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Spring 2012

Magazine for Alumni & Friends of the University

The Wall That Heals Traveling Vietnam Wall Memorial Has an Emotional Visit to Campus

Global Education | Focus on Japan | Elite Eight Appearance | Dolny Stadium Dedication | Rick Fox Honored


A Message from the President Dear Alumni and Friends:

A Note from the Editor: As President Ball referenced in his letter, you might have noticed something a little different about this issue of Lander Magazine. It has been nearly a decade since Lander Magazine underwent a major design change, and the Office of University Relations is proud to unveil a fresh, new look for the publication. In addition to a new cover design, a more streamlined style has been introduced for several sections, including Class Notes, Alumni News and Events, and Commencement, among others. As you read through this issue, we hope you will enjoy the changes – big and small – that we have made. And, as always, we hope you will be impressed by the many great things that are happening right now at Lander University. It is truly an exciting time!

Megan Price – Editor

Lander University has demonstrated its commitment to global development and understanding through the education of its students. Several articles in this spring edition of Lander Magazine will reflect this commitment. Working in harmony with other countries of the world – in spite of the troubles, the violence and the terror – is imperative. And so, our people – the students, the faculty and the staff – have embarked on an expanded international initiative. This past year alone, we have: • Inaugurated a Focus on a Nation Week, with our first focus nation being Japan. We are currently in planning for next year’s Focus nation, Germany. • Increased our number of students studying abroad, including several students going to the Pacific Rim. • Signed 10 agreements with universities in China, South Korea and Thailand. These agreements enable student/faculty exchanges and other mutually beneficial projects. • Established an International Programs Office on our campus. In addition to the initiatives above, Lander will soon implement a new Honors College, with an international component required of all Honors College students. Please note that, as a gesture of appreciation and good will, Lander displayed the Vietnam Wall on our campus in September 2011, with several thousand visitors coming to witness and demonstrate respect for all of our veterans, who have sacrificed immensely in the hope of world development and peace. I know you will find this edition informative and enjoyable. Cordially,

On the Cover During the opening ceremonies for The Wall That Heals traveling Vietnam Memorial, the Emerald High School Junior Air Force ROTC Color Guard stands in front of the memorial and the university’s Laura Lander Hall. The September ceremony was part of a week of Lander and Greenwood community-sponsored events that drew attention to the memorial and to those who fought and died in the Vietnam War. – Cover photo by Russell Martin

Daniel W. Ball President P.S. We have redesigned Lander Magazine – we hope you like the new look!


Spring 2012

Magazine for Alumni & Friends of the University

LANDER MAGAZINE STAFF Megan Price, Editor Dave Lorenzatti, Writer Russell Martin, Writer Jeff Lagrone, Writer Maria Scott, Designer Kathy Goldsmith, Editorial Assistant David Hays, Sports Writer Bob Stoner, Sports Writer Jacob Lethco, Sports Writer Intern

LANDER ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Myra Greene Shaffer ’78, Director of Alumni Affairs Debbie Lyons Dill ’90, Assistant Director of Alumni Affairs Erin Knapp Layland ’00, President Frank Ridlehoover ’67, Vice President Peggy McClinton Makins ’81, Secretary Deloris Sims Carter ’92, Treasurer Beth Campbell Quick ’00, Vice President for Young Alumni

LANDER EXECUTIVE OFFICERS Daniel W. Ball, President Danny L. McKenzie, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Glenda E. Ridgely, Vice President for Business and Administration H. Randall Bouknight, Vice President for Student Affairs Ralph E.G. Patterson, Vice President for University Advancement J. Adam Taylor, Vice President for Governmental Relations Jefferson J. May, Athletics Director

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert A. Barber Jr. Ann B. Bowen Bobby M. Bowers Holly Bracknell Robert A. Brimmer Linda L. Dolny Catherine Lee Frederick Maurice Holloway, Vice Chair Raymond D. Hunt, Chair Ann Hurst Jack W. Lawrence, Secretary Donald H. Lloyd II John Nicholson Jr. Mamie W. Nicholson George R. Starnes Fred M. Thrailkill Jr. S. Anne Walker Stock art is provided by istockphoto.com.

It is the policy of Lander University to provide equal educational and employment opportunities to all present and future employees and students regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability. Lander University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

Features 16

Lander ‘Art Corner’ Debuts

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Getting A Global Education

Visual arts students have their sculptures on display in Uptown Greenwood

Lander’s largest group of students go abroad to spend a semester studying at foreign universities

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Focus On Japan

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Living in America

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Lander and Greenwood celebrate the history, culture and contributions of Japan

Lander’s British students adjust to life in the States

An Elite Feat 26 The Lady Bearcats make school history with NCAA

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Division II Elite Eight appearance

Play Ball 29 Lander dedicates Stephen B. Dolny Baseball Stadium Cover Story: The Wall That Heals 30 Traveling Vietnam Wall Memorial has an emotional

visit to campus

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Lander Science Lab Dedicated 41 Honoring Rick Fox’s three decades of service

The University in Review

2-4 5-6 7-12 13-15 17-19 26-29 32-35 36 37-40

Homecoming Alumni News Class Notes Commencement International Studies Bearcat Sports News Briefs Faculty Publications Scholarship News

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University Relations and Publications 864-388-8329 • www.lander.edu Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

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Let the Good Times Roll By Russell Martin

Students and alumni turn up the jazz, throw on their Mardi Gras feathers and beads, and “Laissez les Bons Temps Rouler” – or “Let the Good Times Roll” – for Lander’s Homecoming 2012. Open Division champions Top: Cheer and Dance Team members show off the masks they created as part of the Homecoming Carnival. Pictured, from left, are: Haley Wilson, Mia Greer, Katie Watson, Torah Speach, Tanya Hurt and Ashley Newman. The Cheer and Dance Team won overall in the Open Division for Homecoming 2012.

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1. Royal recognition During halftime of the basketball games on Saturday, Lander crowned a new Homecoming King and Queen: Rhett Sapough, of Clarkesville, Ga., left, and Torah Speach, of Greenwood, both business majors.

2. Celebrating by the grill Members of Phi Mu sorority show Homecoming spirit while tailgating before the Bearcats’ basketball face-off with the Francis Marion Patriots. Phi Mu took the overall win in the Greek Division for Homecoming 2012.

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012


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5. Field of fun From the three-legged race to the various relay challenges, Field Day is a fun part of Lander Homecoming each year. Pictured, Demore Canada represents the Rugby Team, which brought in firstplace honors for Field Day in the Open Division. – Photo by Melissa Spolarich

6. Jester in the box Zeta Tau Alpha member Ashleigh Tuten, center, dressed as a jester for the Homecoming Costume contest. She is pictured with her sorority sisters Paige Kight, left, and Shannon Cleary.

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3. Lander talent on display Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority perform during the Talent portion of Homecoming. The group took home first place for this event. – Photo by Melissa Spolarich

4. Spirit of the Blue Army Members of Phi Mu participate in Spirit Night in Horne Arena as part of the weeklong Greek and Open division Homecoming battle for bragging rights.

Members of Chi Alpha Omega and Chi Sigma pose with their soap box car after tying with Lander’s Cheer and Dance Team for first place in the annual race that has cars speeding down Willson Street.

8. Bonfire of the Bearcats At the end of a busy week of Homecoming activities, students enjoyed a cookout, live music and a bonfire. Pictured, members of Gamma Phi Beta sorority relax by the fire, which was located across from Lide Apartments. – Photo by Melissa Spolarich

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More Good Times at Homecoming 2012 On the green Top: The annual Homecoming golf tournament at the Greenwood Country Club was a huge success, with 50 golfers in attendance. Participants hit the green at noon and were finished in time to enjoy the Dolny Stadium dedication that evening. A team led by Joseph Cabri won the overall tournament, which was preceded by a putting match, won by Robin Scott, Class of 1979.

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9. Waking up to waffles Alumni, faculty and staff started off Homecoming Day with a waffle breakfast sponsored by the Young Alumni Council. The fundraiser took place on the bridge in the university’s Johnston Commons. The Young Alumni Association sold around 75 tickets; in all, over 100 waffles were enjoyed.

10. In the Fun Zone From the bouncy house and slide to face painting, more than 40 children and their parents enjoyed another Family Fun Zone for Homecoming 2012.

11. Bearcats vs. Patriots

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For the Homecoming game, Lander’s men’s and women’s basketball teams squared-off against the Patriots of Francis Marion University. The Lady Bearcats won with a 96-62 victory and the men’s basketball team staged a second-half comeback for an 83-71 win.

For more photos, as well as videos and news regarding this event, visit the website at www.lander.edu/features/homecoming.

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

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Alumni News

Honoring Their Efforts Alumni Association Singles Out Three Grads for Special Recognition By Dave Lorenzatti

Brig. Gen. Darlene M. Goff, the first female general officer in the history of the South Carolina Army National Guard; Amy Landers May, last year’s winner of the state’s Young Lawyer of the Year award; and Jeff May, whose name adorns Lander’s new sports complex, are winners of the Lander Alumni Association’s top awards for 2012. Goff received the Distinguished Alumni of the Year Award, given to graduates who gain distinction in their careers. She graduated from Lander with a sociology degree in 1978 and went on to obtain two master’s degrees. She enlisted in the Army National Guard in 1977 and completed officer’s training at Palmetto Military Academy in Columbia four years later. Over the next 29 years, she rose through the ranks, culminating with her promotion to brigadier general in December of 2010. Goff, SCARNG’s Assistant Adjutant General and Vice Chief of the Joint Staff, has earned an impressive array of military decorations for distinguished service. Married to retired Army Col. Eddie Goff, the Ninety Six native was the featured speaker at Lander’s commencement exercises last December and received an honorary Doctor of Science degree. She was stunned to be chosen Distinguished Alumna of the Year. “It’s an awesome acknowledgement,” she said. “I appreciate Lander for giving me what I needed to help me advance in my military career.” In 2011, Amy Landers May experienced a series of first-time events. Last spring she learned she was pregnant with twins and, the next day, the South Carolina Bar Association named her its Young Lawyer of the Year. On Oct. 25 her twin boys, Finnegan and Landon, were born. A few weeks later, she was chosen to receive the 2012 Young Alumni of the Year Award, recognizing alumni who have graduated within the last 15 years and serve their communities in exemplary ways. May received a political science degree from Lander in 1998 and a law degree from Mercer University in Georgia, fulfilling a lifelong goal. She said, “I knew in fifth grade that I wanted to be a lawyer.” In 2006, she joined Rogers Townsend & Thomas in Columbia where she is a shareholder specializing in estate planning, probate administration and elder law. She, her husband, Jon, and their twin boys live in Columbia. May was surprised to be chosen as Young Alumna of the Year, adding, “It’s nice to be recognized. I am proud to be a part of Lander.”

Pictured, from left, are: Myra Shaffer ’78, director of Lander Alumni Affairs; Amy Landers May ’98, Young Alumna of the Year; Jeff May ’73, The Grace IIer Norman Award recipient; Brig. Gen. Darlene M. Goff ’78, Distinguished Alumna of the Year; and Dr. Daniel Ball, president of Lander University.

The Grace Iler Norman Award went to Lander Athletic Director Jeff May for significant achievements within the alumni association and the university. In 2009, the Board of Trustees voted to name Lander’s new athletic facility on Montague Avenue “The Jeff May Complex,” honoring his many contributions to Lander as a student-athlete, administrator and athletic director. He was a standout basketball player and won several collegiate awards, including All-American honorable mention three times. The team’s most valuable player four years in a row, he is a member of Lander’s Athletics Hall of Fame. May received a health, physical education and recreation degree from Lander in 1973 and a master’s in administration and supervision at Clemson University. He worked as a teacher and administrator in Abbeville and McCormick county school districts and in 1976 Lander hired him as director of Student Activities and admissions counselor. Over the next 35 years, he served as dean of students, assistant to the president, vice president for University Advancement and executive director of The Lander Foundation, and assistant men’s basketball coach for eight years. In 1997, he was appointed athletic director after his former coach, mentor and friend Finis Horne retired. May said, “I am blessed to have received a number of honors and awards, but the Grace Iler Norman Award is special because of who it is named after and what it represents. Grace was a very special lady who was very helpful to me during my early days working in Alumni Affairs.” The awards were presented to May, Gen. Goff and Amy Landers May at the Alumni Association luncheon in April.

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Alumni Events

The Lander University Alumni Association kept busy in the fall with a great lineup of events that brought alumni and staff together for fun and fellowship. Among the gatherings was the annual Fall for Lander in Greenville, as well as Lander on the Road and Tower Club socials and young alumni events.

2. Food and fun

1. Falling for Lander

Students feeling anxious about December exams had the chance to melt away the stress with a waffle breakfast, courtesy of the Lander University Student Alumni Association and Waffle House.

Alumni ushered in the fall season with a successful Lander on the Road/Fall for Lander event at ’81 grad Mike Craig’s showroom, Venue4Design, in Greenville. Pictured at the event, from left, are Virginia Nell Ouzts Becknell ’88, Pam McLamb Freeman ’86 and Lynn Rushton Ouzts ’60.

In October, alumni gathered at Carolina Wings for a Tower Club-Columbia social and membership drive. Among those enjoying the festivities were, from left: Michael Goodwin ’01, Torri Toland ’00 and Joseph McEachern ’06.

3. Fighting stress with waffles

4. Living it up in the Lowcountry

In November, Charleston-area alumni and accepted students were treated to a delicious

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Lowcountry Boil at Bowens Island Restaurant. Pictured at the event are: Marty Craft Wilson ’73; Myra Greene Shaffer ’78, director of Alumni Affairs; Alan Wilson; and Robert Barber, Lander Trustee and owner of Bowens Island Restaurant.

5. North to Virginia

The Alumni Association headed north to Richmond, Va., for a special Lander on the Road event, where area alumni gathered for a social at The Water Grill. Pictured are, back row, from left: Myra Greene Shaffer ’78, Ronnie Evans ’89 and Charm Bullard ’03. Front row, from left: Sarah Smith Perkins ’48, Bethanie Constant ’02 and Chris Constant.

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A l u m n i Events Calendar 2012 Apr. 14 Campus Beautification Day Apr. 20-21 Alumni Weekend at Lander Apr. 28 Spring Commencement/Grad Greeters May 3-6 Lander on the Road - Savannah Alumni Getaway Weekend May 18 Lander on the Road - Myrtle Beach June 2 Greenville Drive Outing Aug. 23 Lander on the Road - Elberton, Ga. area Aug. 30 Lander on the Road - Winston-Salem/ Greensboro/Chapel Hill/Raleigh Sept. TBA Alumni Music Fest Oct. 4 Tower Club-Columbia Social Oct. 12 Lander on the Road - Upstate (Fall for Lander) Oct. 13 Alumni Board Meeting

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Dates/locations subject to change. For event details, visit www.lander.edu/alumni.

