Issuu on Google+

d e pa rt m e n t o f g e o s c i e n c e s a n d n at u r a l r e s o u r c e m a n a g e m e n t university of copenhagen

L a n dscap e Pl anni ng 2013

STEELSC APE PR OCESS DIARY

// GROUP 12 //


university of copenhagen

landscape planning

2013

page

21

Group 12 WEEK ONE

In the Loop

We imagine the centre of Frederiksvaerk to be lively, vibrant, and inclusive of all citizens. By turning the focus toward the canals, we activate a new part of the city and create a relationship between urban space and the natural realm. Frederiksvaerk has a long history of steel production and a rich culture that has developed around it. While this has resulted in the formation of a number of unique neighbourhoods in the city, these areas lack any true individual identity. This is also in part because of the city’s cardominated infrastructure, which segregates these areas from one another, disabling the development of any meaningful connections. In the Loop will attempt to enhance the identity of each of the three defined areas, while simultaneously connecting them with a blue-green loop of Frederiksvaerk. We propose addressing three key issues, which we feel are most important in terms of creating a better Frederiksvaerk: 1. Access; 2. Connection; and 3. Centre.

Access

The lack of access in the city has to do with the car-dominated infrastructure that is currently present in the area. There seems to be a lack of consistent circulation possibilities for pedestrians and cyclists, while cars seem to rule. This is both a safety concern, as well as an issue of movement.

Connection

The second major issue in Frederiksvaerk is the lack of significant and meaningful connections. By this we mean connections to varying spaces by various means of transportation. The current situation is a more separated and segregated series of neighbourhoods, each with its own feeling, but still lacking any true identity. We propose enhancing their unique elements to allow citizens and visitors to truly differentiate between each area.

Plan proposal: In the Loop.

Centre

Along with a series of neighbourhoods that lack true identity, Frederiksvaerk also lacks any true urban centre. We propose defining and developing a centre which will work to increase accessibility and connections, as well as create a lively and vital area that will define the city as a whole.

Plan proposal detail: In the Loop.

By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


u nuinvievresri s t iyt yo fo fc ocpoepnehnahgaegne n

l alnadnsdcsacpaep ep lpalnannin nign g2 021031 3

• •

p apgaeg e2

Group 12

By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen

3


university of copenhagen

landscape planning

2013

•

page

41

Group 12 WEEK TWO

In the Loop

We imagine the centre of Frederiksvaerk to be lively, vibrant, and inclusive of all citizens. By turning the focus toward the canals, we activate a new part of the city and create a relationship between urban space and the natural realm.

In Frederiksvaek there are areas each pocessing a strong identity and unique history. We see the canals as a great opportunity to enhance the individuality of these areas and use the canals actively to connect the different areas and make these more accessible for pedestrians. Frederiksvaerk has a long history of steel production and a rich culture that has developed around it. While this has resulted in the formation of a number of unique neighbourhoods in the city, these areas lack any true individual identity. This is also in part because of the city’s car-dominated infrastructure, which segregates these areas from one another, disabling the development of any meaningful connections. In the Loop will attempt to enhance the identity of each of the three defined areas, while simul-

taneously connecting them with a blue-green loop of Frederiksvaerk.

The Loop

In the loop is not trying to give Frederiksvaerk a complete makeover, but rather attempts to make the city more cohesive and enhance the individuality of the diffrent areas by making the canal the binding factor. Along the loop, the pedestrian will have different experiences walking through; different environments, parts of history, and natural as well as urban landscapes. Along the canal, different steel sculptures will rise as monuments of time, playing elements or visual guidelines connecting the areas. We propose addressing three key issues, which we feel are most important in terms of creating a better Frederiksvaerk: 1. Access; 2. Connection; and 3. Centre.

Access

The lack of access in the city has to do with the car-dominated infrastructure that is currently present in the area. There seems to be a lack of consistent circulation possibilities for pedestrians and cyclists, while cars seem to rule. This is both a safety concern, as well as an issue of movement.

Centre

Along with a series of neighbourhoods that lack true identity, Frederiksvaerk also lacks any true urban centre. We propose defining and developing a centre which will work to increase accessibility and connections, as well as create a lively and vital area that will define the city as a whole.

