Page 1

PMAESA

PORTS HANDBOOK 2017–2018


CONTENTS

3 FOREWORD UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL OF PMAESA PORTS

30 MALAWI MALAWI LOOKS TO INLAND PORT TRADE OPTION

5 INTRODUCTION PMAESA AIMS TO PROMOTE REGIONAL INTEGRATION

32 MAURITIUS VITAL LINK FOR IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

8 MEMBER LOCATIONS PMAESA, PMAWCA AND UAPNA

34 MOZAMBIQUE GATEWAY PORT IS BACK IN BUSINESS

11 PMAESA CONFERENCE HARNESSING THE BLUE ECONOMY 13 INTERTEK (QUALITY CONTROL) A GOOD WAY TO AVOID COST OF BAD IMPORTS PMAESA HANDBOOK 2017-18 is published by:

land&MARINE Land & Marine Publications Ltd 1 Kings Court, Newcomen Way, Severalls Business Park, Colchester CO4 9RA, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)1206 752902 Fax: +44 (0)1206 842958 E-mail: publishing@landmarine.com www.landmarine.com on behalf of:

PMAESA

Port Management Association of Eastern and Southern Africa PO Box 99209 - 80107 Mombasa, Kenya Tel: +254 20 238 1184 Fax: +254 20 261 5868 Email: pmaesa@pmaesa.org www.pmaesa.org

16 ANGOLA NEW TERMINALS AND MORE CAPACITY AT LOBITO 18 BURUNDI REDEVELOPMENT AT PORT OF BUJUMBURA 20 DJIBOUTI EXPANSION PROMISES NEW FACILITIES 22 ERITREA MASSAWA IS MAIN GATEWAY FOR EAST AFRICA 24 ETHIOPIA LANDLOCKED ETHIOPIA MAKING BIG STRIDES 26 KENYA MOMBASA GETS MORE TEU CAPACITY AND NEW RAIL LINK 28 MADAGASCAR TOAMASINA LEADS COUNTRY’S PORTS

36 MOZAMBIQUE BETTER TIMES FOR MOZAMBIQUE RAIL SYSTEM 38 NAMIBIA PLANS TO BECOME TRANSPORT HUB 40 SEYCHELLES PORT VICTORIA HAS FIVE-YEAR PLAN 42 SOUTH AFRICA TRANSNET’S KEY ROLE IN SOUTH AFRICAN ECONOMY 44 SUDAN SUDAN INVESTS IN UPGRADING OF PORTS 46 SWAZILAND SWAZILAND’S EFFICIENT RAIL FREIGHT NETWORK 48 TANZANIA MAJOR UPGRADING FOR PORTS TO FULFIL ‘GATEWAY’ ROLE 52 ZANZIBAR MALINDI HAS KEY ROLE IN ARCHIPELAGO TRADE 54 ZAMBIA KEEPING ZAMBIA’S WATERWAYS SAFE AND EFFICIENT 56 PMAESA MEMBERS DIRECTORY

View online: qrs.ly/wr5aew9 The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor nor of any other organisation associated with this publication. No liability can be accepted for any inaccuracies or omissions. © 2016 Land & Marine Publications Ltd ISSN 2397-9275

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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FOREWORD UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL OF PMAESA PORTS

W

elcome to the first Port Management Association of Eastern & Southern Africa (PMAESA) handbook. This new handbook provides comprehensive information about all ports that are members of PMAESA, covering all those ports stretching from Sudan on the Red Sea coast to Angola on Africa’s Atlantic Ocean seaboard. The publication comes at a time when the Secretariat has just adopted a new strategy focusing on a wider involvement in the total value chain as the Association’s focus is no longer trained only on the performance of seaports but also traces the transport corridor through which the cargo travels from the hinterland to the port and back. Our members are currently working to dramatically expand their facilities. Together with other stakeholders they are developing and improving their vitally important hinterland connections.

Today, the majority of our member ports are a key element of the transport corridors that serve vast inland markets in Africa, handling not only cargoes meant for the coastal states but also those for land-linked neighbouring states. As such, these ports can, at best, expand and develop alongside better roads and railways.

INVESTMENT The level of our influence is extended to include trade facilitation opportunities brought by various investment opportunities, influence the reduction of logistics cost and coordination of activities to be aligned to 2050 AIM Strategy and the Blue Economy concept.

The PMAESA region has continued to witness a significant foreign and local investment in recent years. Our member ports are now realizing their potential and have an exciting future as genuine transport hubs, interfacing between sea and land as part of one seamless operation. This new publication, in a nutshell, illustrates this dramatic development and shows the rest of the world just how far eastern and southern African ports have come and their direction of travel over the next decade and beyond.

Nozipho Mdawe Secretary General Port Management Association of Eastern & Southern Africa

The handbook comes at a time when we are rebranding PMAESA, reviving and recreating the association to best serve our members. Whilst attracting new members, we continue to define the value-add that is unique to each member or cluster.

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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INTRODUCTION PMAESA AIMS TO PROMOTE REGIONAL INTEGRATION

T

he Port Management Association of Eastern and Southern Africa (PMAESA) is a non-profit-making intergovernmental organisation made up of port operators, government line ministries, logistics and maritime service providers and other port and shipping stakeholders from the regions of eastern, western and southern African and the Indian Ocean. PMAESA’s main objective is to strengthen relations among member ports with a view to promoting regional cooperation and subsequently regional integration. The association offers a framework for the exchange of information and ideas among members. It aims to create an

enabling environment whereby members can interface with one another in the port, transport and trade arenas. PMAESA also works towards improving conditions of operation and management of ports in its region of coverage with a view to enhancing their productivity.

COMMON INTERESTS PMAESA seeks to maintain relations with other port authorities and associations, regional and international organisations and governments of the region to hold discussions on matters of common interest. The PMAESA Secretariat, based in Mombasa, was set up to coordinate the activities of the association.

HOW PMAESA BEGAN The organisation was first established in Mombasa as the Port Management Association of Eastern Africa in 1973 under the auspices of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA). This followed a recommendation at a meeting of African transport ministers in Tunisia in 1971.

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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The organisation’s main areas of activity are:

• Regional cooperation.

PMAESA MEMBER STATES

• Maritime safety and protection of the marine environment

Over the years, PMAESA has strengthened its relationships with other port management associations: the North African Ports Association (UAPNA) and the Port Management Association of West and Central Africa (PMAWCA). This led to the establishment of the Pan Africa Association for Port Cooperation (PAPC).

• ANGOLA • BURUNDI • COMOROS • DJIBOUTI • ERITREA • ETHIOPIA • KENYA • MADAGASCAR • MALAWI • MAURITIUS • MOZAMBIQUE • NAMIBIA • RÉUNION • RWANDA • SEYCHELLES • SOMALIA • SOUTH AFRICA • SOUTH SUDAN • SUDAN • SWAZILAND • TANZANIA • UGANDA • ZAMBIA • ZANZIBAR • ZIMBABWE

• Transit transport • Port operations issues such as port statistics • Public sector / private sector partnership • Communication

Evgenia Bolyukh / Shutterstock.com

• Cruise industry

Since its inception, PMAESA has endeavoured to forge links among its member countries so as to fulfil the ambitions of the association.

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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TUNISIA

MOROCCO

ALGERIA

WESTERN SAHARA

LIBYA

MAURITANIA CAPE VERDE

SENEGAL

GAMBIA

GUINEA

GUINEA-BISSAU SIERRA LEONE

LIBERIA

MEMBER LOCATIONS PMAESA, PMAWCA AND UAPNA

BENIN CÔTE D'IVOIRE

NIGERIA

GHANA TOGO EQUATORIAL GUINEA SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

CAMEROON GABON

REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

PMAESA member countries

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• Angola • Burundi • Comoros • Djibouti • Eritrea • Ethiopia • Kenya • Madagascar • Malawi • Mauritius • Mozambique • Namibia • Réunion

• Rwanda • Seychelles • Somalia • South Africa • South Sudan • Sudan • Swaziland • Tanzania • Uganda • Zambia • Zanzibar • Zimbabwe

ANGOLA

LEGEND PMAESA Region PMAWCA Region

NAMIBIA

UAPNA Region Darkened areas imply membership to 2 associations

SOUT


PMAWCA member countries • Angola • Benin • Cameroon • Cape Verde • Equatorial Guinea • Gabon • Gambia • Ghana • Guinea (Conakry) • Guinea-Bissau • Côte d'Ivoire • Liberia • Mauritania • Nigeria • Republic of the Congo • São Tomé and Príncipe • Senegal • Sierra Leone • Togo

EGYPT

ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

OF

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MALAWI

MOZAMBIQUE

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

UAPNA member countries • Algeria • Egypt • Libya • Mauritania • Morocco • Sudan • Tunisia • Western Sahara

RÉUNION SWAZILAND

OUTH AFRICA PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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PMAESA CONFERENCE HARNESSING THE BLUE ECONOMY

Dear Delegates,

I

t is with great pleasure that I welcome you to the forthcoming PMAESA 2016 Conference scheduled for 27 November to 1 December 2016 at Shamandora Hall in Port Sudan under the sponsorship of Sea Ports Corporation Sudan in collaboration with PMAESA. PMAESA is a regional organisation for the ports and maritime sector in eastern and southern Africa. It seeks to promote and nurture best practices among member ports by creating an enabling environment for exchange of information and capacity building to contribute to the economic development of the region.

The forthcoming conference is expected to bring together a cross-section of port executives, maritime experts, equipment manufacturers and suppliers as well as port stakeholders from within and outside Africa. The theme of the conference is ‘Port Strategies for Harnessing the African Blue Economy and Investment Options’. SPC in conjunction with PMAESA is looking forward to coming up with tangible action plans for our ports systems and the region to engage in rigorous deliberations and debate to come out with firm deliverables. We have invited some of Africa’s best brains on ports, maritime and economic issues to deliberate on pertinent matters affecting the best way to harness the continent’s Blue Economy. It is our belief that you will take this opportunity to effectively and positively participate in deliberations on the pertinent issues affecting our ports systems. We sincerely believe that your insight into the maritime industry and the changes in the industry will help to improve the competitiveness of our ports and boost our regional economies to higher levels.

The organising committee and our local hosts have drawn up a splendid pre- and post-conference itinerary which we hope you will find heartening. We also welcome you to partner with us in this event through sponsorship and showcasing your products and services in an exhibition that will be running concurrently with the conference. The ambience at the exhibition hall will offer a unique opportunity for industry leaders from Africa and beyond to meet, network and share their specialised knowledge with industry decision-makers from across eastern and southern Africa. For details about sponsorship and how to partner with us or for any further information, please contact George Sunguh. Tel: +254 722 703 971
 Email: gsunguh@pmaesa.org

Dr Jalal Eldin M.A. Shelia
 General Manager
 Sea Ports Corporation

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INTERTEK (QUALITY CONTROL) A GOOD WAY TO AVOID COST OF BAD IMPORTS

The real cost of importing poor-quality and substandard goods is their impact on the health, safety, economy and environment of the importing country. That is why it is so vital for governments to put in place really effective inspection and quality control programmes – a solution that is now being embraced by members of PMAESA.

M

deliberately ignored for financial gain, there is even more need for control measures.

The aim is to protect against the devastating effects of such goods not only on a country’s economy and environment but also on the health and safety of its citizens.

A robust system of quality control and inspections is also fundamental to all businesses involved in imports and exports. It will help protect their consumers, their brand and their company’s reputation by minimising defective merchandise, customer complaints, non-compliant products and late or short shipments.

any governments have now implemented inspection and quality control programmes to prevent the import of undeclared or substandard and counterfeit goods.

Unsafe and unreliable products can cost a country many millions of dollars each year in replacement costs for products that do not last as long as they should and in compensation for injury, death or damage to property. Under-declaration of shipments can lose countries valuable duty and tax revenue. Without any form of regulation, countries risk being supplied with substandard products or counterfeit goods that are likely to fail basic safety requirements, endangering not only the consumers but also the local economy. In countries where the safety and performance requirements of the importing country or region are not always understood, or may even be

SOLUTIONS The range of quality control and inspection solutions available to governments, customs departments and industry includes:

require inspections only on shipments above a certain value. However, in some instances inspections are necessary for all imported products, regardless of value. In Mozambique, for example, a PSI has been running for many years. Conformity assessment programme: The CAP has been implemented to verify safety and performance of imported goods, requiring exporters to obtain a Certificate of Conformity before shipping in order to clear customs. Manufacturers must be able to verify that products manufactured, shipped and distributed under their brand name to meet industry and government regulations.