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Class Notes

Keaton-Lima ’70 Publishes War Is Not Just for Heroes U.S. Marine Corps combat correspondent Claude R. “Red” Canup wasn’t required to keep personal copies of the dispatches he sent out while covering the war in the Pacific, during World War II. He did so, however, and War Is Not Just for Heroes, edited by his daughter, 1970 Lander graduate Dr. Linda M. Canup Keaton-Lima, is the result. Following the publication of KeatonLima’s book in May, by the University of South Carolina Press, her father’s 398 dispatches will be given to the General Alfred M. Grey Research Center and Archives in the Library of the Marine Corps, in Quantico, Va. She said that “Claude R. ‘Red’ Canup’s will be the only combat correspondent’s collection, the only dispatches, housed there.” Canup, from Anderson, became one of the frontline journalists known as Denig’s Demons at the age of 33. Reporting from Yontan and Chimu airfields, Okinawa, Yokosuka naval base and elsewhere in Japan, he offered an engaging firsthand perspective on the war’s final years. Canup covered the famous giretsu attack on Yontan Airfield, Okinawa, interviewing two marines in the tower the night the

Japanese successfully landed suicide planes with suicide troops, on May 24, 1945. He interviewed pilots from the aircraft carrier Bunker Hill, including famous Marine ace Captain James Swett, who landed on Yontan because kamikazes had damaged their ship’s landing deck. Immediately after the war, Canup interviewed recently released prisoners of war aboard the hospital ship Benevolence, docked in Tokyo Bay. Keaton-Lima said that her father “never wrote about himself or his Marine Corps days after he was discharged.” She said she “was determined my father and other combat correspondents, along with the valuable service they provided Marine families and the American public, would be remembered.” She said the title for her book, which took three years to research and write, “was found penciled in my father’s notes and represented a belief he held.” Keaton-Lima, who graduated from Lander with a B.S. in business education and a minor in art, whose master’s, from Clemson, is in education, counseling and guidance services, and whose doctorate, also from Clemson, is in vocational technical education, remembered her experience at Lander as that of “a nontraditional student, graduating between the births of my two children. The 1970 Lander graduation picture appearing in my Abbeville hometown newspaper of the honor graduates that year pictured a very pregnant me, standing among other honor graduates, most over 10 years younger. I was the only ‘Mrs.’ pictured. My second daughter was born less than two months later.”

Curtis ’04 Leading Communications at Greater Columbia Chamber Since being tapped in 2011 as director of marketing and communications with the Greater Columbia (S.C.) Chamber of Commerce, Lander alumna Nicole Bucalo Curtis has been at the helm of the organization’s strategic communications and rebranding efforts. The Columbia Chamber is composed of more than 1,500 businesses, civic organizations, educational institutions and individuals in the Midlands area. “It has definitely been a busy year,” said Curtis, who graduated from Lander in 2004 with a degree in mass communication. One of her main goals in the process, she said, has been to build better awareness of what the Chamber is and what it can do for the community. “Rebranding is a huge step for a nonprofit, and it is a really exciting time from a professional standpoint. I feel extremely fortunate to be in this position right now.” A native of Columbia, Curtis is a seasoned communications executive with experience in brand management, corporate communications, media relations and crisis management. Prior to joining the Columbia

Chamber, she served as a senior account executive with a full-service advertising and branding firm in Raleigh, N.C., and has worked with national and international clients, including Butterball Turkey, Georgia-Pacific Professional and Johnson & Johnson, among others. An active member of the Raleigh community, Curtis was named one of the Top 10 Young Professionals Under 35 in the Triangle by Triangle Catalyst magazine. In addition to her new role at the Chamber, Curtis is also responsible for implementing the communications plan for the Navigating from Good to Great Foundation, an on-going community development and prosperity initiative from the Columbia Chamber. As a Lander student, Curtis said she stayed involved in and out of the classroom. She served as president of Phi Mu Fraternity, a member of the Lander Dance Company, as well as Miss Lander 2005, where she represented the university at Miss South Carolina. As an alumna, she is staying connected to her alma mater as a member of the Columbiaarea Tower Club where she serves as the club’s secretary. She said her experience at Lander was the foundation for a successful career. “I learned a lot about leadership and accountability,” she said. “I feel like I had an advantage with a mass communication degree because we got to dip our hands into a little bit of everything.”

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Class Notes

Class Notes are compiled by Debbie Dill, assistant director of Alumni Affairs. Please mail items for Class Notes to Alumni Affairs, CPO Box 6004, Lander University, 320 Stanley Ave., Greenwood, SC 29649 or e-mail items to ddill@lander.edu.

Steve Roberts ’84 received the prestigious 2011 Lakelands FCA Coach of the Year Award. Robin Conley Templeton ’86 received the Oct. 13 WYFF News Channel 4 Golden Apple Award. Glenn Breed ’88 was hired by Oconee County as their new assistant administrator. Pleshette Elmore ’90 was selected as the Innovative Educator of the Month by Cengage Learning. Barry J. Sullens ’90 was invited to join the School of Web initiative of the World Organization of Webmasters as a member of their national executive committee. Jodi Lynn Birdwell ’91 recently had her artwork, titled Love letter to Cy … and other notes, displayed at Illinois Wesleyan University in the Merwin and Wakeley Galleries. Leslie Whatley Bussey ’91 was named Teacher of the Year for Lake Murray Elementary School for 2011-12. Jeffrey S. Evans ’92 was named an associate with Adelberg, Rudow, Dorf & Hendler, LLC Law Firm. James “Jim” M. Manley Jr. ’93 was named shareholder with Elliott Davis, LLC accounting firm. Charles “Chuck” H. Stuart ’94 joined Harbor National Bank in Charleston as senior vice president of mortgage banking. D. Greg Voorhis ’95 was promoted to design team manager with Glen Raven Custom Fabrics. Greg has been with the company for 14 years. Merry Bagwell ’97 was promoted to vice president with Countybank. Merry is the information technology manager and has been with the bank 19 years. Jon H. Driggers ’98 is the associate dean for Campus Life and New Student Programs with Erskine College. Jeneen A. Webb ’98 is the new Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) instructor for Northside Elementary School in Greenwood. Elizabeth Wise Douglas ’00 was named the 2011-12 Teacher of the Year for Oakview Elementary School in Greenville. Dr. Antionette A. Bennett ’01 received her medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina and has joined Family Practice Associates of Holly Hill. Heather Jackson Thompson ’01 was hired by Fox Rehabilitation as a physical therapist. Wanda Anderson Robinson ’03 recently published a new children’s book titled It’s Time to Play. Ryan L. Peck ’06 is the new associate athletic director for Development at the University of Denver.

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

High ’70 Named SCAEA Outstanding Principal In the 12 years she has led O.P. Earle Elementary School as principal, Nita High, a member of Lander’s Class of 1970, has been an avid supporter of art education for the students in her Spartanburg District 1 school. This past fall, the South Carolina Art Education Association recognized High for her contributions by naming her its 2011 Outstanding Principal. High, who has more than 40 years of experience in education, has been principal at O.P. Earle since 2000. She has also served as assistant principal at the elementary school, as well as principal at Landrum Junior High School. She will retire at the end of the 2011-2012 school year. O.P. Earle principal Nita High ’70, According to the SCAEA, nominees for Outstanding center, is the SCAEA’s 2011 OutPrincipal must demonstrate a consistent commitment, both standing Principal. She is pictured philosophically and financially, to art programs at their here with students at her school. schools. This year, O.P. Earle launched Community Arts Photo courtesy of Dawn Lynch. Evenings, featuring workshops and receptions that coincide with local artists’ exhibits at the school. The project goal, according to a Spartanburg District 1 news release, was to create an environment in which the arts and academics could be combined, as well as to encourage students to be creators and supporters of the arts. The school also has plans to install an outdoor gallery in the near future. High, who was nominated for the award by fellow Lander alumna and O.P. Earle art teacher Cynthia Lea Broom Riddle, Class of ’82, said she was “extremely excited and very honored” to be recognized by the SCAEA, adding that the award also says a lot about the elementary school’s art program in general. “I’ve always said our art program at O.P. Earle is one of the best in the Southeast – not just the state, but the whole Southeast,” said High. “Much of that has to do with Cindy Riddle. She has enthusiasm for what she does, and she works hard to ensure our students’ work is displayed throughout the community.”

Join the Tower Club and Connect With Alumni in Your Area The first area Tower Club was formed in 2005 and is proudly named for the Tower of the former Old Main building, currently known as Laura Lander Hall. The Tower Clubs serve to build camaraderie among area alumni as well as current and future students. Lander now has Tower Clubs located in Charleston, Columbia, Greenwood and the Upstate. Annual membership dues of $25 support alumni projects and the Alumni Scholarship Fund. Meetings, projects and social events are planned throughout the year. For information on area clubs or to join the Tower Club, visit www.lander.edu/goto/towerclub, or contact Alumni Affairs director Myra Greene Shaffer at 864-388-8351 or mshaffer@lander.edu.


Class Notes

Rose ’95 Earns Accolades as Assistant Principal of the Year

Audrey Neal Thompson ’06 was named Ware Shoals School District 51 Teacher of the Year.

Lander Class of 1995 alumna Meredith Eaddy Rose, assistant principal of Jesse Boyd Elementary School in Spartanburg, has been named the 2012 Elementary Assistant Principal of the Year by the South Carolina Association of School Administrators (SCASA). The award was presented to Rose in November during a surprise announcement at her school. Pictured, from left, are: Russell W. Booker, Spartanburg School District 7 superintendent; Molly Spearman, SCASA Spartanburg School District 7 executive director; Meredith Eaddy Rose ’95, Jesse Boyd superintendent Russell Booker said Elementary School assistant principal; and Bob Grant, Jesse that Rose exemplifies all the qualiBoyd Elementary School principal. ties of an outstanding educator. “First and foremost, she is genuinely concerned for each of the students entrusted to her. Secondly, she is a gifted educator with a passion and enthusiasm for the profession. Finally, she has the character, conduct and commitment that is essential to be successful as an administrator,” he said, adding, “She is a true ambassador for the students and staff at Jesse Boyd.” Molly Spearman, executive director of the SCASA, called Rose “an outstanding ambassador for education in our state.” SCASA, the professional organization for school leaders in South Carolina, has more than 2,800 members and focuses on supporting school leaders in providing the best possible education for our state’s youth. (Information and photo provided by SCASA.)

Meagan Brown Kuhlman ’07 joined the SouthCon Building Group as their accounting and administrative manager.

Humphrey ’94 Pens First Novel

Joshua C. Croom ’04 and Rachel Bates Rowell, North Charleston, Dec. 10. Josh is employed by Rick Hendricks Toyota. They live in Charleston.

In the waning days of the Confederacy, President Jefferson Davis issued an order that the South’s gold reserve be moved to a new, safe location, to keep it from falling into Yankee hands. Instead, somewhere between Abbeville, S.C., and Washington, Ga., it disappeared. Lander graduate D.J. Humphrey imagines where the loot might have been stashed — and a death-defying quest that results in its recovery — in his first book, Jackson’s Raiders and the Lost Confederate Gold (CreateSpace 2011). Humphrey’s book, available in print and online versions through Amazon, is inspired by the fallout from the closing of Riegel Mills, in Ware Shoals, and set in Abbeville. It documents how seven young friends, through determination, courage, good luck and the help of a supernatural friend named Tommy Tyner, solve one of the great unsolved mysteries of history. Humphrey, who described himself as a “late bloomer of sorts,” enrolled at Lander as a 30-year-old nontraditional student in 1990. That he was able to graduate cum laude with a B.S. in elementary education, he said, “is a credit to Lander. This could not have been possible without Lander University’s being the great school that it is.”

F. Michael Seymour Jr. ’08 was promoted to banking center sales manager with Provident Community Bank. Andrea Susan Finley ’09 received her Master of Library and Information Science with an emphasis in School Library Media from the University of South Carolina. Cameron S. Dorn ’10 was hired by Health Wright Products Inc. as an account sales representative.

Weddings Richard Earl Loper ’87 and Alison Mundy Burns, Greenwood, Jan. 28. Richard is the internet sales manager for Ballentine Toyota. They live in Greenwood. Jon Hampton Driggers ’98 and Susan Kathleen Rountree ’99, Columbia, Dec. 17. Jon is associate dean for Campus Life and New Student Programs with Erskine College, and Susan is enrolled in graduate school at the University of South Carolina. They live in Lexington. Kacy Marie Culbertson ’99 and Mark Edward Munnerlyn, Greenwood. Oct. 8. Kacy works with Park Sterling Bank. They live in Greenwood. Carrie Young Place ’99 and Warren Blake Simpson, Belton, Dec. 17. Carrie is a sixth-grade teacher at Honea Path Middle School. They live in Honea Path.

Danny Lee McCormack ’06 and Leslie Elizabeth Hancock, Ninety Six, Nov. 12. Danny is the general manager of Zaxby’s in Greenwood. They live in Greenwood. Brittany Leighann Cann ’07 and William Robert Goforth ’09, Abbeville, Nov. 12. Brittany teaches at Woodfields Elementary, and Bill works with Prysmian Power Cables and Systems. They live in Greenwood. Sarah Ashley Crosby ’07 and Benjamin Wayne Dukes ’09, Hickory Tavern, Oct. 15. Ben is a sales and service specialist with Bank of America in Greenwood, and Sarah is an admissions counselor at Lander University. They live in Greenwood. Marissa Danielle Fatt ’08 and Justin Todd Gilbert ’08, Landrum, Nov. 5. They live in Anderson. Kerri Christin Lown ’08 and Clifton Bruce Donald, Due West, Aug. 27. Kerri works with the National Credit Union Administration. They live in Anderson. Jennifer Michelle McLester ’08 and Christopher C. Lynch, Hartsville, Aug. 20. Jennifer is a registered nurse with Carolinas Hospital System. They live in Florence.

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Class Notes

Ankoma D. Anderson Sr. ’09 and Vertoria Dalisha Lagroon ’09, Greenwood, June 11, 2011. They are the owners of Web Effectx, a local web design company for small businesses. They live in Anderson. Kendal Jane Boyter ’09 and Preston Denman Bethea ’10, Greer, Oct. 8. Preston is enrolled in the Graduate Program at North Greenville University, and Kendal works with Alpha Health & Rehab of Greer, LLC. They live in Greer. Sydney Alese Hale ’09 and Luke Mark Edwards, Anderson, Aug. 27. Sydney works with the Anderson County Assessor’s Office. They live in Anderson. William Cooper Simmons ’09 and Gayle Dian Grooms ’10, Greenwood, Sept. 17. William works with Republic Finance. Gayle was employed with Lander’s Academic Success Center. They live in Myrtle Beach. Courtney Michelle Christian ’10 and Timothy Dwayne Ginn, Greenwood, Sept. 17. Courtney is a registered nurse with Self Regional’s Progressive Care Unit. They live in Greenwood.

