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Kenya airports authority Handbook 2011-12


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Kenya airports authority Handbook 2011-12

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ForeWord on course For A top-FliGHt Airport sYstem

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settinG our siGHts HiGH proFile oF KenYA Airports AutHoritY

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KenYA Airports AutHoritY contActs

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10 Airports As economic enGines Airports development spurs locAl economies; Keeps nAtionAl economY HumminG 15 JKiA set to trAnsForm into AFricA’s AviAtion HuB eXpAnsion set to douBle pAssenGer cApAcitY At JKiA 19 trAdeWinds AviAtion Group KcAA plAns For sAFer sKies

contents

20 Best oF tHe Best JKiA AGAin Wins routes mArKetinG AWArd For AFricA 22 JKiA is AFricA’s premier cArGo HuB eXpAnsion turns JKiA into A FresH produce HuB 24 siGinon Group 26 KeepinG tHe Birds AWAY For pAssenGer And AircrAFt sAFetY At JKiA 28 momBAsA internAtionAl Airport tourism spurs GroWtH At momBAsA 33 cArGo is BiG Business For eldoret FolloWinG mAKe-over Airport stimulAtes Horticulture industrY in reGion 38 supportinG tourism And Aid eFForts in tHe reGion Wilson GroWs to Be AFricA’s Busiest liGHt AircrAFt Airport 40 mAlindi set to HAndle direct internAtionAl FliGHts 42 reAdY For internAtionAl stAtus Kisumu Airport set For tAKe-oFF WitH eXpAnsion oF eAc 44 WAJir militArY AirBAse AdApts Well to HAndlinG civil FliGHts 45 loKicHoGGio, tHe HuB oF HumAnitAriAn FliGHts 47 uKundA set to HAndle reGionAl FliGHts As tourism numBers continue to climB 48 mAndA to Get neW terminAl BuildinG this Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12 is published by:

lanD & marine puBlications (Kenya) ltD suite A6, 1st Floor, ojijo plaza, plums lane, off ojijo road parklands, po Box 2022, village market 00621 nairobi, Kenya tel: +254 (0)20 374 1934 • cell: 0722 731003 e-mail: kenya@landmarine.com • Website: www.landmarine.com pictures supplied by: denis Gathanju and KAA the opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor nor of any other organisation associated with this publication. no liability can be accepted for any inaccuracies or omissions issn 2046-5416 © 2011 land & marine publications (Kenya) ltd

Kenya airports authority (hQ) p0 Box 19001-00501, nairobi, Kenya tel: +254 (0)20 661 1000, 661 2000 Fax: +254 (0)20 822 078 email: info@kenyaairports.co.ke Web: www.kenyaairports.co.ke


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

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Eng. Stephen M. Gichuki Managing Director Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) The Kenya Airports Authority is committed to seamless connections through our national and international airports. This we can achieve through partnerships with key players, both in the public and private sector. In order to provide aviation services that are unmatched in the region and subscribe to international best practice, the KAA has undertaken capital intensive programmes of rehabilitation, modernisation and expansion at the country’s key airports and airstrips. This is driven on the one hand by market forces and on the other by a desire to provide efficient facilities that meet safety standards for the aircraft, passengers and cargo using our airports. JKIA, the main airport in Kenya and the regional aviation hub for East and Central Africa, is undergoing a massive expansion that will more than double its annual passenger capacity to 10 million. The airport will have a new Terminal 4 building.

EXPANSION The expansion programme at our principal airport also includes an expanded cargo handling capacity. This makes JKIA the largest and busiest hub in Africa for fresh produce. With the expanded airport facilities comes an enhanced security system for both cargo and passenger traffic. Currently, JKIA handles more than 300 million kilograms of cargo annually. This is more than other regional hubs such as Johannesburg and Cairo. To underline this fact, JKIA was recently voted the Best Airport in Africa and the Best Cargo Airport in the Emerging Markets Category. As part of the expansion programme at JKIA, the KAA has announced the development of a new terminal at JKIA to complement the current expansion programme at JKIA. The new ‘Greenfield Terminal’ at JKIA will be delinked from the existing airport termini and will have the capacity to handle up to 20 million passengers per year. It will have 50 international and 10 domestic check-in counters and will be one of the most

KAA invests in human capital and product improvement

On course for a topflight airport system environmentally friendly termini in Africa as the new terminal will be certified by the World Green Building Council. At KAA, we acknowledge that airports are no longer entry and exit points; we see them as important cogs in the growth and development of economies. For this reason, we have continued to expand and develop our airports to meet the needs of a growing Kenyan economy that is interlinked with regional economies. This is evident at our other airports, such as Eldoret International Airport and Kisumu Airport, which are at critical stages of development to serve the emerging economies in the Great Lakes region. As we continue to develop and expand our airports, the KAA has been working closely with the airlines, both passenger and cargo, that fly into our airports. This partnership is geared at identifying areas in which we need to improve on service delivery. Because of this, JKIA, our principal airport, has clinched, for the third time in a row, the Routes Marketing Award. To ensure that we continue to offer the highest customer service at our airports, especially at JKIA, we are facilitating a benchmarking agreement with Incheon International Airport in Seoul, South Korea. Incheon is rated one of the best airports not only in Asia but in the world in terms of customer service. In the quest for enhanced customer service, we are continuously investing in our human resource capital through constant training workshops, geared to making us friendly and responsive to the needs of our direct and indirect customers. We welcome your feedback as we seek to build the airport system of choice in the region.


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Dominic Ngigi Corporate Communications Manager Kenya Airports Authority (KAA)

Setting our sights high

Profile of Kenya Airports Authority The Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) was established in 1991 by an Act of Parliament (Chapter 395 of Laws of Kenya). Under the Act, KAA is mandated to: • Administer, control and manage aerodromes in the country • Provide and maintain facilities for efficient aircraft operations • Provide rescue and fire-fighting equipment and services • Construct, operate and maintain aerodromes and other related activities • Construct or maintain aerodromes on an agency basis at the request of any government department • Provide other amenities for passengers and other persons using the services and facilities provided by the KAA • Approve the establishment of private airstrips and the control of their operations. The KAA works with other government agencies and departments, most notably the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA), which is responsible for air navigational services and civil aviation regulation. It also collaborates with the Ministry of Transport, which is responsible for policy formulation and approval of aviation tariffs.

vision statement: ‘To be the airport System Hub of Choice’

mission statement: ‘To facilitate seamless connectivity through provision of efficient and effective airports facilities and services in an environmentally sustainable manner to exceed stakeholder expectations’ Quality status: ISO 9001-2000 certified

KAA-managed aerodrome facilities: 1. Jomo Kenyatta International Airport 2. Moi International Airport 3. Eldoret International Airport 4. Wilson Airport 5. Kisumu Airport 6. Malindi Airport 7. Lokichoggio Airport 8. Ukunda Airstrip 9. Manda Airstrip 10. Wajir Airport. The KAA also provides technical expertise on maintenance of public airstrips on behalf of the government on an agency basis.

Operations and major business areas: • Landing and parking facilities • Air bridge services • Aviation fuel concession • Ground transport concession • Advertising • Duty-free concession • Building and land rent • Retail concession (banking services, business centre, catering, foreign exchange bureaux, etc) • Car parking • Passenger and cargo facilitation.


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

KAA institutional set-up

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS MANAGING DIRECTOR

DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR CORPORATION SECRETARY

GM Finance

GM Projects & Engineering Services

GM Human Resources Development

HOD, Corporate Planning & Strategy

GM Security Services

GM Marketing & Business Development

HOD, Internal Audit

GM Information Communication Technology

HOD, Procurement & Logistics

Airfield and terminal capacity projects at JKIA, Nairobi Summary of JKIA major projects

ACTIVITY OUTPUT E/COST STATUS FUNDING KES MILLIONS 1 Package 1: Upgrade runway, taxiway and apron capacity

12 additional aircraft parking slots and fuel hydrant

2,640 Complete

2 Construction of T4 building T4 and parking garage 4,900 Clearance by AFD

KAA WB- USD 14M AFD-USD 46M

3 Reorganisation of terminals 1,2,3 and the arrivals building

Additional space and 12 boarding bridges

6,200 Tender document preparation EIB/KAA

4 Cargo apron expansion

Five parking bays, car parks and dual road

1,582 Substantially complete

KAA

5 Sewerage capacity upgrade Expanded gravity flow sewer capacity

773 Substantially complete

KAA

6 Rehabilitation of aircraft Resurfacing of runway and repair pavements to taxiways and apron

1,980 Tender document preparation

AFD

7 Runway capacity improvement Construction of new rapid exit taxiways

2,128 Tender document preparation

AFD

8 Upgrading of instrument Upgrading of instrument to Cat II landing system

948 Tender document preparation

AFD

9

225

complete

KAA/WB

10 Security screening equipment Procurement of security screening equipment. To enhance screen of passengers, baggage and mail

Fire-fighting equipment Purchase of six new fire engines

92

complete

WB

11 Construction of a new domestic Construction of a temporal domestic terminal of terminal Package 5- Lot A 7500 sq.m plus associated car par and civil works

750 million Tender document preparation

12 New Greenfield Terminal Construction of a new passenger terminal building of 500 million (USD) Package 5 – Lot B floor area about 172000 sq.m, with 32 No. contact gates plus 8 No. remote gates, associated apron with 45 stands together with linking taxiways, car parks and landside road access and all utilities

KAA

Tenders advertised. Preparation of Terms of reference is currently underway. Construction is to be on design and build basis

Airfield and terminal capacity projects at principal airports in Kenya Other airports ACTIVITY OUTPUT E/COST STATUS FUNDING KES MILLIONS 1 Mombasa International Airport: Sustain pavement strength and serviceability Pavement rehabilitation

3,800 Tender documents

KAA

2

1,300 Detailed design

KAA

3 Kisumu Airport: Extension of runway from 2075m to 3000m and Redevelopment of facilities widening from 30m to 45m

2,952 Completed

KAA

4 Malindi: Terminal building Increase passenger processing capacity

80 Completed

KAA

5 Malindi: Runway resurfacing Sustain pavement strength and serviceability

125 Completed

KAA

6 Manda: Pavement expansion study

Wilson Airport: Upgrade of New terminal building terminal facilities

Bigger runway and sustained pavement strength and serviceability

25 Completed

KAA

Manda: Terminal Building Increased passenger processing capacity construction

100 Completed

KAA

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777 Construction MOT

Wajir: Pavement rehabilitation Sustain pavement strength and serviceability

8 Isiolo: Fencing Securing airport against intrusion

75 Construction

Construction of runway and New aircraft pavements aircraft pavements

1,500 Tender documents

Terminal building New passenger processing capacity

160 Tendering

9 National Airports System Plan Updated NASP

138 In progress

KAA

KAA


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KAA performance FISCAL YEAR

2004/5

2005/6

2006/7

2007/8 2008/9

190,099

201,289

207,280

OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE Aircraft movements 195,578

197,137

Passengers

5,660,680 6,187,053 6,589,474 6,685,972 6,630,000

Cargo (tonnes)

253,246 284,863

293,554 320,547 302,000

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Revenue (KES millions)

3,907

5,161

5,391

5,071

5,707

Expenditure (KES millions)

(2,718)

(3,242)

(2,949)

(3,202)

(4,070)

Operating income (KES millions)

1,189

1,919

2,697

1,869

1,637

o Upgrade of common-user terminal equipment for airport operation data that help in traffic management and service delivery o Installation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) in Mission Critical areas o Upgraded website to facilitate, inter alia, interaction with stakeholders.

Optimise revenue generation

Plans

Review of land use to identify sites for commercial activities through areas of Public Private Partnerships (PPP). In Jomo Kenyatta International Airport these areas include:

To serve our mandate by ensuring:

1. Medical Clinic

• Airfield and terminal capacity adequacy • Maintenance of safety and security • Improvement of service efficiency • Optimise revenue generation • Compliance with environmental rules on carbon neutrality • Review of KAA Act to optimise Board representation, eliminate regulatory overlap with KCAA and recast the business in terms of commercial operations and the management of security and safety.

