey throgh Frederiksværk.

Landscape architec ture students in the city of Steel - Frederiksværk The unique historical site that de- Until the end of June 60-65 students from Denmark and the world to Arresø and Roskilde Fjord, the will be working intensively with a - transformation of Frederiksværk. hind the main pedestrian street The overall design question is and the canal has drawn attention how Frederiksværk can be transto teachers and researchers from formed within the following The University of Copenhagen. themes; Consequently the University has 1. The connection between the organized a planning laboratory water and the urban environment. in Frederiksværk. The student Sustainable landscapes. projects will be a supplement to 2. The urban spaces and their the competition that takes place mutual relations. Climate and reclater this year. reational space. 3. Access and identity.

tion. The aim is to work with both innovative and traditional solutions in a design for a sustainable urban process in Frederiksværk. Throughout the course at team of Landscape architects, teachers and researchers from The University of Copenhagen will follow and support their work. The studio entail travel, reswork into a wide hearch and range of exemplaty sites in Barcelona, Spain. This paper will work as the stu-

dents dairy, where they each week upload their work, to share with orthers and to show the overall process of their work. One spread corresponds to one week of group work. In the end, this paper will show how the students have gone from analysing and a concept in week one, to having a com plete masterplan and design proposal in the end of their journey throgh Frederiksværk.

ting a stuffed bird, some bricks and a digital plan together and find new and unexpected observations in our work. From what we find we can then go back to our work outside the zone and incoorporate new ways of seeing into our design. With the duct tape we can take this work zone with us when we need to. We work with all scales, with

books, digital drawings projected from the seeling down onto the models we make, paper presentations, animals, 1:1 samples of pavement stone and soil types, movies, etc. This plan is from the studio called Versailles, 2016.


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Prospect for a metropolitan go horseback riding or take a horsecar­riage in the weekends (like Dyrehaven). Olmsted´s way of understanding landscape as something bigger – as context – reaches far beyond his time and into contemporary urban issues of today. It is for this that the ‘Emerald Necklace’ foregrounds the assignment for Landscape Studio 2016. Because of it visionary reach.

Prospect for a Metropo­ litan Nature in Copen­ hagen

In the 1880´s the population of the American city Boston was growing and with it the city had expanded. Tidal water on the one hand and sewage on the other had become an increasing problem for the population of Back Bay. Therefore it was necessary to come up with a long term plan to secure clean water to improve living conditions for the citizens of Back Bay in particular. The solution was handed in to the Boston Park authorities with the title: Proposed Park System from the Common to Franklin Park including the Back Bay and Muddy River Improvements – Jamaica Pond and the Arnold Arboretum. It was Frederick. Law Olmsted (considered to be the farther of American landscape architecture) who had elaborated a system of parks also called the ‘Emerald Necklace’. It was a visionary plan. The idea was to treat and handle the combined sewage-water and tidal-water pressure over ground and in a system of streams, rivers, ponds and lakes. This body of a new waterlandscape was tightly connected with forest plantings, shrubs and clearings creating biotopes that made it possible to ‘clean’ dirty sewage water and to deal with the tidal water of Muddy River.

“We need big visions – again!” Underground sewage systems were known in the 1880´s and still Olmsted chose to solve a very complex urban problem with a landscape. Concepts such as urban ecology, urban farming, sustainability, storm-water management and LAR had not seen the light of day in urban planning. Yet, what

Bostonians today hold as a highly attractive recreational landscape was basically a sanitary urban project. The result was a series of parks, fields and meadows; lakes, streams, ponds and wetlands – all interconnected with a hierarchy of path systems, bridges and meeting places. It is a landscape that invisibly works as climate conditioner: dealing with water, providing fresh air, cooling down the city and providing wildlife with a wide arrange of biotopes.

“the Emerald Necklace foregrounds the assignment for Landscape Studio 2016” Today the ‘Emerald Necklace’ is a place where people meet, picnic, jog,

Contemporary metropolitan cities also need to think ahead and deal with long-term issues and it is striking how similar they are to that of Back Bay in the 1880´s. To put it bluntly: We need big visions – again! The assignment introduces combinations of large-scale dedications (long term) and small-scale interventions (generic) as an alternative to broad strategies of social, economical and environmental improvements. The assignment is open and with few limitations – the scale and the context is debatable through the design. To support the assignment and the learning outcome the course entails fieldwork in Berlin.

The assignment

The overall aim is to plan, design and communicate a prospect (a vision) for a metropolitan nature in Copenhagen. The urban landscape in question stretches from the Damhus Reservoir to the Bay of Kalveboderne and is therefore also where fresh- water meets salt water. A particular focus will be to rethink the landscape and

“focus will be to rethink the landscape and the water cleaning facilities by the Bay of Kalveboderne”

the water cleaning facilities by the Bay of Kalveboderne.

Large-scale dedications

The assignment seeks to envision, plan and design a system of parks, wetlands, ponds, commons etc., to meet the future challenges of heavy rainfall (and dirty water) and increased water levels in the harbor of Copenhagen on a practical level and to rethink the way we handle the issues that we have in our city today – and in the future. One mayor focus will be to study the contemporary concept of Urban Nature.

“the river will have to expand from 20 m2 (16 m3/s) to ca. 60 m2 (4045 m3/s)” This requires knowledge (we will, however, not use all the knowledge in the world), cross-disciplinary work, creativeness and entrepreneurship to find alternative solutions. The program aims to secure different large-scale functions: a combined bicycle and pedestrian connection from the northern to the south. The connection should be encompassed in such a way that it connects significant local areas and at the same time it should enhance the qualities of the different landscapes on the way. Today a small, partly covered, stream connects the reservoir of Damhus to the Bay of Kalveboderne to the south. The body of the stream, forest and must be redesigned if it is to meet the future water anticipated.


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nature in Copenhagen Small-scale interven­ tions

In order to anchor and to support the connection from north to south the quality and identity of the local urban environment must be strengthened. Small-scale interventions along and in proximity to the bicycle and pedestrian path can be identified, designed in greater detail and used for such proposes. To secure different small-scale functions and local identity a number of buildings and infrastructural structures should be considered: 2 work shops for boatbuilding of smaller boats, kayaks – height 10m (2x2000 sq.m.); offices and smaller sheds (500 sq.m.); open storage yards for boats (2000 sq.m.); hostel with 20 rooms (600 sq.m.); café (200 sq.m.); access roads for service vehicles to work shops, halls, and kitchens; parking for 50 cars (1000 sq.m.); jetty for harbor busses; yacht club-kayak clubkitesurfing club (3x200 sq.m. incl. storage yards of 200 sq.m.); small boat habour incl. bridges and hauling space for kayaks and small boats. These smaller interventions can include visions and activities such as space for sports, urban gardens, quiet places, squares for performance, plantings (nurseries) and new places for urban experiments. The proposal must consider principles for storm wa-

ter management on a local level. In this way the proposals will reflect and contributes to an on-going discussion regarding nature in our city: its structural, economical and cultural significance in cities of today.

The Harrestrup River system

Harrestrup River system is a 30 km long water system. It begins in the swamps of Harrestrup in Albertslund and ends up in the Bay of Kalveboderne. The river system includes: Rogrøften, Skelgrøften, Bymoserenden, Sømose Å, Kagså and Harrestrup River itself. The catchment of Harrestrup River includes different landscapes in municipalities such as Ballerup, Albertslund, Herlev, Glostrup, Gladsaxe, Rødovre, Hvidovre and Copenhagen. Harrestrup River is mostly a cultural regulated water system witch primary purpose was to provide freshwater for Copenhagen and to support the fortification of Copenhagen. However, today Harrestrup River primarily functions as drain recipient for substantial part of the metropolitan urban Copenhagen. The river crosses The Fortification Canal and a pump station and an overflow hydraulically connect them. Subsequently, Harrestrup River works as a drainage system for a large territory and is recognized as being an

essential waterway during massive downpour in the future. The municipalities (and their utilities) bordering Harrestrup River and The Fortification Canal have agreed to work together to create, and to coordinate a strategy for using the capacity of the river system in the best possible way. The existing capacity is ca. 16 m3/s. This number is expected to 3-dubble to ca. 40-45 m3/s in the future due partly to ‘the cloudburst’ initiatives by the municipality of Copenhagen. This means that the cross sectional area of the river will have to expand from 20m2 (16 m3/s) to ca. 60 m2 (40-

45 m3/s) if it is to prevent mayor flooding in parks and neighborhoods. Three scenarios are seen as possibilities: A: the profile of the river is expanded so it is 3-dubbled B: a combination of dikes and an expansion of the river profile C: Expanded dikes where the flooding boarders neighborhoods The three scenarios will have different consequences for the landscape, heritage existing trees, commons, meadows and nature in the city in general – for this we need a greater vision!


