Issuu on Google+

The site was explored in depth to gain an understanding as to what might have happened, picking up on any physical traces that still remain. Analysing the current visitor routes enabled new routes to be considered, highlighting important aspects of the estate in the process. Mapping, photographing and sketching helped to inform the proposals, producing a series of postcards, each one depicting a unique route with a supporting montage.

| Studio 2.3 | SIAN BURY | 12001296

The collaboration between Tatton Narratives and Tatton Park took place over a 2 week timeframe. The aim was to investigate the history of the site, not forgetting the people that have made it what it is today.

TATTON NARRATIVES


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Investigate

Site Visit | investigating movement and traces of history

1. Knutsford entrance

3. Desire line

6

5

4

Exploring the paths of Tatton Park leads towards the grand Beech Walk, a significant feature on the route map. There was a sense of anticipation as the walk took us further into the estate. Soon it became evident that the landscape was all enveloping, drawing the visitor almost imperceptively on. It was interesting to think of who had travelled here before and under what circumstances.

3

2

1

2. Beech walk

4. Genius loci in sight


Site Visit | investigating movement and traces of history | Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Investigate

5. Defining boundaries

Approaching the mansion house from the Knutsford entrance enabled the vastness of the parkland to be truly appreciated. Historically the approach to the house would have been a way of displaying the grandeur of the estate. Today, the scale and expanse of the parkland is so impressive that the mansion house and gardens could almost be forgotten. Perhaps it is the natural beauty that overwhelms our emotions, drawing us into the landscape.

6. First glimpse of mansion house

Recorded observations walking through Tatton’s landscape


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Investigate

Site Visit | investigating movement and traces of history

Tatton offers a partial experience of the restored rooms, with a significant number closed to the public. The rooms that are open may be viewed on a generic group guided tour daily or as individuals between 1 and 5pm allowing visitors to choose how much time to allocate to each point of interest. When joining a tour guide the pace is determined by the facts and figures of the mansions history, with much of the information focussing on the pictures and paintings and little reference to the persons in residence.

Front of Mansion House

Drawing Room

Routes taken through accessible rooms


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Investigate

Site Visit | discovery

a selection of photographs that highlight Tatton’s heritage


Understanding the routes

Alternative routes explored in different groups allows us to experience the landscape in a similar way to how the Egerton family and their estate employees would have once done.

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping Analysis of Findings | mapping the journey


1950

1910

1880

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping

Tatton Through Time | analysing and evaluating historic maps

Clear boundary

Clear boundary

Clear boundary defined by tree plantations

Knutsford Drive and Beech Walk clearly defined

East boundary line altered

Easterly edge of boundary altered

Routes similar though not identical to current walks

Knutsford Drive and Beech Avenue (formerly Beech

Knutsford Drive and Beech Avenue clearly marked

Dense tree planting around Mill Pool, westerly side of

Walk) clearly defined

Only 1 fish pond to north-east of estate (cartographic error?)

