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d e t n at u r - o g b i o v i d e n s k a b e l i g e f a k u lt e t

    

The Sugar Plant Territory - Groningen L and sc ap e A rchi t ec ture & Planning Studio 2014


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L and sc ap e Planning 2014 Alderman, Michael John

Day, Olivia Francis

Ljubijankic, Amra

Pedersen, Trine Baarsøe

Ankerstjerne, Christian Henrik

Feldskou, Lisbeth

Lund, Sif Peiter

Petersen, Nick Dyhr

Atchade, Audrey

Folvig, Sara

Lunde, Louise Juncher

Petersen, Signe Hvergel

Avery, Diana Clare

Frederiksen, Susie

Lysemose, Julie

Rasmussen, Simon Kallenbach

Bang, Malene Fogh

Garancsy, Nathalie Silvia

Løvenkjær, Ida

Rekos, Monika

Berggren, Ulf Frederik

Genee, Sidsel Marijke

Magnon, Antoine

Salac, Josef

Bonde, Linda

Glad, Marie

Moldenhawer, Milan Holm

Snitgaard, Esben Elleby

Bøye, Cecilie

Gomes, Matilde Cerqueira

Mortensen, Nicolai Lindberg

Svendson, Melissa Elisabeth

Chmielewska, Justyna

Gomes Martinez, Cinta

Mulvad, Inger Marie

Understrup, Kristine Grue

Christensen, Søren Lahn

Hansen, Camilla Kjærgaard

Naumann, Sebastian

van Haaster, Johannes Antonius

Cloarec, Maxime

Hansen, Lasse Bøtker

Nemeth, Caroline Sofie Grenaa

Wahlgren, Troels Bak

Conciatu, Cristina

Keil, Lærke Sophie

Nielsen, Signe Lilleskov

Davidsdottir, Hulda

Lin, Liangliang

Pedersen, Rasmus Weitze

Teaching t ea m

Edi tor ial t ea m

Peter Lundsgaard Hansen - Course responsible Ellen Marie Braae Torben E. Dam Virginie C. le Goffic Anne Magrethe Wagner Jens Linnet Martin Lysholm Hjerl Carsten Johansen (ModelLab)

Daniel Lund Sørensen Niels-Christian Mariager Pedersen Peter Lundsgaard Hansen

L ayou t Jette Alsing Larsen

Sp ecial t hanks to: SEEDS SEEDS is an international project that explores temporary use as a strategic tool for urban transformation through a EU funded North Sea Region Interreg collaboration. The aim is to investigate transnationally how short term interventions can support long term regeneration of urban derelict areas. At University of Copenhagen this is done both locally and internationally through 1:1 prototyping, teaching, seminars and knowledge exchange. Having landscape architecture students examine a strand of possible futures for the transformation of the now vacated Sugarplant serves as a very valuable input to the collected knowledgebase of SEEDS. www.ign.ku.dk/seeds www.seeds-project.com THE MUNICIPALITY OF GRONINGEN Thanks to Hiltje van der Wal, Just Verhoeven and Jan Martijn Eekhof for their help - and for making it possible for us to work onsite at The Sugar Plant during our fieldwork in The Nederlands. COLLEAUGES We are greatful for the stimulating walks, talks, lectures and discussions with our fellow colleagues from landscape architecture offices and from The University of Copenhagen. Lastly a thanks to Bart Brands for dropping in for a lecture.


INTRO

In this design studio 55 international students from Denmark and the world have been working intensively for 8 weeks with the transformation of a closed down sugar plant in the western periphery of the Dutch city of Groningen. The University of Copenhagen collaborates with Regio Groningen Assen and the City of Groningen with the Sugar Plant site as one of the 15 pilot projects that serve as test beds for SEEDS interventions. The approach to this design- and planning studio 2014 ironically draws a line to Nordic history. Like the Vikings we too have explored the world

on boats. We have sailed the canals of iconic Dutch landscapes, bicycled through open fields and along historic water defense lines, we have walked through gardens and cemeteries, we have talked about the historic parks and contemporary urban landscapes that we have seen in Amsterdam, Utrecht, Hilversum, Rotterdam, Leiden and Groningen. With the knowledge and inspiration that we got from our travels and with the preparations that was made in the studios in Copenhagen, we worked onsite at The Sugar Plant in Groningen. We built models, made sketches, walked in the pouring rain, talked and worked in groups by the fire in the factory. Here discussions about the urban transformation of this anti territory took place and the work was celebrat-

ed with an exhibition and a feast that no Viking could ever have dreamt of. This newspaper presents the unedited results from 8 weeks of intense work by landscape architecture master students. 13 groups have worked on elaborating future plans for The Sugar Plant Territory. The projects on the following pages work with concepts such as parks, allotment gardens, green nurseries, sustainable water management, housing, retail, recreational landscapes, temporary interventions, education and experimental urban research. The participant’s work contributes to an ongoing discussion regarding urban transformation of industrial sites, their infrastructure and it specifically challenges our approach to working with cultural heritage within the framework of industrial territories as a whole.

By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


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Table of Contents Introduction

Group projects

Landscape Planning 2014

1

Intro

2

Table of Contents

5

Anti’s Territory

6

The Sugar Plant Territory

9

The way we work I

11

The way we work II

12

The way we work III

13

The way we work IV

14

The way we work V

15

The Sugar Mount Group 1

18

Vooruit Groningen Group 2

20

Where Two Lines are Meeting Group 3

22

Westerbruut Group 4

24

Park Kvekerij Group 5

26

Crossing Hoendiep Group 6

28

Urban Waters Group 7

30

Testing Fields Group 8

32

Agri-Unie Group 9

34

Linking Neighbourhoods Group 10

36

Site of Succession Group 11

38

Experimental Islands Group 12

40

A Multifaceted Urban Park Group 13

42


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Anti’s Territory The Sugar House and the Willow Tree

Hello. My name is Anti. I know that I have never met you in person but I am certain that I have encountered you through some mysterious communication. I feel that I know you - through your thoughts and through the motion made by your movement. I hope it is okay that I take a minute of your time. Maybe it is just my imagination – so I hope you will bear with me for a moment. I know this place – or at least I think I do. I don’t know exactly how to put it but to begin with there is nothing wrong. The thing is tha t there is nothing that makes this a special situation and I am almost certain that there is nothing to worry about. Come to think of it - this situation is not any different to other situations that I can think of. The people are ordinary people. The houses are all with roofs and windows and proper doors. The streets have trees and there are shops. The little girl is a normal girl with a mom and dad. There are schools and people go to work. Okay, there is a kitten stuck in a tree but that shouldn’t alarm us. It is to be expected. There is absolutely nothing that I can see what should alarm us. So why do I say “to begin with there is nothing wrong” and “I am almost certain that there is nothing to worry about”. You have probably already noticed it and you have seen the title because it is quite big. Size 18. I saw it too and I am sure that it is my imagination but I am beginning to think; what if there is something not right about the whole situation. Could it be that something is about to change? If I am right then the situation could easily take a turn for the worse and then

why shouldn’t I be a little uneasy? Don’t you agree? I can’t exactly point out why, but with what we already know new things pop up in my mind. Let me give you an example. If only I add “in the outskirts of town” or how about “on the grounds of an old sugar plant” this whole situation could very well spin out of control. Combine them with the “ little girl” and we have a tragedy. I am sure it is just my imagination, I am sorry, it’s just how my head works, I know! But you shouldn’t worry. You know the streets I told you about. There is also a road and, it cuts through the neighbourhood where the little girl lives. She’s got a best friend and he’s got a map. The boy lives on the other side. They call the road “the road” because it is a big road. The old sugar plant they call “the sugar house” because that is where the house is. No body knows about the house in the willow tree except for Mr.3 that is. I know what you think – I thought so too, but the situation is this; Mr.3 said “the Vikings are notorious for sailing their vessels into unknown territory to loot and raid all over the European continent – even rape.” Their skills as merchants and traders are widely underestimated, he rampeled on. He knows because he descents from a long line of merchants him self. That is how he lost a leg before he came here with a circus. “Actually I am going on an expedition”, he says, “I am almost set to go – if only I had a map.” For this part of the story I can truly say that I am not imagining anything because I don’t know what happened when they spoke about the map. No-

‘Instant urbanity’, 2014. Chalk on blackboard, Peter Lundsgaard Hansen.

body knows and your guess it as good as mine. But what ever happened or what words were exchanged that day – sealed the deal - and now the three of them are going to the continent. The boy and the little girl even had a talk about the three-legged-Viking descented-cat. “Cars talk too”, the little girl had said to the boy. Good talk!

The African Queen

The preparations are coming along as planned. They already have a raft for sailing and most of the supplies for the journey. It all adds up to; dry socks, a Yankee-bar, a flashlight, one pocketknife (somebody must have forgot-

ten it after the last circus left), some robe (the circus again), an old can with a matchbox, a pencil, two bottles of water and the map. They have rolled everything up in a blanket - except for the rope, the knife and the map. Mr.3 have been studying the map. It is a real Michelin he said when the boy found it down by the canal one day. They have made a circle that marks the willow tree and this is where they will depart. X marks the destination. The route will take them across the concrete dessert close to the chimney and down to the edge of the canal - to the water pond. From this point – if they get there - they have decided to cross the dangerous waters of the Amazon By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


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River to the other side on the raft. However just when everything seems to be ready it hits them that the raft doesn’t have a name. How could they forget? Mr.3 explains that they will never get across the river if the raft doesn’t have a proper name. The little girl and the boy are caught by total surprise and for a minute things could go either way. To their luck Mr.3 reassures them that folks forget to give their vessels a proper name all the time and the ceremony can be done quite easily. He suggests that they call it ‘The African Queen’. I couldn’t believe my ears when I heard this part of the story. I love that

film! What a coincident, don’t you think? You may think nothing of this name but Mr.3 is an old film buff and he remembers the film from 1951 starring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn. Amazing fellar- this Mr.3 is. I hope to meet him one day.

Soap bubbles

And so it is. The little girl and the boy can’t believe their luck. They are going on a Viking voyage across the Amazon River aboard ‘The African Queen’. They set off full of anticipation and confidence. The weather is so calm that the man with the soap bubbles turns up. He parks his car by the old chimney like he has done so many sundays

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before, and from the car he pulls out a folding table and a chair. Everything is just like it should be. I must apologize. I know I promised you that I would only take a moment of your time and I know you have other more important - matters to think of. I’ll let you get on with your business now. I can pop in later and tell you more. My hope is that this situation isn’t that bad anyway! I certainly am beginning to feel pretty good about the whole thing, you see. Yours truly Anti Territory

By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


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The Sugar Plant Territory

The Sugar Plant is situated vest of the city centre of Groningen The aim of this studio is to design and plan for a future urban transformation for The Sugar Plant Territory, Groningen. The assignment for the Sugar Plant Territory is to combine designs for interventions in urban structure, public space, transformation process (including landscape interventions), and development possibilities with a vision for needs like infrastructural improvements. There are no existing housing or commercial problems that would determine the programme. The question is maybe how to tempt the market to invest in a new, preferably profitable (what is profitable?), use of space and thus ultimately redevelop the site.