Pre-shipment inspection: The PSI may be mandated by the government of the importing country. The inspection programme should ensure that the price charged by the exporter reflects the true value of the goods and that the standard of goods entering the country meets the requirements of that country. Currently, a number of countries in Africa

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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Many countries around the world have now implemented and enforced safety standards to ensure that products being imported, sold and used in their countries are safe. However, countries which do not use the CAP system are at greater risk of being targeted with substandard products, effectively becoming a dumping ground for those products rejected by other countries. International standards are applied wherever possible, which means that reputable manufacturers are well able to comply; and since programmes are usually paid for by exporters, the costs do not have to be borne by the government or importers. Kenya and Ethiopia are just two PMAESA member states that have implemented such a programme. The potential benefits of CAP include:

• Reducing customer complaints due to inferior products • Detecting merchandise containing non standard or non-compliant components • Eliminating or reducing late shipments • Ensuring contractual quantity and quality specifications as per purchase orders and letters of credit • Preventing the dumping of poor-quality and substandard products, thus helping domestic manufacturers to compete fairly •

Assisting when disputes occur, as certificates can form the basis for settling claims either between the parties or through underwriters

• Ensuring that products conform to standards prior to shipping

• Offering supply chain security

• Ensuring that correct quantities are shipped

• Preventing the transport of illegal and undeclared goods

• Minimising the amount of defective merchandise

• Improving the security of trade and transport

Ensuring compliance with Integrated Maritime Policy (IMP) and United States and European Union regulations regarding movement of goods and vessels through ports.

These methods of quality control and inspections help to minimise risk and provide long-term benefits to African countries looking to grow their economies and ensure sustainable success.

WORLD LEADER IN CAP Intertek is a world leader in conformity assessment programmes, having implemented its first programme nearly 20 years ago. Its knowledge of international standards and local markets allows Intertek to add value to governments in regard to quality control and inspections. www.intertek.com/government

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

ANGOLA NEW TERMINALS AND MORE CAPACITY AT LOBITO

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 12°19’6S, 13°34’E CONTACT: Av. Independencia, No. 16 Lobito Angola TEL: +244 9234 48346; +244 926 912710 EMAIL: diurkassul@yahoo.com MAXIMUM DEPTH: 14.0 - 15.2 metres.

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PORT OF LOBITO

L

obito is Angola’s second-largest port and the terminus of the recently restored Benguela railway, which serves the provinces of Huambo, Bie and Moxico and will eventually link the Atlantic Ocean with neighbouring Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Since 2008 work has been under way at the Port of Lobito to fully rehabilitate and then expand facilities. It is now poised to take advantage of the increased traffic generated by the newly restored rail link to its natural hinterland. The Angolan government has invested heavily in the port in recent years and has looked to Chinese construction companies to undertake the work as part of an ‘oil for infrastructure’ deal. In particular, Lobito has a new 700,000 teu container terminal with an alongside depth of 14.7 metres and direct rail access. The terminal is supported by a dry port facility with its own rail link. Nearby, a 310 metre long ore handling facility has been completed. Together with the container terminal it represents the third phase of the port’s reconstruction programme. Both will be served by rail. Total cost of this work is put at US$ 1.247 billion.

A joint venture led by the Singapore-based DT Group has been granted concessions to manage the various terminals at the port. In turn, DT Group has appointed bulk logistics specialist Impala to operate the bulk facility. A specialist partner will be appointed to oversee operations at the 414 metre long container terminal. As a result of the five-stage upgrading, the Port of Lobito will have a total quay length of 7.8 km and the capacity to accommodate 20 oceangoing vessels. It will have an annual capacity of about 11 million tonnes.

YACHT CLUB

between the port of Lobito and Luau on the DR Congo border was completed in 2015 and an inland container depot has been constructed in Luau. A further 775 km of track through DRC and another 90 km in Zambia still require restoration and in order to provide another outlet to the sea for the two countries’ copper and mineral exports. The line has an annual handling capacity of 20 million tonnes. Meanwhile a new 590 km branch line from Luacano (via the border town of Jimbe) in Angola to Chingola in Zambia is still in the planning stage and is expected to cost US$ 1 billion.

Future plans include the opening of a dedicated cruise terminal and luxury yacht club. A new US$ 7 billion Sonangol oil refinery is due for completion in 2018. Once commissioned, it will dramatically increase Lobito’s liquid bulk exports. For the time being, there is a jetty for the discharge of fuel at Sonangol’s Ocean Terminal. The Benguela-Lobito Corridor is vital to the port’s success. A US$ 1.9 billion Chinese-backed project to rehabilitate the 1,344 km Cape gauge Bengulea Railway (Caminho de Ferro de Benguela)

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

BURUNDI REDEVELOPMENT AT PORT OF BUJUMBURA

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 03°22. 5’S, 029°20.8’E CONTACT: Société Concessionnaire de l’Exploitation du Port de Bujumbura (EPB) BP 59, Bujumbura, Burundi TEL: +257 229 490 FAX: +257 223 852 EMAIL: bujaport@cbinf.com HOURS: 07.30 to 17.30. FACILITIES: General cargo wharf (400 metres); container wharf (100 metres); petroleum wharf (150 metres); port basin (450 metres by 100 metres).

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IMPORTS: Capital goods, petroleum products, foodstuffs. EXPORTS: Coffee, tea, sugar, cotton, tin ore. EQUIPMENT: Shore crane of 50 tons capacity, five mobile harbour cranes of 5 to 40 tons capacity, one Pinguely mobile crane of 81 tons, 11 fork-lift trucks of 4.5 tons, two front loaders of 25 and 28 tons. STORAGE: Eight warehouses with a total of 18,560 square metres. MAXIMUM DEPTH: 9.0 metres.


T photography / Shutterstock.com

SOCIÉTÉ CONCESSIONNAIRE DE L’EXPLOITATION DU PORT DE BUJUMBURA (EPB)

T

he Port of Bujumbura, in the north-east corner of Lake Tanganyika, handles up to 80 per cent of the external trade of Burundi. Built in 1959 and previously run by the government, the port was leased in 1992 to the Société Concessionnaire de l’Exploitation du Port de Bujumbura (EPB), a public-private partnership. The port has a capacity of 500,000 tonnes, which is more than double the current annual throughput. Bujumbura has three quays: a 400 metre general cargo quay, a 100 metre container wharf and a 150 metre petroleum wharf next to the container wharf. Cargo ships are handled in the port basin, which is 450 metres long and 100 metres wide. Depths alongside range from 7.0 to 9.0 metres. Main cargoes handled are bagged products such as cement, sugar and fertilizer, petroleum products, vehicles and machinery, breakbulk and containers. There is little manufacturing in Burundi, so most goods and some foodstuffs have to be imported.

allow more efficient cargo handling. The economy is growing at a rate of three to five per cent a year and imports are rising. Cargo volumes are forecast to rise to nearly 300,000 tonnes by 2020.

reduce container transport costs by about 18 per cent as well making the transport chain more efficient and giving a boost to economic development in Burundi and neighbouring countries.

DEVELOPMENT

SHIPPING LINKS

In conjunction with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the port has embarked on an investment programme to improve its services and productivity. A feasibility study was carried out by JICA and an agreement was signed in May 2014 worth Yen 2,800 million (about US$ 23 million). Work is expected to be completed in 2016.

The port has shipping links across Lake Tanganyika to Kigoma in Tanzania, Lalemie and Kalundu in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Mpulungu in Zambia. Being landlocked, it depends on neighbouring countries for access to the sea.

The plan embraces three phases of redevelopment: • Construction of a container terminal, including dredging to deepen quay depths. There will be two 80 metre berths with 4.5 metres depth alongside and a 34,660 square metre container yard. • Construction of a shipyard, including a boat launch. Currently, shiprepairs are performed at Kigoli in Tanzania. • Relocation of 1,200 metres of drainage channels to reduce the need for harbour dredging.

Three options are available: • The 2,000 km Northern Corridor through Rwanda, Uganda and Kenya to the Port of Mombasa using road and rail transport. • The 1,400 km Central Corridor through Tanzania using lake transport to Kigoma and then road or rail to Dar es Salaam. • The Deep South route through Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa using lake transport to Mpulungu and then road and rail transport to Durban in South Africa.

The port lies north-west of the city of Bujumbura. There is a fuel storage area about 1 km to the north and parking for trucks and other vehicles about 500 metres to the south.

With port improvements in place, Bujumbura will be able to accommodate larger vessels. The project is expected to generate many new jobs.

There are many infrastructure projects in the region to improve cargo traffic to the landlocked countries, including a railway under construction from Mombasa to Kampala, and road improvements in Kenya, which could shorten the Northern Corridor route from Mombasa to Bujumbura by nearly 400 km.

The Port of Bujumbura currently has a maximum handling rate of 300 tons per crane per day. But an expansion and redevelopment plan is under way to

Programmes of improvement are also going ahead at the Port of Mpulungu and on Tanzania’s central rail line between Dar es Salaam and Kigoma. This is expected to

Kenya Ports Authority is also building a 50 acre container depot at Taveta, on the Kenya-Tanzania border, to position itself closer to Bujumbura.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

DJIBOUTI EXPANSION PROMISES NEW FACILITIES

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW PORT OF DJIBOUTI SA (PDSA) LOCATION: 11.6°N, 43.1°E The port’s three main facilities are the bulk terminal, the conventional terminal and the container terminal. FACILITIES: • Bulk terminal has 500 metres of berth with a ro-ro berth.

Conventional terminal has multiple handling ability for general cargo, cars (30,000 units) and livestock. Container terminal has four quay cranes and an annual capacity of 350,000 teu. STORAGE: There is bulk storage capacity for 30,000 tonnes of grain and 40,000 tonnes of fertilizer.

DORALEH MULTIPURPOSE PORT (DMP)

• Conventional terminal has 3,200 metres of berth.

Operational end 2016.

• Container terminal has 400 metres of berth with a ro-ro berth.

FACILITIES: Bulk terminal, breakbulk terminal, car terminal, container terminal and storage area.

EQUIPMENT: Bulk terminal has a highspeed bagging station, two pneumatic ship unloaders for grain and a conveyor system.

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EQUIPMENT: Bulk terminal has two pneumatic ship unloaders. Breakbulk terminal has portal and overhead cranes,

fork-lift trucks, flatbed trailers, etc. Car terminal has automated cargo monitoring, vehicle inspection and wash bay facilities. Container terminal has portal, quay and rail mounted gantry cranes, reach stackers, empty container stackers, fork-lift trucks, etc. STORAGE: DMP has 35,000 square metres of storage for solid fuels; bulk storage for fertilizer (100,000 tonnes), grain (100,000 tonnes) and sugar (50,000 tonnes); dedicated area of 57 hectares for breakbulk; over 40,000 vehicle slots; and a container yard capacity of 200,000 teu.


DJIBOUTI MULTIPURPOSE PORT PHASES I AND II PORT OF DJIBOUTI

P

erfectly positioned at the entrance to the Red Sea and at the crossroads of three continents, the Port of Djibouti is a regional container hub as well as an entrepôt for the Horn of Africa (especially landlocked Ethiopia) while also handling Djibouti’s seaborne trade. Djibouti covers an area of 23,000 sq km. Its ports are set for an unprecedented expansion during 2016-17 as new and, in some cases, wholly dedicated facilities come on stream. The Port of Djibouti is well connected by road and rail with the hinterland. Centrepiece of these connections is a new Chinese-funded rail line to Addis Ababa. Representing an investment of US$ 4 billion, this 656 km line was due to open in 2016, offering a transit time to the Ethiopian capital of 10 hours and replacing the old railway, built in 1917. The new line is the first stage of much wider plans to improve rail links from the Port of Djibouti across a great swath of East Africa. The port’s container terminal has a surface area of 22 ha and an annual throughput capacity of about 350,000 teu. The terminal can accommodate vessels of up to 8,000 teu capacity at its two 400 metre berths, which are equipped with four ship-to-shore gantry cranes of 50 tonnes capacity each. There is also a ro-ro berth.

