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SUMMER 2010: VOLUME XLVIII, NUMBER III

THE LANDMARK SOCIETY OF WESTERN NEW YORK

Inside Rochester: Modern Living in Historic Buildings


“Private charities, as well as contributions to public purposes in proportion to everyone’s circumstances, are certainly among the duties we owe to society, and I have never felt a wish to withdraw from my portion of them.” Thomas Jefferson, 1812

NEW BEGINNINGS

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elcome to this new issue of Landmarks! As your Interim Executive Director, I have the pleasure of continuing a 73-year heritage of service to the built and natural environments. As a longtime member of The Landmark Society, past board member and current board member of Historic Brighton, as well as an appointee to the Brighton Historic Preservation Commission, I have made a strong commitment to preservation issues and The Landmark Society’s mission. Part of that continuing mission is the magazine you are holding. Its refreshed design, coupled with exceptional editorial quality, useful information, timely programming and regional resources, all combine to continue our mission every time you read it and share it with others. As members, you are the future of this organization. We need your support both financially and as volunteers and ask your consideration in moving to a higher level of support as we face difficult economic times. As a native Rochesterian, I have seen firsthand what preservation can do to increase the quality of life in a community, and that intelligent development, informed and guided by preservation planning can ultimately benefit all who live in that community. The Landmark Society’s work, more relevant now than ever before, supports a combined economic, cultural and vitally human mission in an increasingly graceless age. As we continue to engage the past to create the future, I hope you will join us on that path. I’m delighted to lead this organization and welcome your participation. Best,

David J. Whitaker Interim Executive Director

BOARD OF TRUSTEES President: Henry W. Williams, Jr. Vice Presidents: Preservation

Scott Forsyth

Education & Properties

Katherine H. Karl Development

Beth Teall

Finance & Treasurer

Mary Znidarsic-Nicosia Secretary: Hugh A. Hamlin

JoAnn Beck Thomas Castelein Christopher S. Clarke Joanne DeMarle Charles Fitzgibbon Jean R. France Sandra Frankel Andy Germanow Irena Guinness Joseph R. Hanna James I. Marasco Michael Mincher Carol S. Mullin

Edward J. Olinger Ann Penwarden Jeffrey J. Pollock Linda H. Riordan Christopher Sardone Peter Siegrist William F. Sullivan Allen Williams Jessie P. Woodward At Large: Jerry Ludwig Mimi Freund Tilton Stacey VanDenburgh


Landmarks COVER: DETAIL FROM FAÇADE OF H.H. WARNER BUILDING, ST. PAUL QUARTER, ROCHESTER; PHOTO BY LISA M. FEINSTEIN

discover, protect and revitalize

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6 SUMMER 2010 This newsletter is the official publication of The Landmark Society of Western New York, Inc. Publication is assisted with income from the Marion Moore Whitbeck Fund and public funds from Monroe County and from the New York State Council on the Arts, whose funds are recommended by the governor and appropriated by the State Legislature. The mission of The Landmark Society of Western New York, Inc. is to protect the unique architectural heritage of our region and promote preservation and planning practices that foster healthy, livable and sustainable communities. Landmarks is published quarterly by The Landmark Society of Western New York, Inc., 133 South Fitzhugh Street, Rochester, New York 14608, (585) 546-7029. Our fax number is (585) 546-4788. Look for our web site at www.landmarksociety.org. E-mail us at mail@landmarksociety.org.

NEWS PRESERVATION TRAVELOGUE FEATURE: INSIDE DOWNTOWN

CALENDAR HOME EXCHANGE

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NEWS

RENOVATIONS

SPECIAL EVENT

WELCOME CAITLIN! RIGHTING WRIGHT

A CHILLING GHOST WALK

Caitlin comes to The Landmark Society as our new preservation planner after spending the last few years living in Manhattan, Kansas. In Kansas, Caitlin worked for the State Historic Preservation Office at the Kansas Historical Society in Topeka. She holds a master’s degree in historic preservation from the University of Vermont, a graduate student internship with the Landmarks Preservation Commission in New York City, and a bachelor’s degree in history and Spanish from the University of Rochester. A native of Syracuse, Caitlin is excited to be in upstate New York once again. She looks forward to working at The Landmark Society and is eager to reacquaint herself with Rochester and western New York.