Births Brandon Pitts ’96 and Alisha Glymph Pitts ’97, Charlotte, N.C., a daughter, Lauryn Elise, April 20, 2011. Lauryn joins big brother Evan, 2. Markeisha Smith Ross ’96 and Persell Ross, Rock Hill, a daughter, Madelyn, March 10, 2011. Kyle Craigo ’00 and Tara Rushton Craigo ’01, Lexington, a son, Connor Patrick, Nov. 22. Kyle is an auditor with the Legislative Audit Council, and Tara is an accountant with Comporium. Cathy Bishop Dority ’02 and Joseph D. Dority ’03, Ware Shoals, a son, Benjamin Walters, Oct. 4. Joseph works for Merrywood Elementary, and Cathy is the office manager at Southern Cultured Marble. Benjamin joins big brother Jackson, 3. Robert Strickland ’02 and Angela Gilbert Strickland ’02, Irmo, a daughter, Vivienne Louise, Oct. 6. Rob works for First Citizens Bank, and Angela is an attorney with Bowman & Brooke. Vivie joins big brother Fin, 2.

Rice ’70 Honored for Her Love of Learning Eleanor Suggs Rice spent her adult life as a classroom teacher and school principal, and one of the schools where she had her greatest impact is now named in her honor. Rice, who received a degree in education from Lander in 1970, died in the summer of 2010 after a courageous battle with breast cancer. She was 61 years old. On Sept. 19, 2011, a dedication ceremony was held renaming the Oakland Elementary School in Greenwood the Eleanor S. Rice Elementary School. The event took place almost 23 years to the day after a gunman invaded the school and opened fire, killing two students, injuring six others and wounding two teachers. Rice was principal of the school at the time. Greenwood School District 50 officials say it was her strength and leadership that helped the school and its students, teachers and staff recover from the tragedy and get on with the business of education. During the renaming ceremony, Debrah Miller, chair of the District 50 Board of Trustees, said the school was being dedicated to Rice’s exemplary qualities of integrity, strength and her love of learning. Rice was principal of Oakland Elementary School when she retired in 2001 but she did not stay retired for long. That same year, she opened a new chapter in her career as an educator when she became principal of McCormick Elementary School in McCormick County, the position she held at the time of her death. In 2010, the McCormick County School District Board honored her by naming the McCormick Elementary School and Middle School media center the Eleanor S. Rice Media Center.

Lindsey Jones Stork ’04 and Bill Stork, Simpsonville, a daughter, Blythe Suzanne, June 20, 2011. Melissa Brounkowski Young ’04 and Steven Young, Greenwood, a daughter, Harper Price, Sept. 23. Melissa is a real estate agent with Associated Brokers Inc. Harper joins big sister Mary Claire, 3. Yolanda O. Washington ’05 and Sterling Smalls, Mauldin, a daughter, Brooklyn Nicole, Nov. 9. Yolanda is a sales manager with JCPenney. Kelly Garland Tillinghast ’08, Chesnee, a daughter, Lillian Catherine, Dec. 23. Evan Henderson ’09 and Tracey Henderson, Greenwood, a daughter, Zaylee James, Oct. 31. Zaylee joins big brother Zalin, 3. Evan is a transportation safety specialist for Helpe Inc. 10

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Class Notes

Bush ’79 ‘Loved Lander and Lander Basketball’ James Ricky Bush ’79 loved sports and had a special affection for officiating basketball and football games, something he did for most of his adult life. Bush died on Dec. 29, 2011, at age 56. As a tribute to his many years as a man behind the whistle, his family chose to have him buried wearing his referee’s uniform, like the uniforms he donned so many times to officiate countless high school basketball and football games. He was the manager of the men’s basketball team during his four years at Lander. Finis Horne, head coach at the time, recalled Bush as doing whatever needed to be done to help the team. He said Bush managed the team almost like it was a full-time job. “He was a loyal individual who loved Lander and Lander’s basketball program. He was a special individual.” Steve Grogan, Lander’s assistant athletic director and manager of the Jeff May Complex, described Bush as “a good guy.” Grogan, a 1980 Lander graduate, and Bush were among the students who shared a suite at the Brookside residence hall. Grogan said, “He always had a smile, he was always upbeat.” After graduating, Bush worked in the food industry at Lander, Wofford College and Wesley Commons. Most recently, he was a substitute teacher in the Edgefield County School District. Survivors include his wife, Doris; mother and stepfather, Daphne and Alvin Murrell; sons James Ricky Bush II and Jason Bush; brothers Tim and Woody Bush and Barry Jones; and sister, Bonnie Smith.

Patsy Payne ‘A Real People Person’ Lander mourns the loss of Patsy Charles Payne, who was a familiar face on the Lander campus where she was the director of the university’s Postal Center for nearly seven years. She died at home on Oct. 28, 2011, after a lengthy illness. She was 54 years old. Patsy was a native of Greenwood and a graduate of Piedmont Technical College and Advance Beauty College. For many years before joining the Lander staff, she was a nail technician and the owner of Nails, Etc., in Greenwood. She and her husband, Rick, also operated a framing shop in the same location. Patsy and Rick were married for 24 years. He described her as a real people person and said she loved working at Lander, especially her relationship with students. He said many students visited with her at home and stayed in touch with her after declining health forced her to retire in July of 2011. The Paynes spent a lot of time on the road, traveling extensively in South Carolina and to other parts of the country. They also raised horses, and Rick said Patsy enjoyed riding. She also spent a lot of time with their five grandchildren. In addition to her husband and grandchildren, her survivors include sons, Michael Collins, of Aurora, Ill., and Jamie Payne and Kenny Payne Jr., of Greenwood; her brother, James Charles and wife Cathy, of Greenwood; and her sister, Sara Peterson, of Bryson City, N.C.

In Memoriam Anne Macomson Rivers ’35, Chesterfield, Oct. 2. Anne was a retired teacher. Surviving are a daughter, and many nephews and nieces. Eula Caudle Bracknell ’37, Plum Branch, Nov. 1. Eula was an accomplished pianist and served as musician for Plum Branch Baptist Church, where she was a member. Surviving are a son, two daughters, seven grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and two sisters. Margaret Lawson Black ’38, Charleston, Feb. 5. Margaret was a retired elementary school teacher and a member of John Wesley United Methodist Church. Surviving are a son, a daughter, a grandson, four granddaughters and three great-grandchildren. Mildred Hughes Briganti ’38, Shallotte, N.C., Dec. 3. Mildred was a member of Morrisville Presbyterian Church. Surviving are two sons, a daughter and a sister. Frances Braselton Gregory ’39, Covington, Ga., Jan. 21. Frances taught home economics and was a member of Allen Memorial United Methodist Church. Surviving are a son, and several nephews and nieces. Belinda Sanders Pratt ’39, Lexington, Dec. 22. She was a retired teacher and was appointed the first reading resource teacher in South Carolina. Surviving are three sons, and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Annie Laurie Hammett Preston ’39, Greenville, Aug. 13. She was the youngest postmistress to serve at the Greenwood Post Office. She also served as a missionary to Brazil in the 1940s. Surviving are a son, three daughters, six grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren. Elizabeth Rast Giles ’40, Swansea, Oct. 7. Elizabeth was a member of Swansea United Methodist Church, where she taught Sunday school. Surviving are two daughters, six grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and three sisters. Sara Watkins Bull ’42, Holly Hill, Jan. 11. Sara was a Lander May Queen and taught in the Holly Hill School District. Surviving are two sons, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Harriotte Mae Guess Davis ’42, Florence, Aug. 28. She retired from teaching after 30 years and was a member of St. Paul United Methodist Church. Surviving are her husband, a son, a daughter, three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Etheleen Cassell Betts ’43, Fuquay-Varina, N.C., Nov. 24. She was a retired secretary and bookkeeper, and was the pianist for her church, Piney Grove Baptist. Surviving are three sons, seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Lila Gray Scurry Cauthen ’43, Summerville, Feb. 13. Lila had a passion for art and was the owner of The Country Mouse for 19 years. She was a charter member of the Charleston Artist Guild. Surviving are a daughter, a brother, a sister, and several nephews and nieces.

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Class Notes

Teresa Vanlandingham Nabers ’46, Alexandria, Va., Nov. 14. Teresa was originally from Camden and was retired from the IRS. Surviving are two sons and a grandson. Clelle Simmons Armstrong ’47, Pensacola, Fla., Sept. 10. She was a retired teacher. Surviving are two sons, a daughter, six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Submit an Item to Class Notes Please send your information on weddings, births, deaths, awards, promotions or other items of interest to: Office of Alumni Affairs, Lander University, 320 Stanley Avenue, Greenwood, SC 29649

Martha Ida Bryan ’49, Darlington, Aug. 14. She was a home economics teacher. Surviving is her sister.

You can also submit information by calling Debbie Dill at 864-388-8351 or by e-mailing ddill@lander.edu.

Martha Gravely “Mot” Willis ’50, Clemson, Aug. 18. She was an elementary school teacher and a member of Clemson United Methodist Church. Surviving are her husband, two sons, two daughters, nine grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren.

Jimmie Land Fowler ’76, Starr, Jan. 9. Jimmy was retired from the S.C. State Department of Education and was a member of Starr Baptist Church. Surviving are his wife, two daughters, four grandchildren and two brothers.

Catherine Harter McAllister ’52, Mount Carmel, Nov. 2. Catherine taught elementary school and helped build the family furniture store. Surviving are three sons, two daughters, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Cecil Carroll Covil ’58, Greenwood, Jan. 21. Cecil was the owner of Cecil Covil Plumbing, Electrical and HVAC, and a U.S. Navy Veteran. Surviving are his wife, four daughters, 10 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Doris Matthews Gattuso ’58, Charleston, Sept. 5. Doris was a schoolteacher for over 40 years. Surviving are a son, two brothers and three sisters. Henrietta Bowers ’65, Ninety Six, Dec. 30. Henrietta was an elementary school teacher and taught music. Surviving are many nephews and nieces. Pamela Overby Potter ’67, Moncks Corner, Oct. 31. She was a member of Moncks Corner United Methodist Church. Surviving are her husband, a son, a daughter and a sister. Allen M. Roy ’67, Summerville, Aug. 22. Allen was a human resource manager with Greenwood Mills. Surviving are his wife, three sons, a daughter and six grandchildren. Charles E. Todd ’69, Greenwood, Oct. 17. Charles was retired and was a member of Callie Self Memorial Baptist Church. Surviving are a son, two stepsons, a daughter, two stepdaughters, 18 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and four brothers. Bruce Brown Young ’71, McCormick, Jan. 15. He was a U.S. Army Veteran and the owner of Young’s Outdoor Supply. Surviving are two sons and four grandchildren. Rita Winecoff Jackson ’72, Ware Shoals, Oct. 18. Rita was a retired nurse with Self Regional Healthcare and a member of Ware Shoals First Presbyterian Church. Surviving are a daughter and a granddaughter. 12

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John Michael Gardner ’76, Greenwood, Aug. 30. He was a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church. Surviving are his wife, two sons, two grandchildren, father, brother and three sisters. Susan Marie Graydon ’77, Hickory Tavern, Jan. 9. Susan was a registered nurse with the VA Hospital in Augusta, Ga. Surviving are her mother, a sister, a nephew and a niece. Richard James Baldauf ’79, Columbia, Dec. 11. Richard was a U.S. Navy Veteran. He worked for Gov. Carroll Campbell and retired from the State Energy Office. Surviving are his wife, two daughters, five brothers and four sisters. Stacia Mae Hagen ’84, Abbeville, Oct. 22. She was retired from the S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, and she was a member of Main St. United Methodist Church. Surviving are her mother, a sister and many cousins. Chris A. Skrivan ’86, Columbia, Nov. 24. Chris was a regional area manager for Link Snacks. Surviving are his wife, two daughters, his mother and a brother. Stephen P. Kodman ’92, Lexington, Nov. 18. Stephen was an assistant solicitor for Aiken County and a member of Radius Church. Surviving are his wife, two sons, one brother and three sisters. Roger Richard Duncan ’93, Pickens, Dec. 15. Roger was a U.S. Army Veteran and a partner in Bradshaw, Gordon, Clinkscales Accounting Firm. Surviving are his wife, a son, a daughter, his mother and a brother. Matthew B. Milner ’93, Greenwood, Feb. 8. Surviving are his mother, two brothers, an uncle, two nephews and a niece. Jeri Nesbeth Roberts ’04, Arlington, Va., Oct. 1. Jeri was a crime analyst for the FBI and a member of Emerald Baptist Church. Surviving are her mother, her grandparents, an uncle, an aunt and several cousins.

Sympathy To Carolyn Hughes Murph ’40 on the passing of her sister, Mildred Hughes Briganti ’38, Dec. 3. Jo Ellen Roberts Johnson ’60 on the passing of her mother, Ellen Batson Roberts, Sept. 9. Jo Ann Miley Purkerson ’60 on the passing of her mother, Elma Grigsby Miley, Sept. 27. Marshall D. Faulkner ’72 on the passing of his wife, Bonnie Faulkner, Jan. 5. Myra Blum Rhodes ’73 on the passing of her daughter, Amy Norris Truelove, Feb. 13. Deborah Cox Gardner ’78 on the passing of her husband and Derek Michael Gardner ’03 on the passing of his father, John Michael Gardner ’76, Aug. 30. Claude C. Robinson ’79 and Nicole Doucette Robinson ’85 on the passing of their son, Zachary Robinson, Feb. 4. Betsy Shedd White ’81 and Sally Shedd Garner ’83 on the passing of their father, Willoughby B. Shedd, Oct. 18. Keith M. Polatty ’84 on the passing of his father, Joseph Mills Polatty, Dec. 2. Tina Haskin Bell ’89 on the passing of her mother, Emilie Foster Haskin, Sept. 24. Julie Reichardt Bailey ’97 on the passing of her husband, Tara Bailey Rice ’93 on the passing of her father, and Greg A. Rice ’98 on the passing of his father-in-law, Eddie Wayne Bailey, Oct. 31. Caroline Roberts Nave ’03 on the passing of her mother-in-law, Irene Estes Nave, Sept. 22. Madison Elizabeth Bull ’11 on the passing of her grandmother, Sara Watkins Bull ’42, Jan. 11.

Faculty/Staff Former accounting instructor Marion Gaines Saulsbury passed away Jan. 8. Marion taught at Lander from 1981 to 1987. Former Public Safety Officer Jeffrey Scott Woodhurst passed away Sept. 30. Sympathy to Lander President Dr. Daniel Ball on the passing of his mother, Anna May Valhovich Ball, Oct. 3. Sympathy to Mary McDaniel on the passing of her mother, Arline Jennings Wilkie, Sept. 25. Mary is director of Lander University Procurement and Retail Services. Sympathy to Margaret Pilgrim on the passing of her husband, Ronald D. Pilgrim, May 30, 2011. Margaret works in Lander Procurement Services. Sympathy to Cathy Roberts on the passing of her daughter, Jeri Nesbeth Roberts ’04, Oct. 1. Cathy works in Lander Information Technology Services.