General cargo handling remains a key activity for the Port of Djibouti, with a particular emphasis on traffic to and from Ethiopia. General cargo traffic comprises the import and export of liquid bulks, dry bulks, breakbulk, cars and livestock. In fact, non-containerised dry cargo volumes reached over 5 million tonnes in 2015. This increase was due largely to growing steel imports related to the port’s 150,000 tonne open steel yard. There are three berths for bulk cargoes such as imported cereals, fertilizer, sorghum, coal and clinker. The port has an impressive storage capacity of 30,000 tonnes for cereals and 40,000 tonnes for fertilizer, and discharge rates of over 8,000 tonnes per day are not uncommon. Bulk carriers of up to 30,000 dwt and 200 metres in length can be accommodated. In terms of car imports, there is an offdock storage area for 7,000 units. Again, many of the imported cars are destined for Ethiopia. In addition, the Port of Djibouti is involved in various new port development projects around Djibouti. These comprise: • Doraleh: This US$ 590 million scheme calls for the two-stage construction of a new port with 15 berths totalling 1,200 metres and 16.0 metres of water depth. The port, which is being built on a 690 hectare artificial island site, will include facilities for handling containers, general cargo, bulk cargo and cars. It will be able to accommodate capesize vessels of

100,000 dwt. Annual capacity is nearly 9 million tonnes and the port is expected to commence operations in 2016. • Tadjourah: US$ 78 million is being invested in a new port to handle the export of potash from two berths totalling 435 metres and a ro-ro berth of 190 metres. Once fully operational in 2016, Tadjourah is designed to handle about 4 million tonnes of cargo annually. • Damejog: This new, dedicated livestock export facility is built on 50 ha and has 655 metres of quay. Able to handle five livestock carriers, Damejog has an anticipated 10 million head a year capability. Work is due for completion in 2016. • Ghoubet: A new US$ 64 million port for the export of salt. It comprises a single 400 metre berth with 15.0 metres draught. Annual capacity is 5 million tonnes and completion is set for 2016.

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

ERITREA MASSAWA IS MAIN GATEWAY FOR EAST AFRICA

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 15°37’N, 39°28’E CONTACT: Ministry of Transport and Communications Maritime Transport Department PO Box 679 or 1120 Asmara, Eritrea TEL: +291 1 182792/189156/185251 FAX: +291 1 186541 E-MAIL: maritime@tse.com.er HOURS: Three shifts: 06.00 to 14.00, 14.00 to 22.00 and 22.00 to 06.00

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FACILITIES: Port of Massawa has three main sections. Khor Dakliyat has berths for the cement works and the Total Oil Terminal; the main commercial port area has six multipurpose berths plus shiprepair facilities; and Hargigo Bay has two oil terminals. The Port of Assab, in the far south, is Eritrea's only other seaport of significance. MAXIMUM DRAUGHT: 12.0 metres.


MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS MARITIME TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT

E

ritrea’s shipping and ports sector is controlled by the Maritime Transport Department, based in Asmara. The Department aims to: • Promote and maintain an efficient and regular maritime transport service • Expand port services and facilities while maintaining the efficiency of the system • Ensure a high degree of safety and security in maritime transport • Prevent marine pollution from ships.

The nation’s main port and East Africa gateway, Massawa, is located on a series of naturally protected bays with safe anchorages and good links to the Eritrea hinterland. The current port was founded in the 19th century and developed by the Italians.

RESTORATION Under the Eritrea government, Massawa has undergone a major rehabilitation and restoration of various facilities and services at the port. The commercial seaport is located on the northern shore of Massawa Island and is connected to Taulad Island and the mainland by a series of causeways.

The port has three main sections. • Khor Dakliyat, north of the Abdel Kader Peninsula, contains berths for the cement works and Total Oil Terminal. • The main part of the commercial port lies between Massawa Island and the Gherar Peninsula. It contains six berths plus shiprepair facilities as well as berths for loading salt. (See Table 1 for berth details.) A single stevedoring company operates the two container berths, which are supported by a 4,169 teu capacity storage yard. Fishing vessels and dhows use the shallow bays of Gherar and Taulud for berthing. • Hargigo Bay, south of Taulud Island and Massawa Island, with oil berths. (See Table 2 for berth details.)

TABLE 1 - COMMERCIAL PORT BERTHS TERMINAL

LENGTH DEPTH

Conventional

176 metres

4.9 metres

Ro-ro and conventional

150 metres

7.4 metres

Ro-ro and conventional

137 metres

8.7 metres

Conventional

137 metres

8.0 metres

Container and conventional

186 metres

8.5 metres

Container and conventional

208 metres

12.0 metres

TABLE 2 - OIL BERTHS TERMINAL

LENGTH DEPTH

Tamoil Oil Terminal

185 metres

8.84 metres

Total Oil Terminal

192 metres

9.20 metres

The port has four recognised anchorage areas with depths ranging from 11.0 metres to 32.0 metres. The port entrance and a 350 metre diameter turning basin off berth No 6 have been dredged to a depth of 12.0 metres. Maximum draught of vessels permitted in the Port of Massawa is 12.0 metres except in special circumstances and with the harbour master’s approval. The infrastructure of the port is controlled by Massawa Port Authority. The port of Assab, in the far south, is Eritrea’s only other seaport of significance.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

ETHIOPIA LANDLOCKED ETHIOPIA MAKING BIG STRIDES

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW CONTACT: Ethiopian Maritime Affairs Authority Mexico, in front of Hotel D’Afrique Tadesse Tefera Building, 5th Floor PO Box 1861 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia TEL: +251 115503638; +251 115503828 DUTY OFFICE: +251 115503640 FAX: +251 115503960 EMAIL: maritime@ethionet.et EMAIL: info@maritimeaff.gov.et WEB: www.etmaritime.com

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REUNION


TRANSPORT & MARITIME AFFAIRS REGULATORY DEPARTMENT, MARITIME DEPARTMENT, MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATIONS

S

hipping, transport and logistics are vital to Ethiopia as a landlocked nation. The Ethiopian Maritime Affairs Authority (EMAA) was set up by the government in 2007 to oversee the country’s marine and dry ports, its transport and logistics infrastructure as well as its maritime training and seafarer certification. This is part of Ethiopia’s five-year plan.

70 per cent of Ethiopia’s current imports. But their success has resulted in a need for additional capacity. Under the auspices of the Dry Port Service Enterprise (DPSE) four new dry ports are to be built at Moyale and Mekelle (42 hectares) and at Woreta and Diré Dawa (27 hectares).

LOGISTICS This is part of a regional drive to create infrastructure interlinked with the East and Horn of Africa trade. The ports will set up logistics chains that link up with dry ports and seaports in Somaliland, Djibouti, Kenya, Sudan and South Sudan.

This is a complement to Ethiopia’s improving rail links with its main trade gateway, Djibouti, which handles most of the nation’s external trade. The new links will ease the flow of goods and help reduce transport costs and transit times. A 759 km standard-gauge line between Addis Ababa and Djibouti has been built by China Railway Engineering Corporation (CREC) and China Civil Engineering Construction Corporation (CCECC). This rail line represents an investment of about US$ 4 billion and is due to be fully operational in 2016. The project is a key part of Ethiopia’s plans to build some 5,000 km of new lines across the country by 2020.

Despite being landlocked, Ethiopia is making big strides to develop its transport infrastructure and create a first-rate logistics network. The country is aware that the efficient movement of goods and the import and export of cargo is the key to a successful economy. Ethiopia aims to create a logistics network comparable with the best in the region. This has led to the construction of new roads, rail lines and, crucially, a network of strategically located dry ports – with more on the way – to relieve congestion at existing facilities. In addition to Modjo Dry Port, the nation’s first such facility, 75 km outside Addis Ababa, a second dry port has been established at Semera, 560 km from the capital. These two dry ports have the capacity to handle about

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

25


ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

KENYA MOMBASA GETS MORE TEU CAPACITY AND NEW RAIL LINK

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW CONTACT: Kenya Ports Authority PO Box 95009-80104 Mombasa, Kenya TEL: +254 (0)41 211 3999 FAX: +254 (0)41 231 1867 EMAIL: pr@kpa.co.ke WEB: www.kpa.co.ke

LAMU LOCATION: 2°18’S, 40°55’E FACILITIES: Three anchorages for vessels of up to 5.18 metres draught to enter harbour at LWST. Loading and discharging by dhows.

26

MOMBASA LOCATION: 4°04’S, 39°41’E HOURS: 07.00 to 15.00 and 15.00 to 23.00. Extension of regular hours, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays all constitute overtime. FACILITIES: Container and ro-ro facilities mainly at Berths 16, 17 and 18. Back-up area for container stacking and handling. Ro-ro facilities at Berths 5 and 13. Cruise terminal at Berths 1 and 2. Tanker terminals include Kipevu Oil Terminal (for crude oil carriers up to 100,000 dwt), Shimanzi Oil Terminal (for vessels up to 35,000 dwt) and Cased Oil Jetty (currently not in use). IMPORTS: Crude oil, fertilizers, salt, sugar, paper, iron and steel, motor vehicles, farm machinery, wheat, maize.

EXPORTS: Coffee, tea, soda ash, cement, canned fruit. EQUIPMENT: The old/current container terminal 01 consists of berths 16 to 19 with a total quay length of 840 metres. The terminal is equipped with 10 ship-to-shore gantry cranes of 45 to 60 tonnes capacity. Other cranes include 22 rubber tyred gantry cranes, two rail-mounted gantries for rail cargo and yard mobile cranes. Maximum draught at berths 1-18 is 12.0 metres, while berth 19 is 13.5 metres. STORAGE: Eight main quay transit sheds with a total floor area of 62,890 square metres. Three transit sheds with 36,952 square metres. MAXIMUM DEPTH: 10.5 metres.


KENYA PORTS AUTHORITY

M

ombasa is Kenya’s only deepwater port and the main cargo gateway to a number of landlocked East African states. The port’s cargo throughput figures have grown steadily in recent years and the Kenya Ports Authority has had to work hard to cope with the continued increase in traffic; in some cases finding workable short-term solutions ahead of long-term investment plans. One such interim solution has been the completion in 2013 of Berth 19 at a cost of US$ 66.7 million, which saw the Port of Mombasa increase its annual container handling capacity by 250,000 teu. The first phase of a second container terminal, west of the port’s Kipevu Oil Terminal, is now complete, with the first ship berthing at Berth 21 on 25 April 2016. This two-berth terminal has a draught of 15.0 metres and a capacity of 450,000 teu. It is equipped with two ship-to-shore gantry cranes and 10 rubber tyred gantry cranes. Eventually, the terminal will comprise three

berths with a total length of 900 metres. This first phase has brought in an added capacity of 550,000 teu. Phase 2 is set for completion in 2019. Capacity will be increased to 1.2 million teu. The terminal is currently being operated by KPA after encountering problems with the private concession. This US$ 280 million project has been financed by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JCIA). On the horizon is a new 32-berth port at Lamu, some 240 km north of Mombasa, being built by Chinese contractors at a cost of just over US$ 3 billion. Rather than compete directly with Mombasa for traffic, the aim is to provide better transport links with some of Kenya’s northern neighbours.

the main port area of Mombasa are also being discussed. Such a zone would allow the port to evolve from a pure centre of transport and become more directly involved in added value activities such as cargo processing and logistics. Funding is being sought for the project. For the time being, the KPA owns and operates two inland container depots, one in the Nairobi suburb of Embakasi and the other in Kisumu, in the far west of Kenya, on the shores of Lake Victoria. The Nairobi ICD has an annual capacity of 180,000 teu, while the smaller Kisumu depot can process about 15,000 teu per year. Both ICDs are rail linked to the Port of Mombasa.

UPGRADE

This will be the ocean terminus for the ambitious Lamu Port South Sudan Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET) project. Lamu Port at Manda Bay will have a depth of 18.0 metres and when complete will cover about 1,000 acres.

Expanding port capacity is, however, only one element of Kenya’s plans to upgrade its transport infrastructure. Equally important is the construction of a new standard-gauge railway from the port to Kampala, Kigali and Juba.

The overall corridor scheme, worth about US$ 30 billion, involves the creation of the port at Lamu; a standard-gauge rail line from the coast to Juba and Addis Ababa; and a US$ 4 billion oil pipeline serving South Sudan and Ethiopia. LAPSSET is among the flagship projects for Kenya’s Vision 2030, and the first three berths are expected to be complete by 2020.

The first 609 km stretch from Mombasa to Nairobi (costing US$ 3.8 billion) is expected to be operational by late 2017. The line is designed to carry 22 million tonnes a year of cargo – or a projected 40 per cent of Mombasa’s total throughput – by 2035.