Come October, The Landmark Society’s Ghost Walk, Rochester’s original foray into our history, will return. The Ghost Walk has been thrilling and chilling for more than 15 years – and there is a cryptic rumor circulating about the upcoming 2010 Ghost Walk. In the darkness of the night, whispering voices warn that “something wicked this way comes” – that Rochester’s most notorious former resident may be returning, and that despite being deceased for over 100 years, he will be showing up to proclaim his innocence … If you have never been to Ghost Walk, this is the year to attend. If you have been to Ghost Walk, but not for a few years – this is the year to return. The 2010 Ghost Walk begins at the Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue (corner of East and Goodman) at 6:30 p.m. This year’s walk is scheduled for the last two weekends in October: the 22-23 and the 29-30.

Recently, Jean France and her fellow trustees along with Jane Parker of the Cosentino-Parker Trust (both pictured above) were treated to a tour of the Boynton House (1908), Rochester’s very own Frank Lloyd Wright residential opus. Exceptional care is being taken in the restoration to ensure that such comprehensive repair is not necessary for another century or longer. The disastrously slim steel brackets that actually once held the gutters inside the eaves are being replaced with weatherproof brackets. The original orientation of the house is being enhanced and the roof is being returned to Wright’s specifications. All of the work will serve the house well beyond its second century.

TAPAS 177: EAT WELL AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE A SPECIAL EVENT TO BENEFIT THE LANDMARK SOCIETY

PHOTO AND CONTENTS PHOTO COURTESY OF TAPAS 177

September 24 & 25: 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

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Tapas 177 Lounge, a unique St. Paul Quarter location for dinner, cocktails and live entertainment, is offering a special lunch menu during the Inside Downtown Tour to benefit The Landmark Society of Western New York. Known for a creative fusion of familiar and exotic flavors, Tapas will feature a range of items from their menu – from their signature calamari salad and southwest style crab cakes to beef empanadas and more. Lunch includes salad and dessert. Tickets ($15 per person) may be purchased online at www.landmarksociety.org or at Tapas 177 Lounge after August 20th. Part of the proceeds from the lunch will benefit The Landmark Society. Break away from the ordinary and join us!


PRESERVATION

HISTORIC HAPPENINGS

By Lisa M. Feinstein

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never been modified and is still in its original condition. Sitting on the busy corner of Denver and Parsells, surrounded by modest Foursquares and Colonial Revivals that date from the early 1900s, the Romanesque Revival church is imposing. Constructed of red, gray and black brick, the nave is mounted by a steeply pitched roof, which is sheathed in slate shingles and copper flashing. Six barrel-roof dormers project above the main roof. Inside, the nave houses three blocks of pews. Above the pews, the oak truss work of the roof features large hammer beams faced with dark brown oak. The sanctuary’s windows were designed by the Pike Stained Glass Studio of Rochester and wrought iron, lantern-style lights that date from the 1925-’26 redesign illuminate the worship area.

A Spiritual Cornerstone

Thirty miles west of the city, the Edward Harrison House in the Village of Brockport, now commonly known as the Brockport Alumni House, was also named to the registry. Built in 1872 by Edward Harrison, a clothier and civic leader who served as a village trustee, a member of the Normal School Board, a fireman and a collector of tolls on the Erie Canal, the structure originally served as his family’s personal home. In 1898 however, the house was deeded to the State Normal and Training School by Harrison’s daughter Margaret. Located at 142 Utica Street, the house stands at the entrance of what is now the College at Brockport’s Hartwell Hall. The house served as the residence for principals at the Normal School from 1898-1942, and for the college president from 1942-1962 after the institution became a state school. Today, the house is home to the Brockport Alumni Association and has been painstakingly restored and preserved. An exquisite example of French Second Empire architecture, the house features a steeply pitched mansard roof that is lit by arched dormers. The main entrance is CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