#16 ‘We create as we


speak’


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Harrestrup Commons

Riparian habitats are created along Harrestrup Å, supporting a rich and thriving wildlife while preserving the many valuable mature trees. Visual, physical and mental access enable urban dwellers to be active actors of metropolitan nature and gain from its psychological and physical benefits. and accessible to all dwellers in the city, the park design responds, conserves and rearticulates existing deep structures whilst connecting and bonding with its surrounding context. Furthermore the strengthening of existing activity hubs as well as adding new program areas creates an opportunity for a rich and inclusive cultural layer to emerge throughout the park.

landscape elements. Accommodating a stormwater water management agenda with areas set aside to sustain flooding of varying degree further remodels the existing park structure and a design language of islands starts to emerge. Elevated areas established with mature trees cross over into depressions that allow for continuous change and reinterpretation by the varying water levels. The ecotone between wet and dry provides habitats for increased biodiversity. Signature

Trees and islands Harrestrup Commons is a vision for an inclusive Metropolitan Nature that reawakens a stretch of existing green spaces in the southwest of Copenhagen. The redesign aims at creating a robust park for a wide range of people and activities whilst simultaneously creating a habitat for a thriving flora and fauna. Driven by the vision of making natural resources available

A diverse coverage of existing mature trees throughout the site is one of the deep structures providing the park with a valuable spatial quality as well as a habitat for a multitude of species and natural services. Therefore keeping most of the existing trees whilst allowing for some clearing to emphasize visual and physical connections as well as a more varied landscape experience is the main driver influencing the transformation of the remaining

2.0

“ Harrestrup Å will be a destination as well as a sequence in a journey ” trees with a unique form or an important position are emphasised and given space to act as special solitary trees.

Harrestrup Å

Despite currently being mostly cana-

lised and often not accessible, Harrestrup Å is another of the area’s deep structures and thus has great potential. Allowing the stream to adopt a naturalistic flow further emphasises the island design language. Additionally, water in its varying appearances becomes experienceable in certain areas whilst restricting human access to others, allowing nature to prosper undisturbed.

A park for all

The planned path system consists of a generous main path combining bicycle and pedestrian traffic, providing an efficient north-south connection. A secondary path system invites to investigate the landscape on a more intimate level and discover the park’s varying island characters ranging from wildflower meadow, activity areas and enclosed private spots. The secondary paths system also provides ample opportunity to access and move across

2.0

Single-family houses

Sydkærsvej

Fraxinus Allé

1.0 Buffer

Permanent stream

2.0

Signature poplar Island

Occasional stream

Signature oak

1.0 Island of densified existing trees with meadow understorey

Permanent stream

Meadow island

Occasional Buffer Path, cycle stream lane and formal entrance

Signature birch Existing trees

Entrance through social housing with signature tree

Section A-A’ 1:1000 - Varying water levels continuously modify the spatial feeling. Group 1: Anna Sofia Falkentoft rjn130, Alex Michl qfk593, Zenia Mølgaard Schmidt lzg382, Rachel Subtil dmw241


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Housing block Damhus Sø

1. 1.

Entrance square Cascading water

Single-family houses

0

0

2.

2.

0

Path Cycle lane

0

Existing mature trees Playground

1. 0

Soccerfields in clearings

Species-rich meadow

Proposed trees

1. 1.

0

Formal entrance

0

Wild stream play area Permanent waterbody Hvidovre st.

Sitting area

Bonfire

Open grass

Secondary path

Scouts

Square with cafe and sitting steps down to the stream

Cafe Clubhouse

Wood workshop

2.

Single-family houses

1.0

Signature tree

0

Football field

Plan of detailed area 1:2000 - Flexible and multifunctional activity spots integrated to the riparian landscape provide attractive gathering points for a wide range of users to enjoy. Formal entrances lead neighbors to local meeting points. Swimming area

Shaping defined spaces Succession of spaces shaped by trees, water and landform.

Proposed housing Skatepark, basketball, handball

Holbæk motorvejen

Formal entrance A’

A

the park thereby connecting residents on both sides and increasing the opportunity to meet, bond and form a healthy community. Formal side entrances are marked by programmed arrival and departure areas with rows of trees extending the park into the city, thereby creating awareness and inviting into the park.

Gammel Køge Landvej

Connecting through and along Harrestrup Å Going for a stroll along the river. Being lead in and out.

Clubhouse, cafe, basketball, handball Scouts’ camp Wood workshop

Proposed housing and offices Kayak storage and clubhouse

Cultural center

Proposed housing Harrestrup Holmes St.

Inclusive and robust

Building upon existing uses, new program hotspots throughout the park allow for a wide range of interpretations and activities. Decks on island edges provide access to water and leisure activities. Football fields, skatepark, ecopool and a harbour appeal to the active and diverse metropolitan user. Workshops and local community buildings create social gathering points with shared facilities. Harrestrup Commons aims at being more than a park but an open-minded, flexible and inclusive lifestyle.

Detailed area

Boat-building workshop and boat storage

Hostel

Houseboat Beach Grazed meadow

Harbor

Programing the hotspots Activities for all.

Viewing hill Hvidovre st.

Forest living

Friluftsbadet

Kalveboderne

Rotunden

Harrestrup Holme

Plan 1:15.000. Group 1: Anna Sofia Falkentoft rjn130, Alex Michl qfk593, Zenia Mølgaard Schmidt lzg382, Rachel Subtil dmw241


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Crossing Common Grounds

“An example showing how the two different canal-edges is interpreted in Crossing Grounds. One is the existing hard edge, and the other is the naturalized edge, which opens up towards a recreational cultural landscape, that preserves old ecological features and as a result creates a water resilient park”. Harrestrup Å is a deep structure embedded in Copenhagen’s urban fabric. The stream makes up the genesis of the park, but today feels segregated, strictly controlled in a concrete channel and in parts is fenced off. ‘Crossing Grounds’ creates access to the water whilst preserving important structures along Harrestrup å. Preserving selected areas enables us to reestablish wetlands and other historical and contemporary functions, making Harrestrup Å into a climate resilient park for both metropolitan nature and recreation, whilst telling the story of the sites history.

Today it is used for sewage overflow and the entire length runs in a concrete channel (Sammen om Byen, 2013). The park at Harrestrup Å today is predominantly cut grassland with large areas of mature trees. Hidden behind a mix of wire fencing and dense vegetation lies the unexplored potential of the site - the stream itself. The

space, including capacity for changing climate and urban water related issues, urban nature and space for recreation. Preservation is focused on existing mature trees with high nature value, and those that would take decades to replace to a similar mature stage. Relics of the parks past like old concrete pipes and access ramps to the streams

Left: Harrestrup å in greater CPH water system. Right: Crossing grounds

Conceptual diagram using historical map with path (dotted).

The site today

network of desire lines along the edge of the stream proves the public’s urge to walk next to and experience the water and this forms a strong argument to create access to, and along the entire length of Harrestrup Å.

will be used, and features will stand out as sculptures, reminding the public of a past where natural values were of lower priority to the urban systems demands. The reestablishment of wetlands through naturalising the streams edge is inspired by the idea of the idyllic countryside composed of wet meadows, grass fields, softly curved streams that once was the identity of Harrestrup Å. These forgotten qualities will once

Harrestrup Å originates in Harrestrup mose and its functions have changed over time according to the devel-

“Crossing grounds is about preservation and access” opment and needs of Copenhagen. Originally the stream ran naturally and drained surrounding grasslands. Private housing

Existing edge

Stream & boardwalk

Crossing grounds

The dynamic mix of preservaing grounds and reestablishment of wetlands, is composed into a park that tells a story and accommodates the modern and future needs of such a

Naturalised stream edge reestablishes wetland with retaining gabion wall

Shared soft traffic route

again be part of Harrestrup Å. Grounds are pushed down towards the stream creating wedges and revealing the natural edge of the stream. They will frame different ecological and functional purposes creating a variation among themselves and the preserved grounds. The preserved grounds stage existing trees that stand as giants in the lowered landscape, creating a strong contrast between old and new. Like a well choreographed dance between past and present, the pathway along the river unifies the landscapes making drawing people into and along Harrestrup Å - the main attraction of the park.