Plans to create either an export processing zone or a free trade zone just outside

The existing rail line between Mombasa and Nairobi (opened in the 1890s) is only metre gauge and has speed and weight restrictions. Nevertheless, the two lines are likely to operate side by side.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

MADAGASCAR TOAMASINA LEADS COUNTRY’S PORTS

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 18°09’S, 49°25’E CONTACT: Société du Port à gestion Autonome de Toamasina (SPAT) Enceinte Portuaire Boulevard Ratsimilaho Ampasimazava Est Toamasina EMAIL: spat@port-toamasina.com. HOURS: 08.00 to 12.00, 14.00 to 18.00 FACILITIES: Container berthing C2-C3, length: 306 metres, depth: 10 to 12.0 metres; cargo berth: C1, B; berths for cabotage Mole A: 305 metres; berth for domestic vessels: 362 metres.

IMPORTS: First necessity products, rice, wheat flour, cement, fuel, coal, limestone, sulphur. EXPORTS: Nickel, cobalt, chromium, textiles, litchi, cloves, vanilla. EQUIPMENT: Four container cranes of 40 to 45 tonnes; one rail mounted unloader of 300 tonnes/hour; three truck cranes of 20 to 27 tonnes; 37 fork-lift trucks of 2.5 to 16 tonnes; 47 tractors; 49 trailers of 5 to 40 tonnes. STORAGE: Total space: 270,000 square metres; open storage including container yards: 98,627 square metres; customs yards: 15,720 square metres; new car storage yard: 126,000 square metres; warehouse: 30,000 square metres. MAXIMUM DEPTH: 12.0 metres.

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PORT OF TOAMASINA

M

adagascar is the world’s fourth-largest island, with 4,828 km of coastline and a population of over 22 million. Yet the ports of this island nation remain mostly undeveloped, with trade centred largely on just one gateway, Toamasina. The Port of Toamasina is managed by a Malagasy State owned company, the SPAT (Société du Port à gestion Autonome de Toamasina). It is the authority in charge of management and exploitation of the port, following an institutional reform initiated by the Malagasy government regarding commercial ports. The management and exploitation of containerised cargo is handled by Madagascar International Container Terminal Services Ltd (MICTS), a subsidiary of the Philippines’ International Container Terminal Services, Inc (ICTS). A public-private partnership was signed in 2005 for a 20-year concession of the container terminal. The state-owned Société de Manutention des Marchandises Conventionnelles (SMMC) deals with the handling of non-containerised goods including bulk merchandise, cars, metals, liquid and solid materials. Since the institutional reform, the Port of Toamasina has increased its handling capacity from 60 to 2,500 tonnes a day and

has been instrumental in allowing the port to develop as a reference port. Toamasina handles 90 per cent of Madagascar’s container traffic and over 80 per cent of external trade. It is the closest port to the capital, Antananarivo, and the two are connected by a freight-dominated 371 km rail link operated by Madarail, which is part way through a 25-year concession to operate the line. Madarail carries over 90 per cent of all rail freight. The network is single track, metric gauge, with a maximum axle load of 16 tons. Before the institutional change in 2003, the port was prevented by poor tariff structures and slow handling from becoming a regional cargo hub. Container handling rates were as low as five to six units (teu) per hour, well below the international average. This has now improved dramatically, while average dwell time for containers in the port has been reduced from 20 days to nine days for imports and 3 days for exports.

DOMINANCE Toamasina’s dominance means that the rest of Madagascar’s ports have a relatively minor share of the nation’s trade. The second-biggest port is Antsiranana, occupying one of the world’s most beautiful natural harbours at the extreme northern tip of the island. Its attractiveness

as a destination has made Antsiranana a cruise call of growing importance. Cargoes such as coffee, corn, peanuts and cattle are exported from the port’s single berth, which is 300 metres in length with 8.5 metres draught. Toliara, on the south-west coast, handles sisal, soap, hemp, cotton, rice and peanuts. The port is equipped with three 30 tonnes mobile cranes and has both covered and open-air storage. Mahajanga, traditionally Madagascar’s second port, is on the north-west coast. Its development as a harbour has been held back by limited water depth (only 4.5 metres at high tide) and a series of storms and cyclones. Although the port is in need of rehabilitation, Mahajanga is still a key facility for exports of frozen seafood. The recently constructed Port d’Ehoala, close to Fort Dauphin, has two berths of 275 metres and 150 metres in length (with 15.75 metres and 8.0 metres draught respectively) with a 440 ha industrial zone set aside for development. The port was built at a cost of US$ 275 million by Rio Tinto and the government in a World Bank-funded project. Port d’Ehoala is used by Rio Tinto QMM to export mining material, but also handles containers. The port aims to improve accessibility in the Anosy Region of Madagascar.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

MALAWI MALAWI LOOKS TO INLAND PORT TRADE OPTION

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW MAJOR WATERWAYS: Lake Malawi (Lake Nyasa) and Shire River (144 km). There is a ferry service to Likoma Island and across the lake. RAILHEAD: Port of Chipoka, Salima district, central Malawi. SMALLER PORTS: Monkey Bay, Nkhata Bay, Nkhotakota, Chilumba.

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MARINE DEPARTMENT, MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT AND CIVIL AVIATION

A

s a landlocked country, Malawi currently relies on seaports in neighbouring Mozambique and Tanzania to handle its imports and exports. This has a significant impact on the cost of delivering goods to final destination. Imported goods are expensive in Malawi, while Malawian exports are priced too high to be internationally competitive. Consequently, the Malawi government has been actively looking at ways to reduce the cost of its international trade. Malawi has major waterways in the form of Lake Malawi and the 144 km long Shire River. In October 2013 the Malawi government launched the Nsanje Inland

TANZANIA LINK Malawi, in an agreement with Tanzania, has an inland cargo centre at Kurasini in Dar es Salaam to handle imports destined for Malawi.

Port project, which has been widely publicised. This would provide a waterway connection between the Malawi town of Nsanje and the Indian Ocean by way of the Shire and Zambezi rivers. The Shire merges with the Zambezi near Cena (Mozambique) and the Zambezi then flows into the ocean. The idea is to build new port facilities at Nsanje and to dredge part of the Shire River to allow seagoing vessels to reach the inland town. A feasibility study has been carried out. The Malawi authorities say the Nsanje Inland Port would reduce import costs by up to 60 per cent. Some of the main concrete work on the jetty has been completed but the project has been put on hold due to lack of investment. So far, the inland port has not been in operation due to unresolved issues with Mozambique. One of the main reasons is that the inland waterway project would undermine the current situation, whereby transport and logistics providers in the main ports of Mozambique are benefiting from Malawi’s landlocked status. The Nsanje project has been called into question by some. In particular, there are questions about how big a capacity the inland waterway option could allow in terms of water depth and vessel size. It

is possible that cargo would need to be transhipped at ocean ports into smaller feeder vessels in order to navigate the inland waterway. This would increase transit time and handling costs. From Nsanje, goods would still have to be transport by road or rail to the distant commercial centre of Blantyre and also Lilongwe, and this would involve more costs.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE One option that has been widely discussed is for Malawi to use the Mozambican port of Quelimane, which has the key advantage of being closer to major centres in Malawi than either Beira or Nacala. For example, Quelimane is just over 300 km from Blantyre. The port is also well developed and able to receive large containerships. This option would require new road construction between Quelimane and the border town of Muloza. It has been estimated that the Quelimane option would reduce transit times to Malawi from the current three days (for Beira) and seven days (for Nacala) to six or seven hours. It would also reduce the cost of inland transport from about US$ 4,000 to US$ 900 per container.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

MAURITIUS VITAL LINK FOR IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 20.3°S, 57°E CONTACT: Mauritius Ports Authority H. Ramnarain Building Mer Rouge Port Louis Republic of Mauritius TEL: +230 206 5400 FAX: +230 240 0856 EMAIL: info@mauport.com WEB: www.mauport.com HOURS: 24 hours, 365 days a year

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FACILITIES: 2,850 metres of quay; container terminal, cruise, sugar terminal; 292 reefer points. MAIN IMPORTS: Coal, wheat, maize, soya bean meal, edible oil, cement, bitumen, petroleum products. MAIN EXPORTS: Sugar and molasses. EQUIPMENT: Five post panamax gantry cranes, eight rubber tyred gantry cranes. STORAGE: 20 hectares of open storage MAX DEPTH: 14.5 metres (inner harbour 11.0 metres).


Kletr / Shutterstock.com

MAURITIUS PORTS AUTHORITY (MPA)

M

auritius Ports Authority (MPA) is responsible for the operation of Port Louis, on the north-west coast of Mauritius, which handles about 99 per cent of the external trade of this island nation of some 1.2 million people. The port facilities in Port Louis are a vital link in the supply chain for importers and exporters. Located next to the capital, the port handles about 7 million tonnes of cargo a year including 430,000 teu of containerised cargo. About 70 per cent of container traffic is destined for the local economy while the rest is transhipped. The port also handles about 1.7 million tonnes of liquid bulks (mainly petroleum products) and 1.8 million tonnes of dry bulks.

There are bulk discharge facilities for coal, wheat, maize, soya bean meal, edible oil, cement, bitumen and petroleum products; and loading facilities for sugar and molasses, the island’s main exports. The port handles about 3,000 vessels a year. About 20 per cent of calls are made by containerships and other liner services. The remainder are mainly fishing vessels, tankers and bulk carriers.

FACILITIES Terminal I: 1,170 metres of quay with six berths for cargo, passengers and fishing vessels. Multipurpose Terminal: 1,000 metres of quay with six berths and 12 metres. Specialised facilities for handling and storage of sugar, fish, cement and petroleum products. Cruise berth of 124 metres with 10.8 metres depth alongside.

Druid007 / Shutterstock.com

Mauritius Container Terminal: With an annual handling capacity of 550,000 teu, the terminal has two quays of 280 metres in length with five post panamax gantry cranes and eight rubber tyred gantry cranes. Access channel has a depth of 14.5 metres. Bulk Sugar Terminal: Operated by Mauritius Cane Industry Authority, and can accommodate vessels of up to 11.0 metres draught and has a storage capacity of 175,000 tons (no longer in use). Cruise Terminal: The first cruise facility in the Indian Ocean region, opened in 2010, and can accommodate vessels of up to 300 metres in length. There are two access bridges for passengers and vehicles. Oil Jetty: With an annual capacity of 4 million tonnes, the jetty is equipped

with eight pipelines. Depth alongside is 14.5 metres and tankers of up to 50,000 dwt can berth. The port handles about 1.6 million tonnes a year of petroleum products consisting of white oil (gasoline, gasoil and aviation fuel), fuel oil and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Mauritius Ports Authority (MPA), established in 1998, is a landlord authority. It regulates and controls port activities and services, including the provision of marine services, and is also responsible for planning and development of port land. The Multipurpose Terminal and Mauritius Container Terminal are operated by Cargo Handling Corporation Ltd (CHCL). MPA is required to produce a master plan for port development. Its vision is to develop Port Louis into a logistics hub serving the wider region.

INVESTMENT Current investment includes a 240 metre extension to the container terminal, dredging to 18.5 metres so that 10,000 teu vessels can call. Mauritius Freeport is a duty-free logistics, distribution and marketing hub located within the port. The 45 hectare site is home to some 300 companies offering logistics and warehousing facilities for transhipment, consolidation, storage and processing. Together they handle about half a million tonnes of cargo each year. Port Louis is the only official port of entry and exit into Mauritius for ships. The only other commercial port is Port Mathurin on Rodrigues Island, about 600 km east of the main island of Mauritius.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

MOZAMBIQUE GATEWAY PORT IS BACK IN BUSINESS

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 25°58.2’S, 32°33’5E CONTACT: Maputo Port Development Company PO Box 2841 Maputo, Mozambique TEL: +258 21 34 05 00 FAX: +258 21 31 39 21 EMAIL: info@portmaputo.com WEB: www.portmaputo.com

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HOURS: Office hours: 07.00 to 15.30; operational hours: 24 hours except 1 January. FACILITIES: The Port of Maputo has over a dozen berths handling a range of traffic. Berths 1, 2 and 6 are for small ships; Berth 3 is for small ro-ro vessels and cruise ships; Berth 4 handles small ships and small ro-ro vessels; Berth 5 is for breakbulk and bulk ro-ro; Berth 7 is for bulk, molasses and tankers; Berth 8 is for reefers; Berth 10 is for bulk sugar, breakbulk and bulk; Berths 11, 15 and 16 are for breakbulk and bulk; Berths 12 and 14 are for containers and breakbulk. Other facilities include the Matola Coal Terminal (TCM), with

a capacity of 7.5 million tonnes; the oil jetty; the STEMA grain terminal; and the Mozal aluminium terminal, with an annual handling capacity of 1.4 million tonnes. STORAGE: Total port capacity: 32,064 square metres; total covered areas: 4,242 square metres; total hardstanding 27,821 square metres. MAXIMUM DEPTH: 11.0 metres; soon to be increased to 14.3 metres.