“an experimental Garden for new urban development” The program/design should consider the following overall issues; how can landscapes contribute to urban development? Should the transformation

focus on process rather than result? Can the design for an iconic building set of the process and what are the merits and disadvantages of these options? The studio is invited to explore (a combination of) these possibilities.

City strategy – ‘an experimental Garden for new urban development’ The city is seeking to enhance even further its present position as the urban centre par excellence for the immediate region with almost a half million people. As a university city with a leading university, it also wishes to be known as a City of Talent where young people can sample the Tree of Knowledge and as a Health City with Healthy Ageing as its spear point. And with the other partner in Energy Valley it wants to play a key role in the turntable of sustainable energy and also have a neutral environmental impact at a project level. With increasingly fewer of its own development planning opportunities and situated in an area with increasing population shrinkage, Groningen

“The program is open. The scale and the context is debatable through the design” wishes to be an experimental Garden for new urban development.

Objectives of the work

The studio aims to plan, programe and design for a sustainable Sugar Plant Territory in Groningen and thus one important challenge of the work will be to identify where and how to develop and transform this urban landscape. Three overall themes must be addressed: 1. The connection to a general urban context and the city centre in particular. 2. The urban spaces and their mutual relations. Climate and recreational space.

3. Access and identity. Affiliation. The proposal should consider the possibility for future housing, sustainable rainwater management, acces for walking and bicycling, publig transportation, leisure, temporary use, a future bridge across the canal and urban frabric. The proposal should display a visionary design; combining history and contemporary culture - ecology, economy and technology. The circular boundary indicated on the illustration marks the general territory. The square marks the hole for your models to fit in. The program is open. The scale and the context is debatable through the design.

Note. This assignment text draws inspiration from the Europan 12 competition program for the transformation of an area just opposite the Sugar factory. By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


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The way we work I The way we work is by repeating the same model and drawings throughout the course. We do this while we talk, travel, listen, read, draw and evaluate. MEMO is an abbreviation for; Model, Engagement, Movement and Observation. The theory is: we make models because we work with space. We make them in order to engage with matter. The movement made from working with models help us observe and enable us to make new and better drawings and models. When we work with models and drawings they never exactly look alike. This is because they are feeding off of each other (through us) – one always making the other adjust a little.

The method

We use Google earth, maps, film and other representative medias to recreate the urban landscape of Groningen. We will build analogue model (we will build them in our Model Lab) of Groningen. During the building of the mod-

Presentations and discussions of design models. The way we work is through putting individual models and group models in the hole of the big model. This is our laboratory and this is where we rate and talk about the qualities of the design work. We set up simple work zones when we travel - in this case - in the old factory of The Sugar Plant, Groningen.

“we feed off models” el we will rate qualities of the urban landscape and the possibilities for new development as qualified as possible. The big model (the context model) will have a hole where we test and develop our ideas. The hole determines part of the project site. During our work with the design we use the walls and floors of the school to exhibit our work in progress. The exhibition wall is where we meet our imaginary client and where we let go of our fear of showing all the mistakes we have to make before we are satisfied with the result. Engagement. Think of a crime scene and of working on a murder case. Who is the murderer? In real life we try to recreate the scene of the crime through movement. We do this while we narrow in on a motive. The motive is important because it can reveal the murder. When we work in the studio we feed off models so to speak, because the movement we create makes us able to engage in our work. In planning we call the motive; issues (problem formulation) and the scene of the crime; the site. The observations we make when we work we document, evaluate and talk about. Observations that give us new knowledge and new possibilities are what we are looking for. We often call them the little mistakes because they

Simple research model from a fieldtrip.

often show themselves in a drawing or a model as something that just doesn’t fit in the big picture. So look out for them! Besides working digital we work with two types of different models.

Simple models

There is a substantial advantages in building simple physical models. The investigative and inquisitive models have a central role in the process of analysis and design. They empower ideas, concepts and programming.

We repeat the simple model again and again.

Abstract model

The first (and often the last) model we work with when we engage and try to understand our own work or other works of landscape architecture is even more simple. The model is abstract and we carry it with us in a model box. We can build this type of model anywhere.

In order to strengthen and qualify the way we discuss and evaluate our work in the context of a greater urban landscape we use a big model to test our arguments by putting our simple concept models in a big context model. We then repeat the process while we work on our digital plans, visualizations, sections, text and so forth.

Big model

Abstract model. We travel with a model box and we have meetings and talks while we are on the move.

To read more about the way we work http://www.fusion-journal.com/ issue/003-fusion-the-studio/the-simple-model-method-creating-steeplearning-curves-in-academic-designstudio/ By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


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The way we work II

Daniel Lund Sørensen and Niels-Christian Mariager Pedersen

By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


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The way we work III Group

Group

studio

studio

chairs and tables

Landscape Planning 2013

S TEE L S C APE P R O C E SS DI ARY

Landscape architec ture students in the city of Steel - Frederiksværk The unique historical site that deto Arresø and Roskilde Fjord, the hind the main pedestrian street and the canal has drawn attention to teachers and researchers from The University of Copenhagen. Consequently the University has organized a planning laboratory in Frederiksværk. The student projects will be a supplement to the competition that takes place later this year.

bricks and copplestone

Until the end of June 60-65 students from Denmark and the world will be working intensively with a transformation of Frederiksværk. The overall design question is how Frederiksværk can be transformed within the following themes; 1. The connection between the water and the urban environment. Sustainable landscapes. 2. The urban spaces and their mutual relations. Climate and recreational space. 3. Access and identity. -

tion. The aim is to work with both innovative and traditional solutions in a design for a sustainable urban process in Frederiksværk. Throughout the course at team of Landscape architects, teachers and researchers from The University of Copenhagen will follow and support their work. The studio entail travel, reshearch and work into a wide range of exemplaty sites in Barcelona, Spain. This paper will work as the stu-

dents dairy, where they each week upload their work, to share with orthers and to show the overall process of their work. One spread corresponds to one week of group work. In the end, this paper will show how the students have gone from analysing and a concept in week one, to having a com plete masterplan and design proposal in the end of their journey throgh Frederiksværk.

modelbox plant

tables

table on wheels

Bench

projector

The Big Model 3 stuffed birds

L a nd sc ap e P l a n ni n g 2 0 1 3

ST E ELS C APE PRO CES S D IARY

Landscape architec ture students in the city of Steel - Frederiksværk The unique historical site that deto Arresø and Roskilde Fjord, the hind the main pedestrian street and the canal has drawn attention to teachers and researchers from The University of Copenhagen. Consequently the University has organized a planning laboratory in Frederiksværk. The student projects will be a supplement to the competition that takes place later this year.

ladder

Until the end of June 60-65 students from Denmark and the world will be working intensively with a transformation of Frederiksværk. The overall design question is how Frederiksværk can be transformed within the following themes; 1. The connection between the water and the urban environment. Sustainable landscapes. 2. The urban spaces and their mutual relations. Climate and recreational space. 3. Access and identity.

tion. The aim is to work with both innovative and traditional solutions in a design for a sustainable urban process in Frederiksværk. Throughout the course at team of Landscape architects, teachers and researchers from The University of Copenhagen will follow and support their work. The studio entail travel, reswork into a wide hearch and range of exemplaty sites in Barcelona, Spain. This paper will work as the stu-

dents dairy, where they each week upload their work, to share with orthers and to show the overall process of their work. One spread corresponds to one week of group work. In the end, this paper will show how the students have gone from analysing and a concept in week one, to having a com plete masterplan and design proposal in the end of their journey throgh Frederiksværk.

projection on floor

gaffa tape - work zone

Group

collums

studio studio kitchen Group

The studio Versailles and the Gaffa zone.

The Studio

In the studio called Versailles a ladder across a gaffa tape boarder (on the floor) marks a special work zone -the Gaffa zone - this is where The Big Model is. This 3x5 m square is on the floor of Versailles, Model Lab and Skallingen and is the experimental ter-

The Gaffa zone in Versailles is where we work with vertical projection. This allows us to project digital drawings, film medial, historical maps onto the floor of the studio, the Big Model or onto a light table. We then work directly on the floor, the model or the table. When we are satisfied whit what we have we can take a picture of the plan and go back to work outside the Gaffa zone.

Entry

ritory of Groningen. In this zone we can mix and experiment with matter that normally seem non compatible - ex. fitting a stuffed bird, some bricks and a digital plan or film together and find new and unexpected observations in our work. From what we find we can then go back to

studio

our work outside the zone and incorporate new ways of seeing into our design. With the gaffa tape we can take this work zone with us when we need to. Here we work with all scales, with books, digital drawings and film projected from the seeling down onto the

models we make, paper presentations, stufed animals, 1:1 examples of pavement stone and soil types, movies, etc. We use the gaffa zone for presentations and exhibitions - called Campfire Design Sessions.

Horizontal Projection

Vertical Projection

ladder

table on wheels The Big Model

By Peter Lundsgaard Hansen


The way we work IV

The way we combine drawings and models aims to provide a platform for students, supervisors and other involved actors for the exchange of ideas and experience – individually and in groups - and for a solution-focusing strategy. Lastly, the method facilitates a key aim of the design studios: to increase the student’s ability to translate physical form (the model being a non-verbal agent) into a spoken language (creating an explicit awareness).


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The way we work V

We can take the Gaffa zone with us wherever we go. We can test and express concepts, important components and the architectural language. The simplicity means that the student has to address key components, the architectural language and syntax. Working with the models is democratic in the sense that every student and supervisor can rearrange and rebuild collectively in an on-going dialogue but also without suffocating personal artistic expression and integrity. The ability to see and recognize spatial and structural quality becomes as important as being able to create.


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The Sugar Mount

Fig: 01 Photomontage of the summer houses, the wotherfrom promenade, the urban square and the mount in 30 years. In the western part of Groningen, the sugar industry has left behind immense brown land. That is a call for unusual and original urban planning. The sugar mount project is all about designing a landscape as a strong urban body to invent a new story for the town. Vision, concept and process are described below. Europe saw the birth of the sugar beet industry during the first decades of the 19th century. Since then, the massive farming of Beta vulgaris spread all over Europe. In autumn, the harvest of huge amounts of beets is collected in piles along the fields, creating small temporary mounts. Today, European regulations and international competition lead to the closure of these indus-

“such an iconic landmark will be known by all and across the country” trial monuments. At Groningen, the urban ambition must match the immense urban opportunity, which is the result of the industry´s disappearance. Through the construction of the true and perennial Sugar mount our proposal aims at writing a new chapter in the city’s book.

A mount for Groningen

The project aims at creating a unique and never seen landscape in the city

of Groningen and north of the Netherlands by achieving the creation of the Sugar mount in 25 years. Dominating the region by its 50m, such an iconic landmark will be known by all and across the country. The mount and its surroundings will attract hundreds of citizens every week through a diversity of activities –from leisure to work. The area will play a major role in the overall urban fabric.