2. Airport Food Court

Enhancement of safety and security Safety and security at the airports: 24-hour activity reinforced by: • Enhanced intelligence gathering capability • Security fence • Installation of modern communication and security screening equipment (scanners and CCTV) • Upgrade of fire cover • Pavement safety • Runway maintenance • Strict verification of applications for airside access passes • Management of birds and wildlife • Regular security audits and training of key staff • Ongoing harmonisation of security procedures in EA region.

Improvement of service efficiency • Enforcing service excellence through service level agreements with concessionaires and other third party service providers • Participating in the ACI quarterly service quality surveys and using feedback to enhance service quality • Business process automation with the following activities already in progress:

3. Airport Transit Hotel 4. In-Flight Catering Kitchen 5. Transit Warehouses 6. Aircraft Maintenance Hangars. Land for packhouses (warehouses with cold rooms) and transit facilities at Moi International Airport and Kisumu International Airport has also been identified.

Sound environmental management • KAA complies with statutory environmental requirements in its operations • KAA is commencing a project in conjunction with ACI Africa to comply with carbon neutrality requirements • Airline operators are upgrading their fleets with fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly new-generation aircraft • Energy audit on KAA’s facilities is ongoing with a view to eliminating wastage.

Challenges • Encroachment on airport land that undermines security and safety management as well as facility expansion • Dynamism in safety and security threats • Limited resources to meet customer demands on time • Over-regulation of KAA’s operations.


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Kenya Airports Authority Contacts Kenya Airports Authority (HQ)

Kisumu Airport

P0 Box 19001-00501, Nairobi Tel : +254 (0)20 661 1000, 661 2000 Fax: +254 (0)20 822 078 E-mail: info@kenyaairports.co.ke Web: www.kenyaairports.co.ke

PO Box 13, Kisumu Tel: +254 (0)57 202 0811 Fax: +254 (0)57 202 1857

Jomo Kenyatta International Airport PO Box 19087-00501, Nairobi Tel: +254 (0)20 822 111, 661 1000, 661 2000 Fax: +254 (0)20 822 930

Moi International Airport PO Box 93004, Mombasa Tel: +254 (0)41 343 32111 Fax: +254 (0)41 343 3220, +254 (0)41 343 4434

Wajir Airport PO Box 512 – 70200, Wajir Tel: +254 (0)46 421 019 Fax: +254 ()46 421 362

LokichogGio Airport PO Box 88, Lokichoggio Tel: +254 (0)54 32266 Fax: +254 (0)54 32440

Ukunda Airstrip

Eldoret International Airport

PO Box 139, Kwale Tel: +254 (0)40 320 2126

PO Box 2323, Eldoret Tel: +254 (0)53 206 3377 Fax: +254 (0)53 60337

Manda Airstrip

Wilson Airport PO Box 19005, Nairobi Tel: +254 (0)20 603 260/77 Fax: +254 (0)20 601 496

Malindi AirPORT PO Box 67, Malindi Tel: +254 (0)42 31201 Fax: +254 (0)42 31840

PO Box 167, Lamu Tel: +254 (0)42 632018


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S OUTHERN SUDAN ETHIOPIA

Lokichoggio LOKICHOGGIO AIRPORT

Ramu

Lodwar

EASTERN Marsabit

U GANDA

Wajir WAJIR AIRPORT

RIFT VALLEY

K E N Y A

Kitale WESTERN Kakamega

ELDORET INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

NORTH EASTERN

Mado Gashi

Eldoret

Isiolo Nanyuki

KISUMU AIRPORT

Kisumu

Nakuru Nyeri

Kericho

CENTRAL

NYANZA Narok

Thika

NAIROBI WILSON AIRPORT

Garissa

Embu

EASTERN

JOMO KENYATTA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Magadi Lamu

Garsen

MANDA AIRSTRIP

COAST

TANZANIA

MALINDI AIRPORT

Malindi INDIAN OCEAN

MOI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Mombasa UKUNDA AIRSTRIP


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Airports as economic engines

Airports development spurs local economies and keeps national economy humming

Airports have long ceased to be merely entry and exit points. Over the years they have been transformed into vital economic engines for the nations they serve. The economic benefits that come with a vibrant 24-hour airport operation have become a major focus for many countries, especially in the developing economies. Leisure and business travel continue to show tremendous growth as the world gradually shrinks into a global village. And as businesses and corporations from the developed economies continue to seek new markets, especially in the emerging economies of Africa, the Middle East, the Asia Pacific region and

Latin America, the critical role played by airports in harnessing business linkages cannot be understated. Air travel into and out of these regions has grown as business and commerce continue to thrive, and this in turn has placed a greater emphasis on airports playing a pivotal role in helping spur business and trade in these regions by offering first-rate connections worldwide. According to statistics from the Kenya Tourism Board, business travel through Nairobi has overtaken leisure travel in the past few years, further underlining the pivotal role played by Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) in advancing business growth in Kenya.


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LEFT: A Kenya Airways jet stops at a boarding bridge for international arrivals at JKIA BELOW LEFT: Construction of the new apron and Terminal 4 at JKIA RIGHT: Nairobi skyline BELOW: JKIA handles fresh produce straight from the farms for export to European markets

In Kenya, air travel has gradually expanded over the past two decades. This, together with the fact that Nairobi has become a diplomatic, hospitality, banking, manufacturing, aviation and commercial hub for the whole of East and Central Africa, has further enhanced the development of Kenya’s aviation sector and its airports.

Floriculture and horticulture The exponential growth and development of the Kenyan economy, especially the floriculture and horticulture subsectors, has fuelled the development of a first-rate aviation infrastructure. The industry has seen remarkable growth over the past 20 years to become one of the leading foreign exchange earners for Kenya and the largest in Africa. Its development has seen JKIA transformed into a logistical cargo hub not only for Kenya, but for the entire region. As the subsectors continue to grow, JKIA has a key role to play in the development of the industry. A sign of this trend is the expansion of cargo facilities at the airport.

JKIA has become the largest and busiest cargo hub in Africa, with the capacity to handle fresh produce straight from the farms for export to European markets. As well as handling produce from Kenyan farms, the cargo termini at JKIA process fresh farm produce for export from neighbouring countries such as Uganda, Rwanda and Tanzania. JKIA now has the largest and most modern cold rooms in Africa for fresh produce. Aside from JKIA, Eldoret International Airport (EIA), Kenya’s third-largest air gateway, located in the North Rift region, is billed as a new economic engine that will enhance the growth and development of fresh farm produce exports from western Kenya. The airport is centrally located in some of Kenya’s most fertile farmlands and could play a pivotal role in developing floriculture and horticulture in the region.

Nairobi’s growing stature With a booming Kenyan economy has come a rising middle class and an enhanced business environment that has seen Kenya’s small and medium-sized enterprises flourish. This has led to an increase in efficient air connections from Nairobi to key markets in the Middle East and Far East that has been achieved through the continued expansion of the national carrier, Kenya Airways. Many regional and international carriers now fly into Nairobi to take advantage of the business opportunities arising from Kenya’s expanding economy. This has significantly reduced travel time to Europe, Africa and Asia and has made Kenya a favoured business destination in the region, thanks to JKIA. The effectiveness of JKIA as an aviation hub has strengthened Nairobi’s key role in the region as a meeting place for diplomats and business people. In addition, Nairobi is home to the global headquarters of the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Human Settlements Agency (UN-Habitat). Each year, the United Nations Office in Nairobi (UNON) pumps more than $350 million into the Kenyan economy, with some of the revenue coming from the many international meetings hosted by the city.


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Airline-airport hub concept The ambitious expansion of Kenya Airways, arguably the most successful and fully privatised airline in Africa, underlines the critical role played by JKIA in the Kenyan economy. Kenya Airways has seen remarkable growth over the past decade. According to its CEO, Titus Naikuni, this growth could not have been achieved without an efficient air hub capable of handling the huge passenger and cargo traffic generated by Kenya Airways. Under this partnership, the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) and Kenya Airways are working closely to develop the airport into a successful airport-airline hub concept similar to Amsterdam Schiphol-KLM and London Heathrow-British Airways. According to Naikuni, this concept will be a great driver for economic growth and development, not only for the airline and the airport, but also for the entire Kenyan economy.

Tourism The expansion of Kenya Airways and the entry of new regional and international carriers flying into JKIA has not only provided business and diplomatic travellers excellent air links, but has also helped fuel Kenya’s booming tourism industry. JKIA not only serves as the aviation gateway to Kenya and the whole region, but also provides feeder traffic and support to Kenya’s secondlargest airport, Moi International Airport (MIA) at Mombasa. While MIA serves both passenger and cargo aircraft into and out of the coastal city, the airport also serves a large number of chartered airlines, especially from key tourism source markets in Europe. According to the Ministry of Tourism, this has helped develop Kenya’s tourism product through excellent air links between the holiday resort and key European markets such as France, Germany, Italy and the UK. Nairobi’s second airport, Wilson Airport, also has a critical role to play in developing Kenya as a tourism destination. Located south of Nairobi, Wilson is Africa’s busiest airport for light aircraft and the source of many flights to and from principal tourist desti-

ABOVE: The expansion of Kenya Airways has helped fuel Kenya’s booming tourism industry BELOW: Light aircraft form a vital link for many safaris

nations such as the Masai Mara National Reserve in the south, Samburu National Reserve in the north and holiday resorts such as Diani in the South Coast, Mombasa, Malindi and Lamu Island. Figures from Kenya Tourism Board (KTB) show that tourism generated more than US$1.1 billion in 2010 compared with US$980 million in 2009. As Kenya continues to focus on domestic and conference tourism, the KAA has reported handling more than 40,000 highvalue conference customers at its principal airports in 2010. This, according to both KAA and KTB, is the result of leveraging on Kenya’s growing stature as a regional conferencing hub.


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Simon Githaiga Airport Manager Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA)

JKIA set to transform into Africa’s aviation hub

Expansion set to double passenger capacity at JKIA

Once dogged by a crumbling infrastructure and misguided investment policies that were never implemented, Kenya has recently seen a radical shift in its investment policies. This has led to a huge investment programme by the government aimed at overhauling the nation’s infrastructure. The shift in investment policy is driven largely by the demands of a robust and ever-expanding economy and guided by the nation’s ambition to become a middleincome, industrialised economy by 2030.

opments across the country. Key among the planned upgrades is the transport sector, which over the years has been starved of investment in its crumbling yet vital infrastructure. Some facilities have received no upgrading or regular maintenance since they were first built in the 1970s. This, coupled with the nation’s steadily growing population, has further put a strain on the ageing facilities, stretching them to the brink of collapse.

The government has pumped millions of dollars into upgrading the infrastructure as well as planning new infrastructural devel-

One such facility is the nation’s principal air gateway, Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA), which also provides

BELOW: Airlines that fly into JKIA

Regional aviation hub


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ABOVE: $200 million makeover for JKIA FAR RIGHT: JKIA will be transformed into Africa’s premier aviation hub

a passenger and cargo hub for the whole region. Nairobi’s growing status as the region’s aviation, communications, medical, banking and diplomatic hub has been a key factor in pushing up traffic at the airport in the past few years. Kenya’s growing middle class and the expansion of small and medium-sized businesses have helped to fuel the growth in passenger and cargo traffic at the airport. So has the fact that multinational companies and businesses as well as non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have chosen Nairobi as the site of their regional headquarters.

In addition, Nairobi is the only Third World city to host the global headquarters of two major United Nations agencies – the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat). This means that Nairobi plays host to high-level diplomatic meets all year round, with JKIA being the principal entry and exit point.