Beech walk and base of Tatton Mere

Routes evident at north-east of estate

Urban District Boundary indicated by tree plantation

Approach Clump identified to west of Tatton Mere

Melchett Mere featured

Bullring indicated to right of Beech Walk

Urban District Boundary line still clearly marked by

Number of routes no longer evident to north-east of

Tatton Mere narrows at point of Ford

Melchett Mere not evident

Shading Pond beside Lady Mary’s Walk featured

estate

tree plantation •

Swan Clump introduced between Old Hall and Mill

Tree planting less noticeable to north-east of estate

Pool

Urban District Boundary no longer marked with tree planting

• Boundary

Past & Present Routes

No Longer Featured

Tatton Mere shape developing


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping

Tatton Through Time | analysing and evaluating historic maps

Summary of historic maps •

Little change to boundary of estate

Main routes remain the same

Tatton Mere stays as a constant feature throughout

Differing style of cartography adds elements of variation e.g tree distribution

Parkland contributes to food supply

2013

1990

Boundary less clear, especially to east side

Multiple routes added by National Trust

Knutsford Drive and Beech Avenue clearly marked

Effort made to restore some original routes

Melchett Mere increasing in size

Boundary challenging to define on map

Original route from Old Hall to Mill Pool reintroduced

Tree planting marking omitted from plan

Tatton Mere continuing to increase in size

Lady Mary’s Walk stops abruptly

Boundary

Past & Present Routes

No Longer Featured

Routes created by National Trust

Estate land usage remains unaltered throughout history


17 16

17 16 1

1 18

12

18

17 16

15 1

12

15

12

2 3

11

11

18

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping

Tatton Through Time | analysing and evaluating historic maps

11 9

10

4

10

6

6

6

5

5

Garden Features up to

5

7 8

1900

8

1870

8

10

1960

4

4

Garden Features added between 1871 and 1900

Garden Features added between 1901 and 1960

Italian Garden (Feature 15) now included in setting.

2. Rose Garden

All other garden features remain unchanged.

3. Tower Garden

1870 1. Walled Kitchen Garden

11. Maze

4. Broad Walk

12. Charlotte’s Garden

7. Japanese Garden

5. Arboretum

16. Conservatory

9. African Hut

6. Golden Brook

17. Fernery & Show House

8. Choragic Monument

18. ‘L’ Border

10. Leech Pool

1. Walled Kitchen Garden 2. Rose Garden 3. Tower Garden 4. Broad Walk 5. Arboretum 6. Golden Brook 7. Japanese Garden 8. Choragic Monument 11. Maze 12. Charlotte’s Garden 13. White Walk 14. Mercury Pool 15. Italian Garden 16. Conservatory 17. Fernery & Show House 18. ‘L’ Border

9. African Hut 10. Leech pool


Basement

Ground Floor

Chamber Floor

Basement not included as part of tour though a fraction of rooms remain open to view. Many rooms closed off. A notable contrast in style and scale of rooms. The basement passageway confined in comparison to grand entrance hall and corridors used by Egerton family.

Large proportion of ground floor accessible to public so greater insight gained. Tour begins by following natural route through rooms, starting with Card Room and finishing in the dining room before being led upstairs. Catching a glimpse of outside through the window allows us to share the same experience as it would have been some centuries ago.

Guest wing open to visitors. Opportunity to view family rooms not possible so we are left only with a guests’ perception. What we do see is opulent and grand. With so many generations of Egertons involved in Tatton, how can the National Trust decide on what era to capture?

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping Analysing the Route | mapping the journey


lords - info used to help with circulation of house and grounds

Considering different subjects of routes that could be explored

Compiling thoughts and ideas on how to highlight the Lords of Tatton circulation of the house, gardens and parkland

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping

Discovering the Routes | uncovering demographics


Basement

Ground Floor

Chamber Floor

Low usage

Medium usage

High usage

There would have been no need for the Earl/Baron to enter the basement. The number of people working in the Basement basement would be high (though lower than the 1:500 previous century). The calibre of the rooms would not be of suitable standard to be frequented by the Lord of the house.

West wing features heavily with entertaining of guests and even royalty. Entrance hall converted into games room by Maurice Egerton, usage became more frequent at this point. Family dining room and drawing room less opulent and therefore suitable for daily usage by Maurice. Tenants hall stored souvenirs and collections that would become his favoured possessions. Entrance hall doorway and garden exit from library unlikely to be used frequently.

Bedroom probably large central south facing room with adjoining bathroom/dressing room. Family staircase used on daily basis. Corner room used by Maurice’s mother as sitting room. Although all rooms would have been accessible, there would be no need to occupy them all and so only small portion of floor would be used on a daily basis. No wife or children meant that only guests would stay in other bedrooms. One room in the attic was converted for Maurice as a dark room to allow him to pursue his interest in photography.