Effects of Actions

Crossing Grounds is designed with the future in mind. By reestablishing old ecosystems and restoring a historic landscape character, many current metropolitan issues can be resolved. Naturalised banks will accommodate overflow water from extreme rain events, making the park key in how the area will deal with stormwater in the future, also adding biological value to the area. A natural and native planting scheme means the park will reAdjacent road & Social housing

1:400 Section A illustrating the streams naturalised edge and boardwalk that marks the old edge of the stream.Also seen is the gabion wall, retaining quality nature. Group 2: Joshua Samuel Reed, rgq364; Benjamin Alexander Breitenbauch, nks699; Emilie Nørgaard Andersen, wqn291; Anne-Sofie Friis Helmersen, bwj115


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Access to narrow channel Boardwalk

+0.50 TOW +2.00

Damhussøen

Shared soft traffic route

Preserved Oak & Birch trees

Green corridor

Gabion wall

+0.60

Preservation of trees & wedges

Wetland wedge +1.00 Bridge Narrow channel

Footpath Preservation of trees & wedges

Preserved Oak & Birch trees

Entry point

Reestablishment of wetlands TOW +2.00 +1.00 +2.00

A New tree planting

Reestablishment of wetlands (See focus area)

Preserved Oak & Ash trees

+2.00

Maritime facilities

+1.50

New tree planting to seating area

+0.00 Bridge Maritime facilities

Footpath N

Entry point +1.50

Crossing Grounds principle diagrams (left) and Concept plan 1:30000 (right). quire little maintenance, and represent learning values that might enlighten the urban citizens to a historically important landscape with contemporary functions. The crossing of grounds is facilitated by a variation of elements creating access both along and across the stream and grounds. These access routes are the veins that ensures a use of the landscape as both transportation and recreation. An idea about a 20 century romantic landscape, is reshaped as a 21 century stormwater resilient park that contains facilities for everything from scouts, and natural playgrounds to kayak clubs and cafes. The historical ditches will once

again drain the surroundings of Harrestrup Å, now as green corridors, guiding both runoff water and people towards the park. Today the edge of the stream is steep on both sides and the water is not accessible. On the northern stretch the steep concrete channel is kept and a boardwalk along the edge creates a new entry to the park. Moving towards Kalvebod Brygge. Further south One side of the canal is naturalised and the wetlands are reestablish. Where the park gets wider the canal is naturalized to both sides. Close to the bay harbour atmosphere starts to evolve an a series of programs are adjusted into to the grounds defined by bushes, walls and bridges.

Reestablished wetland

Green corridor

Green corridor

Shared soft traffic route

Gabion wall

Entry point Campsite

+0.00

Sheep

Reestablished wetland +1.50 Scouts buildings

+2.00

Go Ape & woodland play

Entry point Campsite

Alder Coppice

Football Club N

Illustration of narrow channel with access from private plots.

1:2500 Focus area, illustrates preservation of trees and reestablished wetlands.

Group 2: Joshua Samuel Reed, rgq364; Benjamin Alexander Breitenbauch, nks699; Emilie Nørgaard Andersen, wqn291; Anne-Sofie Friis Helmersen, bwj115


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Harrestrup Bow

Looking norh along harrestrup Å, the decks link the social housing to the water. seating and new planting activate the area bringing in new visitors to the park esecially to these hot spots. The area has become reconnected to the water and can people can appreciate the nature that is brought closer.

Harrestrup Å is a small river that links Damhussøen to Kalveboderne. This rather narrow sliver of green has nestled within it the canalised Harrestrup Å. Once navigable, today it is part of the local sewerage system, no longer accessible and prone to flooding. The river, which once ran through pasture, is now part of a linear park enclosed by, yet separate from this typical suburban park and the neighbouring houses.

Magnetizing the surroundings

To reinvigorate the park, a new northsouth path structure is laid from the new entra nce to the park at Damhussøen, through to the new recreation complex and beach at Kalveboderne. The most densely populated areas join-

The path is pulled by the building typologies.

ing the park become magnets drawing the path and the river in towards them. The nature of the park changing in appearance from the smooth to the sharp. From pastoral to hortus as they are drawn in. In this vision the core of the park is drawn back by the boulevard, acting like the string of a bow. Creating a new structure in which the park, infrastructure and city structure are one and the same. Nature, recreation, business and housing all interacting beyond their usual boundaries. The river is reestablished as a key element within the fabric of the park and once again becomes accessible through new interventions. These connections to the water allow people a link to the nature and natural processes of the river. At a larger scale the park becomes liberated from

The social housing functions as the magnetic points pulling the path and river away from its natural flow. its containment. New connections are opened up east-west inviting people in while also integrating the park seamlessly with its surroundings. A wide variety of experiences and recreation opportunities line the whole site inviting people to stay. The road becomes a new public space for people to inhabit.

1:1000 Section C: The dense nature next to the family housing and a more open character next to the social houing to provide space for the residents. Group 3: Gareth Callear, qwz975; Claes Pedersen, tgx599; Huiyan Huang, jsd820; Rikke Andreasen, zrq845


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Damhussøen

it links with the station. These pitches help to contain water in the worst flooding events. Coming from the tunnel the space becomes more hortus as the river passes through the first social housing and to the plinths that link them to the water. Passing through the deciduous woodland play areas for the nearby school nestle in amongst the trees. Scattered views and access to the stream break the sense of enclosure. The trees draw back towards the social housing. The expression becomes more hortus as the path passes the community gardens, allotments and their communal buildings. The path now raises and flies over the large road and rail line. The entire site filled with pine trees whose canopies the path is now amongst. An observa-

Roskildevej Water play

Hvidovre Station Shopping Center A

River plinths

Lykkebo School

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tion halo floats above, giving views in every direction. A small skatepark is hidden to oneside. The woodland becomes more open and light as the woodland become more deciduous and open with some glades of cut grass plinths hidden in amongst it. Picnicers take advantage of the views and the recreation areas. A large play zone and a further sunken football pitch are found alongside climbing walls, play topography and other ball sport courts. The park and the boulevard again become one and the same as it takes in more social housing before linking with the station. Here as the river opens up and the path jumps between boardwalk and pave as it goes past a new events complex, restaurants and marina. Further

River deck

Community gardens

B

1:1000

The Observation Halo

Section A: The social housing will become integrated in the park.

Holbæk Highway

Boulevard

1:500

Diverse series of experiences

Entering besides the new waterfall that welcomes visitors into the site, a classically inspired park comes into view. A mix of meadow, cut grass and garden planting surrounding a new water play area linking Energi og Vandværkstedet to the park. A wide shallow shore with stepping stones gives further space to play.

“A wide variety of experiences and recreation opportunities line the whole site”

Section B: The connection at the most traffical place a brigde will cross the road within a pine forrest.

C

Play area

Valbyparken

Event space Åmarken Station Entering a small woodland, the park opens up becomes part of the boulevard and a linear play zone with informal areas, seating, ping pong tables, basketball and barbecue spaces under a canopy of trees. A pair of sunken football pitches with earthen seating banks are hidden in the woodland as

Kayak club Hostel Marina Grazing area Kite club Activity trail

Beach

Kalveboderne

Plan: 1:15.000 of Harrestrup Bow.

A small water inlet for recreational use.

plinths punctuate the route to the beach and its long groins where people fish and swim. A kite surfing club at one end of the beach. Turning back inland and up past the hill top viewpoints an activity complex, café and grazing land completes the site.

With time Harrestrup Bow parkway will establish itself as a utility that helps to knit together all of the areas it passes through, drawing in not just the river and the path. The whole park will act as a magnet bringing in people and creating a new whole for the neighbourhood.