Expansion of Kenya Airways Meanwhile, national carrier Kenya Airways has embarked on an ambitious route expansion and fleet modernisation programme in the past decade that has seen the airline increase its passenger and cargo volumes into and out of Nairobi. Today, the airline

JKIA STATISTICS ITEM

<< ACTUAL

PROJECTED >>

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

AIRCRAFT Domestic

13,902

15,936

23,479

25,085

25,004

29,149

30,023

International

43,685

45,580

49,213

51,188

55,191

58,188

59,934

Total

57,587

61,516

72,692

76,273

80,195

87,337

89,957

PASSENGERS Domestic

629,326

646,960

850,085

892,167

908,774

963,598

1,011,778

International

2,706,601

2,859,444

3,060,469

2,876,393

3,163,013

3,421,004

3,592,054

Transit

903,020

942,628

951,152

982,599

1,006,181

1,101,169

1,156,227

Total

4,238,947

4,449,032

4,861,706

4,751,159

5,077,968

5,485,771

5,760,060

FREIGHT Domestic

3,484,091

3,050,487

1,257,946

6,845,904

1,264,179

1,522,470

1,674,717

International

200,353,873

239,443,091

275,623,371

293,891,078

261,805,894

226,747,960

249,422,756

Total

203,837,964

242,493,578

276,881,317

300,736,982

263,070,073

229,850,286

252,835,315


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

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operates one of the youngest fleets in the African skies and is continuously acquiring larger aircraft such as the Boeing 777. According to its CEO, Titus Naikuni, the rapid expansion of the national carrier is in line with its strategy to develop an airline-airport hub concept similar to KLM at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam and British Airways at Heathrow Airport in London. Over the past decade Kenya Airways has expanded its routes in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, making it the fastest growing and most dominant airline in Africa, offering first-rate connections worldwide. The expansion of Kenya Airways notwithstanding, Kenya’s growing economy and the role played by Nairobi as a regional hub for products and services has attracted regional and international carriers to JKIA. The ripple effect of all the combined forces has been serious congestion at the airport, especially at peak times in the morning and evening.

$200 million make-over

gers and about 1 million tonnes of cargo. When construction is complete in 2013, JKIA is expected to have doubled in area from 25,662 square metres to 55,222 square metres. According to Engineer Stephen Gichuki, managing director of the KAA, the planned expansion at JKIA will not only increase the airport’s capacity but also turn it into Africa’s premier aviation hub, offering seamless international connections.

Given all these factors, JKIA has come under intense pressure and its capacity has been stretched to the limit. Built 28 years ago, the airport was designed to handle about 2.5 million passengers a year, but now deals with about 5 million passengers. This has led to urgent demands for an immediate upgrade of the airport and auxiliary infrastructure to meet current demand and allow for future growth.

According to Gichuki, the already completed Phase I has expanded aircraft parking space from 200,000 square metres with 23 stands to well over 300,000 square meters with 37 stands. Two additional taxiways were also constructed in Phase I.

Over the past two years, through the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA), the government has earmarked more than $200 million for rehabilitation and expansion of facilities at the airport.

Also in Phase I, there is an expanded apron stretching from the soon-to-be-constructed Terminal 4 passenger complex to the cargo village. KAA’s cargo commercial manager, William Simbah, said this would allow simultaneous loading of up to five wide-bodied cargo aircraft compared with three previously.

Under this three-phase programme, which commenced in 2007, the airport’s passenger and cargo handling capacity will be increased to meet current and projected demand. Once construction and upgrades are complete, its annual capacity will be increased to more than 10 million passen-

2012

2013

2014

2015

JKIA is one of the largest and fastest growing cargo hubs in Africa, thanks to a robust Kenyan economy and an everexpanding fresh produce subsector catering for the Kenyan and regional markets. To make sure the airport stays competitive, the KAA has issued tenders for the construction of three

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020 39,174

30,924

31,852

32,807

33,792

34,805

35,850

36,925

38,033

61,732

63,584

65,491

67,456

69,480

71,564

73,711

75,922

78,200

92,656

95,435

98,299

101,248

104,285

107,413

110,636

113,955

117,374

1,062,367

1,115,485

1,171,259

1,229,822

1,291,313

1,355,879

1,423,673

1,494,857

1,569,600

3,771,657

3,960,240

4,158,252

4,366,164

4,584,473

4,813,696

5,054,381

5,307,100

5,572,455

1,214,039

1,274,741

1,338,478

1,405,402

1,475,672

1,549,455

1,626,928

1,708,275

1,793,688

6,048,063

6,350,466

6,667,989

7,001,388

7,351,458

7,719,031

8,104,982

8,510,231

8,935,743

1,842,189

2,026,408

2,229,048

2,451,953

2,697,148

2,966,863

3,263,550

3,589,905

3,948,895

274,365,032

301,801,535

331,981,688

365,179,857

401,697,843

441,867,627

486,054,390

534,659,829

588,125,812

278,118,846

305,930,731

336,523,804

370,176,184

407,193,803

447,913,183

492,704,501

541,974,951

596,172,446


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warehouses under a build, operate and transfer (BOT) arrangement. According to Gichuki, the whole of Phase I has been financed by KAA at a total cost of US$40.2 million.

Enhanced airport security After some delays, the second and most critical expansion phase at JKIA has begun. According to Gichuki, this will involve construction of the long-awaited Terminal 4 passenger complex to help alleviate congestion. The new complex will handle domestic arrivals and departures as well as international arrivals. Total cost is put at US$72.3 million, with the World Bank contributing US$14 million. Phase II will include a new three-storey car park complex with a basement and a footbridge linking the car park to the arrivals terminal. This phase will also see the installation of seven new boarding gates, increasing the number of gates to 21. The second phase will not only transform JKIA into an ultramodern facility but will also make the airport more secure. In a post-September 11 world, airport security is of paramount importance. Kenya has borne the brunt of terrorism in the past and security was a key item to be considered at Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secondbusiest airport.

While many airports across the world have installed bollards or reinforced concrete blast walls to enhance security, JKIA is going a step further by keeping vehicle traffic away from the terminal buildings. Blast barriers and shrapnel protectors, disguised as planters, will guide cars toward a remote parking facility from where passengers will disembark and undergo security checks. Security will further be enhanced in Phase III by introducing separate facilities for departing and arriving passengers. Under the third and final upgrading phase, KAA will construct an additional floor on all three termini so that arriving passengers will have their own space, separate from departing passengers. At a cost of US$92 million, Phase III will put the final touches to JKIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s makeover. Under this phase, Terminals 1 and 2 and the international arrivals complex will be renovated. It will also include the construction of an airside corridor to separate arriving and departing passengers as well as the installation of 12 new boarding bridges. With the planned expansion under way, the strategic location of JKIA and the ever-growing status of Nairobi as a commercial and diplomatic hub, the airport is continuing to see a growth in aircraft movements. Foreign carriers have been flocking to JKIA over the past three years to take advantage of the new opportunities in the region.


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Tradewinds Aviation Group Tradewinds Aviation Group is a privately owned company based at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Nairobi, Moi International Airport, Mombasa and Stansted Airport, UK. The group comprises Tradewinds Logistics and Tradewinds Aviation Services. It has been operating in Kenya for 18 years and has made a major contribution to the development of Kenya’s aviation industry. Operating 24 hours a day, it employs over 700 highly skilled personnel.

KCAA plans for safer skies Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) was established on 24 October 2002 by the Civil Aviation (Amendment) Act 2002. Its mandate is to plan, develop, manage, regulate and operate a safe, economically sustainable and efficient civil aviation system in Kenya, in accordance with the provisions of the Civil Aviation Act Cap. 394. KCAA carries out its mandate through three Operational Directorates and one Support Directorate, namely, Aviation Safety Standards and Regulation, Air Navigation Services, East African School of Aviation and Corporate Services.

The group’s services include: These tasks are performed under the following key functions:

Operational Services • Aircraft handling (inbound and outbound), aircraft weight and balance, load supervision, crew transport and import export documentation. • Its Nairobi base offers an extensive communications network providing up-to-the-minute information to crews and headquarters.

General Cargo • Large agent worldwide network ensures consignments are quickly and safely dispatched. • Efficient cargo tracking and tracing systems. •

Excellent working relationships with the Nairobi warehouse operators: African Cargo Handling, Kenya Airfreight Handling, Transglobal Cargo Centre and Cargo Service Centre. Together these offer comprehensive warehousing services including strong rooms, cold rooms and animal handling.

• Arrangement and management of inland haulage.

Ramp Handling • Complete ground handling service at JKIA since 2004. • From light aircraft to Boeing 747-400 and Antonov 124 Freighters. • Extensive investment in ground handling equipment.

• Oversight Functions: Aviation safety and security regulation to cover safety and security oversight and air transport economic regulation • Service Provision (Operators): Air Navigation Services (ANS) and East African School of Aviation (EASA) in the provision of ANS services for the safe operation of aircraft in Kenyan and other delegated airspaces; and provision of aviation training •

Support Functions: Support services including finance; human capital and administration; internal audit and quality assurance; corporate communications; legal; procurement; ICT; and corporate planning services.


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Best of the best

Lucy Mbugua KAA Marketing and Business Development General Manager

JKIA again wins Routes Marketing Award for Africa For the third time in a row, Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) has won the prestigious Routes Marketing Award for the African Airports category. The award was presented to JKIA at the 16th World Routes Airport Marketing Awards in Vancouver in September 2010. Having clinched the coveted title in 2008 and in 2009, the latest award underlines the benefits of the ongoing expansion programme at east and central Africa’s largest and busiest air hub. The expansion programme at JKIA began in 2007 and is due for completion by 2013. It will more than double the airport’s current capacity to 10 million passengers a year.

Healthy airport-airline relationship Lucy Mbugua, the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) General Manager in charge of marketing and business development, says the Routes Marketing Award is particularly prestigious since the votes are cast by the airport’s customers – the airlines. She said: “The award is indicative of the healthy relationship cultivated between the airlines and JKIA. While voting for the airports, the airlines consider a wide range of factors such as customer service and available airport facilities.” Ms Mbugua added: “The KAA has undertaken a number of marketing activities at JKIA focused on rewarding loyal customers, increasing airport capacity, expanding our market share while providing quality customer service. This award is a testament that we are on the right track as we have witnessed unprecedented growth of six per cent in passenger traffic, three per cent in aircraft traffic and a 7.4 per cent increase in cargo.” According to Ms Mbugua, JKIA’s success can be attributed to the quarterly customer satisfaction surveys and the product improvement exercise that have enabled the airport to deliver an improved service. This exercise in product improvement targets all the customer contact points, from entry to the airport to check-in, security, lounges, shopping, boarding, arrival procedures and landscaping as well as cargo.

According to Simon Githaiga, Airport Manager of JKIA, the award could not have come at a better time: JKIA is undergoing a major expansion programme that will see its passenger capacity more than doubled, while cargo capacity will also be increased; and it has the largest and most modern fresh produce facility in Africa.

Second runway Mr Githaiga said: “We are currently at the second phase of the expansion programme that will witness the completion of Terminal 4 at JKIA and we are looking at constructing a second runway at JKIA once the third and final phase of the expansion programme is completed in the next two years. Under this phase, Terminals 1, 2 and 3 will be refurbished and expanded by constructing another floor on top of the existing complex.” According to Mr Githaiga, a second runway is critical for the future development and expansion of the airport as it transforms into an aviation hub for the region: it will not only come with auxiliary infrastructure, such as new terminal buildings and cargo handling terminals, but will also ensure a smooth operation at the airport should the current runway be rendered unusable in the event of an aircraft suffering a mechanical or technical failure. “We have also witnessed increased interest from existing airlines that seek to add frequencies into Nairobi and new airlines that are seeking landing rights into the airport,” said Mr Githaiga. “Some other airlines have even inquired about landing the Airbus A380 at JKIA and it is some of these factors that are guiding us towards the next expansion phase of the airport once the ongoing expansion programme is complete.” Mr Githaiga believes this kind of product improvement and expansion is a key factor in winning over many of the airlines now flying into Nairobi, who have consequently voted JKIA the best airport in Africa for the third time.