A Token of Appreciation General Makes Commencement Extra Special For Two Lander Nursing Graduates By Dave Lorenzatti

Fall commencement had special meaning for Lander nursing students Capt. Thomas Funderburk and Staff Sgt. Matthew Scruggs. In addition to receiving their degrees from Lander’s William Preston Turner Department of Nursing, they also met face-to-face with Brig. Gen. Darlene M. Goff, of the South Carolina Army National Guard (SCARNG), who is also a Lander graduate. Goff, Funderburk and Scruggs spent a few minutes chatting before the graduation ceremonies began, and she presented them special coins commemorating her promotion to brigadier general in 2010. She is the first female general officer in SCARNG history and, as Assistant Adjutant General and Vice Chief of the Joint Staff, she is also the organization’s highest-ranking woman. Goff, who graduated from Lander in 1978 with a sociology degree, delivered the commencement address and received an honorary Doctor of Science degree. Funderburk, 50, a Greenwood native who now lives in Irmo, began his military career in 1979 as a U.S. Air Force security specialist. For nine years, he was a helicopter crew chief with the 151st Attack Aviation Battalion and served with that unit in Kosovo in 2003. Commissioned in the U.S. Army Reserve in 2006, he is assigned

to the 5010th Army Hospital at Ft. Gordon, in Augusta, Ga., and serves as maintenance officer for the Homeland Defense team. Funderburk completed Lander’s RN to BSN option, which enables registered nurses to receive a four-year nursing degree. He and his wife, Sharon, who celebrated their 13th wedding anniversary last year, have two children and two grandchildren. Funderburk has 24 years of military service and said he plans to stay in the Army until age 60 and beyond if he is eligible. Like Funderburk, Scruggs completed Lander’s RN to BSN option but, unlike his classmate, he elected to be discharged from the military in January. He is working full time at Abbeville Nursing Home and is also enrolled in an online program leading to a master’s degree in nursing. Scruggs is a veteran of two tours in Iraq. When he returned home from the second deployment in 2010, he experienced symptoms that military doctors diagnosed as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They prescribed medication and regular consultations with Veterans Administration health professionals to help keep his symptoms under control. Scruggs plans to write a book chronicling his PTSD experiences. The 35-year-old Hodges native and his wife, Ashley, have been married for more than four years. In 2005, Scruggs and his father, Sgt. 1st Class Frederick Scruggs, were members of the same S.C. Army National Guard unit and deployed to Iraq together. The elder Scruggs has since retired with nearly 40 years of military service. As for his meeting with Goff, Scruggs said, “I was honored and humbled to have had the opportunity to meet her. It is because of inspirational people and leaders such as the general that I was glad to have served in the National Guard and to be a Lander graduate.” Army Reservist Capt. Thomas Funderburk, left, and former S.C. Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Matthew Scruggs, right, met with Brig. Gen. Darlene M. Goff, Assistant Adjutant General of the SCARNG, prior to commencement ceremonies in December. She presented them special coins commemorating her promotion to brigadier general in 2010.

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C o m m e n c e ment Fall 2011

Protecting the Future Goff Encourages Grads to Face the Future Head-On By Russell Martin

Alum returns as honored guest Lander president Dr. Daniel Ball, left, welcomes commencement speaker and honorary Doctor of Science degree recipient Brig. Gen. Darlene M. Goff. A 1978 graduate, Goff is the highest-ranking female officer in the South Carolina Army National Guard.

Top of her class Christin Moss, of Williamston, finished at the top of her graduating class in December, qualifying her for Lander’s prestigious Thayer Award, presented on behalf of the family of Dr. Henry K. Thayer to the graduating senior achieving the highest scholastic average. A member, captain and eventual assistant coach of Lander’s women’s soccer team, Moss graduated with two degrees, a B.A. in Spanish and a B.S. in exercise science. Pictured at the award ceremony, from left, are: Dr. Leland Nielsen, assistant professor of physical education and exercise studies; Christin Moss; Chris Ayer, head women’s soccer coach; Carrie Lucas, instructor of physical education; and Dr. Judi Neufeld, dean of Lander’s College of Education.

The celebration begins Right: While surrounded by friends and family, Lander nursing graduates toss their caps in the air in celebration following the university’s fall commencement ceremony.

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As Brig. Gen. Darlene M. Goff began her address to 182 graduates at Lander’s fall commencement ceremony in December, she shared a line from the university’s mission statement, which reads, “Education is a liberating force which makes it possible for the individual to live a life of meaningful activity, of personal satisfaction, and of service to others.” “My education at Lander did this for me,” Goff added. A 1978 graduate, Goff continued, through tearful expression, with a sentiment that was likely racing through the minds of many graduates. She shared with the audience that her parents were able to fund her education despite having limited resources themselves, and that her time at Lander was “an amazing experience” that prepared her for the road ahead. “I thank my parents for their sacrifice and Lander for providing the unique combination of diverse faculty and personal attention that stimulates lifelong learning,” she added. Goff went on to describe the many obstacles new graduates will face. The topics ranged from national security to economic stability. She even reminded students of several environmental issues the world could face in the near future. Of the topics, Goff explained, “These are complex issues, caught in a global web, that require your attention sooner rather than later.” And of the solutions to the described issues, Goff simply added, “The good news is you. You have fresh minds born in a tech-savvy world, and you know more about the world than my generation when I graduated. You must take action to protect your future and the future of generations to come.” During the ceremonies, the university also conferred an honorary Doctor of Science degree on Goff, a Seneca native who is the highest-ranking female officer in the South Carolina Army National Guard.


Commencement Fa l l 2 0 11

1. MAT graduates Dr. Linda Neely, center, chair of the Department of Art and university coordinator of art education programs, congratulates Master of Art in Teaching graduates prior to the commencement ceremony.

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2. A sea of blue Commencement speaker Brig. Gen. Goff addresses the group of 182 graduates in Lander’s Finis Horne Arena, as the graduates’ friends and families, as well as university Board of Trustees members and faculty, filled the seats of the arena to watch the ceremony.

3. Waiting patiently

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Graduates try to contain their excitement as they wait in the gym for the start of the ceremony. Pictured, front row, from left, are: Danielle Nicole Hilton, of Columbia, psychology; and Aubrey Janell Kimzey, of Summerville, psychology. Back row, from left, are: Latrice Shantay Briggs, of Mayesville, psychology; and Jennifer Nicole Tumblin, of Laurens, psychology.

4. Thanking faculty Alexzandra Miller, right, of Woodruff, expresses her thanks to one of her faculty members, Dr. Meredith Uttley, following the ceremony. Miller graduated with a sociology degree.

5. Musical goodbyes 4

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Music graduate Tanisha Tolliver, center, is congratulated by Department of Music faculty members, from left, Dr. Robert Kelley and Dr. Robert Gardiner.

6. Making education possible After the commencement ceremony, graduates were met and congratulated by many of the loved ones who made their education at Lander a possibility. One such graduate, Heath Smith, center, of Williamston, mass communication and theatre, is pictured with his mom, Cheri Smith, left, and dad, Jerry Smith.

7. You made it 6

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Shante Kollock, left, of Bennettsville, sociology, is congratulated by her sister, Jennifer Kollock, following graduation.

8. Graduates walking Students no longer, graduates line up to exit Horne Arena following the ceremony.

9. A musician to the end Marshall Gagne, of Greenwood, joins the Lander Wind Ensemble for their graduation performance prior to receiving his diploma.

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Lander ‘Art Corner’ Makes Successful Debut By Jeff Lagrone

With the City of Greenwood less than a mile away, it’s not surprising that the work of Lander visual arts students has turned up in galleries, restaurants and other places of business all over town. Another spot where it can be seen is at the intersection of Maxwell Avenue and Edgefield Street, where a Lander “art corner” has been established, and where, since December, two painted steel sculptures, by recent graduate Anne McKinney and senior Amy Walde, have been on display. The art corner is the joint undertaking of assistant professor of art Jon Holloway,

who owns the lot, and assistant professor of art Doug McAbee, who teaches sculpture at Lander. McAbee said, “Jon and I had talked about the possibility of getting some public art in town. When he suggested that we use the sculptures to spruce up the corner lot, I jumped on the idea.” According to McAbee, who said he has received “a ton of positive feedback on the sculptures,” the inaugural exhibit will end soon, and another exhibit will take its place. “The new exhibit will be the result of my ‘anthropomorphic flower’ project,” he said, describing it as an assignment which will give his current students a chance “to learn

the ins and outs of public sculpture. They’ll design several ideas, choose their best concepts and turn in a public art proposal. Then they’ll spend a few weeks creating the sculptures.” McAbee hopes that Greenwood’s new “art corner” will continue to be well-received. “I’d like for this to be a continuing cooperation between the Uptown area and our visual arts students,” he said. Associate professor of art Dr. Linda Neely, who chairs Lander’s Visual Arts Department, called Lander “fortunate to have faculty with this kind of attitude.” She praised McAbee and Holloway for their efforts to “connect artists to the community.”

Left: Lander graduate Anne McKinney, left; assistant professor of art Jon Holloway; assistant professor of art Doug McAbee and senior art major Amy Walde pose with E.H.H. Walde said she named the sculpture after her recently deceased grandfather. Far left: The Canary, by Anne McKinney – Photo by Russell Martin

Below: Ali Hammond, a student in Doug McAbee’s advanced sculpture class, holds her “dandelion” sculpture, created in response to McAbee’s “anthropomorphic flower project.” Hammond also created a “tulip” sculpture, pictured, as part of the project. Both sculptures, and many more, will soon be on display at Lander’s new “art corner.” – Photo by Russell Martin

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International Stud i e s

Lander’s Asia Initiative A Study in International Cooperation

By Dave Lorenzatti

Lander’s year-old international program focusing on colleges and universities in the Pacific Rim region has many successes to its credit. The initiative is under the direction of Dr. Sung-Jae Park, dean of International Programs, assisted by Boyoung Roh, coordinator of International Programs. Jeff Constant ’93, former Student Activities director and before that an Admissions Office counselor, was named director of International Student and Scholar Services. Lander has signed agreements with 10 Asian schools, opening the door for students to study on each other’s campuses. Five are in South Korea: Dong-A University; the University of Incheon; Kwangwoon University; Pusan University of Foreign Studies; and Yeungnam University. Agreements are in place with four schools in China: Eastern China Normal University; Shanghai University Sydney School of Language and Commerce; Haikou College of Economics; and Shanghai Normal University. Last July, officials from Rajamangala University of Technology Phra Nakhon in Bangkok, Thailand, visited Lander to sign an agreement. Lander graduates Andrew Love and Waymon Cassell are teaching at Rajamangala. As a result of the signings, four Lander students participated in an international studies program in Korea. Nicole Richmond, a mass communication major from Columbia, became the first Lander student to receive a Korean government scholarship for a semester at the University of Incheon. Political science major Courtney Priester, of Saluda, has been approved for the same scholarship and will enroll at Incheon next fall. Sixteen Korean students from Incheon, Kwangwoon and Dong-A came to Lander for a semester or one full year of study. Ten students and faculty members will embark on an Asian Summer Study tour in April, and eight students and faculty will head for Thailand in May as leaders of a summer English camp. In June, 25 students from the University of Incheon will travel to Lander for a fiveweek American language and cultural institute. Lander has also hosted two visiting scholars from Shanghai Normal University to work in the office of Student Affairs. Xiaohong “Caddie” Chen completed a five-month internship in January and, in February, Wei “Ivy” Zhang arrived for an assignment through June. Park said the international program also assisted the UpstateSCAlliance and the Partnership Alliance of Greenwood arrange visits to South Korea and establish business links with Korean firms. Lander president Daniel Ball and Duangsuda Taechotirote, president of Rajamangala University of Technology Phra Nakhon in Thailand, sign a memorandum of agreement allowing students from both schools to study on each other’s campuses.

Lander student Nicole Richmond outside Jung Kwan Ru Hotel on Nami Island in Chuncheon, Korea.

Nicole Richmond

Back at Lander After a Semester in Korea Nicole Richmond, of Columbia, studied at the University of Incheon in Korea last fall, an experience she describes as “life-changing.” She is the first Lander student to be accepted for a semester at Incheon or any Korean school, and the first to receive a Korean government scholarship, which paid for her travel to and from Incheon, living expenses and other costs. She was the only foreign student in her classes and soon discovered that her classmates were very willing to help with schoolwork and familiarizing her with the campus. “For many of the Koreans, I was the first African-American they had ever met face-to-face. They were fascinated by how much we had in common despite our differences.” Three of the many friends Richmond made during her stay are among a group from Incheon who are studying at Lander this semester. One, Wanseo Gu, nicknamed Leo, was her university-assigned buddy at Incheon. She is talking up her experiences to Lander students who might be interested in studying in Korea. Among them is Courtney Priester, a junior political science major, who is scheduled to spend the fall semester at Incheon. Richmond said, “I’m so glad I had this opportunity, and I’d love to go back.”

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Study Abroad

Getting A Global Education By Dave Lorenzatti

Lander biology major Karen MacPherson takes time from her studies at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand to take part in a caving adventure at St. Benedict’s Caverns.

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012


Lander’s Largest Group of Students Spend Semester Abroad Thirteen Lander students are spending the Spring 2012 semester at colleges and universities in Spain, Argentina, Italy, England, Chile and New Zealand. Dr. DeWitt Stone Jr., director of the university’s Study Abroad Program, said this is the largest group of Lander students selected for a semester at international schools. Six students are at the University of Winchester in England: Tanisha Elder, a psychology major from Columbia; Kimberly Freeman, of North Charleston, mass communication; Colleen McGhee, of Greenwood, visual arts; Shawaunna Middleton, of Johns Island, accounting; Stephen Sanders, of Greenwood, English; and Tylan Stroud, of Blacksburg, graphic design. Stephen D’Amato, of Duncan, an exercise science major, is enrolled at the University of Tuscia in Viterbo, Italy. Kayla Anderson, of Bradley, and MacKenzie MacVittie, of Lugoff, are studying at Tandem International in Madrid. On her Facebook page, Anderson wrote, “School is amazing. I look forward to each day. Classes are small and teachers are always willing to help you.” MacVittie echoed Anderson, stating enthusiastically on her Facebook page, “It’s amazing here!” She added that she is looking forward to the time she has remaining in Madrid. Three other students with Spanish majors or minors are also in Lander’s spring Study Abroad class. Lauren Carroll, of Greenwood, is at the University of Sevilla in Seville, Spain; Kendall Couch, of

Tifton, Ga., is studying at the University of Belgrano in Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Megan McDonnough, of Rock Hill, is at the University of Vina Del Mar, in Chile. Biology major Karen MacPherson, of Simpsonville, is attending the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. The school is much larger than she is accustomed to. She writes, “The campus is confusing. It makes me miss my tiny campus back home.” She also tells of getting a firsthand look at the widespread damage caused by an earthquake that struck Christchurch a year ago. “I had heard of the earthquake but I don’t think I completely grasped the idea until seeing it.” Anderson, Carroll, Couch, Elder, MacVittie, McGhee, Middleton, Sanders and Stroud are in Lander’s Honors International Program. The spring Study Abroad contingent raises to 97 the number of Lander students selected for the program since 2005 when Stone became director. Of that total, 75 have spent a semester abroad, 17 attended summer sessions, and five completed their student teaching requirements in England through the University of Brighton. In all, 63 students were accepted for semesters at colleges and universities in England. The remainder attended schools in Spain, Germany, France, Scotland, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico and Japan. The credits they earn abroad apply toward their academic requirements at Lander. According to Stone’s latest count, 30 students have expressed interest in Study Abroad for the summer or fall semesters this year or spring of 2013.