Group 3: Gareth Callear, qwz975; Claes Pedersen, tgx599; Huiyan Huang, jsd820; Rikke Andreasen, zrq845


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Stranded Groves Park

The islets of Harrestrup Å in a clearing within the groves. Vison seen from the Southern park towards the filtration plant ruins. Harrestrup Å is a park with a stream. In the future it must be able to retain larger amounts of rainwater. Redesigning a new wider waterscape for Harrestrup Å will not only solve this need, but also contribute to other advantages, like biodiversity and recreational green space. The reshaped boarders of the stream will provide new recreational possibilities for its users, not only by creating a more diverse landscape and access to the stream, but also by providing the possibility to use the water as a new recreational element in itself.

Where islets connect the surroundings

The intention with this project is to reconnect people and green space with the stream. This is done with five concepts. The water gradually develops from a more quiet and straight stream into a more meandering and natural character as it gets closer to the sea. As the water flows more wild and natural, the landscape changes from an urban landscape into something more

A

Park Area

Half piped Stream Fencing

’Natural’ stream

Island

Combined pedestrians & bike path

Todays Challenges: Today Harrestrup Å is fenced off and the area that is park has few species rather than a biodiverse green space.

Proposed Changes: Mildly sloped terrain and variation in vegetation typology will add more biodiversity to the park.

natural. Small islands pop up in the stream, and the water cuts through the landscape in the southern part. The islands create the base for the functions, as they all have a program. Programs can vary from activities like football, a skate park, a playground, a dog park or just an island for biodiversity and nature preservation. All functions are placed in relation to its surroundings and all inaccessible islands function as biodiversity hubs for birds, insects and other anaimals.

Another main element of the project is to create access across and connections to the park, from east to west. At all the roads touching the edges of the park, avenues are planted to reach out to its surroundings. The avenues always lead to a path and a bridge where you can cross the stream. A main problem for the park is that larger roads cut the site into several pieces and create barriers for the flow of the soft traffic in the park as well as the stream. To create connections

Bike path

Open Field

Part of a larger water system: Harrestrup Å stream extends from the dam of Damhussøen in the north to the mouth of the Copenhagen Harbour in south. It is part of a larger water system in greater Copenhagen. Because of its posistion last in the water sytem, the stream needs to be widened to be resilient to future cloudbursts.

Dense group of trees in a grove shape

Section Aa - 1:500 Section of island landscape in the southern part of the park. Section going through kajak klub built into the hill of one island. Group 4: Clément Lecuru, vkz111; Emil Rosenstrøm, JBD109; Emmelie Kitchell, TWV271; Yuhan Zhang, HGZ309.


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Large Football Pitch

Small Football Pitch Basketball & ping pong

1 School 2 Daycare/Kindergarden 3 Nursing Home

Center Square

Planned and unplanned areas of the park in relation to its surrounding functions.

Skate Park

Urban Garden & BBQ Playground

Dog Park

Playground

Football Pitch

Heavy Traffic Bicycle Path Pedestrian Path

Normal size of the stream The stream in a 100 year rain event

The stream changes character when heavy rains occur.

Infrastructure: The division of heavy and light traffic.

we introduce elements of corten steel. Some elements will allow people to experience the water, some other create transitions across barriers and yet some will be part of a terrain wall. At the large roads, this material work as connecting elements that will notify people that the park continues on the other side. From the north to the south of the park the tree typology gradually change from a natural and soft look to a more industrial and hard structure. In the southern end the trees have found their place stranded in the landscape plan in log-like lines and clusters during an imaginary flood.

A resilient landscape composition

Art & Culture District Shelter & Campfire

Kayak Club

Jetty Harbour bus stop Beach

Plan 1:20 000

N

Kayak Club & promenade

Future cloud bursts might affect the security of dwellings, infrastructures and ecosystems. By expanding banks of the stream and creating islands, vegetation groves and smooth slopes to the water, we increase the absorption capacity of the soil and prevent the risks of f lash f loods in neighbouring grounds. Stranded Groves Park is shaped to deal with heavy rain events, creating new shapes of the banks and new islets that are for a short time, inaccessible without a f loating transportation device. A bike path runs through the whole park whereby it connects the north with the south. The east-west going paths connects neighbourhoods with the bike path to give people easy acces to the bike path. In general bike and pedestrian traffic is divided, but in case of f lood events, pedestrians will also be able to walk along the bike path, which is always out of the water. After larger cloud burst events, bikes and pedestrians will still be able to use peripheral streets of the park to reach their workplace, schools and facilities around the city.

Bird & biodiversity island

a

Group 4: Clément Lecuru, VKZ111; Emil Rosenstrøm, JBD109; Emmelie Kitchell, TWV271; Yuhan Zhang, HGZ309.


M

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Vestparken Vestparken investigates a reintroduction of Harrestrup Å into the surrounding landscape, using water flow and its interaction with the surrounding areas and topography as the main source of inspiration. The stream changes character as it flows from Damhussøen down to the bay of Kalveboderne, dividing the landscape into unique zones. The distinctive ways to interact with the water will create different atmospheres, and provide various experiences for the people in the Copenhagen Metropolitan area.

Damhussøen

Existing buildings New buildings Existing trees

Entrance to Vestparken

New trees Meadow vegetation Coastal vegetation Normal water level Medium floding

Damhus Fields

Extreme floding

Farum

Harrestrup Å in Vestparken is a 4,7 km long narrow stream, running past Damhussøen in the north through to Kalveboderne in the south. The river runs between Hvidovre and Valby and, intersects with several main gateways leading into Copenhagen from the western region. The infrastructure crossing the site is an important factor. It has influenced the new design, layout and water flow, and added to the character of the surrounding zone.

Hvidovre Station

Gentofte

Ballerup

Rødovre

Copenhagen

Albertslund

Hvidovre Valley

Valby Kastrup

Hvidovre

Brøndby Strand Dragør Malmö

Larger Copenhagen area, marking green (stribes) and blue (white) areas.

New residential area

Hvidovre

Damhussøen

The project strategy is to use contrasting elements (still vs. fast running water, hard edges vs. soft seasonal planting, freshwater vs. saltwater, steep vs. flat, urban vs. landscape, active vs. quiet and open vs. enclosed. These elements enhance the nature experience portraying an endless amount of contradictions that lies hidden in urban nature. The design for Damhus Fields strenghtens the use of the landscape for sports and play. This is achieved by spot interventions, i.e. skate park and an extension of existing play facilities into the landscape. The presence of water by the entrance to Vestparken ensures a visual link and connection between Damhussøen and the fields.

Vigerslev

Railway

“Using water flow as the main source of inspiration”

Damhus Fields

Cycleway Vigerslev vej

Each of the character zones (Damhus Fields, Hvidovre Valley, Vigerslev Wetlands, Kalvebod Delta) enhances the existing qualities of the landscape surrounding the river, and re-invents the identity. Here the main goal is to provide a series of diverse nature experiences in the greater Copenhagen area. The different identies of the zones are strenghtened by variation in water flow and speed, topography and vegetation, as well as built structures which encourage different ways of interacting with water. The increased river profile and areas designed to be flooded, ensure future sustainability and water management during extreme rain events.

Vigerslev Allé Vigerslev Wetlands

O2 Railway

Kalveboderne Gl. Køge landevej

Cafe

Main infrastructure surrounding the project site.

Existing watercleaning facility Åmarken Station

Damhus Fields

Valbyparken

Hostel

Hvidovre Valley Kalvebod Harbour Watersports Club Vigerslev Wetland Kalvebod Delta

Kalvebod Delta

Areal division of the site into four zones, with each their own identity.

One coherent park - strenghtening local identities throughout the site.

Flow and dynamics of water.

Masterplan of Vestparken at 1:15 000.

Group 5: Anna Bluke, fxc789; Annesofie Milner, cft909; Jonas Hay-Schmidt, tnc953; Lars Ove Nygård, qmr516


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“Hvidovre Valley highlights the dramatic qualities of fast flowing water and provides opportunities to interact with the stream. Stepped concrete platforms mark the gateway from Hvidovre Station”.

cafe and ourdoor serving

ourdoor/water sports bar

The river meanders through a landscape of islands. Varying water levels allow different habitats to establish and thus contributes to the biodiverse profile of the city. The meandering stream, turning into several streams, create spaces for different recreational activities. In dry seasons large islands are accessible by a variety of paths.