A colossal effort for eternal benefits

For more than a century, the West part of Groningen was dominated by the sugar industry, its smells and fumes. On 125 hectares, almost no marks remain from the unpleasant former occupant. The site is not far from being a blank page, literally. The scratch we can start from has already been mostly completed. However it is not a call for a violent tabula rasa but rather the opportunity to tell a new story. Today, the municipality must take it to galvanize and influence the urban fabric’s future in a very positive way. Our proposal is not only sized for the strict project area and will benefit far beyond. The construction of a mount demands a colossal effort but has eternal benefits, such as: the city branding at a national scale (to keep attracting people despite the overall population decline); building strong metropolitan relationship and position, (especially with Hoogkerk); strengthen the city west periph-

3 2

6

4 5

1

Fig: 02.a: short term development (+7 years): 1- allotment gardens, 2- summer houses, 3- first mount layer, 4- outdoor sport facilities, 5- orchards, 6- Waterfront promenade and bridge. 3 4

7

9 6

Fig: 02.b: mid term development (+15 years): 3- first foot of the mount, 4-completed, 6- completed, 7- arts and crafts studios, 9- urban square 3

10

Fig: 02.c: long term development (+25 years): 3- mount achieved, 10-open to private funds investements. Group 1: By Fredrik Berggren, Nathalie Silvia Garancsy, Liangliang Lin, Antoine Magnon


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EN T

ALLOTMENT GARDENS

SQUARE

C

DE NA ME O R P

KM

2014

T RON

C

F T ER WA

B

SUMMER HOUSES

E OD WO

AN MB

KM

B

EN T

URBAN SQUARE

CENTRAL MEADOW

ORCHARD

D

SQUARE LAWN

THEATRE

CAFE BMX FIELD

SPORTS FACILITIES

A

LAWN

ARTS AND CRAFTS STUDIOS

CLIMBING WALL

CLIMBING AREA

BMX FIELD

A

D

WILD SLOPE

1:3000

Fig: 03 Masterplan of the situation of the sugar mount area in 30 years. ery (establishment of a green belt) and organize its limit; offer a symbolic and memorable place for all citizens.

Planning back to front – strategy

Our proposal challenges two major characteristics of the site -first its immensity and then its isolation- by establishing a pattern of diverse functions according to a precise timeline. Three main stages give rhythm to the site’s new life (fig.02.a, b, c). The project bets on a progressive and increasing occupation of the site in order to

“elaborate a diversity of atmospheres across the site” elaborate different attachments and frequencies of uses (from very regular and official to irregular and non-official). After 7 years, most of the constructions will actually be plantations:

allotment gardens, summer houses, orchards, woods for sports and promenade will structure the site limits and offer a diversity of activities aiming at attracting and attaching a great amount of people. After 15 years, the foot of the mountain (urban square, outdoor theatre) is open to the public, arts and crafts studios are settled, the waterfront promenade and the woods for sports are completed. Finally, 25 years later (a 2 meter increase per year), the mount is completed. The materials necessary to such an operation are collected across the region through a sustainable process (cleaning of contaminated soil can also be considered). After 25 years, private investors have the opportunity to settle activities in the central part of the site. Short, mid and long-term objectives give strong outlines for the development of the entire area. The fig.03 gives a preview of the situation in 30 years. It emphasizes the key role of

Fig: 04. a The climbing wall separaties urban square and wood sport facilities.

Fig: 04. b The orchard.

Fig: 04.c The summer houses and the waterfront promenade.

Fig: 04.d The wood embankment at the foot of the mount.

the mount in the overall layout even though it is the last element completed. Meanwhile, unoccupied areas are cleaned up of the concrete surfaces remaining from the industry and cultivated into flowers meadows. This operation provides the first mount layers and regenerates the soil. Overall, the

project combines spontaneous vegetation developments with tree plantations managed by the municipality and individual plant choices (summer houses and allotment gardens). These three typologies contribute to elaborate a diversity of atmospheres across the site (fig. 04.a,b,c,d and 05).

RAILWAY ACESS ROAD

CAFE

THEATER THE MOUNT

HIGHWAY URBAN SQUARE

SUMMER HOUSES

ALLOTMENT GARDENS

Fig: 05 Section West/ East displaying the activities of the sugar mount area. Group 1: By Fredrik Berggren, Nathalie Silvia Garancsy, Liangliang Lin, Antoine Magnon


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Vooruit Groningen Existing vegetation

Main path

The Plantation

Bollards

New waterline

Canal

Link to city and landscape Pedestrian and bicycle connection

A The Stand

Fire places

Main path

D

Football goals

Gleditsia grove

Skate

The Verge C

Hard paved landscape bend towards the canal Pinus grove

The Basin

Bathing area with shallow water

Bollards

B Raised wooden deck with benches

Trampolines Main path

A

Deck chairs Changing rooms and showers

Prunus grove

Existing pavement

Sportfields and parking

The Square

Open space for events

The Plantation

Gleditsia grove

Acces road

The Plantation

Trees in plantholes in existing pavements or with undervegetation of meadow grass Robinia grove

Pedestrian and bicycle crossing

Trees in existing vegetation

Populus canescens grove

Old factory buildings Rail stop

a

Wooden deck

Line of Gleditsia

Lawn

Groves of different species

Flowering perennials

Poplar mix

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Masterplan 1:4000. Vooruit means forward in Dutch. The proposal consist of a new waterfront and a large plantation re-connecting the site with the city and allowing people to move forward into the landscape and the site into the future. A new permanent waterfront and a temporary plantation connects the Old Sugar Factory to the city centre and the rural landscape. With the history as a starting point a slow transformation prepares and matures the site for future development. The Old Sugar Factory is located west of the centre of Groningen. Groningen is the largest city in the northern part of The Netherlands and has one of the youngest populations due to the university. Right now most of the site is empty except for the buildings but the municipality plans to develop the area within fifteen years. The site is bound by the canal to the north, the highway to the east, the railway to the south and the open landscape to the west while the surrounding area is largely dominated by industry.

An Urban Park

The project aims at creating an urban park that respects and emphasizes the history of the place but also adds new elements and make the area attractive. With different experiences and rec-

A

Industrial area

Section Aa 1:500

City centre

Industrial/residential area Landscape

Old Sugar Factory

Highway and rail

Rail Industrial area Stadspark

Overview. Project area in context.

the different planted species and a gradual emergence of natural vegetation will create a diverse green area with different spatial qualities. In this proposal we have worked with simple ideas to create new experiences in the area and make people aware of this special place. In that way our project will become a starting point for future development on site and in the industrial area around the sugar factory as well as create a vibrant link between the city centre and the open landscape.

Find inspiration in landscape

Interpret

Moving Forward

The factory building and the square seen from the Pinus grove. reational functions a new waterfront is the main element inviting people to engage and investigate or simply hang out in an informal green setting; it establishes an identity and attraction for the area that will remain permanent through future development. The tree plantation is a temporary space with focus on process. Here

Canal

Overall the project consists of two areas each with their own identity. The areas borrow from and feed of each other through similarities and differences, creating contrast and interrelation between them and transforming the site into a large urban park. The Verge stands as our main element and key attraction of the site. With different vegetated areas and open spaces it facilitates many activities and allows the visitor to explore and engage in many different ways. The Plantation serves as the green backbone of the whole area supporting the waterfront and framing the pre-

The Verge

Re–shape

Compress and simplify

Process – origin of form. The design is inspired by the characteristic field pattern in the Dutch landscape trying to combine landscape imprint with urban structure.

Sightline framed by trees

The Plantation

Group 2: By Susie Frederiksen, Marie Glad, Camilla Kjærgaard Hansen


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Existing layer

landscape planning

The Verge

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The Plantation Connection Planting holes

New waterline

Structuring line of trees

Old pavement Concrete paving Platforms with vegetation Wooden deck

Mix of Poplar

Connection

Grove

Factory buildings

The three elements of the design; historic layer, waterfront and temporary green space. The main goal of the proposal is to preserve the historic layer and create a new identity, attraction and brand along with a connection between city and landscape. The three elements are combined in an urban park where the suspense between permanent and temporary creates a vibrant area with space for people to take interest and engage. served buildings as well as mediating their scale. The plantation underlines the site as a park where different trees grow in a mix of the existing pavements and grass meadow. The open character of the site is val-

“Transform slowly” ued and through tree species with light canopies, groups of trees with different characters and a fairly large planting distance a transparency is kept. On the whole site materials and vegetation are used to emphasize the merge of urban spaces and open landscape creating the desired experience. Not proposing housing development now allows the site to transform slowly and develop its new identity as an integrated part of the city. By giving way to this process and acknowledging the plantation as a temporary space the proposal seeks to prepare the site and make it even more attractive for residential development in the future. 25 ‰ A

750 ‰

Transformation strategy 83,3 ‰

B

25 ‰

83,3 ‰

25 ‰

C

D

25 ‰

83,3 ‰

Principle sections 1:500. Four different situations where terrain meets the water surface along the new waterline.

The Plantation

The Verge looking south east towards The Square. Pushing down the terrain draws the water in to the site and activates the canal. A pedestrian and bicycle path leads straight through the area connecting to the landscape and the city. It creates a sightline clearly marked by a row of trees. From behind The Plantation reaches out and grabs a hold of the waterfront keeping it in place and connecting it to the open square and the old factory building. The site already has quite a strong sense of place but in order to realize any visions for the site and this proposal in particular the site needs to be re-connected with its surroundings. The planned pedestrian and bicycle bridge is an important link in this process along with a proposed stop on the railway and a pedestrian crossing under the highway. The Verge serves as a fix point and brand in order to create an identity and attraction for the area. It is the main

Old chimney

design area where waterfront and terrain is re-shaped activating the canal by inviting people to engage with the water. On the southern part of the site interventions are simple and the proposal engages directly with the existing layer in a green structure. Together The Verge and the Plantation seeks to generate some of the characteristics of urban temporary spaces in order to clarify existing and new potentials in this interrelation between permanent and temporary drawing out activities such as skate, football etc.

Grove of Robinia

Around the existing buildings The Square provides possibilities for e.g. different cultural events and temporary installations. The proposal works with the existing historic layer adding new elements to create an urban park in keeping with the dynamic city. Through a gradual transformation it focuses on process both considering landscape architecture and general public mind set starting with what we find today and working towards what will happen in the future.

Old factory building

Railway

a

Group 2: By Susie Frederiksen, Marie Glad, Camilla Kjærgaard Hansen


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Where Two Lines are Meeting

The orchard

Masterplan in 1:3000

Indian Sunset

spontaneous vegetation

bee forge meadow

Summer Wind

brick

water

wood

ing request to use the area for cultural events.

Core

Logo with the two lines linking the inner city and the wet fields.

A cultural center will be installed in the old buildings in order to create a core for the area. Besides that, the main functions of the area are to create interesting and pleasant spaces for recreational purposes and events, as well as an east west connection between the inner city and the rural surroundings of Groningen and a north south connection from the northern bank of the canal to Stadspark. The central area of the project will provide space for events, theatre, exhibitions and concerts. It will also house restaurants, clubs and space for studios and workshops. The smaller building will be extended and space for new buildings is included in the planning. The center will become a magnet for Groningen’s young and creative citizens.

The Floating Culture Factory is a project, creating a new cultural core in the west of Groningen. Two promenades along the canal provide a backbone for the area and open it up for the public. They also connect the site with the city center and Stadspark. Two buildings and a chimney are the only remnants of the old sugar plant industrial area. The site is located at the western border of Groningen, a city in the north west of the Netherlands. The site has an approximate size of 18 ha.