MPDC

MAPUTO PORT DEVELOPMENT CO

T

he revival and rehabilitation of the Port of Maputo has been one of Africa’s success stories of the last two decades as a largely unusable harbour has been restored to its preeminent position as the main gateway to a large and economically vibrant hinterland. The Maputo Port Development Company (MPDC) is a national private company – a partnership between the Mozambican Railway Company (Caminhos de Ferro de Moçambique) and Portus Indico, a group comprising South Africa’s Grindrod, Dubai-based DP World and local company Mozambique Gestores. MPDC has a concession to operate the port until 2033 plus the option of a further 10 years thereafter. MPDC holds the rights to finance, rehabilitate, construct, operate, manage, maintain, develop and optimise the entire concession area. The company also holds the powers of a port authority, being responsible for maritime operations, pilotage, towage, stevedoring, terminal and warehouse operations as well as the planning and implementation of port development. MPDC continues to invest heavily in the port. In 2015 it took delivery of two Liebherr LHM 550 mobile harbour cranes, each with a lifting capacity of 144 tonnes.

The port is made up of two separate areas: the Maputo Cargo Terminal and, across Maputo Bay, the Matola Bulk Terminal. Access to both areas is via an 11.0 metre deep channel. Meanwhile, the Port of Maputo comprises the following berths: • Berth 1 of 163 metres for small ships • Berth 2 of 150 metres for small ships • Berth 3 of 225 metres, for small ro-ro vessels and cruise ships • Berth 4 of 225 metres for small ships and small ro-ro vessels • Berth 5 of 227 metres is for breakbulk and bulk ro-ro traffic • Berth 6 of 98 metres is used for small ships (like Berths 1 and 2)

• Berths 12 and 14 totalling 500 metres are used for containers and breakbulk • Berths 9 and 13 are currently not in use. Maputo has three bulk terminals located at Matola. The Mozal Terminal has an annual handling capacity of 1.4 million tonnes of raw materials (essentially alumina, petroleum coke and pitch) for the production of aluminium and 560,000 tonnes of finished metal for export. Matola Coal Terminal (TCM) has an annual capacity of 7.5 million tonnes. Capacity will be increased to 26 million tonnes in Phase 4, which will involve excavation and land reclamation, the construction of two new berths, a stockyard and rail infrastructure. The final terminal footprint will be about 120 hectares excluding any reclaimed areas. STEMA (Matola Silos and Grain Terminal) has a 210 metre berth and provides support services for cereals destined for Mozambique and neighbouring countries. There is also a 230 metre jetty for handling petrochemicals.

• Berth 7 of 200 metres handles bulk, molasses and tankers • Berth 8 of at 200 metres handles reefers • Berth 10 of 400 metres is used for bulk sugar, breakbulk and bulk • Berths 11, 15 and 16 of 140 metres, 185 metres and 172 metres respectively are used for breakbulk and bulk

MPDC

As well as being Mozambique’s busiest port, Maputo is the natural gateway to Gauteng, the industrial and commercial heartland of South Africa, and to

other provinces such as Limpopo and Mpumalanga. This is the Maputo Development Corridor. The port is located about 550 km by road from Johannesburg via the N4/EN4 highway and 581 km by rail.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

MOZAMBIQUE BETTER TIMES FOR MOZAMBIQUE RAIL SYSTEM

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR COMOROS

ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

CFA INFRASTRUCTURE NORTHERN REGION

CENTRAL REGION

SOUTHERN REGION

RAILWAYS Nacala-Cuamba Line Cuamba-Lichinga Line Cuamba-Entre Lagos Line

RAILWAYS Machipanda Line Sena Line

RAILWAYS Ressano Garcia Line Goba Line Limpopo Line

PORT OF NACALA Bulk liquids terminal General cargo quay Container terminal

PORT OF BEIRA Container and multipurpose terminal General cargo quay Fuel terminal Refrigerated cargo terminal

PORT OF PEMBA

PORT OF QUELIMANE

36

SEYCHELLES

PORT OF MAPUTO Fish quay Cabotage terminal General cargo quay Molasses loading terminal Citrus terminal Sugar terminal Container terminal Steel terminal Matola coal terminal Matola bulk terminal Fuel terminal Matola aluminium terminal

REUNION


Fedor Selivanov / Shutterstock.com

MOZAMBIQUE PORTS AND RAILWAYS

M

ozambique Ports and Railways – Portos e Caminhos de Ferro de Moçambique (CFM) – is the parastatal authority that oversees the rail system of Mozambique and its connected ports. The state-owned rail operator was transformed into a public company and the private sector became involved in managing the rail and port system through the concession model. However, CFM maintains as its primary objective the public interest in the system. Following the concession of the port business and railway business in the Central and Northern systems, CFM’s sole duty is the operation of fuel terminals in all ports and the grain and aluminium terminals in Maputo Port as well as the Southern railway system. The rail system has a total route length of nearly 3,000 km with a gauge of 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in), compatible with neighbouring rail systems. There is also the Gaza Railway in southern Mozambique, a 140 km line with a gauge of 762 mm (2 ft 6 in).

CFM NORTHERN Nacala is the terminal of the Nacala Railway, operated by Corredor de Desenvolvimento do Norte. It links with the Nacala Development Corridor and the Central East African Railway of Malawi. The mining company Vale has bought a stake in the rail operator.

CFM CENTRAL Beira is the terminal of the Beira Railway, opened in 1899 with links to Rhodesia

(now Zimbabwe). Its Machipanda Line goes to the Zimbabwean capital, Harare. The Sena Line links the coalfields of Moatize. Beira Railway Corporation is leased from CFM by the Indian companies Rites Ltd and Ircon International.

CFM SOUTHERN Maputo and Matola are the terminals of the Maputo Line, with links to north-east South Africa. The Maputo Line is managed by New Limpopo Bridge Projects together with Transnet Freight Rail and CPM. In South Africa the link goes to Komatipoort and on to Johannesburg. The Maputo Line also links to Swazi Rail and the National Railways of Zimbabwe.

PASSENGER SERVICES

IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS In the Southern region, CFM has been renovating and improving the Maputo Corridor. It is also increasing the capacity of the Ressano Garcia Line in a joint project with Maputo Port Development Company. CFM in partnership with Belavista Holdings is involved in a design study for a deepwater port at Techobanine as well as rail infrastructure projects to allow the export of coal and other commodities from Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. In the Central region, CFM is working to increase the annual capacity of the Sena Line (the Beira Corridor) from 6.5 million to 20 million tonnes. The line carries coal from Moatize as well as other commodities. CFM is involved in a joint project with Vale Mozambique to rehabilitate the rail line between Moatize and Nacala-a-Velha with a 912 km extension. This line will have an annual capacity of 18 million tonnes of coal and 4 million tonnes of general cargo.

CFM has been working to satisfy the growing demand for rail passenger services. CFM subsidises 85 per cent of the travel cost and passengers pay the remaining 15 per cent.

In the Northern region, in the Nacala Corridor, CFM is involved in a project to rehabilitate the Port of Nacala and boost its general cargo handling capacity.

On the Southern system, CFM operates daily passenger services on the Ressano Garcia Line, the Goba Line and the Limpopo Line.

Also in the North, CFM is in a partnership project with the National Hydrocarbons Company (ENH) to develop the new Port of Palma.

As well as long-distance services, CFM operates an inter-city service between Maputo and Matola-Gare Marracuene. In the Central region, there are services between Beira and Moatize and between Beira and the border town of Machipanda. In the Northern region, passenger transport is provided by the Northern Development Corridor (CDN).

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

37


ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

NAMIBIA PLANS TO BECOME TRANSPORT HUB

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 22.94°S, 14 .5°W CONTACT: Namport Head Office Nr 17, Rikumbi Kandanga Rd PO Box 361 Walvis Bay, Namibia TEL: (+264 64) 208 2111 FAX: (+264 64) 208 2323 Port of Lüderitz Hafen Street PO Box 836 Lüderitz, Namibia

TEL: (+264 63) 200 2017 FAX: (+264 63) 200 2028 WEB: www.namport.com.na FACILITIES: WALVIS BAY: General cargo, containers and shipyard. LÜDERITZ: Fishing, general cargo and bulk cargo. IMPORTS: Foodstuffs; petroleum products and fuel, machinery and equipment, chemicals. EXPORTS: Diamonds, copper, gold, zinc, lead, uranium, cattle, white fish, molluscs.

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THE NAMIBIAN PORTS AUTHORITY (NAMPORT)

T

he Namibian Ports Authority (Namport) is a state-owned venture founded in 1994 with its head office in Walvis Bay. Namport is responsible for the ports of Walvis Bay and Lüderitz as well as the Syncrolift dry dock facility in Walvis Bay.

provides a faster transit between Europe and the Americas and southern Africa than the Cape of Good Hope route. Walvis Bay is Namibia’s largest port, receiving about 4,000 vessel calls a year and handling about 5 million tonnes of cargo. Thanks to its sheltered deepwater harbour, it rarely suffers delays owing to bad weather.

The extensive rail and road infrastructure of Namibia and its proximity to landlocked countries to the east have made it a trade corridor for neighbouring Botswana, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The container terminal has an annual capacity of 350,000 teu and a storage capacity of 3,875 containers with 424 reefer plugs.

Walvis Bay and Lüderitz have a key role to play in these transport chains.

An US$ 80 million expansion programme, due to be completed in 2017, is being undertaken by the China Harbour and Engineering Company Ltd (CHEC). This project includes reclaiming land to create a new island to double capacity to 750,000 teu. When complete, the terminal will cover 40 hectares with a quay length of 2,100 metres.

Much of Namibia is desert and the nation relies heavily on imports of foodstuffs, petroleum products and machinery. About 80 per cent of this traffic already uses the inland transport corridor between South Africa and the more densely populated north of Namibia. The rest is carried largely by sea. The development of its ports is a major part of Namibia’s plans to become a regional transport hub. This is a key objective of the government’s Vision 2030 plan. Walvis Bay is connected with landlocked countries in the South African Development Community (SADC) by road and rail corridors including the Trans Caprivi, Trans Kalahari, Trans Kunene and Trans Oranje. Its location on the west coast

CAPACITY

Other facilities at Walvis Bay include a privately operated bulk cargo terminal and six tugs. There is also a thriving shiprepair facility at Walvis Bay, including a Syncrolift dry dock operated by Namport. Vessels of up to 2,000 tons can be lifted out of the water for repair. Many of the vessels are involved in the offshore sector. The Syncrolift typically handles about 50 vessels a month.

For vessels operating in Namibian waters and further north, the Syncrolift facility saves valuable steaming time compared with going on to South Africa. The facility is managed and operated by Namport, with repairs, painting and maintenance being carried out by private companies and individuals. Walvis Bay is also home to Namdock, which has three floating docks. Elgin, Brown and Hamer Consortium (Pty) Ltd and Namport have undertaken a joint venture to boost Namibia’s shiprepair capacity. There are two floating dry docks of 8,500 tons lifting capacity and one of 20,000 tons capacity. The Port of Lüderitz, about 400 km south of Walvis Bay, was traditionally a fishing port. A recent growth in the mineral and offshore sectors has led to an expansion of the port’s activities. Lüderitz gives access to southern Namibia and markets in the Northern Cape province of South Africa. The port was taken over in 1995 by Namport, which has invested in facilities to handle larger vessels and cope with increased traffic. There has been a growth in industrial activities in the immediate hinterland of Lüderitz, which has the potential to become a key gateway and logistics base for the mining and petroleum industries.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

SEYCHELLES PORT VICTORIA HAS FIVE-YEAR PLAN

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 4º37’S, 55º28’E CONTACT: PO Box 47 Mahé Quay Victoria, Mahé Seychelles

PlusONE / Shutterstock.com

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TEL: +248 429 47 00 TEL: +248 422 4701 FAX: +248 422 4004 EMAIL: enquiries@seyport.sc WEB: www.seyport.sc HOURS: 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

FACILITIES: 370 metres of commercial berths, 474 metres of fishing Berths, 425 metres of privately managed fishing Berths, 356 metres of domestic quay on three separate islands. IMPORTS: Machinery and equipment, foodstuffs, petroleum products, chemicals, manufactured goods. EXPORTS: Canned tuna, frozen fish, vanilla, coconuts, coconut oil. EQUIPMENT: Cranes. STORAGE: Limited warehousing and open storage. MAX DEPTH: 11.5 metres.