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping Recording the History | uncovering demographics The Last Lord of Tatton - Maurice Egerton (b. 1874 d. 1958) 1920-1958


The Last Lord of Tatton - Maurice Egerton (b. 1874 d. 1958) 1920-1958

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping

Recording the History | uncovering demographics

The Gardens

The Parkland Few changes were made to the garden after 1913. During Maurice’s ownership the African Hut was the only noticeable development. Maurice’s love was with Kenya and so his connection with the gardens could be considered much less than his ancestors.

The estate grounds featured various routes over the years. Two routes have remained constant during the Egerton ownership. Knutsford Drive runs through the centre of the estate and seems to be the most likely for daily usage during the final years of Maurice Egerton’s ownership. The Beech Avenue could have been used as a leisurely walking route, possibly to Knutsford.

High usage Medium usage Low usage


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Development

The Last Lord of Tatton | capturing the subject

Maurice Egerton was a keen photographer. Converting one of the rooms in the attic into a darkroom enabled him to fulfill his passion. This small selection of photographs portrays a graceful fluid style. His fondness of the outdoors is obvious.

This selection of photographs captures the soft enchanting character seen in Maurice Egerton’s photographs. Including photography as a medium for the final proposal would pay homage to Maurice as well as enticing visitors to explore the grounds further.


It was clear that highlighting the routes and room usage of the Lords of Tatton would be based on a mixture of research from archive material and educated guesses. At first glance, the impression would be that all rooms would be heavily used by the family, though on closer inspection it became clear that many rooms were only made use of when entertaining guests or for special occasions. Focusing on the last Lord of the Mansion (Maurice) perhaps doesn’t highlight enough of the history of Tatton. It would be interesting to compare room usage and circulation with each of the Lords over time. Considering the routes of the Lords and how these could be transferred into a Tatton Visitor’s Guide has made me consider expanding the route to include all the Lords and enlighten visitors at the same time.

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Mapping

Recording the History | evaluating progress


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Transition

Tatton Through Time | changes and developments of the estate and its people Previous owners include Masseys, Stanleys, Tattons and Breretons

1,000 acre deer park introduced

1739_

Long entrance drives known as Southern Avenue Beechwalk created based on Emparkment Act 1739 (reserved right to convert land to park

John Egerton (b.1679 d. 1724) inherits property

Old Hall Built

1685

1520 1580 Property enlarged

1677 Thomas Egerton (b. 1651 d.1685) first owner in residence

EGERTONS OWNERS NOT IN RESIDENCY 1598_

Thomas Egerton (b. 1540 d.1617) purchased property from half sister Dorothy Brereton

1617_

John Egerton (b. 1579 d.1649) inherits property

1649_

John Egerton (b. 1623 d.1686) inherits property

OS Map records the boundary of parkland with tower

Lord Torrington (Diarist)

Maze and Ha-ha created John Egerton (b.1710 d. 1738) inherits property

1790

1750

1716 First house on site completed

“A grand domain of great vendure and with a noble lake; these are the charms: the per contra, no inequality of grand; the timber of neither stature nor girth.�

Walled garden constructed

1724

1738

1780

Samuel Egerton (b.1711 d.1780) inherits property Dining room decoration most visible legacy 1758_ Considerable inheritance from Uncle enables development of Tatton to what we see today

1791 Visit made by Humphry Repton

Hester Egerton (b.1708 d.1780) inherits property William Tatton Egerton (b.1749 d. 1806) inherits property Phase 1 of Tatton Hall rebuild begins using plans devised by Samuel and Lewis Wyatt

1791_

Repton Red Book produced. Emphasis on value of landscape improvement for enhancing stature of site.