“...pleasant spaces for recreational purposes and events...” In it’s current economic state, the city is not in need of new business, housing or industrial development. As we learned from our visit to the site, there is already an overwhelm-

Two Lines Diagram of the sites context, its conections, hard surfices, vegetation areas and water.

The two main pathways of our project guids the people along the canal towards the core and connect it with the former flooding fields and the inner city. They as well break the edge of the southern canal bank abreast to the

baslat paving stone

marbel paving stone

core. This way they create even more attention for this area. At this point, next to a new wide open water area, stairs created for sitting will invite the visitor to linger. To make this 6 meter wide promenade like paths even more visible, it will be paved with a white marbel. A new path system will provide plenty of access possibilities for pedestrians, cyclists and emergency vehicles.

Water

The project is framed by canals in the north and south as well as a third canal connecting different water areas of the site with each other. Water is used for recreational purposes such as swimming and reflecting. It provides a link with the inner city and the Stadspark and seperates the site from the southern industrial aera and the traintrack.

Mosaic

A mosaic of different shaped polygons made of bricks, water or of 3 different vegetation mixes, will create a carpet for the new culture center. It is inspired by the mosaic of the Dutch landscape and with a topographic difference of up to 75cm, it will provide an interesting open space for relaxation and entertainment.

Group 3: By Audrey Atchade, Norman Heidoetting, Monika Rekos


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Plants

In the mosaic perennial mixes with a rich variety of height, color and structure will be used. Chosen for their attrectivness and long flowering period. The species selection provides a variety of autumn colors and some interesting structure remains in the winter. The high amount of grasses and other hardy perennials expending the showtime to almost the whole year. Some mosaic parts just use existing vegetation. A bee forge meadow with fruit trees and Betula pendula will be

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created. In the space between the mosaic and the wet fields in the west we will plant water tolerant plants.

Illumination

As the area is supposed to be used day and night, the edges of the topography will be highlighted at night by indirect light, which is also used to illuminate the permanent seating. Spots in the bricks as well as in the water will emphasise the pattern and the importance of the water.

plant mixes Indian Sunset

hight in m

Summerwind

0,1 - 1

Kiepenkerl Bee Forage Plants pro no 4590 Trees Prunus avium var. Prunus domestica subsp. Domestica Malus domestica elstar Pyrus communis Betula pendula

landscape planning

flower color yellow, oragne, red white, yellow, light blue, purple

0,1 - 1,40

Section of the Promenade by night. Scale 1: 100 time II - X II - X

0,15 - 0,8

yellow, blue, red

VII - XI

up to 30 up to 10 8 to 15 up to 15 10 to 25

white white to green white white to pink white green- yellow

IV - V IV - V IV - V IV - V IV - V

Plantlist

References for path ilumination.

Visualisation of the cultural center and market.One of the weekly events..

Where two lines are meetin. A visualisation of the promenads and the cultural cernter.

Section no.1 The island of memory. Scale 1:250

Section no. 9 The end of the promenade. Scale 1:250

Section no.6 The site in front of the building Scale 1:250

Section no.8 The end of the conection to the Stadspark. Scale 1: 250

Section no.3 Southen edge of the site. Scale 1:500 Group 3: By Audrey Atchade, Norman Heidoetting, Monika Rekos


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Westerbruut hoendiep green corridor ex. house boats ferry terminal

kayak club

library

energieweg

alotments mixed housing

ferry terminal culture house // student club public bath

public accommodations

laan highway

eendractskanaal

existing vegetation

chimney

waterfront residences

public square

cafe

kindergarten

car access

community cluster grove

A

path

local business supermarket

de wolkenfabriek // former sugar plant

public promenade garden village // family housing

public promenade

student housing

workshops // student housing

a

terrace

parking

station // offices

parking

car access green corridor flower market

north 1:3000

existing trees: oak, willow

small growth: acer, herbaceous perrenials, grasses

orchard: apple,pear, cherry,blossom

medium growth: hawthorn, willow

structured: hornbeam, robinia

green corridor: poplar

public promenade: oak, thornless honeylocust, robinia,acer

Westerbruut masterplan illustrating the proposed canal profiles, building footprint, green corridor through the site, public promenade, public open spaces and green structures. Groningen boasts the largest percentage of students per population in the Netherlands. One in four identify as students. The local municipality and universities encourage and anticipate further growth in student numbers. Students today want to live inner city in affordable housing options. They require good infrastructure, mobility and optimal transport systems. Analysis of the site has unveiled the potential of the former Sugar Plant Territory as a new residential zone. Westerbruut creates a hub whereby the city, university campuses and open spaces beyond the site can be connected. Four main strategies are used to drive the design process: activat-

ing site, connecting site, city and surrounds, flexibility and adaptability of design implementation.

An optimal site

We wish to activate the area using a dynamic program in which the construction and evolution of the design can be implemented gradually.

“The element that strikes us most about the site is its proximity to the city... ” The existing site can be improved immediately and the design response evolve through stages of recreating and enhancing the site in preparation

university sports area

Response to site

A green corridor and public promenade through the site will increase accessibility and connectivity. These definitive routes allow fluidity across and through the site. The green corridor connects the northern sports and residential areas with Stadspark in the south. The public promenade connects Groningen city in the east with the

stadspark

open landscape in the west. Local planning guidelines discourage using vehicles as the primary mode of transport. The green corridor and public promenade prioritise cycle paths and walkways. Public transport hubs will be installed connecting site with city and municipalities beyond. A train station connects directly with Central Station and two ferry terminals. The existing canal provides a strong grounding element to the site. As a result the design draws water down into the site. These lines of water contribute to the quality of location and residential zones. They also create alternative access routes and areas for recreation. In addition to these transit lines a series of new streets and lanes will conallotments

ferry terminals

student housing

city centre

open landscape

Site context

green corridor

for future development. The element that strikes us most about the site is its proximity to the city and how simply with design invention connections can be made with various regions of Groningen. A place where water and vegetation can meet and people will converge for recreational and living purposes.

family housing

existing trees proposed trees

Green structure

canals stormwater management

Water structure

residential commercial existing

Site development Group 4: Cinta Gomez, Diana Avery, Milan Moldenhawer, Søren Lahn


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main canal

landscape planning

workshops // student housing

green corridor

waterfront residences

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allotments

A new urban residential zone intergrated into greater Groningen. View from De Wolkenfabriek (former Sugar Plant) rooftop looking across the site illustrating the green corridor, proposed canal structures, residential and recreational zones. tribute to accessibility and connectivity across the site with parking spaces provided. These lines of connectivity will extend beyond the boundary to meet with inner city amenities, museums, atttractions, university and creative institution facilites. The new urban zone will consist of combined housing typologies that cater to 25% of students. Leaving the remainder to cater to a variety of inhabitants. Ranging from affordable mixed use apartments, workshops and studios to waterfront residences. Public buildings will include a library, culture house and kindergarten.

Different housing densities will represent different community clusters. These include houses with private gardens, water frontage, higher density housing with shared community squares, local community shopping centres including retail and services. New and improved vegetation will provide areas for recreation and relaxation. Street trees will enhance the green corridor and public promenade. Other green structures will include the public square, small courtyards and plazas, private gardens, alotments and public open areas of vegetation.

canal

existing

veg-

etation

waterfront residences

tile clinkers

grass

rest place

table tennis

pond

bbq area

community centre grass reinforcement

bike parking

rooftop gardens

local business

supermarket

street asphalt

parking

View of canal, waterfront residences and water edge.

street

private garden

family housing

canal

1:500 Detail plan illustrating community cluster and shared square.

mixed housing

street

canal

water front

workshops

plaza

1:500 Section aA illustrating traffic routes, green structures, buildings and canal structures. Group 4: Cinta Gomez, Diana Avery, Milan Moldenhawer, Søren Lahn


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Park Kwekerij House boats Laan 1040-1945 Highway Hoendiep canal

Water Cluster Forrest Cluster

Bridge

Path Boardwalk

Main road

Factory Cluster

Chimney

Existing vegetation

Main road

Parking

Wet Fields

Existing vegetation

Existing building ‘De Wolkenfabriek’

Meadow Cluster

Activity Square

Event Spot Garden area

Existing building Sport facilities Railway

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Ill.1 ‘Park Kwekerij’ Masterplan 1:3000 Green Link Urban Link

Inner City

Site Wet Fields Stadspark

City Edge

Ill.2 The site is linking existing urban and green structures.

Ill.3 A new production landscape is created as an urban nursery with trees new infrastructure, and greenhouses.

Ill.4 Over time different public spaces occurs and new paths crack through the grid structure of vegetation.

Ill.5 Build structures around the greenhouses create new urban environments.

‘Park Kwekerij’ creates an urban landscape based on a tree nursery that transforms through time. Monotone and dynamic spatial qualities will develop and social city spaces and relations between the site and the city will emerge.

is defined by its edges which are created by strong infrastructural elements

and south of the site (See ill.2). The new urban development project ‘Park Kwekerij’ merges the potential of both scenarios and supports a flow that is linking existing urban and green areas in Groningen. At the same time the site will provide a different character to the city that can be beneficial on a longer term and develop in different levels. The unique spatial experience of a tree nursery creates an urban park there is in the threshold between monotony and dynamics. This park becomes a new typology in the experience of different landscapes and landuses on the city edge between city and agriculture and a strategic tool to create a new identity for the area as a public space and an area for activities and living.

within the first 15-20 years, makes it possible to work towards a temporarily use of the area in a way that enhances existing ecological and social processes on the site and contain a program for future residential areas. The tree nursery planting is used as an urban development strategy that both supports the municipality with a “tree supply” for other development projects and contains an evolving identity and green urban environment in itself.

An industrial production leaves traces, that can be used to emphasize foundation funded qualities and develop into new opportunities. This intervention at the former sugar factory site in the west part Groningen introduces an urban tree nursery as a concept for a dynamic way to create spatial qualities there is beneficial in a temporary context and will develop a green structure where buildings can be implemented as a part of the production process.