Connection

The second major issue in Frederiksvaerk is the lack of significant and meaningful connections. By this we mean connections to varying spaces by various means of transportation. The current situation is a more separated and segregated series of neighbourhoods, each with its own feeling, but still lacking any true identity. We propose enhancing their unique elements to allow citizens and visitors to truly differentiate between each area. By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


uunniivveerrssiitty y o off ccooppeennhhaaggeenn

lla an nd dsscca appee pplla an nn niin ng g

22001133

••

ppaaggee

52

Group 12

Forest.

Canopy Recreational Walk.

In the Loop: Proposed model of the area.

Steel Forest.

Culture Heritage.

In the Loop: Proposed plan of the area.

By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


university of copenhagen

landscape planning

2013

pa g e

61

Group 12 WEEK THREE

In the Loop Gunpowder factory

Connection to Aresø city center

Steel forest

The weatland boadwalk

The canapie walk

In the Loop masterplan: Presenting the loop creating the canopy walk, the wetland boadwalk, steel forest, the gunpowder fabric and the city center all in one loop which connects the city areas.

Frederiksvaerk is a combination of a series of pseudo-neighbourhoods which each have a unique physical expression and particular atmosphere. The existing canal system is a great opportunity to both enhance the individuality of these areas, as well as connect them to form a cohesive whole. Frederiksvaerk has a long history of steel production and a rich culture that has developed around it. While this has resulted in the formation of a number of distinct areas in the city, they lack the strong individual identity that is necessary for a neighbourhood to truly thrive. Furthermore, the city’s car-dominated infrastructure, which segregates these areas from one another, has created a barrier in the development of safe and functional pedestrian and cyclist connections. In the Loop will enhance the iden-

tity of each of the five determined areas by defining a series of existing physical elements which characterize their individuality, and arranging them in a way that will allow residents and visitors to identify the area of Fredirksvaerk they are in. A blue-green loop that runs through the city will then act as a binding element that connects these areas, where pedestrians and cyclists can circulate, rest, and play.

The Loop

Because The Loop works to connect a series of distinct areas, users will experience various landscapes, architectural elements, vegetation, and view lines along their journey. We begin at the northeast corner of The Loop, walking south along the urban portion of the path. The canal is cut in hard geometries, while the buildings line the water unevenly, creating an interesting path that

allows us to discover something new around every corner. At some points, seating areas for cafes and restaurants spill out onto the path, which is built out over the canal to accommodate the extra crowd. We are also free to sit and hang our feet over the edge to enjoy a chat with a friend in the sun. Turning the corner and walking west, we are now enclosed in the Canopy Walk. Moving from urban to semi-urban, residential buildings line one side of the canal for a time, while mature trees line the other, creating a beautiful enclosure that wraps us in a romantic path that is secluded from the rest of the world. The canal is cut more softly than before, and leads us to our next turn, where we enter the dense forest. Continuing north along the path, we are greeted with wetland and large

trees that are scattered naturally all around us. The topography is uneven, and undulates softly through the trees. We come to a fork in the road which offers a detour on a wooden path that leads us jaggedly over the wetlands and deeper into the forest. This choice also allows us to move up and down through the landscape, bringing us close to the treeptops at some points, where we get a lovely glimpse over parts of the city. Turning right once again and heading east, the trees morph into a steel forest, evoking the memory of Frederiksvaerk’s history. Steel trees emerge all around us, growing out of the canal as well. The path itself turns to steel, and we wonder what Frederiksvaerk might have been like at the height of its steel production. Continuing east, the steel forest

By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


university of copenhagen

landscape planning

2013

•

pa g e

72

Group 12

We imagine the centre of Frederiksvaerk to be lively, vibrant, and inclusive of all citizens. By turning the focus toward the canals, we activate a new part of the city and create a relationship between urban space and the natural realm.

disipates into the existing gunpowder museum, giving us a piece of the historical puzzle. A water feature, which lets the water fall from the urban area and continue west, drowns out the sound of the city, allowing us a last moment of respite before we return to urban life at the next turn.

Canopy Walk.

Forest.

Steel Forest.