SEYCHELLES PORT AUTHORITY

S

eychelles Port Authority (SPA) is a government agency set up in 2004.

The country’s main port is Victoria, on the island of Mahé, one of the deepest ports in the region. SPA is responsible for 1,663 square nautical miles of the Victoria Port Limit. It oversees vessel movements in Port Victoria, the main International Commercial Port on Mahé Quay, the Industrial Fishing Port and other domestic inter-island jetties and terminals. SPA is also responsible for smaller facilities on the islands of La Digue and Praslin. The SPA ports receive about 1,500 vessel calls a year including international, domestic and passenger services.

PRINCIPAL FACILITIES The International Commercial Port on Mahé Quay is 370 metres in length and can accommodate two average-sized containerships. The Industrial Fishing Port has a 350 metre quay with 3.5 metres draught alongside used by longliners, purse seiners, reefers and navy vessels. The main ferry port, Inter-Island Quay in Mahé, handles about 800,000 passengers a year, with regular services to other islands in Seychelles, principally La Digue and Praslin.

DEVELOPMENT There are plans to invest in port development and services. SPA is working

with other stakeholders to make Port Victoria a centre for maritime activities including fishing, cruise ships and super yachts. It seeks to engage the private sector in port-related developments while maintaining strong relationships with other ports in the region. The SPA has a Development Master Plan and a Five Year Strategic Plan. Several of the inter-island port areas are being redeveloped to encourage economic growth.

CURRENT INVESTMENT • Extension of the main port quay in Port Victoria to create additional berthing to allow more and larger vessels to berth. Port Victoria will expand by a total length of 600 metres of newly built quay, with an additional 40 metres outward from the existing alignment. This work is expected to be completed in 2018. • The main approach channel and turning basin will be dredged to 15.0 metres by 2019. • The existing quay will be refurbished and rehabilitated by 2021. • Construction of a passenger lounge for the ferry terminal at the Mahé Inter Island Quay to provide a waiting area and rest rooms for passengers, a common area for destination management companies and a baggage collection zone for incoming ferries has just been completed.

on a build, operate and transfer (BOT) basis. It will consist of five public berths. • Improvements to cruise services and facilities are planned. Currently there is not a dedicated cruise terminal.

FISHING Fishing, especially tuna fishing, is a key aspect of port operations. About 200,000 tonnes of fish are landed at Port Victoria each year. Port Victoria is also the principal harbour in the Indian Ocean for unloading and transhipment of tuna. Up to 300 tonnes per vessel per day can be discharged using dedicated handling equipment. Once the new quay is complete, there are plans to add new cold storage and fish processing plants by the tuna fishing company Sapmer, based on Reunion Island. One of the region’s largest fishing companies, it operates a fleet of 12 vessels, longliners and tuna purse-seiners. In addition, the arrival of Indian Ocean Tuna Ltd, one of the world’s largest tuna canning operations, has boosted the local fishing industry and positioned Port Victoria to become a transhipment hub for tuna fishing and processing, with associated service companies and industries also being attracted to the port.

• A 425 metre commercial fishing quay costing US$ 20 million was completed at the beginning of June 2016 at Ile du Port, a man-made island next to Port Victoria,

PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

SOUTH AFRICA TRANSNET’S KEY ROLE IN SOUTH AFRICAN ECONOMY

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR COMOROS

ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: Across South Africa from Saldanha in the west and 150 km north of Cape Town to Richards Bay in the east.

PORTS: Saldanha, Cape Town, Mossel Bay, Port Elizabeth, Ngqura, East London, Durban, Richards Bay.

CONTACT: Transnet National Ports Authority 30 Wellington Road Parktown PO Box 32696 Bramfontein 2017 South Africa

SECTORS SERVED: Containers: Primarily Durban, Cape Town and Ngqura. Dry bulk: Saldanha (primarily iron ore and steel products), Richards Bay (primarily coal and woodchips) and Port Elizabeth (manganese – moving to Ngqura). Breakbulk: Durban, East London, Cape Town Agribulk: Cape Town, East London and Durban. Liquid bulk: Durban and Saldanha. Automotive: Durban, East London and Port Elizabeth.

TEL: +27 11 351 9001 E-MAIL: enquiries@transnet.net WEB: www.transnet.net

42

SEYCHELLES

MAX DEPTH: Saldanha Bay: 21.5 metres Cape Town: 14.5 metres Mossel Bay: 8 metres Port Elizabeth: 12.2 metres Ngqura: up to 18 metres East London: up to 14 metres Durban: 12.8 metres Richards Bay: 19 metres.

REUNION


TRANSNET SOC

T

ransnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) owns, operates, manages and controls South Africa’s port system on behalf of the government. It is responsible for the safety, efficiency and effectiveness of the port system and provides port infrastructure and marine services. TNPA is one of five operating divisions of Transnet SOC Ltd, which aims to provide an integrated network of port and rail corridors. Transnet Freight Rail operates the national rail network, connecting with 1,067 mm gauge compatible networks in the sub-Saharan region. Transnet is in the fourth year of its Market Demand Strategy (ending in 2019) to expand and modernise the nation’s ports, rail and pipeline infrastructure. Highlights include a ZAR 300 billion capital investment programme; a shift from road to rail; and job creation, skills development, localisation, empowerment and transformation opportunities. Guided by Transnet’s Africa Strategy, TNPA has signed memoranda of understanding with a number of African ports to collaborate on areas of common interest. Services offered to African ports include: port and terminal consultation, operations and infrastructure port advisory services, port terminal operations, dredging services, training via its Maritime School of Excellence, packaged IT solutions and business process improvements.

TNPA’s development plan is to create sustainable Smart People’s Ports that use state-of-the-art technology and help surrounding communities by developing skills.

In 2015 TNPA introduced its Integrated Port Management System, which allows port users to track their cargo from port of origin to port of destination.

OPERATION PHAKISA Projects are in place to support the government’s Operation Phakisa initiative to unlock the potential of the Oceans Economy and create jobs. Some ZAR 2 billion will be spent over the next five years to refurbish existing shiprepair facilities at the Ports of Durban, East London, Port Elizabeth, Cape Town and Mossel Bay; and there are plans to acquire a floating dock for Richards Bay. Technical schools are being established at the ports to train artisans for these facilities. Greenfield projects totalling ZAR 13 to 15 billion include capacity creation projects at the ports of Saldanha, Richards Bay and East London. Saldanha Bay, the deepest natural port in the southern hemisphere at 21.5 metres, is to become an oil and gas hub in a ZAR 9.2 billion investment. ZAR 400 million has been invested in aquaculture farms in the Port of Saldanha to create jobs and preserve the country’s natural resources. The Operation Phakisa agenda also includes the rehabilitation and maintenance of proclaimed harbours in Gansbaai, Saldanha Bay, Struisbaai, Gordons Bay and Lamberts Bay as well the creation of three new harbours in Boegoebaai in Northern Cape, Port St Johns in Eastern Cape and Hibberdene in KwaZulu-Natal.

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS Major infrastructure projects will create capacity up to 2021/22. A ZAR 8 billion project at Durban Container Terminal’s Pier 2 will deepen three berths, as well as the basin and approach channel, from 12.8 to 15.4 metres and lengthen the berths to 1,210 metres to accommodate three 9,200 teu vessels of 14.5 metres draught simultaneously. The Pier 1 Phase 2 project will add an 843 metre deepwater quay with a depth of 16.5 metres at Pier 1, increasing its capacity from 820,000 to 2.1 million teu. The Port of Ngqura continues to be developed as the country’s transhipment hub, offering competitive rates on the following routes: West Africa to East Africa; SADC to East Africa; SADC to Oceania. A new 16 million tonnes per year manganese export terminal and a tank farm at berth A100 supported by roads, port entrance and services will create bulk capacity at Ngqura. Additional bulk capacity will be created at Richards Bay through a new LNG terminal and an additional bulk liquid berth. A ZAR 1.6 billion project is under way at Maydon Wharf, Durban, to reconstruct and deepen six of the 15 berths to 14.5 metres to accommodate larger vessels. TNPA’s fleet management programme for all ports includes the acquisition of nine new tugs, three new dredgers, pilot boats and launches. New helicopters for Richards Bay and Durban are also planned. By strengthening its relationships with other African countries, TNPA aims to derive maximum value from its investments as well as play its part in developing and promoting the African economy.

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43


ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

SUDAN SUDAN INVESTS IN UPGRADING OF PORTS

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 37.21°E, 19.36°N CONTACT:  Sea Ports Corporation Mina Road Port Sudan TEL: +249 311 22061 E-MAIL: spcp21@sundaports.gov.sd WEB: www.sudanports.gov.sd HOURS:  Working hours Saturday/Thursday: 1st shift 06.00 -14.00; 2nd shift 14.00 – 22.00; 3rd shift 22.00 - 06.30 FACILITIES: Five container berths totalling 933 metres; nine conventional berths totalling

44

1,556 metres, two cement berths and a 310 metre bulk oil jetty. IMPORTS: Manufactured goods, machinery, cement and foodstuffs. EXPORTS: Petroleum products, livestock, cotton. EQUIPMENT: Four ship-to-shore single lift cranes of 41 tonnes, four ship-to-shore twin lift cranes of 65 tonnes, two mobile cranes of 120 tonnes and 63 tonnes, 15 RTG cranes of 40 tonnes and seven RTGs of 41 tonnes. STORAGE: Facilities for storage of oil, grain and cement. MAX DEPTH: 16.0 metres (container berths) and 14.6 metres at oil terminal. New berth will have 19.0 metres.


SEA PORTS CORPORATION SUDAN

S

udan has several ports along its 750 km Red Sea coast. Except for the Bashayer Petroleum terminal (operated by the Ministry of Energy), the Sea Ports Corporation operates all ports on the Red Sea. They are Port Sudan, Osman Digna (Suakin) and Oseif, plus several other smaller harbours. Most of the specialised terminals in these ports have adequate infrastructure and are operating below capacity. For example, Port Sudan has an installed throughput capacity of 1.2 million teu but in 2013 it handled only 449,800 teu or just 37 per cent of available capacity. The old and new container terminals have a combined stacking area of 39,000 teu. The old terminal has a draught of 12.0 metres and a quay length of 420 metres. The new container terminal, opened in 2012, has a draught of 16.0 metres and a quay length of 780 metres. Both container terminals are equipped with either panamax or post panamax gantry cranes. The old container terminal operates four ship-to-shore gantry (SSG) cranes and 15 rubber tyred gantry (RTG) cranes; while the new container terminal has four SSGs and eight RTGs. Port Sudan has a good terminal operating environment, including state-of-the-art information technology. A single-window system, incorporating customs authorities and stakeholders, is in progress and will hopefully be implemented in the very near future. Capacity for general and containerised cargo at Port Sudan has been upgraded in three phases. Between 1980 and 1984

capacity was expanded from 3.5 to 5 million tonnes; during 1984-86 capacity grew to 8 million tonnes; and since 2002 it has been increased to 11 million tonnes. Capacity will continue to expand as SPC develops plans for the period up to 2020. These plans are being drawn up in compliance with Sudan’s National Strategic Plan. The SPC has begun work on various projects, both physical and organisational. New developments include the building of a second berth of 19.0 metres depth for handling oil products; the setting up of a quality management department; the inauguration of a Regional Centre for Training and Consultation; and construction of a floating dock at Prince Osman Digna Port, due to enter service 2017. In addition, the SPC is investing in modern cargo handling equipment and is designing rigorous training programmes to ensure the efficiency of its cargo handling operations.