PHOTO AND CONTENTS PHOTO BY JIM DUSEN

ven in the 1800s, the preservation of architectural achievement was a hot topic among civic leaders, philosophers and designers alike. Writer John Ruskin (1819-1900), an early advocate of preservation, wrote that old buildings “are not ours, they belong partly to those who built them and partly to all the generations of mankind who are to follow us …” In the spirit of such vision, the New York State Review Board met in Albany to consider nominations to the State & National Registers of Historic Places. Two local sites were approved so that future generations can appreciate not only the buildings themselves, but also the individuals who designed, built and celebrated life in Rochester’s East Side Presbyterian Church and the Edward Harrison House in the Village of Brockport (pictured right).

The East Side Presbyterian Church (1909; 1925), now the Parsells Avenue Community Church in Rochester, is located in the city’s Beechwood neighborhood on the corner of Parsells Avenue and Denver Street. Cynthia Howk, the architectural research coordinator for The Landmark Society, researched and prepared the proposal for the church as a community volunteer – and this proposal had special meaning for her. “My family has had more than a 100-year affiliation with this congregation,” says Cynthia. Throughout the past century, the East Side Presbyterian Church has served as a cornerstone of spiritual life and community life in the neighborhood. The original church was designed by architect Henry Larzelere of Rochester and completed in 1909. That small structure was expanded in 1925, adding the sanctuary, which seats 380 people and the bell tower, both designed by Rochester architects Bohacket & Brew. At the same time, the Opus 560 pipe organ was installed. Built by the Skinner Organ Company of Boston, the instrument boasts three manual keyboards, 1,556 pipes and 24 stops. It has

The Harrison House

Summer 2010

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TRAVELOGUE

DURAND EASTMAN PARK October 2, 2010

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hile Durand Eastman Park is a spectacular destination any season, it is especially delightful in the autumn. Enjoy striking fall colors while hiking the beautiful hills and trails of this scenic park on the shores of Lake Ontario. Originally the estate of Dr. Henry Durand, the park was a gift to the City of Rochester by Dr. Durand and George Eastman, who acquired some adjacent lands to increase the park’s size to 965 acres. The park, formally dedicated in 1909, has a variety of trees, shrubs and wildflowers for your viewing pleasure. You will be guided by The Landmark Society’s horticulturist Beverly Gibson as you explore what Durand and Eastman described as “a public park forever.” The gorgeous vistas include steep wooded slopes, valleys, small lakes and spectacular fall foliage colors. We will be meeting in front of the maintenance building parking lot on Zoo Road at 9:00 a.m. Included in the tour are expert knowledge of the history and importance of the park, lunch at Jack’s Place, nature, history and fun! Cost: $49 (Includes lunch)

PHOTO BY JENNIFER CLELANDL

Reservation deadline: September 20, 2010

HISTORIC ITHACA October 8, 2010

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or centuries, Ithaca was a Cayuga Indian settlement. In 1779, General John Sullivan’s Revolutionary War troops drove the Native Americans away and burned down their orchards and cornfields. The first white settlers arrived in 1788 and set up farms in fields that had earlier been cleared by the Native Americans. Today, Ithaca is best known for being home of Cornell University, an Ivy League school with almost 20,000 students. Ithaca College is also located just south of the city in the Town of Ithaca. On the tour, we will visit Sage Hall on the Cornell University Campus, which was built in 1875. We will also tour the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art which is well known for its controversial concrete façade. The museum collection includes two windows from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin D. Martin House and more than 30,000 other works. Lunch will be at the Taughannock Falls Inn, erected in 1873. After lunch, we will enjoy a private tour of Cornell Plantations, including a walking tour of the botanical gardens. The day promises to be an exciting exploration of an intriguing area. Cost: $144 (Includes transportation, tours and lunch gratuities) Reservation deadline: August 27, 2010 4

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Plan ahead for next summer! Join us in July 2011 as we travel to Easton, Pennsylvania for a factory tour at Crayola Crayon. See how crayons and markers are made, or let out your inner creativity at one of the many craft stations and workshops. Watch for more information in upcoming Landmarks or call Carolyn at (585) 546-7029 x10.