Private study designed between family entrance and grand hall New drives/approaches introduced. Entrances marked by lodge cottages

Egerton Earls and Barons influence on Tatton


During time at property commissioned over 200 pieces of furniture from Gillows of Lancaster

Close friend and regular guest Halle often stays Phase 2 of Tatton Hall rebuild using plans devised by Samuel and Lewis Wyatt

John Webb (pupil of William Eames) works in grounds

Wilbraham Egerton (b.1781 d.1856) inherits property

1813

1795 1806 Park extended to 25,000 acres First reference to arboretum Maze now well established

William de Cole of Chester commissioned to design Choragic Monument of Lysicrates as a vista stopper and point to savour parkland views

1811 Lewis Wyatt designs main entrance gate marking beginning of 1 1/2 mile sequence of views of Tatton Park

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES MADE UNDER OWNERSHIP OF WILLIAM AND WILBRAHAM EGERTON (1780-1856) William Egerton_

Wilbraham Egerton_

Rebuild of Tatton Hall

Main Entrance gate

Repton Red Book

Drainage of lake

Extension to parkland

Orangery

Arboretum

Fernery

Maze

Broad-walk monument

Second story to wing of Manor House added by G.H. Stokes

Lady Charlotte’s Garden designed by Lewis Wyatt

1860

1820

1814 1816 ‘Turn Mere’ lake drained leaving ‘Mercury Pool’ as the only water in the area

1818

1870

1850

Orangery designed by Lewis Wyatt featuring long glass corridor linking to house

Planting by William Egerton recognised. Number of trees increased, especially conifers.

Joseph Paxton builds Fernery

1880_

1856_

Card room converted to drawing room by William Egerton

William Tatton Egerton 1st Baron (b.1806 d.1883) inherits property William Egerton noted for interest in growing orchids Library now less male dominant and more family orientated

Gillows of Lancaster furniture Egerton Earls and Barons influence on Tatton

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Transition

Tatton Through Time | changes and developments of the estate and its people


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Transition

Tatton Through Time | changes and developments of the estate and its people Roof of fernery raised

Hydraulic lift replaced with electric model

Italian garden executed by Paxton’s gifted assistant Edward Miller

Alan de Tatton Egerton 3rd Baron (b.1845 d.1920) inherits property

Added African Hut, 45 more species to arboretum, created runway by flattening land and moved pillars in hall to install 2 billiard tables

Italian garden commissioned and completed by Joseph Paxton

1909

1883 1890 Wilbraham Egerton 1st & last Earl, 2nd Baron (b.1832 d.1909) inherits property Planting by Wilbraham Egerton recognised. Number of trees increased, especially conifers.

1884_

Electricity installed in house

1887_

Prince of Wales stays at Mansion

1900 Tatton Dale Farm recognised as being base for maintenance team

Alan de Tatton visits Anglo Japanese Exhibition White City, London

Maurice Egerton described as an ‘Aristocratic playboy’ and enthusiastic early motorist Maurice Egerton 4th & last Baron (b.1874 d.1958) inherits property

Winston Churchill visit

1940_

Parachute training on parkland Electricity replaces steam in farm

1938_

Italian garden restored using old photographs

1990_

Attempts made to propagate trees

1980

1935

1910 1913

1920

Walled kitchen garden caters for Egerton family and guests Chapel, smoking room and study added to house

1942_

Rose Garden laid out for Lady Anna Egerton. Typical late Victorian/ Edwardian era. Tower Garden designed. Tower no longer part of park.

1929_

Long glass corridor linking Orangery to house removed in order to extend Tenants Hall

Melchett Mere formed by erosion to natural salt beds due to extraction of wild brine for salt

1994

1960

Europ Nastia Award made for restoration of conservatory

1958_

Maurice Egerton dies unmarried Property left to National Trust. Lease drawn up between Cheshire County Council and National Trust Estate open to public under National Trust Balustrade of plinth dismantled

2013_ VISITOR NUMBERS APPROX 140,000. 13 FULL-TIME GARDENERS LED BY HEAD GARDENER, 50 VOLUNTEERS Egerton Earls and Barons influence on Tatton


Topiary

Lady Charotte’s Garden

1900

Kitchen Garden Matured Italian Garden

Maze

Broadwalk

Japanese Garden

1910

White Walk

1816

1750

Tower Garden

1913

African Hut

1940

Maurice Egerton

Fernery

1850

Arboretum

1795

William Tatton Egerton

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Transition

Rose Garden

1913

Alan de Tatton

Choragic Monument

1820

Kitchen Garden

Conservatory

1818

Wilbraham Egerton

1739

Samuel Egerton 1739

1890

Wilbraham Egerton

1814

1814

The men who took residency at Tatton made their own distinctive mark upon the estate in particular on the garden. It is clear to see that Wilbraham created the most impact. Even so each owner has respected the work of previous generations by enhancing features rather than removing them.