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“The ongoing modernisation and expansion of JKIA will most definitely give new impetus to the airport as it grows into a regional hub,” said Ms Mbugua. “This will bring in new carriers into Nairobi. The rapid expansion of our national carrier, Kenya Airways, over the last few years has also greatly helped improve the profile of JKIA as a vital hub that seamlessly connects passengers transiting through JKIA to destinations in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, eastern and central Africa, southern Africa and West Africa. It has greatly increased the number of city pairs and has consequently raised the profile of JKIA.”

Benchmarking with the best Aside from infrastructural upgrades, JKIA is benchmarking itself against some of the world’s best airports. According to Ms Mbugua, the airport is in talks with Seoul’s Incheon International Airport, arguably one of the largest and best airports in Asia, with a view to entering into a memorandum of understanding that will see the two airports exchange notes and learn from each other in terms of customer care and service. While the Government of Kenya (GoK) has pumped millions of dollars into the expansion and modernisation of JKIA, it is also investing heavily in other vital transport infrastructural programmes that are geared towards making that connection at JKIA smooth and hassle-free.

This will be achieved through the construction of a modern light rail transport system to link JKIA with Nairobi’s Central Business District. The GoK will be spending KES 800 million (US$10 million) on the rail link, which will connect JKIA with central Nairobi via Embakasi station. Construction is expected to take about eight months. ABOVE: Approach road to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) BELOW: President Mwai Kibaki (left) commissions the expansion programme at JKIA. With him is the then KAA MD George Muhoho


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Many regional and international cargo carriers have been looking to JKIA as their hub of choice

JKIA is Africa’s premier cargo hub

Expansion turns JKIA into a fresh produce hub The ongoing expansion of Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) will not only enhance facilities at the region’s largest and busiest airport but will underline its status as the passenger and cargo hub of choice for East and Central Africa.

This includes an extension of the cargo apron at the termini and an expansion of the aircraft parking bays to accommodate more and larger freighters. According to Simbah, the cargo area has been expanded to handle at least eight wide-bodied cargo aircraft compared with three previously.

Boasting the largest air cargo business in Africa, fuelled by Kenya’s booming horticulture and floriculture subsectors, JKIA has been taking decisive steps to meet growing cargo demand. According to William Simbah, cargo commercial manager at Kenya Airports Authority (KAA), the cargo business at JKIA, especially for fresh produce, has been on an upward path over several years.

operations

William Simbah Cargo Commercial Manager Kenya Airports Authority

Moreover, KAA is looking to consolidate operations at the cargo termini in a move that will see cargo handling companies relocate to the airside. According to Simbah, this will involve a centralisation of key handling activities, especially of perishable cargo, closer to the airside. This will help to safeguard cargo at JKIA, which was prone to pilferage when cargo had to be transported from the landside to the airside. Consolidation to the airside, notes Simbah, will further enhance security at the cargo termini and avoid duplication of duties. To meet the growing demand for cargo capacity at JKIA, the KAA has entered into a build, operate and transfer (BOT) agreement with major cargo handling companies at the airport. Under this agreement, the companies will install modern cargo termini to boost cargo capacity. This has seen the number of cargo termini at JKIA increase from two to five, with plans to increase them to seven. Cargo termini now in operation at JKIA:

The strategic location of Nairobi, at the crossroads of various trade routes, together with the rapid expansion of national carrier Kenya Airways, have also helped to push up cargo traffic at JKIA. Many regional and international cargo carriers have been looking to JKIA as their hub of choice to serve the growing cargo business from Kenya and the entire Great Lakes Region. In its efforts to expand capacity at JKIA and improve the infrastructure, the government, through the KAA, has so far invested more than KES 1.6 billion in expanding the cargo termini and associated infrastructure.

• Kenya Airfreight Handling Limited (KAHL) • The Nairobi Cargo Centre • Transglobal Cargo Centre • Swissport International Ltd • Siginon Freight.


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ABOVE: Cargo aircraft at the expanded cargo facility at JKIA

JKIA exports (kg) December 2010 REGION FRESH PRODUCE FLOWERS

While cargo business at JKIA has been growing, it is fresh produce – especially the flower subsector – that has boomed in recent years and has led the demand for expanded facilities.

Europe

3,496,346

Middle East

1,496,277

4,708,199 887,707

Far East

48,212

69,843 249,549

East & Central Africa

213,790

Indian Ocean Islands

70,706

95,229

West Africa

51,437

73,280

capacity

Southern Africa

132,071

48,451

North Africa

162,667

120,435

Statistics from the Kenya Flower Council (KFC) indicate that Africa supplies close to 80 per cent of flower demand to Europe, with more than half coming from Kenya alone. Thanks to the level of capacity and expertise that Kenya has developed in the flower farming and handling subsector, regional countries such as Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda have been using the cargo facilities at JKIA to export their flowers and other fresh farm produce to Europe.

Other International

146,788

1,976

Total International

5,818,294

6,254,669

Total Domestic

115,183

94,013

Grand total

5,933,477

6,348,682

As a result, the airport has become Africa’s largest and most developed cargo hub for fresh produce, according to the KFC and KAA. The growth in this traffic has been exponential, with capacity for fresh produce handling at KAHL Freight Terminal being expanded from an initial 20,000 tonnes per year to 100,000 tonnes.

JKIA exports (kg) January 2010 REGION FRESH PRODUCE FLOWERS Europe

2,879,256

Middle East

1,517,645

5,068,368 552,357

Far East

30,986

6,878 361,966

East & Central Africa

299,468

Indian Ocean Islands

30,969

2,284

West Africa

6,933

1,856

Southern Africa

159,784

147,986

North Africa

272,551

224,910

Other International

150,317

47,486

Total International

5,347,909

6,414,091

Total Domestic

1,015

-

Grand total

5,348,924

6,414,091


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SIGINON Group Siginon Group, one of the largest and longest-serving freight companies in Kenya, is to develop a state-of-the-art air cargo terminal at Nairobiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA). Construction of the $10 million Siginon Air Cargo Terminal will be guided by high standards of global aviation security. The new terminal will contribute towards efficient handling operations while reducing costs and maximising cargo warehouse throughput capacity. Key facilities will include import and export warehouses, a perishable goods handling centre with cool and freezer chains, strong rooms, a dangerous goods area and security cages for valuable and vulnerable cargo. The Siginon Air Cargo Terminal will provide much needed capacity at a time when there has been an increase in cargo transport by air to and from Africa.

Siginon is aware of global trends in the industry and the new air cargo terminal is designed not only to meet the demands of the market but also to increase cargo handling capacity at JKIA. It will boost the airportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capacity by an additional 9,000 square metres.

information technology The growth of information communication technology (ICT) globally has provided Siginon with opportunities to leverage information technology (IT) expertise towards supporting business growth and enhancing operational efficiency in its customer delivery. Siginon has adopted Cargospot, a global online cargo handling system which automates air cargo handling operations. Keeping in mind that air cargo is always time-critical, Cargospot provides Siginon customers with speedy, efficient and reliable cargo clearance at the touch of a button. To boost this further, Siginon business processes have been centralised through the adoption of SAP ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) business systems for efficient business management and enhanced customer service. SAP allows for linkages with various customer databases and systems, thus facilitating prompt invoicing and payment processing as well as sharing of information with customers.


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While cargo business at JKIA has been growing, it is fresh produce – especially the flower subsector – that has boomed in recent years and has led the demand for expanded facilities

CARGO IMPORTS IMPORTS SPARES & GARMENTS/ ELECTRONICS PHARMA- MISC. EQUIPMENT TEXTILES/ CEUTICALS PERISHABLE CLOTHING CARGO

MISC. DRY CARGO

MAIL

COURIER

TOTAL

Europe

3,066,570

429,976

463,277

833,914

14,793,698

831,204

233,321

27,436

20,679,396

Middle East

2,117,641

956,792

872,343

1,946,723

8,349,975

255,599

164,973

97,868

14,761,914

Far East

163,949

178,133

99,661

48,856

885,934

11,302

2,040

913

1,390,788

East & Central Africa

850,064

169,886

177,026

255,819

3,159,584

776,169

387,241

40,775

5,816,564

Indian Ocean Islands

204,541

30,743

43,338

52,699

845,737

51,006

5,719

2,461

1,236,244

West Africa

156,944

135,901

35,320

20,628

577,305

36,283

14,362

3,195

979,938

Southern Africa

1,748,714

239,915

170,320

329,211

3,529,948

1,976,313

83,336

140,183

8,217,940

North Africa

291,155

143,970

50,044

126,735

1,290,316

159,469

11,194

1,082

2,073,965

Other International

3,020

195

34,537

3,919

139,256

9,665

381

21

190,994

Total International

8,602,598

2,285,511

1,945,866

3,618,504

33,571,753

4,107,010

902,567

313,934

55,347,743

Total Domestic

53,962

44,430

11,828

13,091

112,511

330,122

32,815

5,039

603,798

TOTAL

8,656,560

2,329,941

1,957,694

3,631,595

33,684,264

4,437,132

935,382

318,973

55,951,541

CARGO EXPORTS EXPORTS FRESH FLOWERS MISC. GARMENTS/ ELECTRONICS SPARES & PRODUCE PERISHABLE TEXTILES/ EQUIPMENT PRODUCTS CLOTHING

MISC. DRY CARGO

MAIL

COURIER TOTAL

Europe

50,529,831 83,091,997 24,017,261

1,207,261

83,589

684,297

4,716,086

124,359

3,658

164,458,339

Middle East

14,075,982 6,495,785

146,420

145,145

180,609

1,288,051

14,175

5,819

24,220,491

1,868,505

Far East

137,997

90,764

82,472

8,292

9,041

12,796

48,591

11,125

247

401,325

East & Central Africa

1,021,836

688,321

689,524

742,234

500,586

2,633,960

6,681,699

142,935

4,732

13,105,827

Indian Ocean Islands

535,266

86,692

111,753

230,080

34,405

112,729

362,201

19,254

5,590

1,497,970

West Africa

57,168

25,923

138,758

204,215

107,790

345,253

1,050,573

39,700

8,601

1,977,981

Southern Africa

1,138,438

581,007

338,411

423,455

300,460

1,119,547

3,543,466

194,734

2,000

7,641,518

North Africa

2,970,349

5,212,237

1,083,706

74,233

51,751

580,393

1,033,778

10,387

-

11,016,834

Other International

-

-

6,069

3,006

136

5,546

39,803

267

-

54,827

Total International

70,466,867 96,272,726 28,336,459

3,039,196

1,232,903

5,675,130

18,764,248

556,936

30,647

224,375,112

Total Domestic

93,226

116,936

7,161

77,162

179,943

7,549

19

632,703

TOTAL

70,560,093 96,371,730 28,388,162

3,156,132

1,240,064

5,752,292

18,944,191 564,485 30,666

99,004

TOTAL INTERNATIONAL

279,722,855

TOTAL DOMESTIC

1,236,501

GRAND TOTAL

280,959,357

51,703

225,007,815


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Keeping the birds away

For passenger and aircraft safety at JKIA Officials at Nairobi’s increasingly busy Jomo Kenyatta International Airport are working day and night to deal with safety and security problems caused by birds. According to George Amutete, the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) Wildlife Control Manager stationed at JKIA, there has been a marked increase in bird activity at or close to the airport, with large numbers of them criss-crossing the runway and flight paths. “This is attributable to a number of factors,” said Amutete. “Some of these factors can be remedied while other factors are natural and are beyond our control. However, we are working around the clock to ensure that these birds are kept away from the airport precincts – and our work is bearing fruit.” According to Amutete, since the Wildlife Control Division was established under the Safety & Security Department in 2006 there has been a marked decrease in conflicts between aircraft and wildlife at JKIA.