GrACIOUS ITalianate

79 Howell Street, Canandaigua, NY

In the heart of Canandaigua’s Historic Home District, this gracious Italianate features exquisite period details joined with new mechanics, a garage and major renovations. Superb amenities include a gourmet cherry kitchen, five bedrooms, three full baths and a two and a half car garage with over a half acre fully-fenced yard. This home has been impeccably maintained and cared for by present owners. Excellent space for entertaining.

Pam Tichenor Associate Broker (585) 755-3473

The Historic Parmele House

101 Howell Street, Canandaigua, NY

The historic Parmele House is a beautifully restored 1875 colonial revival, renovated with a wonderful blend of old and new. Five bedrooms, three full baths, attached twocar garage, 5000 square feet. Architecturally significant period details. Gleaming wide plank and hardwood floors throughout. Part of Sonnenberg Gardens neighborhood. Minutes to Canandaigua Lake, New York Wine and Culinary Center, and all Canandaigua has to offer!

Jane Gavett Associate Broker (585) 919-9137

Summer 2010

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INSIDE DOWNTOWN THE SAINT PAUL QUARTER

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By Lisa M. Feinstein

nce Rochester’s garment district, the St. Paul Quarter is now home to hundreds of residents, and has evolved into one of downtown’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Bounded by the Genesee River, the Inner Loop, Clinton Avenue North and Division Street, the district has seen significant private investment as several historic buildings have been rehabilitated for a mix of uses.

Pictured circa 1890, what is now the Smith-Gormly building once the only known surviving photograph of the original temple. Noti

PHOTO BY LISA M. FEINSTEIN

This year, The Landmark Society’s Inside Downtown Tour focuses High Victorian Gothic H.H. Warner Building, which has a unique on this historic area of the city. Tour goers will have the opportu- façade of cast iron and brick. Other significant works within the nity to view modern living spaces within a district that has under- neighborhood include Our Lady of Victory Church by Andrew gone many changes throughout the Jackson Warner, and the former past decades. Rochester Chamber of Commerce In the early 1800s, St. Paul Building by Claude Bragdon. Street was lined with single-famThe area also features trendy dinily homes, one of which was the ing and a vibrant nightlife. Known Andrews family homestead at the for such popular venues as Tapas southwest corner of St. Paul Street 122 and Pane Vino Ristorante, the and Andrews Street, now the site of neighborhood also offers more casuAndrews Terrace. In the late 19th al dining options such as L J’s II Jacentury, however, the area was remaican Cuisine. Down the road, Full developed to accommodate factory Moon Vista Bike and Sport, which is buildings and offices for garment located in the Smith-Gormly Buildand shoe manufacturers, as well as ing, carries a full line of cycling other trades. Many of those buildequipment, houses a coffee bar and ings survive to this day offering a The St. Paul Quarter has evolved into a chic residential area hosts cycling clinics. populated by spacious lofts and a wide variety of businesses. variety of architectural styles. Another popular destination in Rich detailing can be seen in such buildings as the Beaux Arts- the St. Paul Quarter is the Water Street Music Hall. Previously The style Granite Building, located at the foot of St. Paul Street, and the Warehouse and The Horizontal Boogie Bar, the site has hosted na6

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THE INSIDE DOWNTOWN TOUR This year’s self-paced tour (September 24-25) includes the following destinations:

The Smith-Gormly Building 180 St. Paul Street The first industrial building in Rochester to be converted to loft apartments, this building features bright and inviting lofts and the Pike Stained Glass Studios, founded in 1908.

The Forman Building 116 St. Paul Street The former Harry Forman’s Clothing Store is meticulously restored, uniquely blending historic and modern features. The tour features two lofts, including the spectacular penthouse.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LANDMARK SOCIETY VIA RUSH RHEES LIBRARY

Our Lady of Victory/St. Joseph Church 210 Pleasant Street Built in 1868 with Renaissance-inspired detail and elegance.

SUNY Brockport Metro Center 55 St. Paul Street Housed in the Chamber of Commerce building which was commissioned by George Eastman and designed by Claude Bragdon, Rochester’s foremost early 20th century architect.