Culture Heritage. By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


university of copenhagen

landscape planning

2013

pa g e

81

Group 12 WEEK FOUR

In the Loop FO

RE

WE

TL

AN

ST

EX

PE

RI

CU

LT

EN

CE

D

WI

LD

+N

AT

UR

AL

HE

RI

TA

GE

UR

AL UR

BA

N

VIL

LA

CA

NO

PY

GE

WA

LK

We imagine Frederiksvaerk to be lively, vibrant, and inclusive of all citizens. By turning the focus toward the canals and activating the surrounding space, we create a relationship between urban space and the natural realm, and bind the city together as one cohesive whole.

Frederiksvaerk is a combination of a series of pseudo-neighbourhoods which each have a unique physical expression and particular atmosphere. The existing canal system is a great opportunity to both enhance the individuality of these areas, as well as connect them to form a cohesive whole. Frederiksvaerk has a long history of steel production and a rich culture that has developed around it. While this has resulted in the formation of a number of distinct areas in the city, they lack the strong individual identity that is necessary for a neighbourhood to truly thrive. Furthermore, the city’s car-dominated infrastructure, which segregates these areas from one another, has created a barrier in the development of safe and functional pedestrian and cyclist connections. In the Loop will enhance the iden-

tity of each of the five determined areas by defining a series of existing physical elements which characterize their individuality, and arranging them in a way that will allow residents and visitors to identify the area of Fredirksvaerk they are in. A blue-green loop that runs through the city will then act as a binding element that connects these areas, where pedestrians and cyclists can circulate, rest, and play.

The Loop

Because The Loop works to connect a series of distinct areas, users will experience various landscapes, architectural elements, vegetation, and view lines along their journey. We begin at the northeast corner of The Loop, walking south along the urban portion of the path. The canal is cut in hard geometries, while the buildings line the water unevenly, creating an interesting path that

allows us to discover something new around every corner. At some points, seating areas for cafes and restaurants spill out onto the path, which is built out over the canal to accommodate the extra crowd. We are also free to sit and hang our feet over the edge to enjoy a chat with a friend in the sun. Turning the corner and walking west, we are now enclosed in the Canopy Walk. Moving from urban to semi-urban, residential buildings line one side of the canal for a time, while mature trees line the other, creating a beautiful enclosure that wraps us in a romantic path that is secluded from the rest of the world. The canal is cut more softly than before, and leads us to our next turn, where we enter the dense forest. Continuing north along the path, we are greeted with wetland and large

trees that are scattered naturally all around us. The topography is uneven, and undulates softly through the trees. We come to a fork in the road which offers a detour on a wooden path that leads us jaggedly over the wetlands and deeper into the forest. This choice also allows us to move up and down through the landscape, bringing us close to the treeptops at some points, where we get a lovely glimpse over parts of the city. Turning right once again and heading east, the trees morph into a steel forest, evoking the memory of Frederiksvaerk’s history. Steel trees emerge all around us, growing out of the canal as well. The path itself turns to steel, and we wonder what Frederiksvaerk might have been like at the height of its steel production. Continuing east, the steel forest

By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


university of copenhagen

landscape planning

2013

pa g e

92

Group 12

OBSERVATIONS OBSERVATIONS

FUNCTIONS

BUILDING DENSITY

VEGETATION

FUNCTIONS

BUILDING DENSITY

VEGETATION

NEIGHBOURHOODS

WATER

ROAD NETWORK

NEIGHBOURHOODS

WATER

ROAD NETWORK

PARKING

GREEN SPACES

TOPOGRAPHY

PARKING

GREEN SPACES

TOPOGRAPHY

CHALLENGES

VALUES

ANALYSIS ANALYSIS

THE LOOP

Frederiksvaerk is currently divided into a series of pseudo-neighbourhoods, which are defined by many layers of existing conditions. These separated areas are both a challenge, as well as a great opportunity to use the canal as a binding element to tie the city together. CHALLENGES

disipates into the existing gunpowder museum, giving us a piece of the historical puzzle. A water feature, which lets the water fall from the urban area and continue west, drowns out the sound of the city, allowing us a last moment of respite

VALUES

before we return to urban life at the next turn.

THE LOOP

and enhances the identity of Frederiksvaerk.

Throughout the experience, users are able to see a contrast of a built vs. natural environment, which highlights the existing elements By Jaffer Naveed Janjooa, Lovisa Säretun, Marie Baastrup Hansen, Sara Kristiansen


KU Landscape Planning - Group 12 - Proces Diary