“A new hub for waterfront recreational activities” islands are made accessable by paths and bridges and also provide smaller docks for boats and kayaks. The development of Kalvebod harbour becomes an attractive new residential area between Valbyparken and the coastal landscape. It also creates a new hub for waterfront recreational activities and watersports. The new delta is full of small private groves for exploration on foot or by kayaks.

Hvidovre Valley; edgy forms, narrow stream and intentional plantings.

Vigerslev Wetlands; soft landscape, with varying islands and vegetation.

Vigerslev Wetlands; a dynamic landscape that changes with rising water levels. Wooden platforms and bridges encourage interaction with water. changing water levels

Vigerslev Wetlands

The river landscape opens up as a delta when approaching Kalvebod Bay. The meandering, river widens and smaller sandy islands start to appear as you approach the sea. The outermost islands enclose the harbor towards West, thus adding to the marine biodiversity and visual qualities in the area. The main

marshland vegetation

The water now becomes a dramatic element in the landscape. The fast running stream activates the sounds of water and invites people to playfully engage with the water. Wide river banks with grasses and/or concrete platforms allow water to be the dominating feature in the landscape. This senario provides recreational opportunities right on people`s doorstep. The design incorporates significant existing trees and proposes planting of new tree groves.

Kalvebod Delta

variation in island topography

Hvidovre Valley

During heavy rainfall, the dynamics of the water transforms the landscape and the visibility of the islands.

existing trees mixed with new

The existing Harrestrup connects to the new stream by the end of Damhus Feilds and from here it flows into Hvidovre Valley.

Section 1:500 Vigerslev Wetlands are a dynamic landscape which changes with rising water levels. Wooden platforms encourage interaction with water. Group 5: Anna Bluke, fxc789; Annesofie Milner, cft909; Jonas Hay-Schmidt, tnc953; Lars Ove Nygård, qmr516


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Vigerslev Folkepark

The concrete path is meandering through Vigerslev Folkepark. Visitors can enjoy both passive and active recreation, and investigate the new Harrestrup Stream. This project will connect the different green areas, and secure the link to the surrounding suburban areas. It will generate a specific identity, both for the individual places within the park, but also for the park as a whole. The path and the different recreational spaces will function as the unified identity. The design will establish the park as a climate resilient systemt

The great connection

This project propose a new unifying path system connecting the areas within the park. The path begins at Roskildevej in the north, and ends in the new harbour at The Kalvebod Bay. The path is a consisting element through the entire park. On the way, it will hook onto houses and roads and thereby secure a connection to the surrounding areas. The path has a very strong appearance with non-parallel

straight lines of 2, 5 and 10 meters. The width is varying. As a result, the new path is meandering through the park. The majority of the path will be made of concrete, giving it a smooth surface to both walk and bike on. The element of concrete will make the path stand out as a strong contrast to the ‘wild’ nature around. The edge of the path will at certain places consist of raised concrete elements where visi-

“As a result, the new path is meandering through the park.” tors can have a rest. Where the path enter the stream, the concrete elements will stand in water allowing visitors to get close to the water. Along the path, there will be some remnants of the old park. The existing vegetation will be kept to generate

The concept is the connecting path that hooks onto park and surroundings. a more interesting route through the park. Existing plantings will merge with the new path system. Furthermore, rock beds will be implemented as a spacious element. These are like the concrete elements, shaped by the

path where wild vegetation can break through. The rock beds will at some places be used to separate the bicycle lane from the pedestrian path. At selected places on the way, the path will open up and create new squares.

1:500 Harrestrup stream

Retainment area

Concrete path

Nature playground

Vigerslev Small Farm

Store Vigerslevgård

The water can overfloat the banks. The path is spacies for both bikers and pedestrians. To the right children are playing at the Vigerslev Play Park. Group 6: Josefine Vintov, dwx209; Luís Medeiros, xsg108; Sidsel Danvold,vjs245; Troels Friis, wtr257


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Widening of the path

At special places the path will widen and connect to the surrounding buildings. These widenings become recreational rooms with different functions and identities. These new rooms speaks the same design language, but are shaped differently. The functions are depending on the surrounding neighborhoods. The projects includes the new Damhus Watergarden, Hvidovre Park Café, Vigerslev Play Park, The Lonely Island and Kalvebod Hidden Harbour. The outline of these widenings are shaped with straight lines creating an irregular outline. In the center, irregular organic circular shapes will generate a strong contrast to the strict appearance of the outline of the path.

Damhus Watergarden

Hvidovre Park Café

The Hidden Harbour

Where the Harrestrup stream runs into the Bay of Kalvebod, a water inlet will create a new harbour area. The boat harbours and smaller canals are placed perpendicular to the inlet, generating a unique atmosphere. This area is connected to the rest of the park by the distinguished pathway system. The directions of the harbour inlets, the canals, the harbour buildings and the vegetation, links directly onto the existing water-cleaning facility. The Kalvebod Hidden Harbour will be ideal for kayaking and young sailors with the protected waters in the inlet. On sunny days, visitors can enjoy the harbour atmosphere, play volleyball and buy ice cream in the summer kiosk.

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Climate adaptation

In the future the capacity of Harrestrup River will be triplet. This is done to relieve the neighboring areas of rainwater especially in the case of cloudbursts. New retainment areas will make the area even more climate change resilient.

Cleaning the Stream

Cleaning facilities will be located under the bridges in the whole area. The water will be filtrated in gabions. Concrete elements will slow down the pace of the water. This will allow water to be further filtrated on the grass banks along the stream. These actions will better the water quality, before the water is let out into the ocean at Kalvebod Hidden Harbour.

Urban area

Vigerslev Play Park

Park

Concrete element

Stream

Concrete element slowing the stream.

Existing trees

New trees

New trees as the link to the city.

Vegetation

The project aims to preserve as much of the existing vegetation as possible. Where the path meets existing trees, the path is build around the tree. Also when adjusting the terrain, either up or down, the terrain around the trees

The Lonely Island

“Where the path meets existing trees, the path is build around the tree.” Kalvebod Hidden Harbour

Path

Rock bed

Concrete element

Existing trees incorporation in path.

1:15.000 Murky water

Stone gabion

N

will be kept to secure the trees. When planting new trees, these will be planted in relation to the old trees. The project present three planting schemes; planting avenues in connection to roads and paths outside the park, planting trees in structures that portray housing areas, and fitting new trees into existing plantings. This is done both to maximise the connection to the surrounding urban areas, but also to secure an interesting planting within the park.

Purified water

Gabion cleaning the water stream.

Meandering path system through the new Store Vigerslev Parken. Group 6: Josefine Vintov, dwx209; Luís Medeiros, xsg108; Sidsel Danvold,vjs245; Troels Friis, wtr257


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Metropolitan Reserve Metropolitan Reserve is a project that provides opportunity for diverse metropolitan nature to thrive by embracing threats to the city. The reserve deals with threat of flooding by using a surface overflow system that offers dynamic environments for a variety of habitats and recreational purposes. A differing level of protected spaces occur throughout the reserve from preserved, semi preserved and unpreserved. Each area of protection is defined by the access that is allowed and the level of landscape management. Protected areas have no access and now management. Semi protected areas have minimal access and low management. The unprotected areas provide varied programed activities based on the surrounding context of Hvidovre, Rødovre and Valby. The accessible spaces are connected by a path network that ties these systems together.

Damhussøen Roskildevej Hellas FC Energi- & Vandværkstedet

Harrestrup A A

a

from Oxford Dictionaries Hvidovre St.