The Warner Building 82 St. Paul Street The tour highlights three residential units (pictured below) and the Renaissance Gallery.

The Searle Building 181 St. Paul Street Tour goers will view two residential units.

e sat adjacent to the original Temple B’rith Kodesh (far right). Long ago demolished, this is ice also the 1800s Greek Revival home to the far left of the photograph.

PHOTO BY LISA M. FEINSTEIN

tional and international musical acts for decades. Today the venue still draws thousands of music fans each year. But recreation, shopping, fine dining and a selection of fashionable clubs are not enough for this hip neighborhood. Housed in the former Chamber of Commerce Building, the SUNY College at Brockport Metro Center offers an extensive schedule of college courses. The influx of new residential projects, in addition to existing successes like the Smith-Gormly Building, Riverview Lofts, Water Street Commons and the Michaels-Stern Building, have made the St. Paul Quarter the most populated neighborhood downtown, and transformed some of the city’s most beautiful examples of late 19th and early 20th century architecture into residential spaces that accommodate the needs of the 21st century. The Inside Downtown Tour is a self-guided tour featuring sites that can be visited in any order. A two-day pass provides entrance to all stops during both days of the tour. The tour is Friday, September 24, from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m., and Saturday, September 25, from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Member and non-member tickets will be available in late August and can be purchased through our web site, www.landmarksociety.org, by calling (585) 546-7029 x10 or in person at The Landmark Society at 133 S. Fitzhugh Street. Non-member tickets only will also be sold at Parkleigh, 215 Park Avenue, also in late August. Summer 2010

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GRAB YOUR FLASHLIGHT!

FULL MOON FLASHLIGHT TOURS RISE AGAIN AT STONE-TOLAN By Cindy Boyer What is it about twilight? There’s something special about the borderline between night and day. That hour before the sun sinks below the horizon and the moon takes her position in the night sky brims with a mysterious aura. Nowhere is the magic of twilight more alive than at the Stone-Tolan House during The Landmark Society’s Full Moon Flashlight Tours. The soft glow of the summer’s fading day allows attendees to imagine that modernity might slip away with the sunset. And in the blink of an eye, visitors are transported 200 years into

the past – when the house was first built. As the sun sets, Stone-Tolan, the oldest house in the county, becomes the setting for unique family fun. Flashlights in hand, eager children and curious adults tour the house and imagine life as it must have been when pioneers Orringh and Elizabeth Stone ran a rural tavern and family farm on the property in the late 1790s. Visitors carefully tread floorboards that are over 200 years old as flashlight beams uncover the many treasures in the tavern room, the history at the kitchen hearth and the period pieces in the parlor bedroom. This year, for the first time, everyone is invited to tour the farm’s 19th century barn, admire its transformation into an education center and view the archaeological display. After the tour, guests can partake in lawn and tabletop games, including Jacob’s Ladder, the Game of Graces, 9 Pins and other timeless activities. As the last rays of sunlight disappear, we’ll gather around the campfire and pop corn. We’ll share ancient tales and indulge in a song or two. You can even splurge on a s’mores kit for a sweet, yet traditionally 20th century treat! There is plenty of free parking and admission is only $15 per family or $5 per person. The admission fee includes tours, games, popcorn, the barn visit and dreaming by the campfire. The only thing we can’t give you? Unlimited opportunities to enjoy the evening! There is only one more Full Moon Flashlight Tour scheduled this summer. On August 24, the fun starts at 7 p.m. and ends at 8:30 p.m. See you at Stone-Tolan, 2370 East Avenue!

SALES AND SERVICE

1776 East Main Street (585) 288-2050 For over 95 years, the Feldman family has been providing quality, energy-saving heating and cooling!

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CALENDAR

The Ellwanger Garden, started by 19th century nurseryman George Ellwanger, is an historic landscape that blooms a variety of flora.

CHILDREN’S EVENT MUSEUM EVENT GENERAL EVENT TRAVELOGUE EVENT For updated schedules or to learn more about upcoming events, visit us at www.landmarksociety.org or call (585) 546-7029.