Lander president Daniel Ball and vice president of Academic Affairs Danny McKenzie congratulate students selected for Study Abroad semesters this spring. From left: Kimberly Freeman, of North Charleston; Kayla Anderson, of Bradley; Lauren Carroll, of Greenwood; Ball; Colleen McGhee, of Greenwood, seated; Tylan Stroud, of Blacksburg; Kendall Couch, of Tifton, Ga.; Megan McDonnough, of Rock Hill; Stephen Sanders, of Greenwood; Karen MacPherson, of Simpsonville; Stephen D’Amato, of Duncan; Shawaunna Middleton, of Johns Island; McKenzie; and Tanisha Elder, of Columbia. Not pictured is MacKenzie MacVittie, of Lugoff.

Lander Study Abroad students MacKenzie MacVittie and Kayla Anderson visit a landmark in Toledo, Spain. From left: MacVittie; Maggie Swann, of Clark University in Massachusetts; and Anderson.

– Photo by Russell Martin Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

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Focus on Japan Celebrating the History, Culture and Contributions of Japan By Dave Lorenzatti and Russell Martin Photos by Russell Martin

Lander hosted a weeklong Focus on Japan celebration last September, showcasing many aspects of Japanese life, and plans are under way for Focus on Germany in October. Dr. Sung-Jae Park, dean of International Programs, said Focus on Japan was the first in a series of annual programs to bring students, scholars and educators from many areas together to learn more about each other’s culture. Takuji Hanatani, the Consul General of Japan in Atlanta, was the keynote speaker. The event included lectures, Japanese tea ceremonies, dance, martial arts and more.

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012


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Opening Ceremony 1. Dr. Sung-Jae Park, dean, International Programs, addressed the audience during the opening ceremony for Focus on Japan. At the ceremony, Greenwood Mayor Welborn Adams proclaimed Sept. 19-23, 2011, as Japan Week in Greenwood. 2. Shinji Kataoka, president, Fujifilm Manufacturing USA Inc., also addressed the crowd during the opening ceremony. Fujifilm co-sponsored Focus on Japan, along with Lander, the City of Greenwood and the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership.

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Art Exhibits 3. Edwin Symmes, right, and Dr. Linda Neely, chair, Department of Art, discuss artwork at the Shiro Kuma Collection exhibit in Lander’s Monsanto Gallery. The author of Netsuke: Japanese Life and Legend in Miniature, Symmes led a tour of the traveling exhibit. – Photo by Jeff Lagrone 4. The Arts Center of Greenwood hosted a Japanese cultural and historical exhibit and an exhibit titled Ink and Clay: An Exploration of the Floating World, pictured. – Photo by Dave Lorenzatti

5. Pictured is one of the many paintings exhibited in Lander’s Monsanto Gallery.

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– Photo by Jeff Lagrone

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Japanese Cuisine 8. Lander’s Dining Services also joined the Focus on Japan fun with a Japanese cuisine-themed lunch. Sushi was among the many offerings for the all-you-care-to-eat buffet.

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Fashion Show 6. Following the opening ceremony was a Japanese Fashion Show, during which Lander faculty and students, community members and event organizers modeled traditional Japanese fashions. 7. Pictured, Makenzie Porter, front, and Lucas Kirby were among several volunteer Fashion Show models from Scott’s American Martial Arts of Greenwood. Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

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FOCUS ON JAPAN

Tea Ceremonies

Lecture Series

Martial Arts Demonstration

12-13. Reiko Blackwell, a hostess with the Omote Senke Tea School, demonstrated a Japanese tea ceremony for an audience in the university’s Johnston Commons. A tea ceremony demonstration was also hosted by Certified Tea Master William Holt, who has performed over 50 tea ceremonies in Japan.

– Photo by Megan Price

17. Business executives discuss Japan after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Panel members were, from left, Clemson professor Yuji Kishimoto; H. Harry Watanabe, board member, JAASC, and member of the Alliance for Business Professional Services; Takuma Kondo, chair, Japan Affairs Committee of JAASC, and executive vice president, Associated Fuel Pump System Corp.; and Craig Lundgren, CPA, business development executive, Dixon Hughes Goodman. The panel also included Katsuhiko Ishikawa, not pictured, co-chair of the JAASC board of directors and president, JTEKT Automotive South Carolina Inc.

15-16. During Moon’s demonstrations, Greenwood community members, as well as Lander faculty, staff and students, received hands-on instruction in drawing beautiful lettering with calligraphy.

18. Lander associate professor of chemistry Dr. David Gardner discussed the recent nuclear crisis in Japan. Other lectures covered the topics of Japanese dance, music, philosophy and art.

– Photo 16 by Megan Price

Closing Ceremony

E. S. Moon’s Martial Arts Institute staged a board-breaking demonstration during the Focus on Japan Martial Arts event, which also included a Kyudo demonstration by Aaron Blackwell, 6th-degree black belt in Kyudo, as well as Judo and Aikido demonstrations.

1,000 Paper Cranes 9-10. Dr. Josie Ryan, assistant professor of mathematics, displayed 1,000 paper cranes that she folded personally. The cranes were exhibited in Lander’s Larry A. Jackson Library. – Photo 9 by Alex Mezei

Japanese Craft Making 11. The Greenwood County Library hosted several events for Focus on Japan, including a make-and-take session on Japanese crafts. Other events at the Uptown location included a screening of the film Hachi and a Japanese-themed story time. – Photo by Jeff Lagrone

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

Calligraphy 14. Japanese artist-in-residence Yoshiko Moon demonstrated her artwork during one of her two Calligraphy and Sumi-e: Ink and Brush Painting sessions.

19. The Honorable Takuji Hanatani, Consul General of Japan in Atlanta, delivered the keynote speech at the closing ceremony.


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For more photos, as well as videos and news regarding this event, visit the website at www.lander.edu/features/ focus-on-japan.

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Living in America By Jeff Lagrone Photos by Russell Martin

For Lander’s international students, the transition from their native cultures to the American way of life can sometimes take effort. Differences in language, manners, food, fashion and even holidays can lead to culture shock for some. Of the 68 international students studying at Lander this spring, it might be assumed that students from the United Kingdom would have the easiest time adjusting to life on this side of the pond. After all, the American and British people are longtime allies, have similar tastes when it comes to pop culture, and share a common language. Yet British students face an adjustment period, too. Chris Hobbs, a business management and marketing major from Yarm, in North Yorkshire, one of six players on the Lander men’s soccer team from Britain, sees some notable differences in

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

temperament between Americans and his own countrymen. “British people,” he said, “are a lot more reserved; Americans tend to be more emotional and passionate.” Echoing that sentiment was teammate Matthew Osmond, an exercise science major from Stockton-on-Tees, a market town in northeast England. “Back home, if you saw somebody in the street, you would just walk past them, but here, everybody greets you and asks how you are, which is very nice and actually took some getting used to.” Matthew Bell, an exercise science major from Middlesbrough, a large town on the River Tees, agreed with Osmond. “It was a big change to come here and see everybody chatting away as if they had known you for years!” To Osmond, “Americans seem a lot more relaxed than British people. They seem to not really have any worries and they live at a slower pace.” Lewis Blissett, a sociology and criminal justice major from Low


British students adjust to life in the States Fell, a suburb of Gateshead, identified One aspect of life in the states that the another trait of Americans. He said that students approve of wholeheartedly is Americans “will celebrate anything they the weather. Bell said, “The single best possibly can. If there’s an excuse for a day thing about living here is we see weather of celebration, you’ll do it!” besides wind and rain with clouds!” Hobbs believes that there are signifiOsmond remembered a December day cant differences, likewise, between what when he played tennis in shorts and the British and Americans find funny. In a T-shirt. “The next day I Skyped my his opinion, subtleties are more comical parents, and my mother was wrapped up to the British than they are to Americans. in a blanket, complaining about how cold “I don’t know how to explain it,” conit was.” curred Blissett. “Maybe we just have a dry When it comes to dining out, Greensense of humor.” wood offers some choices the students In British English, “fries” are “chips,” consider attractive. Osmond’s favorite “chips” are “crisps,” and “y’all” does not place to eat, he said, is Moe’s. “I get a exist. In general, however, the students ‘Joey Steak Burrito.’ It’s delicious, and have little trouble understanding what I also love the drink machine in there.” Matthew Bell and Lewis Blissett fight for possession Southerners say. “I grew up spending A special place in Blissett’s heart is of the ball during a recent practice session, as Scott Playle looks on. vacations in Florida,” said Scott Playle, reserved for hibachi chicken from Fuji, a business management whose white sauce, he said “is and marketing major from outrageously good.” Bell said, Dalgety Bay, a coastal town “When we go out as a team, in Fife, Scotland. “So I guess it’s usually to either Mig’s you can say I’m used to it.” or Chili’s, so there’s some Bell added, “It’s not difficult variety in what we can order. I to understand Americans; usually get some sort of pasta it’s difficult getting everyone dish.” to understand us. I think we The animal world is filled speak a lot quicker, with a lot with creatures that have more slang words, so we have adapted in all kinds of ways to be very clear when we talk to achieve a balance with to someone for the first time, their surroundings, and and they don’t know that we Bell has observed the same have an accent.” thing in humans. “I like how Matthew Atkinson, Chris Hobbs and friends enjoy a laugh during the ice cream Politically, Britain and British people become more social for international students, held last fall. America haven’t always been American around Americans, on the same page. While the and vice versa,” he said. “Our two allies are in broad agreement where foreign policy is concerned, friends back in England make a lot of fun when we say anything Matthew Atkinson, an exercise science major from Newton Aycliffe, American, especially words like ‘soccer.’ That’s the ultimate thing in County Durham, believes that there are some significant differnot to say back home!” ences, too. Playle noted the two countries’ different approaches to Hobbs, Osmond, Bell, Blissett, Atkinson and Playle spoke posihealth care. In general, said Hobbs, American policies tend to be tively about the experience of traveling abroad and expressed the more conservative than those of Britain. hope that their American classmates would do so, too. “Learn other people’s cultures,” urged Atkinson. “I have been fortunate to do so, and it was a big eye-opener for me.” Left: Lander’s British soccer players pause for a photo during a practice Although travel may be expensive, said Blissett, “It’s well worth it. at the Jeff May Complex. From left are Matthew Osmond, Chris Hobbs, You only live once!” Matthew Atkinson, Matthew Bell, Scott Playle and Lewis Blissett.

Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

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An Elite Feat B earcat Sports

Lady Bearcats Make Lander History with Elite Eight Appearance By David Hays, Photos by Bob Stoner

Finally, it was Lander’s turn to cut down the nets and board the plane to the NCAA Elite Eight. The Lady Bearcats basketball team had been close before, reaching the NCAA Division II Women’s National Tournament Sweet 16 in each of the previous two seasons. Two years ago, Finis Horne Arena was rocking as Lander hosted Tusculum College for a chance to reach the Elite Eight, to be played in St. Joseph, Mo. The Lady Bearcats built a 24-8 lead in front of a raucous crowd. But Tusculum made it close by halftime, pulled ahead late and held on. The Pioneers cut down the nets, signifying their claim to the Southeast Regional championship, on Lander’s home floor. The Lady Bearcats finished 27-4, the best in program history. But that loss would sting for a while. Last year, the Lady Bearcats were in the Sweet 16 again. They got off to a 23-0 start and were No. 1 in the nation for four weeks before losing – by one point – at second-ranked Clayton State in a February regular-season showdown. Lander returned to Clayton State for the Southeast Regional and met the No. 1 Lakers in the Sweet 16. Clayton pulled away from the Lady Bearcats, and would go on to win the national championship, with three lopsided victories in St. Joseph.

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Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

Lander finished with a school-record 29 wins against only four losses, with two of those defeats at the hands of the national champion. The Lady Bearcats were arguably the second-best team in the nation. But Lander went into the 2011-12 season without Division II National Player of the Year Shannon McKever, another starting post player Tasheba Butler, and reserve Katie Hupp. Also gone was a pair of standout guards in Nardia Robbins and Brianna Webb. But Brittni Johnson, Ciara Lyons, Jasmine Judge, Mukia Myrick, Kaylyn Small and Keondra Barnes were back for their fourth years, and they had plenty of experience under their belts. The Lady Bearcats struggled down the stretch, losing four out of their final eight games to enter the Southeast Regional at USC Aiken as a No. 4 seed. Precious Elkins had the game of her life with 29 points and 12 rebounds, leading Lander to a first-round win over fifth-seed Limestone. The next day, No. 3 seed Wingate upset second-seed Clayton State, and Lander would face top-seed Aiken, who beat the Lady Bearcats twice during the regular season and was undefeated at home. But Lander was eager for a third shot at Aiken, and they came up big. Down by 11 early in the second half, Lander took the lead for good on Judge’s 3-pointer with 1:28 left. Johnson sealed the victory with another 3-pointer. The Lady Bearcats were 61-55 winners and had a date with Wingate in the Sweet 16.


Bearcat Sports

Though they left San Antonio disappointed in the short term, the Coach Kevin Pederson says the Elite Eight in Division II compares team has much to be proud of over the long haul. The senior class had a to the Final Four in Division I. Once again, Lander was one victory shy career record of 100-27, including 7-4 in the NCAA Tournament. of laying claim to being one of the nation’s truly elite teams. “Coming into this season, we were aware The Lady Bearcats were not perfect that this team had the potential to leave against Wingate, but their efforts were Lander as the most successful team in the nothing short of heroic. Lander won a history of our women’s basketball program,” double overtime thriller, 72-67, behind Pederson said. “However, at no point were we Johnson’s 20 points and Small’s careerplanning on judging this season’s success by high 19 points and 22 rebounds. Johnson wins and losses. and Judge played the entire 50 minutes “From the beginning of the season there – 40 minutes of regulation and two fivewas one goal, and that was to win something minute overtimes. Small, battling through tangible. Last year, we had a school-record a late-season injury, played the most 29 wins, and a No. 1 national ranking, but minutes in her career. nothing to show for it in regards to champion Lander’s players were almost too tired ships,” he continued. to climb the ladder to cut down the nets. Pederson said the team talked about winBut they summoned the energy because ning a conference title, conference tournathey had finally reached the Elite Eight. ment championship and a region champion Five days later, they boarded a plane ship. “For this group of seniors, to get the one to San Antonio, Texas. Their hotel was thing that had eluded them for three years – a within walking distance of the Alamo. They led a pep rally at a local elementary region championship – that was the perfect closing chapter to a highly decorated career. school and toured the city’s famous River “Over the last five years, our team has Walk. claimed two Peach Belt Conference tourna Then it was game time, and the Lady ment championships, two regular-season Bearcats had an eight-point lead with Head coach Kevin Pederson cuts the net following conference titles, one division title and five seven-plus minutes left in the national the Lady Bearcats’ win over Wingate at the NCAA consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances, quarterfinals against Rollins College. But Division II Southeast Regional Championship game. including two Sweet 16s and one Elite 8.” they couldn’t seal the deal, losing 66-62.