Perimeter fence He says this was achieved thanks to various security and animal control measures such as fencing off the entire perimeter area of the airport to help keep away animals. Owing to the proximity of Nairobi National Park and open spaces on the east side of the airport, small and large animals, including gazelle, hyena and even zebra, were known to venture deep into the airport precincts, some grazing within a few metres of the runway. With passenger and aircraft safety in mind, the KAA invested KES 200 million in fencing off the whole airport land so as to keep animals out as well as enhance security. The concrete foundation of the perimeter fence is sunk 15 cm underground and the fence is 9 ft high so that small animals cannot dig under it and larger animals cannot jump over it.

Amutete said: “While the fence easily takes care of the small and large animals from straying into the airport precincts, it is the birds and insects that are difficult to keep away and even control. It is very tricky, and we have to use all the bird behavioural habits that we know of to try to keep them away, since they roam freely in the air and cannot be restricted by physical boundaries or barriers.” There has been a marked increase in birdlife in recent years. According to Amutete, the biggest factor is the Dandora landfill site, located 15 km from the airport, which attracts birds of all kinds from Nairobi National Park.

PEAK TIMES JKIA is sandwiched between the national park to the south and the landfill to the north, so that the birds fly over its busy flight paths and runway. The ritual is repeated each morning and late afternoon as the birds commute to and from the landfill. These are also the peak times for aircraft landings and takeoffs at JKIA. “In the mornings, we have the long-haul flights from Europe and Asia arriving,” said Amutete. “There are also flights from West Africa coming in. There are also numerous local and regional flights going out, while in the late afternoons and early evenings we have the regional flights coming in and some longhaul flights departing. This is the critical time when a bird can be easily sucked into an aircraft’s engine, and the consequences would be disastrous.” Even though Amutete and his team are working to ensure that a bird strike does not occur, these are the busiest times for them as they continuously patrol the flight paths and clear the air space around and above the runway. According to Amutete, the landfill has attracted all kinds of birds including dangerous large birds such as eagles, marabou storks and vultures.


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In addition, small insects are attracted to the airport, especially at night when it is floodlit. This, in turn, attracts birds. “We have also noted a radical shift in bird behaviour over the last few years,” said Amutete. “For instance, herons do not fly at night, but now they are resting during the day and are flying into the airport at night to feed on the nocturnal insects that are attracted to the airport by the bright floodlights. This is totally new to us and we have to deal with it. It is some form of adaptation.”

Residential estates Other man-made problems contributing to the increase in the local bird population include the rapidly growing Eastlands housing estates, which are close to the area used by departing aircraft. The rapid expansion of the Athi River and Kitengela industrial and residential areas has also attracted more birds to the area, mainly because some of the new housing estates are not planned and lack basic water and sewerage. Amutete and his team have been using all means to keep away the birds and maintain the safety of passengers and aircraft. They use both simple and sophisticated methods. The most basic is rubber catapults and slingshots, but they also have two solar-powered machines that produce noises to scare the birds away.

Stakeholder participation

FAR LEFT: Bird control experts at JKIA. They use solar-powered bird scaring equipment to keep away birds form the airport ABOVE: The Wildlife Control team at JKIA

He went on: “Other government agencies that we are working with include the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), who have helped by fencing off part of the Nairobi National Park to help keep away small and large animals, as well as the National Museums of Kenya (NMK), who have bird experts. They help us in studying the behavioural life and patterns of the birds that we normally spotted within the airport precincts.” Under the Wildlife Hazard Management Plan (WHMP), which brings together the KAA, the NCC, the KWS, the NMK and the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA), the Wildlife Control Division at KAA has been able to employ both reactive and proactive methods to curb the bird strikes. Long-term remedies being sought by the KAA in collaboration with other agencies include relocation of the landfill and the provision of vital services such as sewerage in the new residential developments. The NCC will be working with government agencies to oversee the provision of such services and to ensure proper planning of the new housing estates and industrial complexes.

In addition, Amutete and his team liaise with other government agencies to help deal with the bird threat.

According to Amutete, there has been a drastic reduction in bird strikes at the airport since the Wildlife Control Division was set up in 2006.

“We are working in close collaboration with Nairobi City Council to help in the planning and installation of essential water and sewerage services in the mushrooming housing estates close to the airport,” said Amutete. “We have also engaged the NCC in talks that will eventually have the Dandora landfill moved to another location away from the airport.”

He said: “Of course, you cannot completely eliminate the bird threat. No airport in the world can do this. The challenge for us is to keep it at the very minimal to ensure the safety of the passengers and aircraft that use JKIA and other airports across the country that are under the management of the KAA.”


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BELOW: The passenger terminal building at Moi International Airport, Mombasa

Mombasa International Airport

Tourism spurs growth at Mombasa

Yatich Kangugo Airport Manager Moi International Airport The bustling city of Mombasa is home to one of Africa’s busiest seaports, providing a vital gateway for trade with East and Central Africa. But there is another side to Mombasa, which is also a resort city boasting some of the world’s finest beaches. Today, Mombasa is a popular tourism destination, especially with European visitors, who can fly direct to the city’s Moi International Airport (MIA) from various places across Europe. Tourism is one of Kenya’s top foreign exchange earners and is the largest employer at the coast. Thanks to its efficient air links with Europe, Mombasa has become the region’s holiday destination of choice.

From its humble beginnings as a small airstrip, developed just after the Second World War, the airport has grown in stature to become not only Kenya’s second-largest airport, but a critical driver of Kenya’s expanding tourism industry. According to Kenya Tourism Board (KTB), the airport has a pivotal role to play in this sector because of the very large number of leisure tourists from Europe who enter and leave the country via Moi International Airport. Formerly Port Reitz Airport, it was expanded to handle larger aircraft such as the Boeing 747 and was renamed Moi International Airport in 1978 after it was expanded to handle inter-

MIA STATISTICS

<< ACTUAL

PROJECTED >> 2011

ITEM

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

AIRCRAFT

Domestic

11,370

13,816

17,488

13,642

16,454

19,034

9,605

International

4,638

5,293

5,549

3,174

4,877

6,372

6,563

Total

16,008

19,109

23,037

16,816

21,331

25,406

26,168

PASSENGERS Domestic

543,895

553,664

649,446

570,680

657,383

689,344

723,811

International

462,906

573,767

604,823

235,277

356,871

473,743

497,430

Transit

52,930

76,943

91,517

80,837

99,620

107,991

113,391

Total

1,059,731

1,204,374

1,345,786

886,794

1,113,874

1,271,078

1,334,632

FREIGHT

Domestic

2,169,614

1,629,896

1,077,921

903,721

832,231

470,365

517,402

International

6,005,403

7,968,297

8,218,347

5,256,977

5,644,158

7,667,917

8,434,709

8,175,017

9,598,193

9,296,268

6,160,698

6,476,389

8,168,092

8,984,901

Total


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

29

national flights and a modern passenger terminal building was built to handle tourists flying in from Europe.

Tourism development As Kenyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tourism sector underwent tremendous growth, the airport was stretched to capacity and a KES 5.5 billion expansion programme was carried out. This included the building of a second passenger terminal in 1996 and refurbishment of the runway, taxiways and apron as well as an expansion of the passenger apron and construction of a general aviation apron.

As the Kenyan economy continues to grow, MIA will go on handling more passengers and aircraft. Key factors in this growth include the development of Destination Mombasa as a resort of choice; and the growing conference and domestic tourism sector at the coast. Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) predicted that traffic through MIA would continue to grow at an average of 5.5 per cent between 2008 and 2018 and an average of 4.4 per cent between 2018 and 2028. According to KAA statistics, the best year for the airport was 2007, at the height of Kenyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tourism boom, when it recorded some 1.27 million passengers and 17,247 aircraft movements.

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

20,193

20,799

21,423

22,066

22,728

23,409

24,112

24,835

25,580

6,760

6,963

7,172

7,387

7,609

7,837

8,072

8,314

8,563

26,953

27,762

28,595

29,453

30,336

31,246

32,184

33,149

34,144

760,002

798,002

837,902

879,797

923,787

969,976

1,018,475

1,069,399

1,122,869

522,302

548,417

575,838

604,629

634,861

666,604

699,934

734,931

771,677

119,060

125,013

131,264

137,827

144,718

151,954

159,552

167,529

175,906

1,401,363

1,471,432

1,545,003

1,622,253

1,703,366

1,788,534

1,877,961

1,971,859

2,070,452

569,142

626,056

688,661

757,528

833,280

916,608

1,008,269

1,109,096

1,220,006

9,278,180

10,205,998

11,226,597

2,349,257

13,584,183

14,942,601

16,436,861

18,080,547

19,888,602

9,883,391

10,871,730

11,958,903

13,154,794

14,470,273

15,917,301

17,509,031

19,259,934

21,185,927


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

30

Refurbishment

Seaport-airport hub

To enhance the delivery of services and support the growing tourism sector, the government, through the KAA, is gradually refurbishing the infrastructure at MIA. Planned works include:

Away from tourism, the airport is set to benefit handsomely once the proposed Mombasa Free Port is up and running. The airport can expect a significant rise in passenger and cargo traffic as a result of linkages to be created in what experts call the seaport-airport hub concept.

Milling of the top 50 mm of the entire runway pavements, regulation of the surface to restore the cross-section geometry and laying of a new 50 mm asphalt wearing course. To avoid rapid wear and tear it is recommended that the touchdown zones be reconstructed in rigid pavement.

MIA currently handles 18 scheduled and chartered flights from Europe and more than 20 regional connections.

Cargo

• Reconstruction of some section of the taxiways, milling, regulation and laying a new asphalt wearing course for the taxiways and aprons.

MIA has one cargo facility capable of handling 500 tonnes of cargo export and import traffic per month. Handling agent is Kenya Airfreight Handling Ltd (KAHL). The cargo facility includes:

• Removal and replacement of pre-cast concrete slabs that have extensive cracks and repair of joints and cracks in slabs with isolated cracks.

• Export warehouse, 5,110 sq ft

• Refurbishment of the airfield lighting system, including new lighting masts and towers.

• Radioactive room, 100.4 sq ft

• Import warehouse, 5,380 sq ft

• Strongroom, 841.1 sq ft •

Refurbishment of the runway and apron edge lighting including replacement of burnt primary cables, replacement of constant current regulators (CCRs), precision approach path indicator (PAPI) units, apron floodlight fittings and high voltage switchgear at substations. 

• Security cage, 328.17 sq ft • Freezer room, 15.25 sq m • Cold room, 25 sq m

• Improvement to the drainage system to protect the runway and taxiways from subsurface water infiltration and as part of environmental improvements.

• 55 offices of various sizes • 150 vehicle parking slots

The refurbishment programme at MIA is being financed by the World Bank with tendering expected soon.

• Communications facilities (telephone, fax, email, etc).


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

Away from tourism, the airport is set to benefit handsomely once the proposed Mombasa Free Port is up and running

MIA facts and figures

31

AIRPORT IDENTIFICATION: HKMO LONGITUDE:

039°35.52’E

LATITUDE:

04°01 43. 08’S

ELEVATION:

59.74 m (196 ft above sea level)

TRANSITIONAL ALTITUDE: 3,000 ft RUNWAYS:

There are two runways:

• 3,350 m by 45 m (21/03)

• 1,260 m by 36 m (33/15)

MAGNETIC VARIATION:

1° W

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE: 32.7°C LAND AREA:

539 ha

TAXIWAYS:

Taxiway system includes:

• A parallel taxiway 3,564 m by 23 m designated A

• Exit taxiways 23 m wide marked B, C & D

• Connecting taxiways 23 m wide marked K, L

• Connecting taxiways (for small aircraft) marked H, J

• Isolated area at Taxiway F, west end of RWY 15

• Military taxiway (old apron) marked M

APRONS:

• Main apron

• General aviation apron

• Military apron

PASSENGER APRON:

The passenger apron consists of rigid pavement bays at the main gear positions of the aircraft. The surrounding area is flexible pavement between the rigid pavement and Terminals 1 & 2. There is also a ground safety service road, plus a static tank and a lawn.