AUGUST EVERY TUESDAY Ellwanger Garden Special Openings

Discover a hidden oasis on Mt. Hope Avenue at one of Rochester’s loveliest gardens. The Ellwanger Garden is a living preservation site which boasts 80 different kinds of perennials, including strong collections of peonies, roses, daylilies, hostas, irises and summer-flowering bulbs. The historic landscape can also be viewed by appointment for groups of six or more. To schedule a tour, please e-mail Sharon Pratt (spratt@landmarksociety.org) or

call (585) 546-7029 x15. Volunteers are always welcome in the garden. To volunteer, please e-mail Shelley O’Brien (sobrien@ landmarksociety.org) or call (585) 546-7029 x14. TIME: 5:30 - 7:00 p.m. LOCATION:

Ellwanger Garden 625 Mount Hope Avenue

AUGUST 2-6 Summer at Stone Tolan

Let your third through sixth graders experience traditional crafts, outdoor games, special tours and other pioneer pastimes during our week long summer camps. Pioneer Days is our traditional crafts and early activities program full of all sorts of early American pleasures and pastimes to enjoy. Our NEW Arch-KID-tecture Excitement program blends an enlightening exploration of all things architectural with historic preservation, exciting crafts and activities. TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. LOCATION:

Stone Tolan House Museum 2370 East Avenue

AUGUST 8 Cobbs Hill Daylily Garden Open Houses

Come and experience the last of a series of open houses at the Cobbs Hill Daylily Garden. Don’t miss this beautiful tour! TIME: 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. LOCATION:

1 Hillside Avenue, west of South Winton Road at the Tay House Lodge

AUGUST 24 Full Moon Flashlight Tours

In the glow of twilight, tour the Stone-Tolan House by flashlight and imagine life as it was in the late 1790s. Enjoy campfire treats, ghost stories and play games that the Tolan children and their friends would have played in the 18th century. For more information see page 8. TIME: 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. LOCATION:

Stone-Tolan House Museum 2370 East Avenue

SEPTEMBER EVERY TUESDAY Ellwanger Garden Special Openings

Discover a hidden oasis on Mt. Hope Avenue at one of Rochester’s loveliest gardens. The Ellwanger Garden is a living preservation site which boasts 80 different kinds of perennials, including strong collections of peonies, roses, daylilies, hostas, irises and summer-flowering bulbs. The historic landscape can also be viewed by appointment for groups of six or more. To schedule a tour, please e-mail Sharon Pratt (spratt@landmarksociety.org) or call (585) 546-7029 x15. Volunteers are always welcome in the garden. To volunteer, please e-mail Shelley O’Brien (obrien@ landmarksociety.org) or call (585) 546-7029 x14. TIME: 5:30 - 7:00 p.m. LOCATION:

Ellwanger Garden 625 Mount Hope Avenue

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SEPTEMBER 24 & 25 Inside Downtown Tour

Celebrating its seventh year, this self-guided tour once again presents a sneak peek at some of downtown Rochester’s newest and most exciting spaces in which to live, work and play. Visitors will see trendy loft living, both old industrial buildings newly rehabilitated as living spaces and new apartments designed with the historic context in mind and stimulating work spaces. TIME: Friday, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Saturday, 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

OCTOBER OCTOBER 2 Durand Eastman Park

How does a morning spent enjoying the striking fall colors of scenic Durand Eastman Park sound to you? Join us on Saturday for a hike among the beautiful and peaceful hills and trails of this Rochester landmark. After our hike, we will have lunch at Jack’s Place. Cost is $49 per person. For more information see page 4. TIME: 9:00 a.m. LOCATION: Durand Eastman Park, maintenance building parking lot on Zoo Road

OCTOBER 8 Historic Ithaca

Visit the Sage Hall, built in 1875, on the Cornell University Campus and tour the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, well known for its controversial concrete façade. Its

collection includes two windows from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin D. Martin House and more than 30,000 other works. After lunch, take a tour of the Cornell Plantations with a walking tour of the botanical gardens. For more information see page 4.