Tolbert Voted PBC Player of the Year Lander’s Dwight Tolbert, a 6-foot-5-inch

wing from Tifton, Ga., became one of the Bearcats’ most decorated players after helping lead the men’s basketball team to a turnaround season in 2011-12. Tolbert, who led the PBC and was fifth nationally with 21.8 points per game, also grabbed 6.5 rebounds per outing and was voted the Peach Belt Conference Player of the Year, as the Bearcats posted an 18-9 overall Dwight Tolbert record and qualified for the PBC Tournament for the first time in three years. The Bearcats were 11-7 in conference play. Tolbert is the second Lander player to earn PBC Player of the Year honors, behind Marshall Dibble (1995-96). He ranked third in the PBC in 3-point field-goal percentage (.427) and was seventh in the NCAA in 3-pointers made per game (3.37). Tolbert had 18 games in which he scored 20 or more points, including

six with 30-plus points. Tolbert, who was named a third-team NCAA Division II All-American and the Daktronics Southeast Player of the Year, was also selected to play in the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) Reese’s Division II College All-Star game, played on March 23 at the Bank of Kentucky Center at North Kentucky University, in Highland Heights, Ky. Lander’s season ended with an 84-81 overtime loss to Columbus State in the PBC Tournament. In addition to Tolbert, juniors David Pruett, of Sugar Hill, Ga., and Corey Wright, of Harlem, N.Y., averaged 13.9 and 13.5 points, respectively, and senior Jermel Kennedy, of Malton, Ontario, added 10.9 points and a team-best 7.0 rebounds. Wright, who was also named to the All-PBC team, led the conference in assists per game (8.1) and ranked third in the country. Lander, which won nine of its first 11 games of the season, ended the season on a high note. The Bearcats triumphed in six of their last eight games, including victories over two of the PBC’s top teams, Augusta State (74-72) and UNC Pembroke (79-75). Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

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B earcat Sports

Nottingham Leads Lander Volleyball Lander’s volleyball team swept two of the

four regular-season tournaments it participated in during the 2011 season, finishing with a 13-19 overall record, and 3-11 in the Peach Belt Conference. Head coach Carla Decker, who amassed an overall 107-87 record in six years and was named PBC Coach of the Year in 2007, resigned this spring in order to relocate to another part of the country. Magi Nottingham At the Mount Olive Invitational, Lander defeated North Greenville (3-1), Fayetteville State (3-0), Elizabeth City State (3-0) and Mount Olive (3-0). In the Lander Crossover Tournament, the Bearcats defeated Augusta State (3-1), Coastal College of Georgia (3-0), St. Andrews (3-0) and Erskine (3-2). The eighth-seed Bearcats ended the season at the Peach Belt Conference Tournament, where they fell to top-seeded and nationally ranked Armstrong Atlantic, 3-0. Lander was led by senior Magi Nottingham, of Indianapolis, Ind., who had 886 attacks and 230 kills. Freshman Jessica Register, of Spartanburg, added 932 assists, while Madison Kubal, of Dacula, Ga., had 516 digs, and Lugoff-native Hannah Dederick had 197 kills and 53 total blocks. Kubal, a junior, ranked fourth in the PBC in digs with 516, and fifth in digs-per-set (4.69) and service aces-per-set (0.33). – By Jacob Lethco

Women’s Soccer Posts 13-Win Season Midway through overtime in the Peach Belt

Christina Barbour

Jamie Shaw

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Conference tournament semifinal match, the Lander women’s soccer team clung to hopes of appearing in its first-ever conference championship game with an NCAA tournament bid up for grabs. However, those hopes were put on hold as Armstrong Atlantic State University’s Nadima Skeff scored from 15 yards out, giving the Lady Pirates a 3-2 victory en route to the PBC championship title. The Lady Bearcats (13-5-1), who defeated Flagler, 1-0, in the quarterfinals, jumped out to a 2-0 lead against Armstrong, with senior Christina Barbour, of Mooresville, N.C., opening the scoring, and freshman Kimberly Kessler, of Moore, extending Lander’s lead with a shot from 10 yards out. Armstrong tied the score late in the first half and eventually won with Skeff ’s overtime goal.

Lander Magazine • Spring 2012

Lander’s 13-win season boosted head coach Chris Ayer’s overall record to 57-42-5. The Lady Bearcats were led by All-PBC selections Jamie and Danielle Shaw, sisters from Columbia, along with Barbour, and the trio was also named to the NSCAA All-Southeast Regional team. Jamie Shaw, a junior, ranked seventh in the PBC in goals scored (10), while Barbour was fourth in points scored (27) and ninth in goals scored (9). The defense, which posted a school-record 11 shutouts, was anchored by senior goalkeeper Chelsea Beetch, who tallied 64 saves, ranking eighth in the PBC. A native of Palmer, Alaska, Beetch posted a 13-4 record, including nine shutouts. Lander opened its season with wins over Wingate, Coker and Erskine before losing to Armstrong in double overtime, 3-2. They followed with a tie to Columbus State and shutout wins against North Greenville, Clayton State, Mars Hill, Georgia College, Flagler and Anderson, before losing to Montevallo, 2-1. The Lady Bearcats closed the regular season with losses to North Georgia and UNC Pembroke.

– By Jacob Lethco

Men’s Soccer Reaches PBC Quarterfinals The Lander men’s soccer team appeared in the NSCAA Top 25 on

two different occasions during the 2011 campaign, and was ranked as high as ninth, but injuries to key players led to a 2-1 quarterfinal-round exit to UNC Pembroke in the Peach Belt Conference tournament. The Bearcats finished the season 8-7-2 overall, and 5-2-1 in the PBC. In 27 years as Lander’s head coach, Van Taylor has an overall 360149-28 record, including five straight NCAA tournament appearances from 2005-2009. The Bearcats were led by All-PBC selection Clement Simonin. A Lorient, France, native, the freshman defender was also named to the NSCAA All-Southeast Region team. Brett Jankouskas, a Palmyra, Pa., native, had a solid season, with 10 goals and one assist for 21 points. Chris Hobbs, a PBC Player of the Week recipient, scored nine goals and added one assist for 19 points. Matthew Osmond, a freshman defender from Stocktonon-Tees, England, earned PBC Defender of the Week honors. Zach Acree, of Columbia, added four goals and five assists for 13 points. Goalkeeper Brett Jankouskas Scott Playle, of Fife, Scotland, posted a 5-5 record, with a 1.48 goals against average. Jankouskas finished the season ranked third in the PBC with 10 goals. Hobbs, from Cleveland, England, finished tied for fourth with nine goals. During the season, Lander upset No. 7 Clayton State, 1-0, and No. 10 Flagler, 2-1. – By Jacob Lethco


Play Ball: Lander Dedicates Dolny Stadium By Megan Price Photos by Randy Pace

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hose who knew Stephen B. Dolny could tell you that he loved Lander University and a great game of baseball. And now, his passion for both will be forever evident, following the university’s official opening and dedication in February of the Stephen B. Dolny Baseball Stadium. Through a generous contribution to her alma mater, Steve’s wife, Lander alumna Linda Latham Dolny ’69, former president of PML Associates Inc., secured naming rights to the stadium as a tribute to her husband, who died in 2007 following a battle with cancer. “Steve cared very much about Lander and he loved baseball,” said Linda, who currently serves on the university’s Board of Trustees. “The family thought that naming the baseball stadium in his memory would combine those passions in a way that honors his love for Greenwood, Lander and the game that gave him so much joy.” Hundreds of Lander fans, alumni, faculty, staff and students packed the 950-seat stadium, located in the university’s new Jeff May Complex, to celebrate the dedication and watch the inaugural game, versus Newberry College. Linda Dolny, along with members of her family, were special guests on the field for the ceremony, and she threw the game’s first pitch, along with Rusty Stroupe, coach of Lander’s first baseball program. “Today is truly a great day for the Lander family and the City of Greenwood, as we open this remarkable facility named for a great friend of this university and community, Mr. Stephen B. Dolny,” said Ray Hunt, chair of the Lander Board of Trustees. Lander Athletics director Jeff May said the stadium will “serve as a lasting tribute to a distinguished gentleman, an outstanding Green-

wood citizen and a great fan of Lander baseball.” Linda Latham Dolny Steve Dolny took on the role of senior associate with PML Associates following a 37-year career with General Electric Company, where he served as manager of the company’s corporate personnel relations organization. A sought-after consultant and speaker, he co-chaired the Greenwood Area Chamber of Commerce’s Bridges Leadership Program and held positions with the S.C. Educational Resources Foundation, the Children’s Center, the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Greenwood Community Theatre. At Lander, Dolny served on the board for The Lander Foundation and was a former member of the university’s Board of Visitors. “The legacy of Steve Dolny, with his love for baseball, Lander and Greenwood, lives on in this magnificent stadium,” said Lander president Daniel Ball. “For generations to come, the Lander University family and friends will enjoy the great game of baseball with much excitement generated in and through this venue. Lander and Greenwood thank Steve and Linda for making this dream a reality.” Lander Baseball coach Kermit Smith added, “It is an incredible honor to coach in such a beautiful facility, while we pay tribute to one of our greatest fans and supporters. The passion that Steve Dolny had for life, baseball and Lander will certainly be exemplified each time we take the field.” For more photos regarding this event, visit the website at www.lander.edu/Athletics.

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The Wall That Heals Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 6. The quiet of the Lander campus is interrupted by the rumble of dozens of motorcycles in a caravan escorting trucks carrying “The Wall That Heals,” a half-sized replica of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C. It would be erected in the grassy area opposite the Old Main Tower and, for four days, The Wall and a small museum was open to the public around the clock, drawing many hundreds of visitors each day. They came to view the 24 panels inscribed with the names of the more than 58,200 service men and women who died in the Vietnam War. Many veterans came to reminisce about their experiences in a long-ago war in a distant place, where they fought the enemy in the jungles, the highlands and on other fields of battle. They wore T-shirts, caps and other apparel proudly displaying the names and insignia of their military units. They shook hands, they embraced. They exchanged words of encouragement as they fought back tears or wept openly, remembering comrades-in-arms whose names are listed on The Wall. They were soldiers, Marines, airmen, sailors and coast guardsmen, many of them teenagers when they went to war, now in their 50s and 60s.

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An Emotional Visit to Lander By Dave Lorenzatti Photos by Russell Martin

Each day, visitors strolled along the 250-foot length of The Wall, stopping when they spotted the name of a loved one or a friend, pausing to touch the inscription, to say a prayer. Some left flowers, photos, small American flags and other memorabilia. At the exhibit’s opening ceremony, Lander president Dr. Daniel Ball said, “It was on college campuses across the nation that the majority of the protests of the Vietnam War were held. It is indeed fitting that today, at Lander, we pay tribute and give thanks to those who allowed us to protest, to those who gave us our freedom, to those who protected us and our nation, and to those who made the ultimate sacrifice.” It was at the suggestion of Carey Bolt Jr., veterans affairs officer for Greenwood and Laurens counties, that The Wall was put on display at Lander to coincide with the 10th anniversary of 9-11. Bolt made the arrangements with the support of Self Regional Healthcare in Greenwood and other organizations as sponsors. Anna Cuson, Self ’s senior internal auditor, worked with Bolt and organized activities to accompany the Lander exhibit, including a health fair and a Hall of Heroes ceremony honoring veterans and first responders. A photo gallery of The Wall That Heals at Lander is available at www.lander.edu/features/Vietnam-Memorial.


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1. Motorcycles lead the truck carrying the traveling memorial as it arrives at its location in front of Laura Lander Hall. The rally began in Greenville, where motorcycle clubs joined The Wall for the ride to Greenwood. 2. Carey Bolt Jr., center, veterans affairs officer for Greenwood and Laurens counties, talks with motorcycle club members and veterans after The Wall’s arrival on campus. 3. S.C. Senator Floyd Nicholson addresses the audience during The Wall that Heals opening ceremonies. The event kicked off several days of activities promoting The Wall’s visit to Greenwood. 4. Lander president Daniel Ball, escorted by members of a military honor

guard, places a wreath honoring those whose names are inscribed on The Wall That Heals. – Photo by Dave Lorenzatti 5. The Hall of Heroes celebration, honoring veterans, police, firefighters and other first responders, wrapped up The Wall’s display at Lander. In attendance were U.S. Congressman Jeff Duncan, center; Janice McCord, left, deputy district director for Duncan; and Adam Taylor, Lander vice president for Governmental Relations. – Photo by Megan Price 6. Hall of Heroes keynote speaker Maj. Gen. Robert Livingston Jr., Adjutant General for the S.C. National Guard, addresses the hundreds of people who filled Lander’s amphitheatre for the event, which coincided with the 10th anniversary of 9-11. – Photo by Megan Price

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News Briefs

The Equestrian Center Celebrates: A New Roof, Certifications and a Wedding

College of Education Creates a New Master’s Degree in Teaching and Learning

Lander’s Equestrian Center, on the grounds of Burton Center in Greenwood, is about to get a new look with the installation of a roof over the football field-sized main outdoor arena in May. Director Nancy Poston said a roof will allow the arena to be used in any kind of weather. She added that some of the Center’s therapeutic riding clients are sensitive to heat, and the roof will shield them from direct sunlight. It will also protect the arena from rainwater, which has to be pumped out, especially after prolonged rainstorms. There were several exciting events involving Lander equestrian program participants in 2011. The North American Riding for the Handicapped Association certified Poston and volunteers Mary Stoehr and Ginny Wagner as therapeutic riding instructors. They will assist therapeutic horsemanship coordinator Beth Wood teach riding skills to individuals with disabilities and enable the program to accept new clients. Five members of Lander’s Bearcat Therapeutic Riding Team competed in the Dream Riders Invitational in Lexington last fall, and they rode away with a total of eight ribbons. Lander’s Equestrian Team hosted its second annual Intercollegiate Horse Show Association event in November, placing second on day two of the competition. Ellison Poston, of Hodges, was the high point individual rider, with 233 points. Sidney Broussard, of Travelers Rest; Jordan Moureau, of Greenwood; and Whitney Malcolm, of Columbia, also won first place ribbons. New Year’s Eve was a special occasion for equestrian coach Mary Hughston as she became Mary Hughston-Weaver. She and Dr. Brian Weaver, an emergency room physician in Laurens, were married at First Baptist Church in Greenwood on Dec. 31.

A new master’s degree program in Lander’s College of Education began holding classes in January. The Master of Education in Teaching and Learning with Concentrations in Diverse Learners, Exercise and Sports Studies, and Instructional Technology replaces the Master of Education in Elementary Education, which had been phased out. Dr. Michael Murphy Dr. Michael Murphy, assistant professor of teacher education, said the new program responds to the national push for “21stcentury learning initiatives.” Dr. Dava O’Connor, Department of Teacher Education chair, said two years of research, investigation and planning by the department indicated a need for the program locally, statewide and beyond. Barbara Ervin, director of Graduate Dr. Dava O’Connor Programs, said, “We’re excited about the response to the program. January enrollment met our expectations and other potential students have expressed interest.” She added that the students currently enrolled are in education- and training-related occupations and classroom teachers. One track prepares certified teachers to provide multimedia-based learning that addresses diverse classroom populations. Barbara Ervin The second track is for nonteachers who are working or seeking jobs in businesses or institutions that use a broad range of technology for training, personal development and other work-related activities. Both tracks are designed to teach students how to use the best technology available to communicate with local, regional and global communities. Six public and private colleges and universities in South Carolina offer similar master’s programs, but Lander’s program is unique because of the dual track. The curriculum also combines traditional on-campus classroom sessions and online learning. O’Connor said the program also created a first-time master’s degree in Lander’s Department of Physical Education and Exercise Studies (PEES), which is part of the College of Education. She added, “It will take PEES to the next level and make graduates more marketable.” For more information about the program and eligibility requirements, call the Department of Teacher Education at 864-388-8628. Information is also available at www.lander.edu.