Capacity of the current apron configuration:

• Main apron 1 - 9 bays

• General aviation apron 1 - 14 bays (for small aircraft)

• Military apron (bays are not marked but can hold two wide-bodied, five medium-bodied and nine small aircraft). TERMINAL BUILDINGS:

The airport has four terminals.

• Terminal 1 has international / domestic departures and international / domestic arrivals.

• Terminal 2 is used for international departures only

• General aviation terminal for local departures to tourist destinations and local airports and airstrips like Wilson, Malindi, Ukunda and Manda Island. • Cargo terminal for uplift of cargo exports and imports. SERVICES AND FACILITIES: • State pavilion

TOP: The terminal building at Moi International Airport ABOVE: Tourists arrive

• VP/VIP lounge

• First-class lounge

• Business lounge

• Administrative units based at Terminal 1 & 2 freight

• Freight terminal south of Terminal 1

• Control tower

• Service building for power and water supply

• Police station

• Workshops

• Two hangars

• Several canteens

• Specialised freight area

• Telephone exchange

• Standby generators

• Post office

SOURCE: Kenya Airports Authority

• Banks • Bureaux


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Cargo is big business for Eldoret following make-over

Peter Wafula Airport Manager Eldoret International Airport Kenya’s third-largest international air hub (after Nairobi and Mombasa) is Eldoret International Airport (EIA), located 16 km south of the country’s fifth-largest city, Eldoret. Eldoret was developed in 1995 and commissioned in 1998 with the aim of opening up the agriculturally rich North Rift region and western Kenya to global markets. The floriculture and horticulture subsector was seen as a viable source of business for the new airport. Since the construction of EIA, new horticulture and floriculture farms have sprung up in and around Eldoret town, with more than 400,000 hectares now given over to horticulture. The town’s growing industrial base was also considered a strong factor in helping to develop business for the airport. It provided a new export gateway for local farmers and industrialists rather than taking their produce and products by road to Nairobi for shipment via JKIA.

Airport stimulates horticulture industry in region As well as a catalyst for new investment and the expansion of business and farming activities in the region, EIA was seen as a tool for development of tourism in western Kenya, providing direct flights between Eldoret and other airports within Kenya, across the region and in the key markets of Europe. The development of this facility would greatly reduce travel time from Nairobi and other destinations.

Transformation into a regional cargo hub Although EIA suffered teething troubles in its first decade of operation, the Government of Kenya, through the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA), went back to the drawing board to chart out a new future for the airport. The result was a new plan to transform the airport into an influential cargo hub not only for the North Rift and western Kenya but for the entire Great Lakes region.


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

The turning point came in February 2007 when Canken International Ltd, a privately owned company, commissioned a 150 tonne capacity dry cargo warehouse at EIA. Along with the existing warehouse, this more than doubled the airportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dry cargo capacity.

Although Eldoret is focused on cargo, it also handles passengers. Traffic has grown steadily from 2,036 passengers in its first months of operation in 1997 to 88,494 passenger movements in 2008. AirKenya, Fly540 and JetLink Express are among those operating passenger flights between EIA and Nairobi.

The transformation of EIA into a regional cargo hub of choice was further underlined when a 230 tonne capacity cold store was commissioned, leading to the first export of perishable goods from the airport in October 2007. This has given the airport a competitive edge in the region, where it is quickly becoming the preferred export point for perishables.

However, it is cargo traffic that continues to record impressive growth. EIA has the capacity to handle both imports and exports comfortably thanks to the existing 300 tonne warehouse and the new 230 tonne cold store. The business of exporting flowers and perishables via EIA has been gradually expanding over the past few years and there is scope for further growth.

EIA STATISTICS

<< ACTUAL

PROJECTED >>

ITEM

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

AIRCRAFT

Domestic

1,676

2,169

3,994

5,859

3,507

4,158

4,283

International

256

239

309

299

236

204

210

Total

1,932

2,408

4,303

6,158

3,743

4,362

4,493

PASSENGERS Domestic

19,490

27,142

51,612

85,049

68,620

69,234

72,696

International

87

124

57

134

60

29

30

Transit

85

250

2,360

12,838

12,013

14,016

14,717

Total

19,662

27,516

54,029

98,021

80,693

83,279

87,443

FREIGHT

Domestic

91,138

-

2,550

13,000

73,739

-

-

International

8,330,727

9,750,985

11,888,143

8,635,090

7,175,508

7,328,042

8,060,846

8,421,865

9,750,985

11,890,693

8,648,090

7,249,247

7,328,042

8,060,846

Total


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

35

EIA is served by various local and international cargo carriers including Emirates SkyCargo, which operates a Boeing 747-400 to and from Dubai. Other cargo carriers include Cargolux, Egypt Air Cargo and Qatar Air Cargo.

Revenue at EIA Recently, the airport has seen a shift of emphasis from its traditional dependency on aviation revenue to non-aviation sources of revenue. This has prompted the KAA to introduce a programme of afforestation. In the past three years, EIA has planted more than 600 acres of eucalyptus trees in a bid to offset carbon emissions at the airport. KAA has also planted 100 acres of trees at the Eldoret Airstrip. Since its inception, the growth in revenue at EIA has been impressive. A case in point is the financial year ended June 2009, when revenue increased by 49.5 per cent. Total revenue for that year was KES 60,983,561 compared with KES 40,788,287 in the previous year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a growth of KES 20,195,274. This surpassed the budget by nine per cent. Revenue was generally boosted by an increase in passenger service charges and landing fees (aeronautical revenue); and increased occupancy of office space and cargo concession (non-aeronautical).

The airport has seen a shift of emphasis from its traditional dependency on aviation revenue to non-aviation sources of revenue

Business opportunities EIA offers many opportunities for business and investment. They include: I

Property and estates

Farmland in the airport and its outlying airstrips can be utilised through joint venture schemes with investors or leased out for agricultural use.

II Construction of hangars

There is scope for aircraft maintenance companies to construct hangars. EIA is keen to persuade investors to set up a flying school at the airport to complement the many colleges in town offering aviation courses.

TOP LEFT: Eldoret International Airport is served by a range of local and international cargo carriers LEFT: EIA is Kenyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third-largest airport

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

4,411

4,544

4,680

4,820

4,965

5,114

5,267

5,425

5,588

216

223

230

236

244

251

258

266

274

4,628

4,766

4,909

5,057

5,208

5,365

5,526

5,691

5,862

76,330

80,147

84,154

88,362

92,780

97,419

102,290

107,405

112,775

32

34

35

37

39

41

43

45

47

15,453

16,225

17,037

17,888

18,783

19,722

20,708

21,743

22,831

91,815

96,406

101,226

106,287

111,602

117,182

123,041

129,193

135,653

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8,866,931

9,753,624

10,728,986

11,801,885

12,982,073

14,280,281

15,708,309

17,279,140

19,007,054

8,866,931

9,753,624

10,728,986

11,801,885

12,982,073

14,280,281

15,708,309

17,279,140

19,007,054


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

37

LEFT: KAA afforestation programme at EIA 3 RIGHT: The passenger complex at EIA

EIA facts and figures AIRPORT IDENTIFICATION: HKEL, ELD

III Retail services

This includes duty-free shopping areas, shopping malls, email services and telecommunications.

IV Concessions

Scope for a range of businesses, including restaurants, warehousing, fuel supply, ground handling, taxi services and airline businesses. EIA currently has two cold stores of about 230 tonnes capacity. The airport is keen to encourage private developers to construct new cold storage facilities. One developer has shown interest and has been put in contact with the legal department.

V Banking facilities

There is adequate space for banks and ATM machines.

EIA environmental contribution EIA has maintained its leading position as an environmentally concerned organisation, not only in terms of the airport’s own working environment but also in regard to the surrounding area. EIA has planted well over 600 acres of eucalyptus trees with the capacity to absorb 1,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year and to positively affect rain distribution, thus helping the local people. Further plantations have included the Kitale and Eldoret airstrips. The local communities are proud of the airport because of its concern to maintain a clean environment. Thanks to the EIA initiative, this process is likely to be replicated at other airports.

LONGITUDE:

36°55.33’E

LATITUDE:

01°19.07’S

ELEVATION:

6,847.97 ft above sea level

RUNWAYS:

Two runways on one stretch

Designation 08/26

Runway is 3,500 metres long

LAND COVERAGE:

762 hectares

TAXIWAYS:

Taxiway system includes:

• Link taxiways, 23 metres wide, marked A and B

• Holding bays at western end of the runway. Holding 08

• Loop taxiways at northern threshold R/W26

PASSENGER APRON:

The passenger apron is made up of asphalt bays at the main gear positions of the aircraft. The surrounding area is also asphalt and the airside road in front of the terminal is concrete. Capacity of the current apron configuration:

• One wide-bodied (for example, Boeing 767)

• Three medium haul Airbus 300 aircraft

• Four light aircraft (Fokker 50, Dash 8)

TERMINAL BUILDING:

Terminal building has two areas:

• International departures and arrivals

• Domestic departures and arrivals

FACILITIES:

Administrative and technical area north of the terminal and freight to the south, including:

• Control tower

• VIP lounge

• Passenger apron / freighter

• Terminal building composed of departure unit, arrivals domestic and international

• Service building for power and water supply

• Police divisional office

• Staff canteen

• Workshops

• Water treatment plant

• Health centre

TOTAL PASSENGERS HANDLED SINCE AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION: Over 440,000 TOTAL CARGO HANDLED SINCE AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION:

Over 90 million tonnes


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38

Supporting tourism and aid efforts in the region

Wilson grows to be Africa’s busiest light aircraft airport

Amoas Chena Wilson Airport Manager

Nairobi’s Wilson Airport (WAP) is Africa’s busiest gateway for light aircraft as well as being Kenya’s first and oldest airport. The airport is in the southern suburbs, off Lang’ata Road, less than 10 km from the city centre. The Uhuru Monument, commemorating Kenya’s independence in 1963, is nearby. Wilson Airport is named in honour of Florrie Wilson, who in July 1929 formed Wilson Airways Ltd, operating from a former First World War airfield at Dagoretti Corner. This site was later abandoned in favour of the present location of Wilson Airport.

This new site, originally called Nairobi Aerodrome, had two murram runways, built by the Public Works Department in 1933. Imperial Airways commenced airmail services between Kisumu and Nairobi soon after. The aerodrome was renamed Wilson Airport in 1962 by the government as a tribute to Ms Wilson for her pioneering work in developing aviation in Kenya. This marked the first stage in the evolution of the present-day airport, which now serves private, chartered and scheduled international and domestic short-haul flights.

critical role WAP also plays a critical role in the development of Kenya’s tourism industry, with many domestic and charter flights to destinations across the country, including the seaside resorts of Mombasa, Diani, Malindi, Lamu and Manda islands. Flights to Kenya’s game parks and reserves such as Masai Mara, Amboseli, Samburu, Tsavo and Meru also use WAP. Each day, the airport handles 160 to 180 landings and takeoffs, rising to 200 at the peak of the tourism season. Tourism and charter flights are the airport’s main economic drivers, with business and relief flights following close behind.