In a city context

The site is located in the western end of Groningen in an industrial area and

“New focal point in the urban fabric” as well as natural structures as the canal and a wetland area. The analysis of the sugar factory area reveals the potential of a site that today has limited access, to be a new focal point in the urban fabric. The Green link define the area together with the existing romantic park ’Stadsparken’ south of the area and the wetland fields in the western edge as a larger recreational area there is accessible from various parts of the city. The Urban link defines the potential of an urban structure that will connect residential areas in the city edge with the housing in the inner city through the business/commercial areas north

Tree nursery as strategy

Since The Municipality of Groningen has no plans to build on the area in

Development of the grid

By introducing the nursery as principle for the strategic development, a massive green grid structure is filling up the space where the sugar production once was taking place. Rows of young tress of varying species are planted in production lines in monoculture sections with a variation in width. At the establishment stage

Group 5: By Lisbeth Feldskou, Matilde C. Gomes, Nicolai L. Mortensen, Rasmus W. Pedersen


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Canal

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Boardwalk Community greenhouse Hazel bushes

Public terrace Oak groups

Ill.8A Water trench and production lines

Raised plateau

Birch plantation

Larch group Parking area

Oak plantation Thinned Birch plantation

Solitary pinetrees

Water trench

Cherry plantation

Ill.8B Raised terrain around clusters

Clearing

Community greenhouse Existing vegetation

Ill.8C Activity square

N

Shared space Main road

Locust group

Ill.6 Zoom of the masterplan 1:1000, showing the relation between building clusters and the dissolved nursery grid Ill.8D Plantation and volumes

Ill.8E Orchard of mixed species

Ill.8F Solitary trees

Ill.7 Visualization depicting the dissolving nursery structure, existing reminiscences are still visible

Ill.8G Clearings

the plantings will already create lines and open spaces that will be more visible as the trees grow. To contrast the straight lines, areas with existing vegetation is kept to have a green structure that correlates to the story of the factory and the existing buildings, and to have bigger vegetation elements from the beginning. New spaces will emerge and develop as the grid is transforming by thinning or replanting of the trees. That way, areas with dense planting will appear as a volume compared to areas where tree groups or solitary trees are created by a massive thinning in the green grid. To facilitate the removing and replanting of trees, water trenches and production paths is implemented in the green system and clarifies that the green structures also have a practical purpose (See ill.8A-G.). The site plan suggests a stringent layout of planted rows for production

ready taking place and these local actors can help kick start new initiatives on the area. The plantings in close relation to the building are used to facilitate this, e.g. the café in De Wolkenfabriek can use the orchard and kitchen garden to supply the kitchen. Attraction can also be created by the species of trees around the site. By planting trees with different qualities and characters the seasonal change can be utilized and creates a frame around an arrangement. That could be a spring festival when all the cherry trees are blossoming or an autumn gathering where the sweetgum creates a fiery red scenery where apples can be picked. That way the trees can fill out the void until buildings are implemented on the area with fully grown trees.

purpose. The infrastructure is implemented as initial cracks in this structure which create circulation on the site and a hierarchy of pathways where new connections to the surrounding city and landscape are established. The cracks is used to create vari-

“Greenhouses are used as a driver” ous situations in the perception of the nursery plantings as well as a method to secure low speed movement of cars in the future residential setting. The scheme for new buildings introduces four urban islands which each has their own ‘local’ identity. Attached to the northern crack the buildings in the city islands create a dense cluster around an inner common public space and a porous edge towards the declining nursery structure. Thereby the city islands interact with the surroundings

in more levels creating variations in the public and private space around them. The city islands are developed around the greenhouses used in the establishment of the nursery. The greenhouses are used as a driver for creating urban environment in the clusters as they can be used for public matters after the nursery is established and become a strong common space where activities and new initiatives are placed around (See ill. 6).

Green temporality

By using trees and bushes as building elements supports the idea of temporality where the site is “empty” until built on in 15-20 years. That way the area is in an on-going process with value from the beginning and something to offer the users. The existing factory building, De Wolkenfabriek, is a strong stakeholder in the process where activities are al-

Group 5: By Lisbeth Feldskou, Matilde C. Gomes, Nicolai L. Mortensen, Rasmus W. Pedersen


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Crossing Hoendiep A Path The Park

Th e

Prom

cit y

de ena

HOENDIEP-PARK

HET SUIKERPLEIN

Hoendiep Canal

wetlands

post-industrial landscape

lake

The Sugar Factory

bicycle path post-industrial landscape

railway

a

1:4000

N

Masterplan The Sugar Factory Site is a post-industrial area that needs a new strategy, in order to develop into a profitable site for urban transformation. The strategy in this project is to connect the site to the city of Groningen and create hubs of creativity and leisure as catalysts for urban development. We aspire to do this by making few but deliberate changes in the landscape. The municipality of Groningen seeks to facilitate innovative uses of the Sugar Factory Site. To date there are a few bottom up initiatives e.g. a restaurant and temporary housing in the remaining factory buildings. To activate the area, the municipality has planned a bridge across Hoendiep Canal to make the site accessible. Due to the university and the art academy, Groningen is thriving with creativity, bursting with small creative initiatives. Our project is inspired by this creative urge of the citizens. Artists and creative entrepreneurs are encouraged to engage with the site, giving it identity and new functions.

Landscape Qualities

The design concept is inspired by the unique landscape features of the Sugar

A

Salix

Factory Site. While walking through the site, its story reveals itself through the remaining fundaments and floors of the demolished buildings. Where once were walls, willow and reeds break through the gravel, creating enclosures in the vast, rough landscape.

“With the factory building as focal point the design unfolds, making the landscape accessible” If left to natural succession, the terrain will become a post-industrial forest. Moving further to the west the remains of the former industrial basins have turned into lush wetlands with potential for rich biodiversity. A structured design emphasizes these existing landscape qualities, framing the wilderness of the post-industrial site. With the factory building as focal point the design unfolds, making the landscape accessible.

Proposal

The design proposal consists of few but deliberate and permanent interventions. The main structuring element is

fountain Salix

existing Quercus Prunus

pillars

Section

Hoendiep-Park

Hoendiep Canal

existing

connections

dedicated areas

Materiality

Het Suikerplein consists of different typologies framing the factory buildings and uplifting them to industrial monuments. Hoendiep Park slopes slightly downwards allowing the water to shape the park. This marks the transition of the cultivated landscape to the untouched wetlands. The rough beauty of the post-industrial landscape is emphasized by the use of refined materials such as black Dutch brick tiles, wooden decks and flowering trees. Also more rough materials such as gravel, corten steel, concrete and willows trees are used, in order to create a balance between the

post-industrial notch Square

Promenade

formed by two axes connecting the site with the city and the wetlands. Together with the factory buildings and the bridge these axes define a dedicated area, in which hubs of creativity (‘Het Suikerplein’) and recreation (‘Hoendiep-Park’) are created. The two axes manifest as “The Promenade” and the “Park Path”, functioning as bicycle and pedestrian paths. The Promenade stretches along the Hoendiep Canal, providing a space for leisure with a view of the site and the water. The Park Path connects the dedicated area with the wetlands.

chimney

Prunus and Malus mix

Grove

concept

Concept diagrams old and the new. The same principle is used in the renovation of the building, adding glass facades and an atrium. Het Suikerplein, Hoendiep-Park and The Promenade connect the area with the city of Groningen and create new public awareness of the Sugar Factory Site.

scene

pillar hall

atrium

a

The Sugar Factory (Restaurant and exhibition hall)

Het Suikerplein

1:1000

Group 6: By Linda Bonde, Sidsel Genee, Julie Lysemose and Simon Kallenbach Rasmussen


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concrete Energieweg

PARK PATH

existing Quercus

Malus Prunus Prunus

existing Salix

HOENDIEP-PARK lawn Malus

path bridge

high grasses

wooden deck Salix

Hoendiep Canal fountain post-industrial landscape

PROMENADE

SQUARE brick tiles

concrete

gravel

light pillars

chimney

GROVE

spiral stairs

Prunus and Malus mix

path post-industrial landscape

light in surface pillars

1:750

N

Zoom of plan showing the crossing between The Promenade and the dedicated areas. The bridge connecting the two main activity centers (Het Suikerplein and Hoendiep-Park) is the original catalyst of the transformation.

A view down The Promenade, showing the meeting with the square and the bridge. Group 6: By Linda Bonde, Sidsel Genee, Julie Lysemose and Simon Kallenbach Rasmussen


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Urban Waters it y

c en

te r

an 4 19

nn

to c

La

Co

Shops and businesses

ion ect

4 19 05H igh wa

A’

y

H

die oen

pc

han

nel

Water fro

nt park

Beach

Café Library Fitness

Central square

Wetland

Kindergarten

Courtyards

Wetland transition

Cultural center Shops and businesses

A

Forestbelt

Forestbelt

N

Railway

Pa

Industrial area

100 M

th to St ad sp

Trees

Coppice

ar k

Park area Lawn

Concrete squares

Wetland vegetation

Meadow

Bushes

Cube houses

Apartment building

Row houses

Masterplan 1:3000 - The water edge and surface along with the vegetation provide attractive surroundings for residents and visitors. Urban waters provides a housing and landscape solution for the growing population of Groningen. This urban extension experiments with the integration of water. The physical remains of the former sugar factory form a central base within the water, urban and vegetation elements. This provides the residents and visitors with a variety of urban spaces and water experiences. The city of Groningen is located in the northeastern part of the Netherlands and has undergone a population growth for the past decade (Groningen municipality, 2014:3). Providing the growing population with quality living environments is one of the challenges Groningen faces.

“Contrasting water edges ensure a diverse experience for residents and visitors” A great opportunity arose when the municipality bought the former

Conceptual layers

Water edge structure

Urban profile

Green composition

The main feature and serves as the structuring element.

An urban center with a main square. Residential areas for a wide range of citizens. Access to the site improved. visitors. The water surface determines the overall shape of the design and is the structuring element of this urban extension. This structure is interrupted by the new central square, which highlights the historic sugar factory and will serve as the centre of the site. A new vegetation structure connects the site with the wetland in the west. ‘Urban waters’ forms a unique, diverse urban area only two kilometres from the inner city of Groningen.

A forest belt encloses the site. Urban vegetation provides appealing open spaces. environment as the water adds recreational and aesthetic values with a variety of waterfronts. These waterfront typologies define the accessibility, appearance and function of the edges. (see typologies on next page) The harbour edge has a hard concrete appeal referring to the old industrial function of the site. The edge has a recreational function and some of the existing harbour front in the northeast is preserved. Steps are integrated in several places to make the water accessible. The private edge is only accessible for the residents living directly by the water. This allows homeowners to design their own water edge and enables them to have a private dock.

sugar factory site located south of the Hoendiep channel, east of the city center. The factory dates back from 1914 and has played a significant role in the history of Groningen. The factory was closed in 2008 and the area has been in little use since.

Urban waters

The design expands the existing water surface and edge forming a varying and appealing environment. This environment provides an attractive neighbourhood along the water. The integration of water distinguishes this urban site from other areas in Groningen. Contrasting water edges ensure diverse experiences for residents and

Water edge structure

Water plays a prominent role within the design, where the main features are three water bodies, attached to the Hoendiep channel. Introducing water into the site results in a dynamic living

Section 1:400 from A-A’

Asphalt road Double lane

Appartments with roof garden

Parking

Brick road Parking Single lane

Semi-public courtyards

Group 7: By Nick Dyhr, Sara Folveg, Hulda Davidsdottir, Joost van Haaster


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A visualization of the view from the water front park towards the central square. The park edge gradually slopes towards a low sheet piling edge. The edge has a maintained appeal and people are able to make contact with the water. The natural edge is characterized by vegetation suitable for wetlands. It slopes gradually and it is not possible for people to make water contact. The edge serves an ecological function and refers to the wetland in the west.

Edges

Harbour edge

The urban profile

Most of the old industrial buildings have been demolished. The remaining building (1915-1921) and chimney (1914) have a high monumental value (van der Hoeve, 2009:p28). These structures are kept as a strong historic reference to the site’s former use and for their aesthetic values. New devel-

Private edge

“The forest belt surrounding the urban structure causes it to appear as a clearing in the forest”

Park edge

Natural edge

Water edge typology explaining different edges and their locations.