Valby

Folehaven Plantation

Hvidovre

New Reserve Hostel Detail Area Vigar Stamme Scouts Vigerslev FC Åmarken St. New Kalveboderne Marina

Kalveboderne

Water cleaning facility

Masterplan 1:20.000

The Metropolitan reserve consists of three themes; water, preservation and access. These themes manifest themselves as interwoven systems integrated within a metropolitan context to help maintain the urban condition. Path

+0.5

Flooding

+0.5

: Reserve A supply of a commodity not needed for immediate use but available if required

Rødovre

Mini-festo

The metropolitan reserve aims to refocus how city and nature are intrinsically intertwined within geological process. The project looks at landscape as systems that functions to maintain or improve a desired condition. Deep structures, such as the existing water system, provide the platform to understanding the historic and existing processes that become the foundation for developing the project. Programing is decided by deep structures and location relative to context. The infrastructure works in conjunction with the programed site by connecting the areas granted access in a network that is coherent to the existing infrastructure surrounding the site.

: Metropolitan Of or relating to a large city, its surrounding suburbs, and other neighboring communities

Existing Trees Hostel Complex

Semi Preserved

Lawn

Unpreserved

Bridge

Sy

Unpreserved

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Vi g

Path

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Scouts

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Bridge Path

Semi Preserved

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Flooding 0 Preserved

Preserved

Semi Preserved

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+0.5 Lawn

Proposed Trees

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Path

Detail plan showing the composition of how the themes of water, preserved areas and access meet and interact with each other. The different fencing types show a varied level of preservation resulting in different habitats. The path can be seen skirting and traversing the preserved and semi preserved areas. Group 7: Luc Guralp, gsk825; Victoria Ross-Thompson, pdx680; Isa Djezzaz Nielsen, gcv161; Thomas Vejsnæs, hrp684


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This illustration shows different types of fencing within the reserve. The high continuous fence encloses the super preserved area whilst platforms gives a visual connection to the nature within. A lower, less dominant fence (the stone wall) borders the semi preserved areas which the paths traversing the space.

Water: deep structure

The core of the project aims to embrace the challenge of flooding by replacing the existing stream with an overflow system that retains the water on the surface. Kalveboderne coastline, which has been joined to the reserve creates a contrasting link between the intricate fragmented water system with the vast expanse of the sea. The overflow system is created by remodeling the terrain. The system consists of a succession of pools susceptible to flooding leading the water towards the sea. These pools create aquatic habitats for a diverse ecosystem.

(un)Preserve: ecosystem services

encourage a biodiverse and recreational landscape by using a fencing strategy that regulates human interaction with the landscape. There are three levels of protection; preserved, semi preserved and unpreserved. The preserved areas will be closed off with an impenetrable fence that prohibits access to humans. The semi preserved areas have low levels of management and can be experienced from a pathway that traverses the area. These rich, biodiverse pockets will allow natural processes to provide ecosystem services such as water purification, climate regulation and pollination. The unprotected areas provide spaces for recreational activities that relate to the urban context such as playgrounds, camps and sports facilities.

Areas along the reserve will be used to

Existing trees

Semi preserved

Water

Semi preserved

Lawn

Path

Lawn

Water system and terrain

Preserved fenced area

Access: connectivity/ network

The Metropolitan Reserve will restrict, limit or encourage access throughout the landscape. The path system responds to the different levels of access by skirting the super preserved areas, traversing the semi preserved areas and opening the unpreserved areas. The accessible areas are connected to one path

Semi preserved

The section shows the interaction of the water system, fencing strategy and the path network.

Water

Preserved

Pathnetwork

Metropolitan Reserve

that links Roskildevej in the north with Gammel Køge landevej in the south and further towards the coast. As the path meanders through the fragmented landscape a difference of visual, physical and mental access creates a varied experience. Along the path, observation platforms work as lookout points whilst certain facilities are placed within the reserve connected to the path.

Path

Existing building

Existing trees Section a_A 1:500

Group 7: Luc Guralp, gsk825; Victoria Ross-Thompson, pdx680; Isa Djezzaz Nielsen, gcv161; Thomas VejsnĂŚs, hrp684


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Copenhagen Forest

Copenhagen Forest is a possibility to escape the busy urban life, for both commuters and users strolling. Together with its open areas, Copenhagen Forest contains a wide specter of possibilities for use. Alone or with friends – it is up to you. Transforming Vigerslevparken into Copenhagen Forest is an ambitious step towards greening the city of Copenhagen. The forest will be the first one inside the borders of the municipality, adding a new element to the green infrastructure. By creating the Copenhagen Forest, the municipality of Copenhagen will achieve its goal of planting 100.000 new trees. An element not only providing recreational values, but also counteracting the negative effects of the climate change.

Strategy

Vigerslevparken is an obvious place to include to the strategy of planting more trees in Copenhagen. Copenhagen Municipality doesn’t have any forest areas within its boundaries. Moreover, Vigerslevparken is capable of hosting 100.000 new trees in addiThe closest forest from the city center is located almost 10 kilometres away. Creating a forest in Vigerslevparken will reduce this distance.

10 km

tion to the existing ones. As the park already contains high number of valuable trees, the strategy is to keep as many existing trees as possible, and plant 100.000 new ones. In 2011 Copenhagen municipality presented a strategy about planting 100.000 new trees in Copenhagen during the following years up until 2015. This strategy was supposed to transform Copenhagen into a greener city and secure better climate conditions.

“keep as many existing trees as possible, and plant 100.000 new” This goal has not nearly been reached and the project during the past couple of years has slowed down. By adding the 100.000 trees to Vigerslevparken a forest will rise over time. When there Copenhagen Forest consists of a coherent woodland area, containing the existing trees together with 100.000 new ones.

is a need for thinning, the trees can, instead, be replanted in the rest of the municipality or be given for the citizens, to keep greening the capital. The forest is beneficial in multiple ways. The municipality of Copenhagen will get an extra element and the first forest in its green infrastructure. Forests have a great infiltration rate, which creates even greater water capacity in the area that is threatened by increasing water amount during cloudbursts. Beside this, trees also prevent the urban heat island effect and poor air quality, which are also effects of the climate change and the growing urbanization. Planting 100.000 trees in Vigerslevparken would be a big step in the direction of turning Copenhagen into a greener and more sustainable city. By this, Vigerslevparken will be transformed into Copenhagen Forest. The forest contains bigger tree surrounded grassland areas along the stream.

Introducing the first forest in Copenhagen

Copenhagen Forest will have a continuous tree cover from Damhussøen to Kalveboderne. The forest will be divided into smaller characteristic areas, with different vegetation creating different spatial feelings. The vegetation choice is based on the existing vegetation together with Forest Development Types. The forest will in this way need a minimum amount of management, and be able to thrive under the conditions that will be present in the area, in terms of amount of water and light under the big existing trees. Copenhagen Forest will contain light, open forest areas dominated by Alder, Birch and Ash, darker; Beech areas with a smaller amount of Oak, and areas around the bigger roads, running through the forest with high Poplars. The characteristic purple Beech will mark the Characteristic plantings in locations where the forest meets the surrounding infrastructure will mark the entrances.

5 km City center

Vigerslevparken

Group 8: Yaming Xiao, mqk315; Nina Jahn Mårtensson, cwk583; Kristine Isahakyan, grn780; Morten Korsgaard, fns198


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– 100.000 new trees Damhussøen

Roskilde Vej

Poplars Detailed Plan

smaller entrances to the park. Copenhagen Forest will contain smaller glades, together with bigger open areas, still framed by trees, containing bigger solitary trees.

Purple Beech

A reservoir in between the trees

In the northern part of the existing Vigerslevpark, south of Damhussøen, the stream will be allocated from the area with single family houses into the green area. In this way the water body will be a part of Copenhagen Forest throughout its entire length. The advantage of this is that the particular area has the highest risk of flooding, so moving the water away from the houses will help to protect them in case of cloudburst. The main changes in the

Railway

School Purple Beech

N

All

é

“raising the ecological and recreational value”

ers

le v

water system are that the movement of the water will be of a more natural meandering kind - more similar to the original water flow in the area and therefore raising the ecological and recreational value. Another change is removing the concrete embankments giving it a natural looking terrain.

V ig

Detailed Plan, year 50, 1:2500 The area south of Damhussøen showing the relation of the new trees(light) to the existing ones(dark). The terrain of the area is adjusted for more water capacity where the stream is running through. A new path system is created for both commuters and walkers.