Members of Lander’s Bearcat Therapeutic Riding Team show off the eight ribbons they won in competition in Lexington in November. Front, from left: Taylor Hall, Sam Neighbors, Ashley Bond, John Mark McQuown and John Green. Hall, Neighbors, McQuown and Green are from Greenwood; Bond is from Abbeville. Behind them, volunteers Mary Lou Wilson and Albert Bull hold Lander horses Seminole and Jake, who rode in the competition.

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News Briefs

From the Outfield to Washington’s Inner Circle

All-Together Club Records Donated to Lander

Lander political science major Ryan McNulty is spending his spring semester as a strategic communications intern with The Heritage Foundation in the nation’s capital thanks to the Washington Semester Internship of the University of South Carolina Honors College. The internship, part of Lander’s Honors International Program, is a paid position Ryan McNulty and, in addition to a paycheck, McNulty earns course credits while getting an insider’s view of the federal bureaucracy. The Heritage Foundation is a think tank that creates and promotes conservative public policy. McNulty, a Jacksonville, Fla., native, is an outfielder on Lander’s baseball team. He applied for the internship after being sidelined by an injury. “The internship is going well and I’m excited to be part of the staff,” he said. “I am learning a lot about journalism, writing for a website and exploring new ways to reach out to people and spread a message.” He is the fifth of five Lander students who applied and were selected for Washington internships. The other four are: Jeremy Babb, of North Augusta; Andrew Willis, of Williston; and Ty Grogan and Conner Lewis, of Greenwood.

A missing chapter in Lander’s history can now be read, thanks to an unexpected gift received by the Larry A. Jackson Library. Library staff members were taken by surprise when they were approached by Jonathan Fowler, a former employee of Williamston Public Library and custodian of a treasure trove of documents. The documents tell the story of the All-Together Club, formed on Oct. 28, 1915, when three women’s groups — the Samuel Lander Lyceum Association, the Williamston Civic League and the Williamston School Improvement Society — became one. For some time, the Samuel Lander Lyceum Association had served as the alumnae association for Williamston Female College, from which Lander University evolved. The records of the All-Together Club were offered to Lander, according to Dr. David Mash, dean of Library Services, because it was “the only surviving institution with a substantial tie to that group.” The All-Together Club was established to stave off what was perceived as a declining interest in the groups of which it was composed, and it achieved its objective. Its members met for 46 years, sponsoring lectures on art, music and travel, working to improve the physical town of Williamston, taking part in the women’s suffrage movement, establishing the Samuel Lander Memorial Library for the Williamston Grade School in 1926, and participating in many other civic duties and functions.

“And the award goes to…” Paul Crutcher, Lander’s broadcast and emerging media specialist, was the recipient of the Second Annual Mary Frances Poole Alston Award in 2011. Crutcher is also the manager of XLR, Lander’s radio station and host of his own daily show on the station. South Carolina ETV personality Rowland P. Alston created the award to honor his grandmother, who graduated from Lander in 1914. To be considered, candidates must provide visibility for Lander throughout South Carolina, the nation and the world. President Daniel Ball noted that Crutcher and XLR meet the requirement since the station’s programming is broadcast on Live365, the Internet radio network, and has an expansive President Daniel Ball, right, presents the range of listeners. Alston Award to Paul Crutcher.

Sacay-Bagwell Wins SCTA Teaching Award Lander professor of theatre Monique Sacay-Bagwell has been named this year’s Outstanding Theatre Educator by the board of the South Carolina Theatre Association (SCTA). The award is given annually to the educator who has done the most to help theatre students in South Carolina. SacayBagwell’s competition included theatre teachers at schools like Clemson, Furman, USC Upstate, USC Aiken and Winthrop, host of the SCTA Secondary School Theatre College Auditions, where the award was conferred. During the 20 years that she has taught at Lander, Sacay-Bagwell’s directing and acting skills have often been recognized by groups outside the university, but never her teaching. She called the validation of her teaching prowess by the SCTA “a great honor.”

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News Briefs

S.C. Teaching Fellows Program Recognized For Its Impressive Achievements Lander is one of 11 state colleges and universities offering the South Carolina Teaching Fellows program, winner of the first Dick and Tunky Riley WhatWorksSC Award for highly effective initiatives to accomplish its mission of recruiting talented high school seniors into the teaching profession. A video produced by SCETV focusing on Lander’s program was a key part of the award competition entry submitted by The Center for Educator Recruitment Retention and Advancement (CERRA), which oversees the program. Dr. Lee Vartanian, assistant professor of teacher education and director of Lander’s Teaching Fellows program, said Lander has 33 Teaching Fellows and each receives an annual state scholarship of up to $6,000. In return, they agree to teach one year in South Carolina for every year they received scholarship assistance. Vartanian explained that Fellows complete the same teacher education courses as their classmates, but with additional requirements for 30 hours of service learning each semester. They help with classroom and other activities at local schools and serve on committees dealing with education reform and advocacy, and school and student partnerships. They also organize three assemblies for Teaching Fellows each semester. Vartanian said the program is unlike a regular classroom setting. “When I teach other classes, I’m in charge and control the narrative.” As director, he offers guidance and remains a presence, but he

New Leadership in Student Activities and Recreation Lander recently welcomed aboard two new directors in charge of helping students stay active and involved outside of the classroom. Shelby Dominick joined Lander in January as director of Student Activities, taking Shelby Dominick the reins from Jeff Constant, who last August was appointed director of Lander’s International Student and Scholar Services. Dominick served as director of Dual Enrollment at Piedmont Technical College, where she had also worked as an academic advisement coordinator and enrollment adviser. She earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and early childhood education from the College of Charleston and received a master’s degree in college student affairs administration from the University of Georgia. Prior to Piedmont Tech, Dominick worked as a career development specialist with Oglethorpe University in Georgia. She has 34

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Dr. Lee Vartanian, right, assistant professor of education and director of Lander’s Teaching Fellows program, meets with elementary education major Alison Haynes, of Ninety Six, one of 33 Teaching Fellows in Lander’s Department of Teacher Education.

allows Fellows to take the initiative and ownership of the program. “I’m a facilitator rather than a ‘sage on stage,’” he added. The program is designed to develop qualities that will make the students better teachers and better leaders. Vartanian said it is an investment in quality education and has had “incredible success” retaining teachers. According to CERRA, between 2000 and 2006, the state program graduated more than 900 Teaching Fellows, a 75 percent completion rate. It said while 261 graduates have satisfied the requirement of teaching one year for each year they received scholarships, 220 of them are still teaching in South Carolina.

also served as a kindergarten teacher at Springfield Elementary in Greenwood. Campus Recreation and Intramurals also began the spring semester under new leadership. Trent M. Kline comes to Lander from Ohio State University’s Department of Recreational Sports, where he had served as a competitive sports graduate administrative associate, as well as coordinator for the university’s Jesse Owens Recreational Center and satellite recreation facilities. Kline received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from Ohio State. In addition to his roles at that university, he served for several years as work crew chief with the Special Olympics Ohio State Summer Games. Randy Bouknight, vice president for Student Affairs, said, “Shelby and Trent have excellent academic and professional backgrounds in the areas of student activities and campus recreation. They both will have a positive impact on the student experience at Lander.” Trent M. Kline


News Briefs

Staff Honored for Excellence Lander president Dr. Daniel Ball announced the recipients of the university’s 12th annual Staff Excellence Awards in February: Linda Kidd, Lander administrative assistant for the Office of University Advancement; and Frank Sells, Lander’s superintendent of grounds maintenance. Special recognition was also given to Perfecta Thompson for her 25 years of service through the university’s Dining Services and Aramark. The awards are presented annually to staff members who show outstanding dedication to their work and exemplify the family spirit at Lander, and recipients are nominated by fellow colleagues. Kidd has been with Lander nine years. One nominator described her by saying, “Her outstanding customer service for students, faculty, staff and alumni is second to none.” Sells, who has been at Lander for six years, was described as “always looking for ways to make our campus look even better.” Of Thompson, Ball said, “She has catered every event that involved a university president since Dr. Larry Jackson. Every year, returning students stop by to say hi to her.”

Pictured, from left, are: Frank Sells, Lander’s superintendent of grounds maintenance; Linda Kidd, Lander administrative assistant for the Office of University Advancement; Perfecta Thompson, of Lander Dining Services; and Lander president Dr. Daniel Ball.

Simmons Crowned Miss Lander 2012 Talent, beauty and grace were abundant at the annual “Miss Lander University” pageant, held in January in Lander’s Josephine B. Abney Cultural Center Auditorium. Seven students took to the stage to compete for the crown, and this year’s pageant incorporated elements of Mardi Gras, drawing on the theme of Lander’s 2012 Homecoming festivities. Contestants were judged on their performance in an interview session and competitions in talent, business/casual wear and formal wear. Capturing the 2012 title was sophomore Chelsey Carolyn Simmons, a nursing major from Greenwood. Sponsored by Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, she performed a jazz routine to Michael Jackson’s hit song, The Way You Make Me Feel, as her talent. Junior exercise science major Tyler Jordan Rogers, of Moore, was named first-runner-up. Sponsored by Minorities on the Move, Rogers performed a clogging routine to Get Me Bodied by Beyonce. Her performance earned her the pageant’s Talent Award, and she was also a co-recipient of the pageant’s Miss Congeniality award. Second-runner-up was Miyarae LeiChelle Payton, a freshman mass communication major from Abbeville. For talent, Payton gave a performance of Hands by Sarah Kay. She was sponsored by Lander alumni Mike and Rozalynn Goodwin. Also competing were: Brittany Tierra Rogers, a senior health care management major from Union, co-recipient of the Miss Congeniality award, sponsored by Williamston Residence Hall Building 5; Kymberlee Renee Byrd, a junior health care management major

Pictured, from left, are: Miyarae LeiChelle Payton, second-runner-up; Chelsey Carolyn Simmons, Miss Lander University 2012; and Tyler Jordan Rogers, first-runner-up.

from Chapin, recipient of the People’s Choice award, sponsored by Lander’s Academic Success Center; Rayshawn Jermeiss Trapp, a junior early childhood education/elementary education major from Blair, sponsored by the Lander University Presidential Ambassadors; and Kaitlin Paige Stowe, of Gaston, a freshman majoring in mass communication, sponsored by Brookside Residence Hall Building 2. The Miss Lander University 2012 pageant was presented by the National Association for Music Education.

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Faculty Get Published Each year, members of the Lander faculty write books, book chapters and articles, and they present research and exhibit their artwork across the United States and abroad. They accomplish these tasks while also spending a large portion of their time sculpting young minds in and out of the classroom. This section highlights several recent books by Lander faculty. For information on other faculty accomplishments and publications, visit www.lander.edu/goto/faculty. Decision-Making in the Absence of Certainty: A Study in the Context of Technology and the Construction of the 21st Century Academic Library By Dr. David Mash Published by Association of College & Research Libraries Decision-Making in the Absence of Certainty is an in-depth study of the often surprising decision-making process at five American universities that built new libraries at the dawn of the 21st century. Their collective decision to invest many millions of dollars in technology and physical space is a testament to their perceptive commitment to a vision that the very best for students and faculty is a library where both technology and the physical space are well-designed. Readers will gain personal and professional insights that expand to any setting where high-stakes decision-making is combined with ambiguity and complexity.

The Involvement of State Governments in US Foreign Relations By Dr. Samuel Lucas McMillan Published by Palgrave Macmillan Offering conclusions for improving intergovernmental relations, determining international economic development strategies, and showing how many subnational governments are involved in world politics, McMillan’s book examines how U.S. states and governors connect to American foreign relations, tracing activities that began in the 1950s and have expanded with globalization. Chapters explain governors’ foreign relations activities in political, economic and defense contexts and how U.S. states compete in the global economy. The book analyzes U.S. states’ abilities to attract foreign investment and promote exports, making use of statistical analysis and personal interviews with state officials in the United States and those posted abroad.

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Carme Riera: Mujer moderna, feminist, detectivesca e imaginative By Dr. Osvaldo Parrilla Published by Alexandria Library, Miami In his second book, Parrilla provides a collection of critical essays submitted by Spanish colleagues who are fascinated by Carme Riera’s writing style. The participants in this project touch on different themes present in the work of Carme Riera, such as the development of the role of modern female characters; the mixture of reality and unreality; the question of a character in one of Riera’s novels being a feminist or a lesbian; and the detective metaphysics in another novel.

Environmental Evasion: The Literary, Critical, and Cultural Politics of “Nature’s Nation” By Dr. Lloyd Willis Published by State University of New York Press How do we reconcile the abstract reverence for the natural world central to American literary history, beginning with Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Nature, with more than a century and a half of widespread environmental destruction? Environmental Evasion examines the environmental implications of literary and cultural productions by writers from James Fenimore Cooper and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow to Willa Cather, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway and Zora Neale Hurston. Willis provocatively argues that the environmentalist outlooks of Cooper and Longfellow were eclipsed by Emerson’s abstract, imperialist vision of nature. He demonstrates how many 20th-century American writers have taken the Emersonian approach, participating in a silent but powerful form of evasive environmental politics in the ways in which they write about the natural world.

An Introduction to Physical Science By Dr. Jerry Wilson, co-author Published by Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning In its 13th edition, An Introduction to Physics presents a survey of the physical sciences – physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology and geology – for nonscience majors. Wilson has been working on the textbook since 1968, when he was a graduate student at Ohio University. Since then he has written or updated every section of the book at one time or another. Wilson’s co-authors are James T. Shipman and Charles A. Higgins Jr.