WAP STATISTICS

<< ACTUAL

PROJECTED >>

ITEM

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

AIRCRAFT

Domestic

57,069

58,292

67,878

57,033

59,062

67,594

69,622

International

10,637

10,468

8,510

7,550

6,669

6,272

6,460

Total

67,706

68,760

76,388

64,583

65,731

73,866

76,082

PASSENGERS Domestic

217,630

258,112

293,027

220,407

211,779

224,643

235,875

International

28,170

37,980

39,726

18,469

16,192

17,666

18,549

Total

245,800

296,092

332,753

238,876

227,971

242,309

254,424

FREIGHT

Domestic

397,335

269,521

501,802

98,704

66,883

94,480

103,928

International

5,815,123

5,694,006

3,081,728

3,667,244

4,267,787

2,487,355

2,736,091

Total

6,212,458

5,963,527

3,583,530

3,765,948

4,334,670

2,581,835

2,840,019


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12

39

facts and figures AIRPORT IDENTIFICATION: HKNW (WLN) LONGITUDE:

1°19’16.578S

LATITUDE:

36°48’53.881E

ELEVATION:

5,536 ft

Transitional altitude: 220 0 Runway:

There are two runways running approximately at right angles:

• Runway 07/25 is 1,463 m by 24 m

• Runway 14/32 is 1,558 m by 24 m wide with displaced threshold giving a landing distance of 1,350 m

As well as serving the tourism sector, WAP has a thriving cargo business and is a logistics hub for local and international aid organisations, which own and charter small aircraft and helicopters for humanitarian missions across Kenya and in the Great Lakes Region. Aid organisations use the facility to airlift emergency food and medicine to remote locations.

Land coverage:

13.3 ha

Passenger apron:

Total of 0.84 ha of tarmacked apron

Facilities:

• Control tower

• Fire station

Services provided by KAA:

• Airport management and maintenance

• Airport security

• Fire, crash and rescue services

• Common-user engineering services, airfield lighting, roads, power, lighting, water and sewerage

gateway The airport is also a vital export gateway for the popular miraa (or khat) trade. Traders from Meru, where this mild stimulant herb is commercially grown, export their produce through the airport to markets in Somalia.

Regional air operations provided by other organisations:

• Flying doctor and air ambulance

• Missionary aviation

• Regional locust control

• Aerial crop spraying

• Aerial survey and mapping

Charter companies:

• Charter flights serving over 30 tour operators

• Passenger facilities, booking, ticketing, baggage weighing and handling

• Agents of private aircraft owners

• Freight flying

Aviation-related services:

• Flying schools

• Aircraft maintenance facilities

• Aircraft fuel supply

• Sales of aircraft

• Sales of aircraft radios and instruments

From a single airline several decades ago, WAP is now home to over 200 operators with more than 400 aircraft. Over the past three years, the airport has registered growth of between five and 10 per cent as a result of Kenya’s economic and tourism expansion.

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

71,710

73,862

76,078

78,360

80,711

83,132

85,626

88,195

90,841

6,654

6,854

7,059

7,271

7,489

7,714

7,945

8,184

8,429

78,364

80,715

83,137

85,631

88,200

90,846

93,571

96,378

99,270

247,669

260,052

273,055

286,708

301,043

316,095

331,900

348,495

365,920

19,477

20,451

21,473

22,547

23,674

24,858

26,101

27,406

28,776

267,146

280,503

294,528

309,255

324,717

340,953

358,001

375,901

394,696

114,321

125,753

138,328

152,161

167,377

184,115

202,526

222,779

245,057

3,009,700

3,310,670

3,641,736

4,005,910

4,406,501

4,847,151

5,331,866

5,865,053

6,451,558

3,124,020

3,436,422

3,780,065

4,158,071

4,573,878

5,031,266

5,534,393

6,087,832

6,696,615


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40

Malindi set to handle direct international flights

Walter Agong Airport Manager Malindi

Malindi Airport is less than 3 km south of the oceanside resort town of Malindi. The town is a former Arab settlement that once rivalled Mombasa City to the south. The Portuguese navigator, Vasco da Gama, visited Malindi in April 1498 in the course of trying to establish a sea route from Europe to India.

The hospitable role of Malindi has continued from the days when it hosted Portuguese seafarers in the 15th century through to modern times, when the first tourist hotel was built in the Swahili town. The Eden Roc Hotel opened in 1957 and is still in existence to this day. A small airstrip was built within the grounds of the hotel to receive international tourists.

The town still has a reputation for hospitality and is considered one of the top holiday destinations in Africa, while its beaches are among the best in the world. Little wonder that Malindi plays host to many local and foreign tourists seeking the ultimate in relaxation on the Kenyan coast.

arrivals

facts and figures Longitude:

31°32’3.679S

Latitude:

40°6’01.891E

Elevation:

22.25 m (73 F) / 29.5 C

Runway:

There are two runways:

• Primary runway is 1,402 metres long and 30 metres wide • Secondary runway is 1,128 metres long and 20 metres wide Magnetic variation:

171/351

Taxiways:

Secondary runway is linked with apron by one liaison taxiway 15 metres wide.

Apron:

Apron area is about 4,500 metres square and can accommodate two aircraft of F-50 type.

Navigational aids:

Airport has adequate navigational aids

Terminal building:

Passenger terminal is a single-storey building, 300 metres square, with three main parts:

• Terminal part consisting of a common arrival and departure hall including a bar, cafeteria, ticketing office, check-in weighing desk and embarkation lounge

• Office block for airport staff

• Private VIP lounge on apron side near a small garden.

Facilities and Services: • Airport is equipped with a synoptic meteorological station behind the fire station • Fuel farm at western side of apron has a storage capacity of 15 cubic metres of AV-GAS and 35 cubic metres of JET-A1 • Control tower and ATC block are west of the terminal. This is a two-storey building with a visual control room on the upper floor

As tourist arrivals into Malindi continued to grow, the then colonial government decided to relocate the airport to its current location on the southern outskirts of the town. Today, Malindi


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The town still has a reputation for hospitality and is considered one of the top holiday destinations in Africa Airport has been transformed into a vital engine for the local tourism-based economy, which is now booming.

management The Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) took over the management and running of Malindi Airport in 1992. But while the airport serves a huge number of foreign tourists, it does not handle direct international flights. They have to land first at Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport or Mombasa’s Moi International Airport for Customs clearance before they can proceed to Malindi as domestic flights.

However, because of the town’s growing importance as a tourist destination and the subsequent expansion of its economy, the KAA has already finished the conceptualisation of the upgrading of Malindi to an international airport under Kenya’s Vision 2030. This will mean that the airport will be in a position to handle direct international flights, especially charter flights from Europe, the starting point for most of Malindi’s holiday visitors. The completion of a new passenger terminal forms the central part of the upgrading work. ABOVE: Malindi is growing in importance as a tourist destination BELOW: KAA is looking to upgrade Malindi to an international airport capable of handling direct international flights


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Ready for international status

Kisumu Airport set for take-off with expansion of EAC

Joseph Okumu Airport Manager Kisumu Airport

On the banks of Lake Victoria, the world’s second-largest freshwater lake, Kisumu is Kenya’s most westerly and thirdlargest city. It has a central location in the expanded East African Community that includes Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi. Kisumu has good road and rail links with major towns and cities in Kenya and across the border into Uganda and Tanzania. It also has marine connections to major inland ports in Uganda and Tanzania. However, it is the development of an efficient aviation hub at Kisumu that has excited the region. Kisumu Airport, on the western outskirts of the city, is one of Kenya’s fastest-growing airports. Developed as one of the country’s first airports, Kisumu has witnessed continued growth in the past 10 years as the western region of Kenya continues to open up economically and the demand for efficient domestic air services goes on growing.

and the entire western region continues to grow, with local and regional airlines looking to start up or expand operations there. KAA has now completed rehabilitating and upgrading the existing facilities, including a modern passenger terminal that will help ease congestion during peak hours. Completion of the work wand the extension of the runway will now see Kisumu upgraded from a domestic to an international airport. Through this expansion programme, KAA aims to: • Sustain the airport’s traffic-handling capacity • Expand facilities to accommodate future growth in domestic, regional and international traffic • Expand facilities to accommodate international cargo traffic.

From its humble beginnings in the 1930s, when the city was served by seaplane flights taking off and landing on the nearby lake, Kisumu Airport has continued to grow in stature over the years.

The expansion of Kisumu Airport has been determined by a recent feasibility study by Netherlands Airport Consultants (NACO), which concluded that its existing facilities could accommodate only light aircraft operating in the domestic market and would struggle to handle medium-range passenger and freight aircraft serving regional and international markets.

In recent years the government, through the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA), has taken steps to rehabilitate and expand the airport, especially as demand for air travel to and from Kisumu

The study also noted that the airport lacked the infrastructure to allow leasing of land for development of aircraft maintenance hangars, freight-handling facilities and cold stores.

KISUMU AIRPORT STATISTICS

<< ACTUAL

PROJECTED >>

ITEM

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

AIRCRAFT

Domestic

3,504

3,331

6,463

6,888

5,850

6,821

7,026

International

198

160

190

130

61

170

175

Total

3,702

3,491

6,653

7,018

5,911

6,991

7,201

PASSENGERS Domestic

105,914

108,353

204,013

232,484

195,038

215,960

226,758

International

535

515

1,009

939

180

1,402

1,472

Transit

580

812

1,089

1,626

4,094

6,518

6,844

Total

107,029

109,680

206,111

235,049

199,312

223,880

235,074


• New Apron • New TW

LAKE VICTORIA

Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12 RA

Existing Kisumu Airport Layout

AY

43

Proposed Kisumu Airport Layout

ILW

&R

Cargo Development

OA

D

RW 2000 x 30mm

New TB

RW 3000 x 45mm

R&FF

New TW’s

TB TWR • 35.6 million US$ investment • Runway lengthened to 3000m • New Terminal Building • New Apron • New TW

LAKE VICTORIA

The conclusion was that the airport must expand to meet growing demand and facilitate easier movement of passengers, cargo and aircraft. Traffic forecasts indicated a need for larger passenger and cargo aircraft to operate to and from Kisumu, which must be upgraded and expanded to handle mediumand long-range aircraft. And with trade expected to grow as the East African Community expands, Kisumu could soon be handling cargo jets from the Middle East and Europe and, therefore, needed to be upgraded and expanded. Work completed at Kisumu Airport includes:

LAKE VICTORIA

It is believed that an expanded Kisumu Airport will help ease congestion at Jomo Kenyatta International (JKIA) and Wilson RA LW and from regional (WAP) as it will accommodate air traffic Ito AY &R OA Sudan, thus destinations such as the Great Lakes and Southern D enhancing city-to-city networks within the region. With the RW 2000 x 30mm completion of the new passenger terminal and the extension of the runway, the airport awaits an official opening. R&FF

facts and figures

TB TWR

Airport identification: HKK1 KIS

• Reconstruction of aircraft pavements

Longitude:

• Runway to be extended from 2,000 to 3,000 metres and widened from 30 to 45 metres to accommodate the B737 • New apron for three B737 stands or five F28 stands with provision for expansion • 3,500 square metres of parking for up to 130 cars • New airfield ground lighting including approach lights • New power substation, two guardhouses and a toll-booth.

2012

2013

2014

2015

7,236

7,453

7,677

7,907

180

186

191

197

7,417

7,639

7,868

8,104

238,096

250,001

262,501

275,626

1,546

1,623

1,704

1,789

7,186

7,545

7,923

8,319

246,828

259,169

272,128

285,734

34°43’44”E

Latitude:

00°05’10”S

Elevation:

3,796 ft above sea level

LAKE VICTORIA

Transitional altitude: 7,000 ft Runway:

2.1 km by 30 m

Magnetic variation:

Land coverage:

762 ha

Taxiways:

There are two taxiways:

• Eastern Taxiway measuring 370 m by 15 m • Western Taxiway measuring 400 m by 15 m

Apron:

Apron covers a total of 2.5 acres. There are four apron floodlights with lantern fitting which can illuminate the entire apron.

Perimeter area:

Total area of 864 acres of which 530 acres is within the perimeter fence. The government has set aside 333 acres for future expansion. However, this land has yet to be acquired by Kenya Airports Authority.