Parking Brick road Double lane

Row housing

opment will not exceed the height of the existing structures to emphasize their importance.

Private garden

Three new building typologies are introduced; row housing with private gardens, apartments with shared roof terraces, and cube housing with a flexible design. This variation in buildings results in a diverse population, as there will be homes suitable for young people, families and elderly.

The green composition

West of the sugar factory the former flow fields form a valuable wetland nature area with a good habitat for birdlife (Groningen municipality homepage, 2014). Together with the nearby Stadspark the wetland have a high recreational value. Accessibility to these areas are improved with a new path system. Different typologies which vary in function, species composition and maintenance are used to create contrast between urban green and natural green. The forest belt surrounding the urban structure causes it to appear as a clearing in the forest. This forest is complemented by plantings consisting of water edge vegetation, meadows, coppice and scattered trees. The urban green structure consist of semi-public courtyards, public park areas and street trees. These elements

Public water front park

require a higher maintenance and consist of lawns, bushes, solitary trees and flowerbeds. Residents and visitors are provided with a variety of public green spaces, offering possibilities for a wide range of activities.

Transformation

In the brief of this design challenge, the site is described as ‘an experimental garden for new urban development’ (Hansen, 2014: p6). The design ‘Urban waters’ experiments with the introduction of water into this urban garden. It transforms the former industrial area into a new attractive neighbourhood by putting emphasis on the water, urban and green layers while acknowledging the historic value of the sites former sugar production purpose.

References Groningen municipality (2014) ‘Sta¬tistical annual review’, Groningen. Groningen municipality (2014) ‘Stedelijke Ecologische Structuur, de SES’ [Online]. Available from http://gemeente.groningen.nl/natuur/ses-als-fysiekeruimtelijke-structuur [accessed: 3 June 2014]. J.A. van der Hoeve, R. Over¬beek (2009) ‘De Friesch-Groningse coöperatieve beetwortelsuikerfabriek (suikerunie) van Heemskerckstraat 101,Groningen’, Groningen/Utrecht. P. L. Hansen (2014) ‘Program for Landscape planning 2014’, University of Copenhagen. p.6.

Cube housing

Parking

Group 7: By Nick Dyhr, Sara Folveg, Hulda Davidsdottir, Joost van Haaster


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Testing Fields pedestrian entrance

floating decks

P

pedestrian bridge open strucutre

b

P

research stations

a

swimming lake

B

canal square

main entrance

pump house pedestrian underpass

main acces road testing fields

P

A

workshop village

pixel park old sugar factory

P activity areas

southern overpass railway

1:4000 N Masterplan: A grid of testing fields engages larger masses of forest throughout the site. The old sugar factory is at the heart of a densified central area, connecting to the activated canal front. Testing Fields is a site for full scale experiments in a public recreational context, working as a satellite for the universities of Groningen. Historical layers are combined with new interventions to create a contemporary design. Influenced by the historical remains on the site, the location and Groningen’s identity as a student city, the Testing Fields contribute new knowledge and enhances urban life by testing and experimenting in a framework of recreational elements.

Merging historical layers

Our proposal is anchored in the historical layers of the site. The characteristic remaining factory buildings are put to new use and a brick chimney stands out as a landmark and a reminder of the history of production. The temporarily hidden footprint of the factory

access to canal

open structure

New facilities and built structures secure use and recreation

Expansion of existing vegetation with new forest plantings.

b

B

Section B: A research station in the testing fields. complex is now working its way up in form of vegetation retracing the outlines of buildings, old roads and silos. Century old land divides are still traceable under the layer of the factory visible in directions and borders. Inspired by these patterns the stories of the site will be told through our design. The natural succession taking over the site encloses the few trees planted purposely. By incorporation the existing vegetation into new larger forested areas, we create a soft framework for

workshop village

a

Section A: From canal to factory through the densified central areas of the site.

1:500

Industrial historical layer: The sugar factory buildings and traces

the grid system of the testing fields. The forest areas can be entered and add new recreational experiences.

Agricultural historical layer: Old field divides

Testing and recreation

Our concept combines creative and scientific experiments with a recreational value for the public. Considering Groningen’s status as a student city, we see the site as an experimental satellite for the two universities located in the city. The various sizes of the fields will facilitate a wide range of experi-

old factory chimney

Exploded axonometric: The merging of historical layers inspires a concept that is realised and enhanced by interventions in landscape and architecture, providing new spaces, functions and recreational qualities.

open square for events

old factory building

1:500 1:500

A

Group 8: By Christian Henrik Ankerstjerne, Louise Juncher Lunde, Sebastian Naumann, Lærke Sophie Keil


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Visualisation: a view from the testing fields east of the factory building, looking west towards the old factory chimney and the workshop village. ments. The exact use of the fields will not be dictated, instead a set of criteria will ensure that the conducted projects fit into a public recreational context.

“...the site will offer constantly changing experiences...” Experiments should be varied and balanced, and could include research in fields such as: arts, architecture, agriculture, biology, civil engineering etc. For the public, the site will offer

constantly changing experiences depending on the current experiments, in some cases inviting public participation. The site will also be able to host events, such as festivals, exhibitions, market days and open air cinemas. In a smaller scale, the Pixel Park repeats the testing field pattern, facilitating smaller experiments, creating an attractive recreational south facing square, connected to the activities in the sugar factory building. The canal is activated and made accessible along the entire water front via floating decks and pathways, enabling

recreational activities and the expansion of testing fields into the water.

Built structures

Research stations, consisting of clusters of containers, are situated in the junctions of the fields. Each cluster is shaped around a common meeting area. The research stations can be modified to fit ongoing tests, but also provide basic shared facilities. The clusters are anchored in the open landscape by hedges, creating smaller spaces and vertical structure in the open fields throughout the year. Fur-

new bridge

boardwalk

sitting steps plinths concrete tile paving plinths gravel open structure

trees: Pinus, Gleditsia, Platanus Sorbus, Populus

commercial, workshops, study centre

commercial, workshops, study centre

gravel

Detail plan: The canal square links together the new pedestrian bridge, the water and the workshop enclave. 1:500 N

ther indoor activities, like workshops, small commercial functions and a study centre, will be located in the permanent low-rise buildings in the workshop village north of the factory. Along the canal, seven more or less open structures function as recreational shelters or as temporary research stations servicing the testing fields in the canal.

Infrastructure

Integrated in the grid structure of the testing field pathways ensure full accessibility. The area will be accessible for the public on three strategic spots: at the bridge in the north, crossing the canal and leading straight to the canal square available for pedestrians and cyclists only. The main access road and the alley parallel to the highway are available for cars. The overpass for pedestrians and cyclists in the south, crosses the rail tracks and connects the site with the surrounding areas. Pedestrians and cyclists have the freedom of choice in terms of moving within the site, whereas car access is merely granted on certain roads. The event square is shared space allowing access to the rest of the site, delivering goods and materials for the experiments and events. By activating the old pumphouse, we recreate the streams of water running through the site, along the fields. Surfacing in bassins in the events square and Pixel Park.

Group 8: By Christian Henrik Ankerstjerne, Louise Juncher Lunde, Sebastian Naumann, Lærke Sophie Keil


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Agri-Unie

“Visualization showing the atmosphere of fields for urban farming right next to housing.”

The transformation of the Suiker Unie site in Groningen addresses two main issues, first re-engaging the citizens with the site and secondly preparing the area for future housing development. The “AgriUnie” project aims to create a strong framework based on urban farming which will be built step-by-step for housing programs. Groningen in the Netherlands has continued to grow demographically, but the current economy appears to be very challenging considering traditional planning. This stagnation of the housing market forces us to plan in a different way as we know that the site is supposed to remain without any program for the next 15-20 years and then be transformed into housing. Therefore, this project takes advantage of the site’s potentials in short-term period while preparing a flexible framework capable of absorbing a series of transformations for the needs of the future city.

Strategy

The site is located between agriculture (west) and the city (east). Our approach is inspired by the idea of an “ecotone”, meaning a transition area between two

biomes where ecologies are in tension. In this situation, the city and the agriculture will overlay and interact to create an “agri-city” where urbanity and fields meet. Thereby, the project allows citizens to enjoy the city life

“(...) short-term opportunities within the framework of uncertainty of the future (...)” style while being partly self-sufficient by producing their own food.

A step-by-step development is a different and flexible way to transform the site depending on investments and the citizen’s engagement. It provides short-term opportunities within the framework of uncertainty of the future and thereby takes into account the municipality’s program for the site. Step 1: As the budget is low at this stage, the idea is to activate the area engaging citizens giving them the possibility to rent a plot for urban farming. Existing buildings and shelters for tools will be surrounded by a frame of fields, meadows and trees which constitute a strong landscape structure. Step 2: As money increase, housing

will be built allowing architecture and agriculture to merge. Step 3: Investment keep increasing and allow reaching the final stage of the design process.

Landscape structure

Inspired by the strict man made geometry of the field of the typical Dutch landscape, the design plays with these lines to create a project which dialogue with the surrounding agriculture. A. By mutualising fields, the project creates large open spaces towards the canal. Citizens are responsible for their own plot and can use it for all kinds of urban farming. Different

Money final housing development of the Suiker Unie + “one step planning” site

housing + development

site City activating the area urban farming

Agriculture

revenues

add values and program 0 “one step planning”

Between agriculture and city

Design inpiration from the fields

Time 15/20 years

Step-by-step development

Group 9: By Trine Baarsøe Pedersen, Melissa Svendson, Esben Elleby Snitgaard , Maxime Cloarec


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alley

hill

A’ canal experimental fields bridge

allotment gardens

stage

promenade

A

the ards tow enter c y cit

community field

orchard

esplanade / event / market place

water reservoir

toolshed

courtyard

suiker unit

cows field railway

N

“1:4500 Masterplan showing the final stage of the Suiker Unie site in Groningen.”

eslplanade / event / market place

2,3 storey building with courtyard

5,6 storey building

community field / urban farming

streetscape

1:1000 section west-east

sizes will correspond to the different needs: community fields, allotment

A. Fields for urban farming

“(...) trees will define a clear organization of the space (...)”

existing building B. Ditches dividing the fields

C. Trees organize the site

Salix

orchard D. Meadows before housing

E. housing structure

“Landscape layers ”

Populus

gardens and fields for experimentation. To facilitate urban farming, shelters for tools will be implemented from the beginning. As the owners of each plot will be replaced through time, the fields become dynamic and experiences will constantly change. B. As a traditional way to divide fields, small ditches will be created and linked to the canal, they will also have the potential to handle storm water. C. Trees will define a clear organization of the space. Rows of Populus tremula will emphasize the lines towards the canal. They will be planted next to the higher buildings as a complementary design choice while smaller rows of Salix alba will be planted in the future streetscapes. Moreover, orchards of fruit trees (Malus, Pyrus and Prunus) will constitute the public rooms between buildings and fields. D. Meadows, surrounded by trees,

will require low maintenance and constitute open rooms which will then be transformed into housing. E. Building structures of 2, 3 and 5, 6 storey buildings will constitute five communities. 2 and 3 storey buildings are associated to courtyards whereas 5 and 6 storey buildings are directly connected to the fields. The building process is planned to ensure the final design of the site. The first two communities will be built around the vacant industry buildings and later the rest of them as investment increase. Parallel with the building process, a hill will be created with the left over material from the building construction and become bigger over time. Finally, the central part of the whole site will be transformed into a public space. By its dimension, it will allow potential investors and organizations to arrange specific events and activities which cannot take place in the existing public spaces in Groningen.