OCTOBER 22, 23, 29 & 30 Ghost Walk

This ever-popular Halloween event revives true tales from Rochester’s past told by “recently returned Rochesterians” in period costumes. Lantern-bearing guides lead participants under the cloak of darkness to each performance then back to the church for Halloween refreshments. For more information see page 2. TIME: 6:30 - 9:00 p.m. LOCATION:

Walk begins at the Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word 597 East Avenue

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 14 Historic Preservation Awards & Annual Meeting The Landmark Society honors some of the area’s best examples of restoration and care of historic structures. To nominate a candidate or property for an historic preservation award, contact chowk@landmarksociety.org. TIME: 3:00 p.m. LOCATION:

Academy of Medicine 1441 East Avenue

Mark & Kathy Cleary Offset & Digital Printing. Event Signage. Banners. www.cityblueimaging.com | 585.454.1695

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graced by a neo-colonial, sixpanel door with a leaded transom and sidelights. The elongated windows provide ample sunlight to flow into the first floor living spaces. The interior of the house is decorated in period furniture. At least 14 pieces that were used in the home between 1910 and 1936 have been located and brought back to the house. Such attention to detail and commitment to preservation made this house an ideal nominee for State & National Registers of Historic Places. Of special note is a Capen Piano that was built in Brockport circa 1900. Capen Pianos

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were produced by the Brockport Manufacturing Company from about 1890 until about 1930. Known for building elaborately carved pianos, these instruments were expensive at the time and often constructed from exotic woods. Both the East Side Presbyterian Church and the Edward Harrison House are fine examples of the variety and beauty of architecture represented in western New York. The preservation of these buildings not only allows this generation to look to the past for inspiration, it also guarantees a strong foundation and sense of history for generations to come. John Ruskin would be extremely pleased.

PHOTO BY ANDY OLENICK

CONTINUED

The East Side Presbyterian Church, now the Parsells Avenue Community Church, still boasts its original marble stairs and Romanesque arches.


HOME EXCHANGE

GRACIOUS ITALIANATE

HISTORIC PARMELE HOUSE

In the heart of Canandaigua’s Historic Home District, this gracious Italianate features exquisite period details joined with new mechanics, garage and major renovations. Superb amenities include a gourmet cherry kitchen, five bedrooms, three full baths and a two and a half car garage with over a half acre fully-fenced yard. This home has been impeccably maintained and cared for by present owners. Excellent space for entertaining. Believed to be one of the earliest homes on Howell Street. Minutes to all that Canandaigua has to offer! To see this gorgeous home, call Pam Tichenor at (585) 755-3473. More details can be found at www.realtyusa.com

This beautifully restored 1875 colonial revival, renovated with a wonderful blend of old and new, features five bedrooms, three full baths, an attached two-car garage, architecturally significant period details, gleaming wide plank and hardwood floors throughout and a formal living room with a gas fireplace. A total of 5000 square feet with a large inviting front porch, this home is part of the Sonnenberg Garden neighborhood. Minutes to Canandaigua Lake, New York Wine and Culinary Center and all Canandaigua has to offer, this home is a must see! Please call Jane Gavett at (585) 9199137. More details can be found at www.realtyusa.com

79 Howell Street, Canandaigua, NY

101 Howell Street, Canandaigua, NY

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133 SOUTH FITZHUGH STREET ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 14608-2204 David J. Whitaker

Interim Executive Director

Cindy Boyer

Director of Museums & Education

Eric Bridle Landmarks Editor & Designer

Maranne McDade Clay Grants Administrator

Lisa M. Feinstein Associate Editor & Writer

Beverly Gibson Horticulturist

Carolyn Haywood Receptionist & Administrative Assistant

Norma Jean Hildreth Membership Associate

Cynthia Howk Architectural Research Coordinator

Cherise Jordan Executive Assistant

Carole Lombard Finance Officer

Caitlin Meives Preservation Planner

Shelley O’Brien Events and Volunteer Coordinator

Mark Powell Director of Development

Sharon Pratt Museums & Education Associate

Judith Trabert

Stone-Tolan Tour Guide


Landmarks: Volume XLVIII, Number III