Poplars Holbæ

k mote

rvejen

Adjusting the terrain

The terrain along the stream will experience changes in particular areas. Because of the too small capacity these areas have a high risk of not being able to handle the rainwater during cloudbursts, resulting in flooding big part of the surrounding residential area. To deal with this problem in these areas the terrain will be adjusted by giving general steepness and also dikes along the houses. As a result, the same area will be able to handle the same amount of water during 100 year events without flooding the areas around. In addition, the presence of trees will also help to increase the water capacity as the tree roots create pores in the soil increasing the infiltration rate.

Elderly house

Poplars Purple Beech

ay i lw

øg el K Ga

mm

Ra

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School

Plan, year 50, 1:15.000 N 100.000 trees will create Copenhagen Forest

Kalveboderne

Plan 1 and section 1, year 10, 1:2500 The beeches planted 10 years ago have reached a height of around 4,5 meters. Some will be moved to locations under old beeches as part of a rejuvenation process.

Plan 1

Plan 2

Plan 2 and section 2, year 50, 1:2500 The beeches planted 50 years ago have reached a height of around 17 meters. Older beech and ash trees are reaching their age limit.

Section 1

Section 2 Group 8: Yaming Xiao, mqk315; Nina Jahn Mårtensson, cwk583; Kristine Isahakyan, grn780; Morten Korsgaard, fns198


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Braid Park

Visulisation shoving the raised bordwalk going through an area of wetland. Within this area a broad variaty of both animals and plant species are to be found, and area also functions as a place to be flooded during major cloudbursts. Harrestrup stream is a very important piece of infrastructure because it handles huge amounts of rainwater from a great part of western Copenhagen and provides a recreational place for people. But the stream is too small to handle the increase in heavy cloudbursts, so in order to do that, the stream and the surrounding nature needs to be transformed into an attractive recreational water system and a modern piece of metropolitan nature. Harrestrup stream originates from Harrestrup bog and is a coherent water system with approximately 30 km long streams. Harrestrup stream has a long history of supplying Copenhagen with fresh water and later on, functioning as an overflow channel for the city’s wastewater in periods with heavy rain and cloudburst. Many urban rivers and streams have long been neglected, undergone radical changes in their natural flow, to serve merely as a place to lead wastewater, sewage or in some cases being covered up and build on, for instance Ladegårdsåen in Copenhagen. But these ignored struc-

Hellas heroes

Train tracks Roads Pedestrian paths Arial divisions

Existing water flow

Water retainment Water inlet New water flow

Hvidovre square

Vigerslev parken

Nordic nature

Vigerslev wetland

Kalvebod delta

Infrastructurel diagram with railtracks, roads and pedestrian paths.

Diagram showing the existing water flow.

Diagram of the new water flow, water inlets and the water retainment areas.

tures hold a huge potential as rainwater systems and as recreational places just waiting to be utilized.

the edge of the area, making it very difficult to see and experience the water from the paths. Furthermore, the stream is covered with plantings and some places, even fenced off. The new design is seeking to improve this by changing the tracé of both the stream and the path system, so commuting through the park becomes easier and more experiential. By diverting the

stream into the park, a link through the whole area is created, making it more coherent, strengthening the green and blue connection. The different areas along the stream is done so that it relates to the surrounding buildings and functions. This strategy will ensure different experiences along the pathway that fits the recreational needs of the different surrounding residen-

Concept

Our concept is to connect Harrestrup stream with the surrounding green structure, by weaving it into the park and improve the connection to the water. The current tracé is located along

Group 9: Anne Ignatiussen, mrk643; Marina Rets, zkc743; Rune Simonsen, ltf418; Peter Sørensen, qxs224


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a

A

Concrete steps

Stream

Path

Path

Section of the urban area next to Hvidovre center. 1:200

A

a emerges. In areas with a high concentration of villas with private gardens, people primarily use the park for dog walking, running and other activities that requires larger green spaces. In areas with higher concentration of apartments and shopping, the needs are different and the more secluded recreational areas is in focus. People might seek out the park to escape the stressful life of the city, and therefore needs more nature resembling settings. Here one can explore the dense forest or go to open wetland. The northern area (“Hellas Heroes”) is mainly suburban, with private housing and small gardens surrounding the park. A local football club is located

tial areas. Because the project area is almost 5 km long, the areas along the stream are very different, and split up into multiple pieces by roads and railways. Because of this division, the area is not experienced as one coherent structure, but a series of individual parks. The programming of the different areas along the stream is done so that it relates to the surrounding buildings and functions. This strategy will ensure different experiences along the pathway that fits the recreational needs of the different surrounding residential areas.

b B

Strategy

The design of each “sub-area” is based upon different factors, such as the existing character, potentials and the surrounding buildings and functions. By mapping the areas around Harrestrup stream, different needs inside the park

1:15.000 Masterplan of the area from Damhussøen to Kalveboden showing the proposal.

B

b

Retaining pond Wetland Boardwalk

Stream

Path

here, thus the area is mainly football fields and large green areas. “Hvidovre Square” is of a more urban character because of the location next to Hvidovre Center and Hvidovre station. This area is designed in a stricter and more geometrical layout with a skating area and a multi-purpose ball court, supporting the urban setting. This is also the area where Harrestrup stream is introduced into the park. The stream is enclosed by vertical sides, with concrete plateaus creating a canal with possibilities for people to stay and interact. Vigerslev-parken is quite the opposite. A big open meadow allowing for various activities with a wild and “natural” planting. The triangle in the middle (“Nordic Nature”) is made as a kind of “Nordic landscape” with inspiration from the road leading down to it - Kulbanevej. It consists of a pine forest, with flooring in crushed black rocks in different sizes resembling coal, fallen of the trains, on the way to Copenhagen. “Vigerslev Wetland” is a large open area designed to retain huge amounts of rainwater. The area consists of open meadows and grassland, combined with a boardwalk leading people dry through the flat landscape. “Kalvebod Delta” is the most southern part of the project area and the largest one. On the north-east side, a large forest acts as an extension of Valby-parken and provides a “change of scenery”. Because of the expanding city, the wastewater treatment plant, located in the middle, is being moved out of the city and the buildings left behind is being transformed into businesses and offices. The southern part is turned into a beach, with different functions, such as kayaks, surfing, a marina, café and hostel. In front of the beach is created a new artificial island.

Footballfields

Section through the park. Notice the terrain on the left allowing for rainwater on different levels in case of cloudbursts. 1:400 Group 9: Anne Ignatiussen, mrk643; Marina Rets, zkc743; Rune Simonsen, ltf418; Peter Sørensen, qxs224


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Edge Park

A view from the edge overlooking the terrain as the water changes side to the opposite edge. The edges are strictly programed and create a contrast to the soft slopes and the diffuse vegetation. This project presents a new vision for the Harrestrup stream and its surrounding park. We strongly believe that by reactivating the stream, improving access, stimulating user activity and incorporating cuttingedge architectural design we aim to recreate Harrestrup stream into a distinctive and efficient space for both locals and commuters alike. Harrestrup Stream was once a natural brook and part of the water system surrounding Copenhagen. The stream has since been canalized and made inaccessible by vegetation and fences. As a result, the area is no longer an active part of the park. The channel is currently nonfunctional as its capacity is too small to sustain future floods. Needless to say, the area is in need of an upgrade. The linear park works as such but the flow of the park makes user engagement difficult, as many seem simply use the park as a cut through.

In simpler terms, the current layout of the park does not stimulate users to stay long. The rich vegetation and enclosed edges give the space a unique and peaceful feeling of seclusion. However, many are unaware of the park due to poorly marked entrances hidden behind the dense vegetation.

The edge

The greatest element of design within our proposal is its functioning edge. The edge is a 5m wide band with a 50cm border that will be used as a combined bike and walking path. This path will flow along the stream throughout the park. It will change in height and function with various seating elements and water-way accesses. The space between the edge and living areas of the park will include various recreational fields of grass and gravel for multiple uses and programed activities. Lush vegetation consisting of Salix alba sericea, Populus tremula and Robinia pseudoacacia will line

water access

crossing pathway

the edge in grids. The vegetation chosen will be both suitable for the urban environment as well as aesthetically pleasing to the eye. By playing with the height and features of the concrete edge, Harrestrup Stream becomes both physically accessible and sensibly stimulating for users. Where the hard edge jumps from one side to another, the stream will become swampier and accompanied by species of Juncus.