Facilities and services: • Navigational aid • VOR • DME/NDB • VDF • Airport landing facilities including runway edge lights, PAPI, apron lights, etc • Full control tower services • Fire and rescue services – Category 5 • Immigration services • Customs services • Port health services • Fuel services • First aid, ambulance and vaccination services • Catering services • Bars and restaurants • Courier services • Lounges – VIP lounge, departure lounge and arrival lounge • Mobile phone services


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Wajir military airbase adapts well to handling civil flights Located in Wajir County, in north-eastern Kenya, Wajir Airport began life as a military airbase, constructed by an Israeli company and completed in 1978.

represented at the airport. They include the KAA, the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA), Customs, Immigration, Port Health and the National Security Intelligence Service.

The airport is situated about 5 km east of Wajir Town. It remained a purely military facility until 7 September 2007 when it was commissioned by President Mwai Kibaki to handle passenger and cargo flights. Meanwhile, it continues to handle military jets.

Owing to its proximity to war-ravaged Somalia, the airport is currently handling both domestic and international flights. Flights to and from Somalia are required to land at Wajir for security screening before continuing to their final destinations. In this context, the airport is equipped to handle international and domestic, arriving and departing, passenger and cargo aircraft.

According to Kenya Airports Authority (KAA), the government has plans to transform Wajir into an international airport.

expansion Wajir Airport currently stands on 566.48 hectares. There are plans to acquire more land to bring the total airport area to 801.77 hectares. This will provide room for future expansion. The airport has a 2.8 km runway (designated 15/33) and eight taxiways (A to H). The longest taxiway is A (Alpha) which runs parallel to the runway and is of the same length. The airport is open daily for operations between 06.30 and 18.30 hours. Owing to loose chips on the runways, taxiways and apron, the airport is used only by propeller-driven aircraft. There is a terminal building which houses the arrival and departure lounges, check-in, screening and transit areas as well as an administration wing, a police station, and the Customs, Immigration and Port Health services. The control tower, crash gate and fire station are 50 metres south of the terminal building. The airport contains two military camps (one air force, one army) within its perimeter fence. The airport is entered via a single gate manned by armed military personnel to ensure a high standard of security. Wajir Airport employs about 100 workers. Most of these are with the police department, but several other agencies are

No passenger airline currently operates at Wajir Airport apart from Echo Flight, which calls twice a week to drop off or pick up special passengers, mostly NGO staff. The other flights are charter, cargo or military. The airport handles an average of seven flights a day, most of which are cargo.

facts and figures Airport Identification: HKWJ Longitude:

40°5’29.477E

Latitude:

1°43’59.93N

Elevation:

770 ft ASL

Transitional Altitude: 3,000 ft QNH Run Way and Apron: • The runway goes from north-west to south-east. It has eight taxiways and an apron with three parking areas. • Parking area No 1 can accommodate up to four Fokker 50s. Area No 2 can accommodate two Fokker 50s and area No 3 one Fokker 50 • Apron surface: Asphalt and concrete. Strength: PCN 5 OIF IB/W /T

• 2,800 metres long

Magnetic Variation:

1W

Taxiways:

25 metres wide

Facilities:

• 2,800 metre long by 30 metre wide runway (15/33)

• Parallel taxiway 2,800 metres long by 25 metres wide

• Apron with three parking areas

• Terminal building

• Control tower

• Fire station

• Police station

Services provided by KAA:

• Air navigational services • Airport lounges

Navigational aids:

• Aviation fuel uplifts (supplied in drums) • VOR/DME (WAV) • Radar station

• NDB (WA)


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Located in the north of the country, Lokichoggio Airport has grown in stature in recent years since it was established in the 1970s as an airstrip for Christian missionaries working in the remote and arid region of Turkana. This was a small facility until the civil war in Southern Sudan. As that conflict intensified, the airport saw an increase in air traffic. A tripartite agreement was signed between the Government of Kenya (GoK), the Sudanese People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) and the United Nations in 1989. This allowed UN aid agencies and non-government organisations to use Lokichoggio to bring relief supplies such as food and medicine into northern Kenya for the many Sudanese refugees who had fled the civil war. With the humanitarian situation in Southern Sudan worsening, the GoK expanded Lokichoggio to accommodate larger aircraft as the UN and other agencies launched Operation Lifeline Sudan (OLS).

comprehensive This situation continued until a comprehensive peace agreement (CPA) was reached, with Kenya’s help, between the northern Islamic government of Sudan and the SPLM. This brought an end to decades of civil war in the Christian south. Lokichoggio continued to serve northern Kenya as well as the now semi-autonomous region of Southern Sudan, where vital transport and communications infrastructure such as roads and airports had all been destroyed. At this stage, Lokichoggio Airport was not only receiving humanitarian charter flights from Nairobi but was also handling a growing number of scheduled cargo and passenger services because of its proximity to Southern Sudan. After the signing of the CPA between the SPLM and the Sudanese government, Juba International Airport opened in Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan. Since then, Lokichoggio Airport has seen a reduction in both passenger and cargo flights. However, even with peace in Southern Sudan, the airport continues to play a key humanitarian role because it is used by NGOs and other UN agencies to supply relief efforts in northern Kenya, especially at the Kakuma Refugee Camp.

Lokichoggio, the hub of humanitarian flights facts and figures Airport identification: HKLK Elevation:

2,100 ft / 640 metres above sea level

Average temperature: 31ºC Runway:

5,900 ft / 1800 metres by 65 ft / 20 metres

Runway position:

RWY 09ºN 04 12.25ºE 03420.39 RWY 27ºN 04 12.22ºE 03421.38

Hours of operations: 03.30 to 15.30 UTC Land area:

600 acres, with about 250 acres in use

Location:

370 nautical miles north-west of Nairobi and 214 km north-west of Lodwar Town, 24 km to border of South Sudan

Taxiways:

There are no designated taxiway systems in Lokichoggio. However, aircraft are guided to designated parking positions through radio control and physical marshalling

Aprons:

Apron surface both tarmacked and murramed. No marked apron bays. Area is divided into:

• Caravan ramp for general aviation

• Main apron for mainly WFP operations and medium aircraft

• Buffalo ramp and murram ramp

• Former ICRC ramp

• 748 ramp for private parking

Cargo facilities:

No cargo facilities at Loki. However, World Food Programme operates a large warehouse at the airport for storing relief supplies. Other small-scale cargo is handled by individual operators

Airport components: • Runway 1,800 metres long and 20 metres wide adjoined the aprons

• No runway lighting

• Runway has centre marking and threshold marking

• Aerodrome has no meteorological station

• Electricity supplied by two generators with capacity of 200 KVA each

• Terminal structure is temporary and movable

• AV Gas 100 on prior arrangement

• Control tower

• Police post

• Port Health services

• Immigration office

• Passenger canteens

• Customs office

• Jet A-1

Terminal building:

Terminal building is made up of temporary and movable structures

Services:

• Passenger facilitation and Co-ordination

• Air navigation services

• Duty-free shop

• Air charters

• Taxi services

• Aviation fuels

• Hotel booking

• Fire and rescue services

• Bar and restaurants

• Police service


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Ukunda set to handle regional flights

Mohamed Shiraj Ukunda Airstrip Manager Located in the heart of Kenya’s south coast beach resort area, Ukunda Airstrip plays a key role in linking this popular tourism centre – which includes the Diani stretch south of Mombasa – to other parts of the country, especially the major tourism circuits inland. From the airstrip, tourists can board flights from Diani to visit remote locations across the country, including major game parks and reserves in the coastal areas of Kenya such as the Tsavo East and West Game Reserves. Ukunda Airstrip also handles chartered flights from private airstrips across Kenya and acts as a feeder to other airports, especially Mombasa’s Moi International Airport and Nairobi’s Wilson Airport, as some tourists prefer to fly in and out of the south coast at either end of their vacation. This is the airstrip of choice for tourists and tour operators as it avoids travelling through central Mombasa City and delays at the Likoni Ferry that links Mombasa Island with mainland Likoni and the road to Diani. In addition to safari flights, the airstrip handles scheduled passenger services operated by AirKenya and Fly540 from Nairobi’s Wilson Airport to Ukunda Airstrip. As the tourism industry continues to grow, the government, through the KAA, is looking to expand the Ukunda Airstrip. This

As tourism numbers continue to climb facts and figures airstrip:

The airstrip is less than 1 km east of Ukunda Township and 30 km south of Mombasa. Access is via the A14 main road from Mombasa to Tanzania, by way of the Likoni Ferry.

Facilities:

The runway is 1,100 metres long and 20 metres wide and is linked to the apron by two short cross taxiways of 10 metres width. This Class 1B runway has an ICAO code and its magnetic orientation is 01/19.

The 5,000 square metre apron, located near runway threshold 01, can accommodate three DHC-6 aircraft at the same time.

Terminal facilities:

The airstrip service building covers 150 square metres and accommodates passenger documentation formalities and some offices.

Ukunda Airstrip has no air traffic control or navigational facilities. Potential:

The airstrip is important because it serves the south coast hotels. It has potential for growth, especially as the tourism industry continues to flourish.

expansion will embrace a number of infrastructure improvements. These include lengthening the runway to accommodate larger aircraft flying out of Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport. Customs and Immigration services will be provided at Ukunda Airstrip. Tourists staying on the south coast will be able to fly directly from Ukunda to other resorts in East Africa, including the Tanzanian capital, Dar es Salaam; the spice islands of Zanzibar and Arusha in northern Tanzania; and Mount Kilimanjaro.


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Mohamed Lipi Manda Airstrip Manager

Manda to get new terminal building Situated on Manda Island, at the northern edge of Kenya’s coastal strip, Manda Airstrip serves the mainly tourist destinations on that stretch of coast, most notably the historical Swahili town of Lamu. The airstrip was developed in 1962 and 1963 to serve the then colonial administration. Later, it was used by a group of white settlers for day trips to nearby Lamu Island, since there were no hotels on the island. As a result of the boom in Kenya’s tourism industry, the airstrip is now served by charter and scheduled passenger flights from various airports at the coast and from Nairobi’s Wilson Airport. Currently, the airstrip boasts a new passenger terminal, which has just been completed and awaits official opening. While Manda is used mainly by international visitors touring the Swahili settlements of Lamu, it is not classified as an international airport. For this reason, all international flights heading for Manda Airstrip must land first at Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport or Mombasa’s Moi International Airport for airport and Customs formalities before they can proceed to Manda as domestic flights. Manda is an unmanned airstrip, however, so that pilots must co-ordinate among themselves to make a safe landing there. Emergency arrangements can be put in place at short notice.

General operations The airstrip stands on 194 hectares, thus providing room for future expansion. This is important because of the intended construction of Kenya’s second deepwater seaport at Lamu. Manda is a Class III airstrip and has Category 5 fire cover. It operates between 06.00 and 18.00 hours. There are two runways. The main runway (16/34) is 1 km long by 15 metres wide with a bitumen surface, while the second runway has an overrun of 700 metres of compact murram. The main runway (PCN 8) can accommodate a range of aircraft including:

• • • •

ATR 42 Saab 340 Challenger II Twin Otter

• • • •

Dash 7 and Dash 8 Citation L-410 King Air.

The secondary runway (08/26) is 700 metres long and 15 metres wide. The surface of this runway is all compact murram and it is used mainly at certain times of the year, especially when there is a change in cross winds. Owing to its nature and length, the runway can accommodate only small, light aircraft.

facts and figures Airport identification: LAU Co-ordinates:

2°16’S, 40°55’E

Runway:

There are two runways (both serviceable):

• Main: 1 km bitumen and 600 metres compact murram • Secondary: 700 metres x 15 metres all compact murram Bearing:

• 10 ft ASL 16/34 (main)

• 08/26 (secondary)

Navigation aids and ATS:

None

Immigration services: None at airstrip, but can be arranged Frequency of aircraft movement:

Daily


Kenya Airports Authority (HQ) P0 Box 19001-00501, Nairobi, Kenya Tel: +254 (0)20 661 1000, 661 2000 Fax: +254 (0)20 822 078 Email: info@kenyaairports.co.ke Web: www.kenyaairports.co.ke


Kenya Airports Authority Handbook 2011-12