EARMARKED Moreover, SPC has earmarked a number of priority projects for which private sector participation is required. These include: • Construction and operation of a livestock and fisheries terminal about 30 km south of Osman Digna port in Suakin. The facility would be 600 metres in length and 12.0 metres deep. Phase 1 of the project is already in progress, with the completion of dredging operations and the building of a berth. The cost so far is put at US$ 100 million out of a total estimated cost of US$ 500 million. • Saloom Inland Container Depot (ICD), to be located 18 km south-west of Port Sudan. With a total area of 12,000 square metres, it will have a capacity of 75,000 teu in Phase 1. Total cost of the

project is put at US$ 400 million. The project is intended to ease pressure on the storage capacity and customs inspection area in the seaport, reducing the waiting time for goods at the port and thus increasing the port’s accommodating capacity. It will also provide a large space for storage of goods and for containers, along with logistical services relating to the ICD. • New passenger facility at Osman Digna port with a capacity of 3,000 passengers, estimated to cost US$ 42 million. The aim is to meet the growing demands of passenger traffic as well as offering improved services for passengers, particularly pilgrims and tourists. • Rehabilitation of Osman Digna port at an estimated cost of US$ 60 million. The work involves completing the connection of the two berths and preparing the land and operational equipment as well as preparing an area of 200,000 square metres at the back of the berth for container handling and storage. • Construction of a new berth at Oseif port, 260 km north of Port Sudan, for handling exports of iron ore and other metals. The facility would be 320 metres in length, with 16.0 to 20.0 metres depth, capable of handling vessels of up to 100,000 dwt. Estimated project cost in Phase 1 is US$ 30 million.

CORRIDOR In addition, there will be a need to establish a corridor management structure for Port Sudan to handle issues to do with transit trade and transport facilitation along the corridor. Technical assistance is being sought in this respect from PMAESA and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

SWAZILAND SWAZILAND’S EFFICIENT RAIL FREIGHT NETWORK

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR COMOROS

ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW CONTACT: Swaziland Railway Building Dzeliwe Street, Mbabane EMAIL: info@swazirail.co.sz EMAIL: sizwe@swazirail.co.sz INLAND CONTAINER DEPOT: Bhekisisa Manyatsi ICD Manager Matsapha ICD TEL/FAX: (+268) 2518 4016 CELL: (+268) 7602 9498

SWAZILAND RAILWAY SYSTEM MAP

(SR / M / 36)

46

SEYCHELLES

REUNION


SWAZILAND RAILWAY

S

waziland Railway is a parastatal organisation that provides transport services for import and export commodities as well as transit cargo. It is rated one of the best railways in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region in terms of transit time, reliability and predictability. It links the main industrial centres of Swaziland with the railway systems of South Africa, Mozambique and other SADC countries trading with overseas markets. Swaziland Railway owns and maintains the infrastructure and rolling stock and operates a 301 km rail network.

FREIGHT SERVICES CUSTOMER SERVICE Swaziland Railway aims to provide its customers with total logistics solutions. Its stations are located at strategic points across Swaziland at Matsapha, Sidvokodvo, Phuzumoya, Big Bend, Nsoko, Lavumisa, Mlawula, Mpaka and Mhlume. Both exports and imports are transported by Swaziland Railway. EXPORT On the export side, the main commodities are: • Sugar: Main client is Swaziland Sugar Association, which has a warehouse and siding at Mlawula. It exports the raw sugar to overseas markets via Maputo port. • Coal: Main client is Maloma Colliery, which has a siding at Nsoko. It exports anthracite to Richards Bay Mines in South Africa via Golela. • Canned fruit: Main client is Rhodes Group. IMPORT On the import side, Swaziland Railway handles:

• Cement: Main client is Afrisam Swaziland, which imports cement from Lichtenburg to Matsapha via Komatipoort • Wheat: Main client is Premier Foods, which imports wheat from Durban. • Fuel: Clients are Galp Energia, Total Swaziland and Engen, all of which import fuel products from Durban.

• Customs clearance facilities with through bills of lading in both directions between Swaziland and overseas places

BULK RAIL TRANSPORT For bulk services, Swaziland Railway insists on a minimum weight per wagon and a minimum train of 20 wagons. To avoid delays it is advisable to move a full train of 30 to 40 wagons.

• Computerised tracking of containers

Experience has shown that rail is the most economical option for long-distance haulage of bulk commodities as well being environmentally friendly.

INLAND CONTAINER DEPOT With the expansion of Swaziland’s export industries and the growing use of containerisation, it was a logical step to set up an inland container depot. The Matsapha Inland Clearance Depot (ICD) was established in 1993 after a feasibility study under the aegis of the SADC. This facility provides importers and exporters with streamlined services that are both time and cost sensitive. It has also provided Swaziland Railway with a broader revenue base.

• Temporary storage of containers • Dedicated team of staff members. Containers are brought by road to the ICD and taken onwards by rail to the seaport, from where they are transferred to ships. Infrastructure and facilities at Matsapha have been enhanced to deal with the growth in container traffic. The stacking area was upgraded in 2002 to provide a harder surface. A 45 tonne reach stacker was installed with a stacking capacity of five-high empties and threehigh loaded, leading to more efficient movement of traffic. Annual container traffic figures have gone up from 2,500 teu (before 2002) to an average of 10,000 teu per annum so the growth has been substantial. On-site services at Matsapha include: • Port charges collected by Swaziland Railway on behalf of South African Port Operations (SAPO)

The inland clearance depot is effectively a dry port that provides all the services associated with a seaport – ideal for a landlocked country like Swaziland.

• On-site customs offices for clearance of goods

MAIN SERVICES INCLUDE: • Handling equipment for 3 metre, 6 metre and 12 metre containers

• Shipping agents such as MSC Logistics and Safmarine have offices in the station building

• Road trailers and vehicles for door-todoor services

• Clearing and forwarding agents located in or near Matsapha Industrial Site.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

TANZANIA MAJOR UPGRADING FOR PORTS TO FULFIL ‘GATEWAY’ ROLE

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW CONTACT: Tanzania Ports Authority Office of the Director General Bandari Street PO Box 9184 Dar es Salaam TEL: +255 22 2110401/8 FAX: +255 22 2130390/2113938 EMAIL: dg@tanzaniaports.com

DAR ES SALAAM LOCATION: 6°50’4”S, 39°17’57”E HOURS: Dar es Salaam port operates 24/7

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Dar es Salaam is the country’s main port. It serves Tanzania and the landlocked countries of Zambia, Malawi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, Zimbabwe, Rwanda and Uganda. The port is the gateway to the Central and Dar es Salaam corridors, served by two railway systems of different gauges. The port’s 3.5 km entrance channel can receive vessels up to 234 metres LOA and 140 metres breadth with a depth of 10.5 metres at chart datum. FACILITIES: The port has a total quay length of about 2.6 km with 12 shore berths at the

main quay, one offshore berth at the single buoy mooring and dedicated berthing for coasters at the lighter quay. • General cargo terminal with seven deepwater berths (Nos 1 to 7) with 8.7 to 10.5 metres depth equipped with cranes, fork-lift trucks, tractors, trailers, etc. • Container terminal operated by TICTS with a total quay length of 540 metres. There are four berths (Nos 8 to 11) with an average depth of 11.0 metres and 12,000 square metres of paved area. Equipment includes five SSG cranes of 35.6 tons each, nine RTG cranes, one rail mounted crane (serving both TAZARA and TRC), front loaders, tractors and trailers.


TANGA LOCATION: 5°3’56”S and 39°6’18”E HOURS: 24-hour service for all geared vessels. Tanga has an annual capacity of 750,000 tons and 130,000 teu. There has been investment in additional barges and tugs, paved yards and container handling equipment.

• Two inland container depots at Ubungo and Kurasini with 19,000 square metres of storage. • Lighterage and dhow wharves with four quay points and a total length of 588 metres. Malindi Wharf is for passenger services to the Zanzibar archipelago and for cargo vessels; Dhow Wharf is for dhows and schooners. • Grain terminal with 30,000 tons of storage in concrete silos and three bagging plants. • Oil terminals comprising single buoy mooring for crude oil with 14.0 metres depth and a pumping capacity of 7,500 tons per hour and Kurasini Oil Jetty, with an average depth of 11.0 metres, for refined products. EQUIPMENT: TICTS operates five panamax ship-to-shore gantry cranes of 35.6 tons each, nine rubber tyred gantry cranes and a rail mounted gantry crane (serving both TAZARA and TRC) as well as fork-lift trucks, empty container handlers and terminal tractors and trailers. For general cargo, the port has mobile cranes, reach stackers, empty container handlers, front loaders, tractors, trailers, highway trucks and fork-lift trucks. STORAGE: TICTS has three container yards: main terminal yard (11,500 teu capacity), Kurasini Inland Container Depot (500 teu) and Ubungo ICD (2,000 teu). The port has seven cargo sheds with a total floor area of 81,040 square metres plus a total of 52,440 square metres of open storage; a 30,000 tonne capacity grain silo; and storage yards for containers, motor vehicles and general cargo.

Facilities: Multipurpose jetty (unused), 12 anchorage berths and a lighterage quay of 3.8 metres draught for local craft. Maximum alongside draught is 11.0 metres. The 12 anchorage berths range from 5.0 to 12.5 metres draught. There is a tanker berth with a maximum draught of 4.1 metres and a submarine pipeline to discharge fuel oil. EQUIPMENT: Front loaders, empty stackers, reach stackers, fork-lift trucks, tractor units, AFM and RTG trailers (20 and 40 tonnes capacity), mobile tower cranes (up to 63 tonnes) and five portal cranes. STORAGE: Three sheds totalling 68,411 square metres; 34,692 square metres of open storage; stacking space for 4,300 teu.

MTWARA LOCATION: 10°16’4”S, 40°11’53”E FACILITIES: Quay length of 385 metres with a draught of 9.85 metres. Can accommodate two ships and one coastal vessel. EQUIPMENT: Three mobile cranes (25, 15 and 4 tonnes), four tractors, 18 trailers, eight forklift trucks and a front loader of 7.5 tonnes (can be upgraded to 15 tonnes). STORAGE: Four transit sheds with a total capacity of 15,000 tonnes.

MWANZA SOUTH PORT The South Port has a general cargo wharf, a liquid cargo wharf and a rail linkspan for the train ferry. The Mwanza ports are linked to Dar es Salaam Port by the Central railway.

BUKOBA PORT Located south of Bukoba town, on the western shore of Lake Victoria, the port serves as the gateway to Kagera Region and is the secondlargest and busiest port on the lake after Mwanza. It is primarily a passenger terminal with an annual capacity of 150,000 passengers and 5,000 tons of cargo.

LAKE TANGANYIKA PORTS

KIGOMA PORT Located on the eastern shore of the lake, Kigoma Port is a vital link in the central corridor for transit trade from DRC and Burundi. It is linked by rail to Dar Es Salaam. The port has cargo and passenger terminals and an oil jetty.

KASANGA PORT Strategically located on the south-east side of the lake, Kasanga specialises in transhipped cargo to Burundi, DRC and Mpulungu Port in Zambia.

LAKE NYASA PORTS

ITUNGI/KIWIRA PORT (KYELA) Operates as a branch office for Lake Nyasa ports serving about 13 points along the lake.

LAKE VICTORIA PORTS

MWANZA NORTH PORT

MBAMBA BAY PORT

Mwanza North is a passenger terminal with an annual capacity of 200,000 passengers and 5,000 tons of parcels and luggage.

Operates as a sub-office under Kyela port. A new jetty was completed in 2009. There is a passenger shed.

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EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

TANZANIA PORTS AUTHORITY

T

anzania has three main ports: Tanga in the north; its main gateway of Dar es Salaam; and Mtwara in the far south. Most of the nation’s cargo, and that of its landlocked neighbours, flows through Dar es Salaam. Dar es Salaam is a key element in the Central Corridor, a regional logistics network promoted by the Central Corridor Transit Transport Facilitation Agency (CCTTFA), whose member states comprise Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The Dar es Salaam Maritime Gateway Project is an ambitious plan to increase cargo throughput from its present level of 12.5 million tonnes to 18 million tonnes by 2016/17. The eventual aim is to reach 20 million tonnes a year by 2020. To achieve this target, the TPA is spending US$ 585 million to increase efficiency at the Port of Dar es Salaam. This plan forms a part of the government’s Big Results Now action plan to transform Tanzania into a middle income nation over the coming 10 years. The lion’s share of container handling in Dar es Salaam is carried out by Tanzania International Container Terminal Services Ltd (TICTS) at its privately managed terminal. Until comparatively recently, both Tanga and Mtwara have played a secondary role to Dar es Salaam. But this situation is changing, with both Tanga and Mtwara being involved in a significant expansion and upgrading programme.