S c holarship News

Make a Difference, Leave a Legacy

Your Gift Matters! Lander University has many different students from many different backgrounds, but one thing that ties us all together is the campus atmosphere. All gifts to Lander make a difference, and we rely on our alumni, parents and friends to help ensure this unique Lander University experience continues. You can choose the areas you are passionate about; your gift could go toward scholarships for deserving students, support for faculty, or even providing assistance for academic, cultural and athletic endeavors. Think $25 or $50 can’t make a difference? Think again. This year we are encouraging you to make the difference by supporting Lander University through a gift to the Lander Loyalty Fund. The Lander Loyalty Fund seeks to build strong relationships with Lander alumni, parents and friends, encouraging their support of Lander and educating them about the importance of annual giving. It is that support that helps sustain Lander’s tradition of and commitment to excellence in learning. Through the end of this fiscal year ( June 30, 2012), we will recognize all gifts to the Lander Loyalty Fund of $50 or more by placing your name on a donor recognition wall. Gifts may be made in honor or memory of special people in your lives. We have selected the Jeff May Complex as the location for the donor recognition wall. In the decades to come, thousands of Bearcat fans and visitors will see the wall as they attend baseball, softball, soccer, tennis, or other athletic or cultural events at the state-of-the-art complex. The donor wall will be a place of pride – where alumni and friends will see their names and donors will feel great about being recognized for their generosity. While we ask for your support, we also thank those who have contributed to Lander. Your support is the reason we can celebrate so many wonderful achievements by Lander students and faculty. By making a gift to the Lander Loyalty Fund, you are doing much more than just donating a few dollars. You are making a difference! Ralph Patterson Vice President for University Advancement and Executive Director for The Lander Foundation 864-388-8350 rpatterson@lander.edu

Give to the Lander Loyalty Fund this fiscal year and see YOUR NAME HERE on the Loyalty Fund Donor Wall.

Give to the Lander Loyalty Fund this fiscal year and see YOUR NAME HERE on the Loyalty Fund Donor Wall.

Give to the Bearcat Club this fiscal year and see YOUR NAME HERE.

Give to the Bearcat Club this fiscal year and see YOUR NAME HERE.

Lander Loyalty Fund Donor Wall at the Jeff May Complex How Can You Make A Difference? To celebrate the opening of the new Jeff May Complex, any Lander alumni or friends who make a gift of $50 or more this fiscal year (July 1, 2011 - June 30, 2012) will have their names placed on a permanent donor wall at the Jeff May Complex, courtesy of The Lander Foundation. Lander alumni – your friends – will see your name on the donor wall and know that you have made a difference at Lander. Your gift may go to help with scholarships, academic programs, the Jeff May Complex, the Equestrian Center or the Bearcat Club, or it may be unrestricted.

How do I give? Simply mail your gift payment information to The Lander Foundation using the provided envelope, or you may give online. You may also set up a monthly draft from your credit card or checking account, or even include Lander in your will or estate planning. All contributions are tax-deductible. For details about giving, contact Ralph Patterson at The Lander Foundation at 864-388-8350.

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S c h olarship News

‘Boe’ Liked What He Heard About Lander added, “I hope we will get him to visit Lander so he can see firsthand that we are thankful for his generosity, and that we are worthy of his support. But mostly, I couldn’t be prouder of Boe. He has a huge heart, and he is giving some of his heart to us. For me, that’s as good as it gets.” Dr. Doug Grider, dean of the College of Business and Public Affairs, said, “It is this type of support that enables the College to continue to offer educational opportunities to quality students who likely will go on to successful careers in business and return the favor to others in the future. We consider this gift from an outstanding entrepreneur to be a leveraging gift for the future, and we are especially grateful for this meaningful show of support for Lander and the College of Business.” Boedecker’s philanthropic endeavors began when he went into business for himself at age 23, giving away leftover food to the needy from restaurants he owned or managed. He founded The Boedecker Foundation in 2009. Its mission is to “provide critical resources to nonprofit organizations that inspire positive change within diverse communities around the world.” It believes the importance of education in today’s global economy is at a critical stage. The organization said education provides individuals with a solid platform in order to seek better opportunities and significantly contribute to the success and growth of their communities. More than 50 nonprofits have received financial assistance from Boedecker’s multimillion dollar foundation. Its three major recipients are: The Q Fund, which supports a school in Zambia, Africa, offering education to impoverished children from preschool through 9th grade; Youth Opportunities Inc., in LaPaz, Mexico, a nonprofit organization operating a community center improving the quality of life for over 4,000 underserved children and their families; and grants that support The Family Learning Center in Boulder, Colo., which offers educational opportunities to entire families in need by instilling educational values, self-reliance and community involvement. At age 50, Boedecker is retired but has a number of pursuits, in addition to the foundation, that keep him busy. One of them is his position as volunteer assistant basketball coach at Ft. Lewis College, a Division II school in Durango, Colo. The head coach is Bob Hofman, his former high school coach and mentor. Boedecker’s three grown children, Brianna, Sophia and Barron, have followed his example George Boedecker, center, hands out pencils at the Chimoza Community School in Zambia, operand are involved in charitable activities. He ated by The Q Fund with support from The Boedecker Foundation. – Photo by Kevin Kew said, “I gave them the spirit of giving.” George Boedecker Jr., the founder and creative force behind the Crocs footwear company, also founded and chairs a philanthropic organization in his name whose impact is felt in many parts of the U.S. and around the world. Education is its primary focus. Boedecker was recently made aware of Lander and, because he liked what he was told about the university, he has established two endowed scholarships that will be awarded annually. The scholarships, funded by The Boedecker Foundation in Boulder, Colo., will be awarded to one female and one male varsity athlete who are majoring in business. “Boe,” as he is known to his friends and business associates, said he was not familiar with Lander but he has been friends for many years with Ralph Patterson, Lander’s vice president for University Advancement. Patterson was Boedecker’s junior varsity basketball coach at Fairview High School in Boulder, where Patterson grew up. Boedecker left home when he was 15 years old. He said, “Ralph and others were charitable to me after I left home.” He added, “Ralph’s a good man and his passion about the decisive impact higher education can have on young adults at Lander is impressive.” Patterson said, “When I think of Boe, I think of a friend who has done more wonderful things for other people than anyone else I know. Boe has truly made a difference for many, many people.” He

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Scholarship News

The Eula Caudle Bracknell Scholarship

The family of Eula Caudle Bracknell ’37 has established a scholarship in her memory that will be awarded to two Lander students each semester. Bracknell, who was born in Anderson and raised in McCormick, died last November at the age of 94. She graduated from Lander with a degree in piano. For more than seven decades, she pursued a love of music that she acquired while in the third grade when she began taking piano lessons. For most of her life, she was the pianist at Plum Branch Baptist Church in Plum Branch, where she accompanied her husband of 63 years, soloist Bill Bracknell. She wanted to retire after 50 years, but the congregation was reluctant to let her step down, so she continued to play at services for another 19 years. In addition to her music, she was active in civic affairs as president of the McCormick County Council of Farm Women, a founding member of the McCormick Garden Club and a member of the McCormick Arts Council at the Keturah (MACK). She was also a hospital volunteer and president of the PTA. She is survived by her children: Louise Bracknell, of Plum Branch; Judith Workman, of Spartanburg; John Bracknell and wife Holly, a member of Lander’s Board of Trustees, of Greenwood; seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Ralph Patterson, vice president of University Advancement, thanked the Bracknell family for creating a scholarship as a lasting tribute to her memory.

Scholarship Honors a Spirit of Selflessness

Lander student Ty Grogan said his father, James, was “a pretty selfless guy who liked to help those in need.” James Grogan, a welder with a Greenwood sign company and an avid hunter, died last July at the age of 50 after battling cancer. His family decided to honor his generosity by establishing the James Mickey Grogan Scholarship in his memory. James Grogan Ty Grogan said the scholarship will be awarded to a first-generation Lander college student majoring in political science who needs financial assistance. Grogan, a senior, is also a political science major. The elder Grogan would be pleased to know that the first recipient of the scholarship in his name is Lander sophomore Kierra Brown, of North Charleston, who is very grateful for the award. Brown, a political science major, said she has not received much financial aid and works as a part-time store clerk to help pay her college expenses. She said the Grogan scholarship will allow her to reduce the number of hours she works and spend more time on her studies. “Lander is thankful for this special gift that recognizes Mr. Grogan for all of his good works,” said Ralph Patterson, vice president for University Advancement. Kierra Brown

Your Gift Matters!

Scholarship Options: Endowed vs. Funded

Information on contributing to or establishing a scholarship is available by contacting Lander’s Office of University Advancement at 864-388-8350.

What is an Endowed Scholarship? A minimum gift of $10,000 is required to endow a scholarship at Lander University. The “corpus” is invested and a portion of the interest earned each year is awarded to a student recipient in the form of a scholarship. Thus, the endowed gift remains part of The Lander Foundation’s endowment in perpetuity.

Give online at www.lander.edu/loyaltyfund New endeavors at Lander University are transforming our campus and expanding academic and athletic opportunities for our students. With numerous giving and naming opportunities available, you can be a part of this exciting transformation. Visit www.lander.edu/loyaltyfund to give or get additional information.

A Funded Scholarship may be established with any gift amount. If a donor would like to give, as an example, $500 each year, the gift of $500 will be awarded to a student recipient in the form of a scholarship. To continue the scholarship, the donor will need to “fund” the scholarship each year.

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S c h olarship News

The Sylvia Brooks Grubb Scholarship One of Lander’s “flagship departments” recently became the beneficiary of a new endowed scholarship, the Sylvia Brooks Grubb Nursing Scholarship. Grubb, a member of the first class of nurses to graduate from Lander, in 1959, established the scholarship to help a nursing student showing financial need. The scholarship is renewable, as long as the student is in good academic standing. Grubb enjoyed a long, distinguished career. From 1967 until her retirement in 2003, she worked as a school nurse for Richland County School District 1. From 1974 until 1999, she also served as coordinator of health services. During her tenure, Grubb established an aggressive health screening program for children that included screening for vision, hearing and dental problems. District 1 was the first school district in the state to screen adolescent students for scoliosis, and the first to offer a free dental clinic. She said, “The most important part of the program was finding services within the community for treatment and follow-up care for students unable to afford services.” When she became coordinator of health services for District 1, five nurses served 48 schools. By the time she retired, every school in the district had a registered nurse. Grubb’s accomplishments did not go unnoticed. In 1999, she was named South Carolina School Nurse of the Year. “I had a wonderful nursing career,” she said. “I enjoyed every minute of it.” She credited Lander with giving her the foundation she needed to

Curry’s Service to Lander Remembered

R. Boykin Curry, a longtime board member with The Lander Foundation and a Lander benefactor, passed away in March. He was 96. A 1937 graduate of Furman University, Curry served in World War II with the U.S. Navy. After the war, he returned to Greenwood to work in the family business, Citizens Trust Company. Curry was active in the development of Greenwood and served on the boards of many organizations and agencies, including Mutual Savings & Loan, Self Memorial Hospital, Greenwood Heritage Foundation, the Genetic Center, Hospice Care of the Piedmont and the Greenwood YMCA. The Greenwood Chamber twice elected him to the Greenwood County Hall of Fame, and he was named the Rotary Club’s “Man of the Year.” Lander president Dan Ball said, “Few men follow the legacy left 40

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succeed. She called Janie Hardwicke, Dora McNeil Sandhu and Shirley Gordon, who constituted the entire nursing faculty at the time, “exceptional teachers. They took a personal interest in each student.” Grubb’s scholarship creation was also inspired by the Self Foundation Scholarship that she herself received. She called it “very, very helpful.” Associate professor of nursing Dr. Robbie South, who chairs the Department of Nursing, said, “Lander has a proud heritage of educating nurses for over 50 years, and the Sylvia Brooks Grubb Nursing Scholarship is especially significant, since it was established by Ms. Grubb, one of our graduates from the first nursing class.” Ralph Patterson, vice president for University Advancement, thanked Grubb “for stepping forward and doing this for Lander. She’ll impact Lander students forever, which is a wonderful gift.” by their fathers of a life dedicated to community service. I admired Boykin Curry for being such a man.” For more than two decades, Curry held leadership roles as a member of The Lander Foundation Board of Trustees, and he was completing his latest term on the board at the time of his death. In addition to his service on the foundation board, Curry was a member of The Samuel Lander Society, having established several charitable remainder trusts at the university. In 2006, Lander awarded Curry an honorary doctorate of humane letters in recognition of his contributions to the university and community. Ralph Patterson, vice president for University Advancement and executive director of The Lander Foundation, said Curry was “a valued friend to Lander and to the Greenwood community that he loved so much.” Eleanor Teal, who worked with Curry during her time as vice president for University Advancement and foundation executive director, said, “Boykin Curry was as near to perfect as any human can be. A man of integrity, he was intelligent, dependable and generous. His leadership and influence will be felt for generations to come.”


Honoring Rick Fox’s Three Decades at Lander By Dave Lorenzatti

D

r. Richard Fox, of Greenwood, which is given to a faculty member who retired as professor of biology in 2008 demonstrates exemplary performance as concluding a 31-year career at Lander, a classroom teacher and scholar, and for but his name is permanently engraved service to the university and beyond. not just on the minds of his former His role in education reaches well bestudents and fellow faculty members, yond the Lander campus. He maintains but now also on the laboratory where a website that is viewed regularly by stuhe did most of his teaching. dents and educators in other states and Because of the efforts of faculty, staff around the world. Invertebrate Zoology and students in Lander’s College of Online is a manual containing original Science and Mathematics, Fox’s former anatomical descriptions of at least 112 lab on the second floor of the Science species, the result of over 30 years of Retired Lander biology professor Dr. Richard Fox, center, Building has been named in his honor. holds a plaque dedicating his former teaching lab at Lander research by Fox. in his honor. At left, Mike Runyan, chair of the Department He was invited to campus late last year Fox has also co-authored three books, of Biology; right, Dr. David Slimmer, dean of the College of for the unveiling of the bronze plaque, including the textbook Invertebrate ZoolScience and Mathematics. Photos by Russell Martin. now mounted at the entrance to the ogy and Seashore Animals of the Southeast, lab, whose inscription reads: “The a field guide to marine invertebrates. Richard S. Fox Ecology Laboratory. In recognition of his many con Runyan said Fox’s Internet site and books have given Lander tributions to the field of biology and to the education of hundreds international exposure. For example, he told of conducting an of biologists.” Internet search to find possible course offerings for biology student He said the naming was unexpected and added, “I love it. I am Karen MacPherson, of Simpsonville. She is attending the University very honored.” of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, this spring as part of Biology Department chair Mike Runyan said naming the lab for Lander’s Study Abroad Program. Runyan discovered that CanterFox is an appropriate way to honor him. “He is a great scientist who bury recommended one of Fox’s marine biology textbooks. did a huge amount of work for the university, going out of his way to In addition to his contributions as an educator, Fox provides help students understand concepts and provide them a good learnfinancial assistance to students in the form of a Lander scholarship ing experience,” he added. he created in 2006 in memory of his mother. The Jane Farmer Fox Fox’s specialty is invertebrate zoology and it was one of the many Scholarship is a four-year scholarship awarded to outstanding biolcourses he taught, along with ecology; limnology, the study of ogy majors. inland waters; comparative anatomy and more. Lander’s first ecolo In an interview on the occasion of his retirement, Fox was asked gist, he was instrumental in the establishment of the university’s to cite his greatest satisfaction at Lander. He replied, “Watching and environmental science program. helping very young freshmen develop into intellectually sophisti In 1985, he received Lander’s Distinguished Professor Award, cated young scientists.”

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Spring 2012

Fans cheer eagerly as the Lander women’s basketball team arrives back on campus following the Lady Bearcats’ first-ever appearance in the NCAA Division II Elite Eight, in San Antonio, Texas. The team had one of its most successful seasons in the history of the program. Read more about their exciting run on page 26 of Lander Magazine. – Photo by Megan Price


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