Group 9: By Trine Baarsøe Pedersen, Melissa Svendson, Esben Elleby Snitgaard , Maxime Cloarec


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Linking Neighbourhoods Pedestrian bridge

Leftover spaces for vegetation and natural selection

Café

Car park a A

Event square for concerts

Library and bookshop

Market square

Workshop

Wolkenfabriek Restaurant

Car entry Reading hall

Kitchengardens

Public square

Orchards

Green houses

Car park

N

Masterplan of the three designed neighbourhoods in Groningen 1:3000. The plan shows neighbourhoods (primarily for students) characterized by different existing elements; respectively the Water Front, Green Living and Remnants. A strong path system is linking the three different areas and is making the walk variated. This paper investigates the site of the Sugar Plant Territory located near the centre of the city of Groningen in the Netherlands. By connecting different housing areas and spaces through a strong path system, the design hopes to integrate a large student population with an old agricultural site, while retaining its existing industrial charm. The city of Groningen has a population of almost 200,000 people, of which 25% are students. The University of Groningen (Rijeksuniversiteit) and the Hanze University of Applied Science are the two higher educational institutions in the city and are both located within 4 kilometres of the old sugar factory site. Housing is often unaffordable for the large student population, which includes 3750 international students. The site’s close proximity to the city centre and nearby University facilities offers potential as a new student accommodation zone. In the city of Groningen approximately 50% of all trips within the city are made by bicycle, so easy access to bike lanes and bike parking are essential in the urban scene.

trian bridge over the canal (which is currently planned), a path under the major highway on the east and a link crossing the railway which leads to a large recreational park (Stadpark) to the south. Conceptual geometric connections were established based on the orientation of the existing buildings and paths that bordered the site. After

identifying key potential entry points, these linear connections were challenged and broken down to allow for more visibility and accessibility, with the existing industrial tower as the focal point for movement.

The ‘flowing path’

The shape of the path has been in-

fluenced by the organic forms of the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt Delta, which runs through Belgium and the Netherlands. The flowing path turns and weaves, like a delta, changing spaces and landscape as it meanders over the site. As the path turns, new view lines are created. Much like a delta carries and deposits sediment from upstream,

The water front

Green living

Remnants

Green living area: Defined path

This diagram shows the concept with the three different neighbourhoods and a linking path between them.

Access to shopping and restaurants

Connection to Groningen city center

Connection to university

Remnants area: Free roaming

Connection to wetland fields

Reconnect Isolated Site

Barriers to pedestrian movement have isolated the site and connecting the former sugar factory area to its surroundings is seen as a vital step in bringing the site to life. Opportunities to repair these connections include a pedes-

Connection to shopping

Connection to Stadpark

The path is created by the criteria that the site links to areas that is sourrounding it and make the site more accesible.

Water Front area: Designated resting

Group 10: By Michael Alderman, Amra Ljubijankic, Sif Peiter Lund, Signe Lilleskov Nielsen


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the path carries pedestrian movement and provides stopping points and open squares besides its primary transitional function. This allows people to engage with the space beside the path, whether it is public buildings, recreational areas or existing traces of the factory site. New designated open spaces will also allow for opportunities to explore beyond this main transitional path and connect the broader site both visually and physically. Materiality is an important tool in establishing boundaries between the primary pedestrian path and these intermittent resting points. The flowing path is influenced by existing, but also new features spread throughout the site, including silo footprints, the factory building itself and a new library. These destinations hook and pull the path, promoting an engaging pedestrian experience. The organic shape of the delta is sometimes challenged to accommodate a more geometric form. The scale of the site encourages varying path typologies, with smaller ‘arteries’ breaking up some of the larger spaces created by the primary path. The edges, where the interactions between open path space and its surroundings occur, will have differing and interesting forms that will encourage varying experiences such as intermittent water channels, sloping surfaces and vegetated retention beds. In an effort to retain some of the existing footprints and traces of the old factory landscape, large areas of open space were kept. The aim was to mesh some of the existing ground plain as ‘cut outs’, with vegetation and greenways hinting at possible future spaces. These existing materials could also be used in future design to retain a sense of place, so that new built form belonged in this landscape. In this sense, the design is planning for the unplanned ways that people will use the site.

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Visualisation of the ‘flowing path’ entering a public space framed by the library and canal. Wetland vegetaion

Neighbourhoods

Three condensed neighbourhoods have been established in the design, each with a defining character related to its context. To the west, new built form hooks onto the existing industrial traces of the circular silo footprints. This form has been emphasized with the creation of a circular performance space lined by trees. Along the waterfront a new set of buildings and spaces have been set onto a series of canals. The changing heights of the paths, water level and bridging paths provide an engaging experience with built form. The eastern neighbourhood, inspired by existing vegetation, is seen as a green environment where the built form is closely connected to dense vegetation and has an easy access to greenhouses, orchards and kitchen gardens. By controlling the size and form of the residential apartments there is a clear and measured understanding of the spaces created between each building. A combination of vegetation, paths and paved surfaces were used to conceive a variety of private and public spaces. In contrast, public build-

Bikeparking

Steps down to water

Courtyard

Grass lawn

Sitting area viewing the canal Student housing Study hall Robinia pseudoacacia Benches Benches Concrete pedestrian path

Alnus Glutinosa

Library and bookshop

Asphalt cycle path

Detail plan 1:500 of the flowing path going through the Water Front and the library area ings break free from the modular form to be visual markers for communal activity in each neighbourhood. The orientation of these new buildings offers a contrast to the flowing path, taking precedent from some existing built form, aligned perpendicular to the canal. Paths, parks, commu-

nity gardens and informal recreational activities inhabit the space between the new built form, while roof-top terraces and balconies provide private spaces in the apartments.

Library

Roof top terasse

Robinia pseudoacacia

Wetland vegetaion

Marking bike path

Canal Shared space between buildings

Submerged step

Student housing

Wooden path

Wooden boardwalk

Concrete path

Section 1:250 showing the Water Front area and the shift in materials in the public space Group 10: By Michael Alderman (kcr983), Amra Ljubijankic (cpb508), Sif Peiter Lund (fvc170), Signe Lilleskov Nielsen


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Site of Succession car entry

quay path boat rental

office building

forest layer

greenhouse

parking

bike path

café glass extension

highway concrete layer

greenhouse greenhouse

A

forest layer hammock area

greenhouse

raised boardwalk

chimney

ice cream parlor

raised boardwalk

bike path

playground

glass extension wooden deck sand area

sugar factory

DETAILED PLAN

herb layer wooden deck terrace

herb layer

herb layer

water play railway

station AA

N 0m

THE PENINSULA

BIKEPATHS

CONNECTIONS

city centre

50m

100m

MASTERPLAN

WATER

city centre

canal project area

canal

project area

project area

project area

railway

highway

Stadspark

Stadspark

The railway, highway and the canals proclaim the idea of an isolated peninsula.

The project area is connected to the city centre of Groningen and to the city park.

Connecting the area to the city’s bikepath system provides improved accessibility and connection between the city centre and the city park.

The system of canals and wetland zones. The southern canal is largely expanded while the western and northern canals are connected.

The old factory site is reinvented and reshaped with the intention of improving the social and cultural life in Groningen. Connections are adapted to existing infrastructure to improve the accessibility and to establish a flow between the city centre and the city park. Natural succession of pioneer plants is used as a strategy for development and the final output is a recreational peninsula for the inhabitants of Groningen.

and other infrastructural elements are framing what used to be the site of the old sugar factory Suiker Unie.

will attract a mixed user group. The old factory site becomes a link between the city centre and the Stadspark by expanding the connections with easy accessibility for pedestrians, bicyclists, trains and cars. The succession of pioneer plants is used as an economically profitable strategy for developing the area. The industrial feeling within the area is preserved and reworked by using materials of metal, bricks, steel and concrete combined with glass.

Connections

The site

The site is situated in an industrial area close to the city centre of the University City Groningen in the Ne-therlands. Groningen is the 6th largest city in the Netherlands, and is known as the most bicycle-friendly city in the world. The old sugar plant territory is a flat and open landscape surrounded by industry, wetlands, housing areas and the public park Stadspark. Canals

Qualities

The various qualities of the area have served as inspiration for the project. The site is a big open space, where the succession of pioneer plants causes a feeling of temporality. Lines of water and infrastructure surround the site as a dynamic border of trains, boats and vehicles, creating an isolated feeling that stresses the need for better accessibility. The site is located seven minutes by bike from the city centre and a few hundred meters from the romantic Stadspark.

Concept

The concept of this project is to create a peninsula near the city of Groningen with space for cultural events, activities and recreational experiences that

The peninsula

The peninsula is shaped by keeping the existing canal in the north, while largely expanding the small canal in the south and opening the canal in the west. The organically shaped southern canal interplays with the strict lines of the northern canal and acts like a slo-ping river along the southern side.

To improve the connection to the city centre and the Stadspark the site is connected to the existing bike path system in three different directions. This is done by establishing a bridge as an extension of a boardwalk and a bike path across the site. The existing pedestrians’ entry in the eastern part of the site is extended with a wooden deck along the southern canal. Two

“The project benefits from the force of natural succession” parallel wooden boardwalks emphasize the flow towards the southern canal, and strengthen the connections across the peninsula. The two boardwalks are linked to the wooden deck and the buildings. By adding a station the site becomes accessible by train.

Group 11: By Justyna Chmielewska, Lasse Bøtker Hansen, Inger Marie Mulvad, Caroline Grenaa Németh


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Accessibility by car is possible from the main road in the north east.

Plant strategy

The project benefits from the force of natural succession of Salix and herbs which is used as a tool for deve-loping the area. The plant succession in the existing and new cracks in the concrete are made to develop the area towards the proposal of this project. However, the succession is not uncontrolled and will not overrule the building structures and the path system. The Plant strategy is divided into four different vegetation layers; the forest layer that consists of natural succes-

“The aim of this project is to provide users with different cultural, recreational and active experiences.” sion and Populus, the existing concrete layer, the herb and tree layer and the herb layer that slope into the water.

Green structure

Visualization showing the canal and the terrace at the southern side of the old sugar factory. The wooden deck runs along the canal and provides the area with different experiences and usabilities. Paths

Experiences

Future building strategy

paved forest path

boat rental

bike path

forest layer tree and herb layer

existing concrete layer

boardwalk

paved forest path

herb layer

trampled path

boardwalk

bike path

hammock area

wooden deck station

parking

open space/ entrance open space family area playground café

water play

sand area

conti nuing to ca nal

Building strategy

The built structures are organized along the two parallel boardwalks, where future expansion of the built structure will be possible. The structure intersects with the east-west going flow of the site and divides the area into three sections to break the scale.

succession crack concrete layer

floating deck southern canal bike path

Experiences

wooden deck

0m station

10m

20m

railway

AA

The aim of this project is to provide the users with different cultural, recreational and active experiences. The large open area near the old sugar factory can be used for outside marketplace, stage area or other place demanding activities. The buildings provide room for exhibitions, offices and service functions. Recreational experiences are provided in the dense forest area with hammocks hanging in the trees. By the southern canal users can take a walk or sit on the wooden deck and rest on the sand area or the terraces near the water. Boat rental, playground, skate boarding, ice skating and fishing are some of the activities that can be performed, both in the open spaces and near the water.

succession crack

forest layer

Detailed plan of the south western part of the site with the station. The wooden deck and the bikepath cross the canal. The open space on the concrete layer with cracks of Salix and wild herbs can serve for various events, such as a market.