These two ports will not be developed in isolation, but will form the maritime terminus of mini transport corridors of their own. Tanga will be a key part of the Mwambani Economic Corridor (MEC) project. This envisages the construction of a new deepwater port and free zone at Mwambani and the building of a new standard-gauge rail line with links to a range of hinterland destinations. An existing metre-gauge rail line links Tanga with Arusha. Plans exist to extend this line to the town of Musoma on Lake Victoria with a ferry link to Port Bell in Uganda. A further development (as yet unconfirmed) is the creation of a new Chinese-funded mega-port at Bagamoyo, 69 km north of Dar es Salaam. The estimated cost of this giant- project is estimated at US$ 11 billion. Situated some 580 km south of Dar es Salaam, Mtwara is being transformed from a comparatively small harbour into a port that will play a major role in the future economic and social development of Tanzania.

The discovery of significant oil and gas fields totalling an estimated 50 trillion cubic feet in the Indian Ocean has seen the port take on a new national importance. As a result, there are plans to expand and rehabilitate the port at a cost of US$ 214 million. Some 263 hectares of land has been acquired for an expansion westward that will see the quay lengthened and the number of berths increased to seven. A further 110 hectares is earmarked for a proposed new Free Zone.

MTWARA DEVELOPMENT CORRIDOR The long-term goal is to create a port capable of handling up to 28 million tonnes of cargo a year. Forming a key element of this goal is the Mtwara Development Corridor – a scheme that aims to provide better transport links in Tanzania’s underdeveloped south and also with the neighbouring subregion. Aside from the three main Indian Ocean ports, the TPA also operates several lake harbours. The most important of these is Mwanza on Lake Victoria. Mwanza acts a transit point for cargoes moving between Dar es Salaam and Uganda is the terminus of the Central Line railway. Mwanza comprises a north and south port. The north handles mostly passengers and the south is a cargo terminal. Plans are in hand to modernise Mwanza South and other Tanzanian lake ports (such as Kigoma and Kyela on Lake Tanganyika) and to acquire new cargo handling equipment. Meanwhile, Mbamba Bay is set to become the main Tanzanian port on Lake Nyasa. It features prominently in the Southern Corridor development plan to link Mtwara with Malawi and other hinterland states.

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

ZANZIBAR MALINDI HAS KEY ROLE IN ARCHIPELAGO TRADE

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR

SEYCHELLES

COMOROS ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

REUNION

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW LOCATION: 6°S, 39°E CONTACT: Zanzibar Ports Corporation PO Box 263 TEL: +255 24 223 2857; +255 24 223 2017 EMAIL: info@zpc.go.tz WEB: www.zpc.go.tz PORTS: Malindi, Mkoani, Wete, Wesha and Mkokotoni. EQUIPMENT: Mobile cranes, Grove crane, terminal tractors, reach stackers, fork-lift trucks, empty container handler. STORAGE: Two large sheds and an open space are used to store motor vehicles, general cargo and containers.

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EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

ZANZIBAR PORTS CORPORATION (ZPC)

Z

anzibar Ports Corporation (ZPC) is a parastatal organisation established by the government of Zanzibar. ZPC was set up to take over functions previously performed by the local Department of Ports & Marine Transport (DPMT) and another parastatal, Zanzibar Wharfage Corporation (ZWC). Main responsibilities of ZPC include managing, operating, developing and promoting the ports sector in Zanzibar. The corporation also performs the role of port operator in relation to commercial activities on the islands of Unguja and Pemba in the Zanzibar archipelago.

MALINDI: Located close to Stone Town, this is the main entry point for the archipelago’s international trade. About 95 per cent of Zanzibar imports and export pass through Malindi. In addition, the port is East Africa’s busiest ferry terminal, with well over 1.5 million passenger using Malindi each year. The port consists of a single deepwater berth with a quay length of 240 metres plus another for coasters with a length of 113 metres. There are no shore cranes on the wharf, so ship’s gear is used for cargo handling.

landing craft. There are plans to improve the port’s facilities. Some passengers are also handled and the port is connected with Mombasa, Tanga, Dar es Salaam and Unguja. WESHA: Located in the central part of Pemba. A jetty handles tankers. The tidal port consists of a 125 metre jetty for dhows, lighters and landing craft. MKOKOTONI: Located in the north of Unguja about 50 km from Stone Town. Until now the port has remained undeveloped and is used only by local vessels and fishing boats.

MKOANI: The main port of the island of Pemba. It comprises a narrow jetty with a head of 115 metres length which can handle vessels of up to 4,000 dwt and 10.0 metres draught. The port also has a smaller berth for dhows and lighters and there is a passenger terminal.

EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

The establishment of ZPC is the result of a major programme begun in the early 1990s to restructure the economy. The aim of this programme was to boost the economy’s capacity to produce and deliver goods and services, primarily through the private sector.

The archipelago has five ports and harbours:

WETE: Also located on Pemba, but in the north of the island. It has a 147 metre long jetty for handling dhows, lighters and

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ERITREA

SUDAN

DJIBOUTI ETHIOPIA

SOUTH SUDAN

UGANDA

ZAMBIA KEEPING ZAMBIA’S WATERWAYS SAFE AND EFFICIENT

SOMALIA KENYA

RWANDA BURUNDI TANZANIA

ZANZIBAR COMOROS

ANGOLA

MALAWI

ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA

MAURITIUS MADAGASCAR

SWAZILAND SOUTH AFRICA

OVERVIEW CONTACT: Cnr. Fairley & Government Rd Lusaka Zambia TEL: +260 21 125 0716 EMAIL: jmwape@mct.gov.zm FAX: +260 21 125 3145

54

SEYCHELLES

REUNION


DEPARTMENT OF MARITIME & INLAND WATERWAYS (MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT, WORKS, SUPPLY & COMMUNICATIONS)

Z

ambia’s Department of Maritime & Inland Waterways was established in 1994 as the authority responsible for maritime transport (ports and shipping) and inland waterway transport. This role includes the maintenance of canals, waterways, ports and harbours and other infrastructure. The Department promotes the development and growth of the water transport sector in order to ease the movement of passengers and cargo. In this regard, the Department supervises the Inland Waters Shipping Act (Chapter 466) and the Provisional Merchant Shipping Act (Chapter 468). Other duties performed by the Department include:

LAW ENFORCEMENT Law enforcement is carried out jointly with the Zambia Police Marine Section. The

NAVIGATION SAFETY The Department is committed to reducing marine accidents to the lowest possible level. It aims to encourage a safety culture with regard to decisions made by everyone involved in water transport. Among their other activities, the Department’s Surveyors of Vessels take part in radio broadcasts, especially in local communities where water is the main source of transport and livelihood. They also meet with boat owners, operators and crew members to caution them against overloading.

marine-related matters and advises government institutions and private operators on the technical specifications of vessels permitted to operate in Zambian waters. It also provides water transport services in hard-to-reach areas; and promotes research and development in relation to marine transport. INLAND WATERWAY DEVELOPMENT The Department has a remit to build, maintain and upgrade Zambia’s existing ports and harbour infrastructure. This involves the rehabilitation, construction, upgrading and maintenance of canals including programmes of dredging, The installation and maintenance of navigation beacons and buoys in international shared waters is also part of the Department’s remit.

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION The Department undertakes marine accident investigations and provides search and rescue services on all waterways. SHIPPING SECTION The Department collaborates with regional and international organisations on the implementation of treaties, protocols and agreements on maritime matters. It also provides policy guidance to statutory bodies in the maritime transport sector.

erichon / Shutterstock.com

SURVEY AND REGISTRATION Registration of vessels. The Department gives title of ownership to individuals and organisations in relation to vessels including motorised or powered boats.

waterways are patrolled by police officers, together with a Surveyor of Vessels, in order to enforce the regulations governing maritime operations.

The Department draws up and circulates policy guidelines and standards on

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PMAESA MEMBERS DIRECTORY BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD. PO Box 900 Durban 4000, South Africa TEL: +273 12742400 EMAIL: wandile.mzamo@bidports.co.za

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT - MTR - GOSS South Sudan EMAIL: silyeabdu@yahoo.com

CFM MAPUTO PO Box 2158, Maputo, Mozambique TEL: +258 21431706 EMAIL: rosario.mualeia@cfm.co.mz

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATION, MARITIME DEPARTMENT PO Box 1238, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia TEL: +251 115 8227 EMAIL: askalw@yahoo.com

DEPARTMENT OF MARITIME AND INLAND WATERWAYS, MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & TRANSPORT PO Box 50065, Lusaka, Zambia TEL: +260 125 0716/251 444/251 022 EMAIL: jmwape@mct.gov.zm

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATION, MARITIME TRANSPORT AUTHORITY PO Box 679 or 1120, Asmara, Eritrea TEL: +291 118 9156/185 25; +291 172 38280 EMAIL: kidaneven@yahoo.com

DSM CORRIDOR GROUP LTD. PO Box 50163, Dar es salaam, Tanzania TEL: +255 (0)75 4632827 EMAIL: mari@dsmcorridor.com

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE & EQUIPMENT Av. Independencia, No. 16, Lobito, Angola TEL: +244 9234 48346; +244 926 912710 EMAIL: diurkassul@yahoo.com

EPB BUJUMBURA Burundi KENYA PORTS AUTHORITY PO Box 95009, Mombasa, Kenya TEL: +254 412 112 999 EMAIL: gndua@kpa.co.ke MALAWI CARGO CENTRE Private Bag A - 81, Lilongwe, Malawi TEL: +265 175 8892, +265 996 23253, +265 753 531 EMAIL: makuzulalgw@yahoo.co.uk MARINE DATA SOLUTIONS PO Box 51680, Waterfront, South Africa TEL: +272 138 68517 EMAIL: steven@marinedata.co.za MAURITIUS PORTS AUTHORITY PO Box 379 Mer Rouge, Port Louis, Mauritius TEL: +230 240 0415/206 5415 EMAIL: s.suntah@mauport.com

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PMAESA HANDBOOK 2016-17

PORTEK MAGERWA Rwanda SEA PORTS CORPORATION PO Box 531, Khartoum, Sudan TEL: +249 914 465 293 EMAIL: m.madani293@gmail.com SEYCHELLES PORTS AUTHORITY PO Box 47, Victoria, Mahé Quay, Seychelles TEL: +248 224 701 EMAIL: aciseau@seyport.sc SOCIETE D’EXPLOITATION DU PORT DE TOAMASINA B.P. 492, Toamasina 501, Madagascar TEL: +261 205 332 155 EMAIL: sept@wanadoo.mg SURFACE & MARINE TRANSPORT REGULATORY AUTHORITY PO Box 3093, Dar es salaam, Tanzania TEL: +255 222 114 174; 211 5579 EMAIL: info@sumatra.or.tz

MOFED TANZANIA PO Box 105638, Dar es salaam, Tanzania TEL: +255 285 1471/4; +255 785 510 857 EMAIL: info@mofed.co.tz

TANZANIA PORTS AUTHORITY PO Box 9184, Dar es salaam, Tanzania TEL: +255 222 116 250 EMAIL: dg@tanzaniaports.com

MPDC MAPUTO Maputo, Mozambique TEL: +258 213 40500 EMAIL: soraia.abdula@portmaputo.com

TOAMASINA PORTS AUTHORITY Toamasina, Madagascar TEL: +261 205 332 994 EMAIL: spdg@port-toamasina.com

NAMIBIA PORTS AUTHORITY PO Box 361, Walvis Bay, Namibia TEL: +264 642 082 201 EMAIL: bisey@namport.com.na

TRANSNET NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY PO Box 32696, Bramfontein, South Africa TEL: +27 11 351 9001 E-MAIL: enquiries@transnet.net; Richard. Vallihu@transnet.net

PORT AUTONOME INTERNATIONAL DE DJIBOUTI/PORT DE DJIBOUTI B. P. 2107, Djibouti TEL: +235 213 275 36 CELL: +253 776 85844, +25321327546, +25377824270 EMAIL: anissa.aliahmed@gmail.com

ZANZIBAR PORTS CORPORATION PO Box 263, Zanzibar TEL: +255 242 232 857; +255 242 232 017 EMAIL: zpc@moicv-rgoz.com; allyhaji1@hotmail.com


Port Management Association of Eastern and Southern Africa PO Box 99209-80107 Mombasa, Kenya Tel: +254 20 238 1184 Fax: +254 20 261 5868 Email: pmaesa@pmaesa.org

www.pmaesa.org

PMAESA

PORTS HANDBOOK 2017–2018

PMAESA Ports Handbook 2017-18  

Official Ports Handbook of the Port Management Association of Eastern and Southern Africa (PMAESA), published by Land & Marine Publications...

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