“A strong character and identity for the park” The slope

On the opposite side of the stream, water will flow freely into the grassy slopes. To add refreshing juxtaposition, this side of the park is more open towards the middle with only small clusters of trees and vegetation. This

allows for more sunlight to come into the space. Dense vegetation will serve as a barrier between the park and adjacent living areas. This will give the park and private and special feeling. As the path continues down the park, its material will change from concrete to gravel bleeding into a more organic landscape. Previously existing trees will be given a new life along the pathway, creating a visually pleasing space.

The network

A pathway will line each side of the stream in both the north and south direction. Throughout the park, the material of the pathway will change from a concrete edge to a gravel pathway, then back again. Crossing pathways traveling eastward and westward will allow for easy traffic flow allowing users to change direction quickly and efficiently. The crossways are raised over the stream on a bridge structure to ensure

landing

edge

flood level water level private

activity area

path

stream

soft sloping edge

path

vegetated edge

street

Section representing the typical elements of the design in scale 1:500 Group 10: Andreas Gansted Brink, ptw692; Peng Ding, wqt898; Trine Ruø Jensen, cgd412


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accessibility when water levels raises. A small landing area framed by a couple of concrete edges provides a leisurely resting stop accompanied by a grove of Betula pubescens, where the bridge touches on the grass slope. This signiture group of trees will indicate the crossing and ease navigation. The areas where park meets road will provide a refreshing green space for the otherwise gray-scale city. Such will connect the park with the city.

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Damhussøen slope flooding capacity

path network Roskildevej

landing programmed edge

Section

Flooding

Conceptual drawing

Flood senario

Hvidovre st. Hvidovre mall

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The existing stream will add value in our design just by being visual. The course of the stream varies in width, access and visibility providing different activities and atmospheres. The design of the new stream is made to cope with future downpours. It is important that the river is large enough in capacity but remains appealing in normal circumstances in the park. It must be such, that the park by flooding changes expression, yet not seems “empty” on a regular day. The appearance of the water is different on the two sides of the stream and if flooded water flow can spread into the grassy slopes.

Users and community

Two main users of the park include local citizens and busy commuters. In order to make the space most efficient, Harrestrup Stream must appeal to both parties. Thus, it is important to create a fast, eventful and secure connection while at the same time, entice visitors to stay. By making the entrances wider and planting attractive vegetation, Harrestrup Park will draw new attention to itself connecting neighborhood with park. The greenspace will add a refreshing change to the gray-scale city.

new railway Holbækmotorvejen

Robinie Pseudoacacia

Robinia pseudoacacia Square

Activity Block

Åmarken st.

Bavreask

hostel

Populus tremula Leading view

Leading View

Salix Alba Selicia

Salix alba sericea Blocking view

Block View

cafe offices beach

workshops outdoor storage club houses 0

0

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0 0

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habour

Masterplan in 1:15000, showing the park streching

Betula Pubescens from Damhussøen to Kalveboderne.

Betula pubescens Landing

Landmark

The edge shifts from side to side engaging the appertaining neighborhoods with programmed activities.

Kalveboderne

N

Programmed trees Group 10: Andreas Gansted Brink, ptw692; Peng Ding, wqt898; Trine Ruø Jensen, cgd412


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CLEAN and EAT

W / B N BE I

ST U M S N O I T A S R N T S M U L O ILLU C 4 1 L L I F N A C THEY

The orchard along the stream provides a chance for guests to visit the park and enjoy the natural enviroment in urban context with the benefit of different kinds of experiences.

1:200 A At some places the stream will be covered by ‘wild’ vegetations.

1:200 B The wetland offers a variety of different vegetations and a degassing process which will help the purification of water by extracting nitrogen.

Harrestrup Å runs along Engdraget and Vigerslevparken all the way to Kalveboderne through a narrow trench often hidden by dense vegetation. By cleaning the water, and opening up the stream, new possibilities arise. The concept is to clean the water and use the cleaning agents as elements of experience through the possibility of growing and picking vegetables, fruits and herbs in situated kitchengardens and allocated vegetation around the park. The cleaning includes, among others, oxygenation of the water which is carried out by a waterfall, degassing of nitrogen by the wetland and filtration of pollutants by vegetation.

1:400 C The park is at some places a wide space providing visitors different kinds of experinces. In this case a kitchen garden.

The present site

Today the stream is partly used as a drainage channel for untreated waste water thus the stream is situated very deep with the bottom covered by tiles and concrete to keep the water from interacting with the underlying soil. Besides at times being a foul sight the stream especially during warmer periods, causes some unpleasant smells affecting the whole park. The water is in fact far from clean. Currently the stream is at some places fenced with some dense vegetation which hides away the water. This element somehow creates curiosity to what is on the other site of the vegetation, and by taking advantage of this element, it is possible to emphasize the existence of the stream in other ways than just by visibility. The park already offers a variety of different functions which will not be removed but improved - mostly concerning the stream.

Group 11: Lukas Andersen, kgs465; Birna Katrine Dahl, cml355; Freja Holm Brandt, rtc827; Shaobin Xu, tgw150


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EXPERIENCE SOUND OF WATER

WATERFALL

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2016

ELDERFLOWER

Football pitches

SHOWER OF ROCKS

CANAL

ORCHARD

A

WILLOWL AND

Edible vegetation

HERBS

MEANDERING WATER

FISHING DEGASSING

Canal

KITCHEN GARDEN HIDDEN SOUND

Rocks

Orchard

FISH

Meandering water BEACH

Orchard Willowland

The three concepts are purification of water, edible sourroundings and experiences. Clean water will create a plesant atmosphere for visitors and embrace a new flora and fauna. The edebility will offer visitors topick fruits and grow vegetables and by working with water and vegetation a number of various experinces is created

Kitchen gardens

Orchard Meandering water Orchard

1:15.000

B Wetland

NORTH

Clean

By introducing several cleaning agents, the water will both be an attraction and a act as a resource creating the possibility of different experinences and forming an essential foundation for the kitchen gardens and fruit trees along the strip. Basically the stream will be lead through five types of cleaning facilities. First of all a waterfall will oxygenate the water then going through a bed of rocks again oxygenating. After this the meandering part of the river will be able to let pollutants sediment on the sides of the stream. Further down a stand of coppiced willow will extract both nutrients and heavy metal and lastly a constructed meadow will handle degass nitrogen. At the very south, where Harrestrup Å is lead out into the sea, a beach and marina will be situated with the bene­ fit of clean water.

The stream will undergo different cleaning facilities trough the park. One of the more important cleaning agents will be the implementation of a different water profile which both filtrates and oxygenates the water.

fication of the water is not just a sustainable solution but also a potential. For instance, the waterfall both serves as a cleaning facility and as an attraction leading visitors into the park. The same goes for the wetland, which will, among others, be a habitat for different species concerning both flora and fauna.

Kitchen gardens

C

Willowland

Meandering water

“The clean and eat concept acts as a catalyst for experiences.”

Meadow

Eat

As a result of the cleaning, there will be implemented several possibilities of edible contents such as fruits, herbs and berries along the stream and specifically situated kitchen gardens which is a foundation for collecting food locally, creating a new layer of activities in the park. The water is also purified to the extent that fish will be able to exist in the waters.

Marina Kalvebod Beach

Experience

The clean and eat concept acts as a catalyst for experiences. Through the new implementations and alterations new situations occur and offer different expressions which will accomodate even more interests than the present ones. The idea is basically that the puri-

The meandering water emulates a non-constructed river system, creating a pleasent atmosphere and possibilities with interaction to the water meanwhile carying a function of treating the water as well. All in all, the aim is to exploit the cleaning facilities, transform issues into resources and create a variety of experiences through different senses.

Group 11: Lukas Andersen, kgs465; Birna Katrine Dahl, cml355; Freja Holm Brandt, rtc827; Shaobin Xu, tgw150


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Prospect for a metropolitan nature in Copenhagen  

Landscape Studio is a core landscape planning and design course on the graduate program in landscape architecture at the University of Copen...

Prospect for a metropolitan nature in Copenhagen  

Landscape Studio is a core landscape planning and design course on the graduate program in landscape architecture at the University of Copen...

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