A

northern canal

Section

forest layer

bikepath

existing concrete

southern canal

train station 0m

10m

AA 20m

Group 11: By Justyna Chmielewska, Lasse Bøtker Hansen, Inger Marie Mulvad, Caroline Grenaa Németh


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Experimental Islands Entry bridge connecting to city

Idea City

A

start up businesses

Continuos green structure

Highway

Existing canal Experimental zone large scale

Experimental zone small scale

Production Square

Wetland

warehouses for large scale work

Factory Plaza

event and exhibition space

Experimental zone medium scale

Old Sugar Factory

Environmental Centre

New canal

science and research labs a

Railway

Entry bridge connecting to Stadspark

0m

25 m

50 m

100 m

N

Masterplan 1:3500. Experimental Islands, a diverse site on the traces of former industry to test and showcase creative ideas. City Idea City

Water Factory Plaza

Factory Plaza

Factory Plaza

Production Square

Environmental centre

Vegetation

Stadspark

Connections

Neighbourhoods

Path systems

Green and blue structure

Experimental Islands is a new creative addition to the city of Groningen. This landscape seeks to provide more than just a regular park; it creates a place that dissolves the boundaries between learning and enjoyment.

the demands of innovative people. The three experimental neighbourhoods: Idea City, Production Square and Environmental Centre, facilitate the different needs of entrepreneurs, researchers and artists. All neighbourhoods are connected by a dynamic system of paths and vegetation spanning from the old sugar factory, which remains the heart of the site.

A unique structure

tegrating water in their own specific way, which creates distinct spaces that in turn allow different experiences in each area.

What if a landscape could facilitate growth in a city of Universities and at the same time guide Groningen into the future as a city of inventions? Experimental Islands is located a little west of the city centre of Groningen. This space has been created to meet

What makes the Experimental Islands so unique is its cutting edge structure extracted from the history of the site. The structure of pathways and canals are taken from the former industrial footprints on site. It acknowledges imperfection as an endearing feature. The vibrant chaos of the structure offers a dynamic experience of the place.

Connecting elements

Inner City Groningen

Idea City

Production Square Wetland

Factory Plaza Environment Center Highway and Airport

Stadspark

Concept diagram illustrating each centre’s connection and experimental uses.

Through the site water and vegetation act as unifying elements. The forested vegetation spaces form a connected green belt that separates each experimental area into an independent but not isolated island. It is also a recreational space for visitors to walk through and enjoy the whole site. The water cuts into the land both dividing and pulling together the site. It separates by being a definite border for the Experimental Islands. It pulls together the site by surrounding the whole place, which lift the experience of Experimental Islands as a unified special place in Groningen. The neighbourhood relates to each other by in-

A cultural centre

The two main access bridges lead directly to The Factory Plaza (formerly the sugar factory), which acts as the centre of the site. The strong and direct angle of the bridges leads attention to the old factory buildings and connects to Groningen city centre in the north and Stadspark to the south.

“Locals and visitors gather to network and brodcast their ideas” The Factory Plaza is a central point naturally due to its large open expanse of space and ability to connect the different neighbourhoods. The Experimental Islands is a place where locals and visitors gather to network and broadcast their ideas. The Factory Plaza, both visually and structurally, is a key element in

Group 12: By Olivia Day, Signe Hvergel Petersen, Kristine Understrup, Troels Bak Wahlgreen


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Railway

Canal

Cut grass

Canal

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Canal

A Canal

Recreational

The Factory Plaza

Forest

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Section Aa: The railway to the waterway, looking towards the Old Sugar Factory, through recreational green structure and event space.

the city’s history and context. The plaza contains three main elements – the old factory buildings, a wooden deck connecting to a café and a green area for relaxing. It is designed to facilitate different kinds of events and temporary activities.

Three neighbourhoods

In each corner of the site an experimental neighbourhood is placed. These neighbourhoods are the keystones of the site, and define the way the entire site will be used over time. Each neighbourhood is organized differently to allow for different uses and activities. Furthermore an outdoor experimental space is linked to each of the neighbourhoods that is temporary and allows for more wild and changing uses. In the northern corner near the entry bridge to the city centre lies Idea city. Idea city is a neighbourhood with an urban feel. It is perfect for startup businesses that can profit from the densified area where thoughts and

Environment Centre

Production Square

Idea City

The three different neighbourhoods, showing different building typologies and landscapes within. ideas can be easily shared and developed. The neighbourhood is characterized by the colour red, which is used in the red brick pavement and light poles. A tightly structured, small-scale, experimental area is linked to this neighbourhood. Production Square is placed in the south eastern corner of the site just beside a raised highway that connects Groningen to the outside. This neighbourhood caters for the experiments and explorations of a large scale with big production halls and large open

spaces. This space is appropriate for both artistic and scientific large scale projects. The neighbourhood is connected to the colour yellow, which is shown in yellow striped tarmac and yellow details on the buildings. An easily adaptable experimental area for physically large projects is linked to this space. Located to the west of the site in connection to the wetland is The Environmental Centre. This neighbourhood which is for environmental science labs and agricultural work has

smaller office buildings surrounding three green courtyards that function as small orchards. A green, less organised, experimental area is linked to this neighbourhood. Experimental Islands creates wonder for the visitor as a park that continuously changes, an idea generator for the curious mind and a place of growth for Groningen. It becomes a place that bases itself on the old industry and defines a new one in a time of knowledge.

The old site

Traced lines

Overall network

The ground structure is drawn from the original built pattern of the sugar factory.

Visualisation of the Factory Plaza, an open industrial space for temporary events and exhibitions.

Group 12: By Olivia Day, Signe Hvergel Petersen, Kristine Understrup, Troels Bak Wahlgreen


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A Multifaceted Urban Park

bridge

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perennials wooden deck

forest

forest fragment

bridge rainwater basin path rainwater basin event square

wooden deck

car entrance

stage grass

cultural center

path forest fragment

forest

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forest cultural center

car entrance

Fig. 1. Masterplan 1: 3000.

As the city of Groningen faces challenges caused by a growing number of residents this project proposes an urban park for both cultural and recreational use that in time can transform into an attractive green housing area. With a population of approx. 198.000 inhabitants Groningen is the largest city in the northern part of the Netherlands. As an important urban centre for arts, education and business, the city is often referred to as “The metropolis of the North”. Groningen is a leading university city which is a strong feature in the city’s identity and here you find the lowest average age in all of Holland. Furthermore, Groningen is known as

Fig. 2. Concept for the design of the urban park. Pieces break off the two forest structures and move around in the funnel shape, creating a dynamic landscape. one of the world’s top biking cities and as such infrastructure is very impor-

“Today, the former industrial site forms a desolate void and physical barrier between the surrounding areas.” tant for the city. In spite of the natural expansion the city has gone through

over decades the urban structure has been kept compact in order not to overtax the surrounding vulnerable landscapes as well as upholding an easily accessible inner city. However, as Groningen has become such a vibrant metropolis the city now faces the challenge of a growing number of residents. This challenge must be faced in future planning, not only in terms of providing housing, but also in terms of public health, environmental sustainability and ecology.

The recent demolition of the sugar plant located west of the city centre has left a space ready for new intervention. Today, the former industrial site forms a desolate void and physical barrier between the surrounding areas. The area is inaccessible and as such it is not possible to cross it going from one neighbourhood to the next without having to take a detour. This proposal introduces an urban park that links the surrounding neigh-

Fig. 3. Section through the park showing the diverse vegetation elements of varying densities and species compositions.

Group 13: By Cristina Conciatu, Ida Løvenkjær, Josef Salac, Malene Fogh Bang


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bourhoods together and provides an attractive, green recreational environment that for the present can play host to the numerous events that take place in Groningen annually, and on longer term also can be a frame for future housing developments.

Park design

The proposed new design for the former sugar plant site is structured by two large forest formations. These make up the backbone of the area and on the one hand screen the site from the highway and railway and on the other hand hold on to the surrounding areas and thereby linking them tog-ether. The two forest structures form a funnel shape that opens up towards the open wetlands and narrows in towards the city. Within the funnel shape, forest fragments orientated towards the funnel head create dynamic landscape elements on a grass cover (fig. 2). Through different densities

Fig. 4. Visualisation depicting the atmosphere around the stage on the event square in front of the future cultural center.

Fig. 5. Diagram showing how the rainwater basins in the future could develop into housing. Eventually, the forest fragments will become housing fragments instead. and diverse species compositions the forest elements ensure a varied experience of the site as well as provide biotopes for wildlife (fig. 3). Linked to most of the forest fragments are voluminous autoregulated perennial beds

“By developing an iconic green space from the start it will bring a particularly strong identity to the area” of a slightly wild character that bring additional recreational and ecological values to the site. The green structure that is laid out will not only have recreational functions, but also cultural. The remaining buildings will function as a cultural

center and a square in front of them provide the necessary space for the many various events in Groningen that could potentially take place here (fig. 4). The accessibility to and across the site will be improved by a total of seven entrances. A sturdy path system for both cyclists and pedestrians will make it easy to move around in the area and a road running along the southern border will make it possible for cars to enter the site.

A forest within a city becomes a city within a forest

The structure of this urban park is such that it can easily hold housing in the future. This is hinted on the western side of the forest fragments by squared depressions in the terrain that for the

present function as rainwater management, but also outline where future housing will be developed (fig. 6). In the end, the character of the park will go from being a forest within a city to being a city within a forest as the forest fragments will eventually become housing fragments instead. By placing future housing on the western side of the forest fragments it will bring yet another dimension to the experience of the site. When facing east you will experience the “urban” facet of the area, meaning the housing structures with the city skyline in the background. When facing east you will see the “park” facet, meaning the vegetation elements with the vast open wetlands in the distance.

Strategy

Where planning schemes often tend to develop the urban structure prior to

Fig. 6. Section through a depression in the terrain that function as rainwater basin, but also outline where future housing will be developed. the green spaces this project seeks to do it the other way around. By developing an iconic green space from the start, it will bring a particularly strong identity to the area and thus appeal even more to potential dwellers. It is often seen that where the urban structures are developed first, not enough space is left green as it by that time is considered unprofitable. Developing the park first will ensure there will be green space in the area once the housing is built which will be beneficial both for social, ecological and economical reasons.

1:2000 Group 13: By Cristina Conciatu, Ida Løvenkjær, Josef Salac, Malene Fogh Bang


d e t n at u r - o g b i o v i d e n s k a b e l i g e f a k u lt e t

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The Sugar Plant Territory - Groningen  

Landscape Planning 2014 - University of Copenhagen

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