Tatton Through Time | strolling through several hundred years of change in gardening taste


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Transition

Tatton Through Time | evaluating progress

It was clear that the Lords of Tatton had a great deal to contribute to the development of the estate. Many of the owners in residence added to the gardens in their own distinctive way. Repton’s ‘Red Book’ may have played a valuable role in inspiring the ideas that were then developed. The changes to the mansion are more challenging to assimilate as the availability of the records are restricted in this area.

Images showing the production of a group timeline and the finished result


A Photographer’s Trail

A Day in the Life of a Lord

The photography trail takes the visitor on a journey capturing images of Tatton that tell the story of Maurice’s passion for photography by depicting life in the mansion and on the estate.

The lifestyle of each Lord inevitably changes with the fashions of the era though many features will have remained the same. The garden has seen many significant changes as those who came to inherit Tatton put their individual stamp on the landscape.

Chamber Floor

Parkland

Maurice Egerton, The Last Lord of Tatton was well respected. He didn’t make many significant developments to the estate. Being guided through Maurice’s life leaves out many parts of the house and its estate due to his frequent travels to Kenya.

Chamber Floor

Ground Floor

Gardens

The Last Lord

Chamber Floor

Ground Floor

Gardens

Ground Floor

Gardens

Parkland

Potential routes that capture the essence of Tatton and its Lords

High usage

Parkland

Medium usage

Low usage

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Development

Mapping The Route | conveying the Lords and their importance


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Development

Precedents | design studies

Overlapping images draws the selected elements together, highlighting their connections. Distorted perspectives add a creative touch and intrigue the observer.

An abandoned book in a woodland setting has an air of mystery and intrigue. Is there a story? Who does it belong to? Why is it here?

Su Blackwell’s work features books as a medium for presenting a visual story. By lifting the images out to stand vertically against the page they take on a life of their own, almost as if they are ready to leave the pages and join the viewer.

This work by Andrea Mastrovito shows how the key image comes to life when presented vertically to the base material.

An open gateway entices the viewer to look beyond what is right in front of them. Layering features allows for multiple elements to be seen, even if it is just a glimpse through a door.

This image of an open book tempts us with translucent pages that allow us to see more than can be seen on the surface.


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Development

Proposals | design development

Open book recognising Lords and their involvement. Each feature presented with portrait of Lord who is responsible for it.

Layering the features to highlight the influence the Lords of Tatton had on the gardens. Possibility to digitally enhance sketches and merge with photographs.

Incorporating the garden features by using the gateways and approaches to suggest the opening of a new vista. Elements layered to add depth and intrigue.


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Development

Proposal | highlighting the history of the site

Samuel Egerton 1739 Broadwalk - 2 1739 Maze - 3 1750 Kitchen Garden - 1

William Tatton Egerton 1795 Arboretum - 4

Wilbraham Egerton 1814 1814 1816 1818 1820 1850

Lady Charlotte’s Garden - 6 Topiary White Walk - 8 Conservatory - 11 Choragic Monument - 7 Fernery - 12

Wilbraham Egerton 1890 Italian Garden - 10 1900 Kitchen Garden at its prime

Alan de Tatton 1910 Japanese Garden - 17 1913 Rose Garden - 14 1913 Tower Garden - 14

Maurice Egerton 1940 African Hut - 18

Montage Features

Map Features

Repton Red Book incorporated

Garden entrance still featured in proposal

Suggestion of house setting draws garden and

Entire garden explored

house together

All features of garden included on route

Open parkland view in the distance

Non-dated features highlighted on walk

Glimpse of garden features

Continuous flow without need to double back

Pages in chronological sequence of development

Chronological sequence of owners

Chosen montage highlighting Lords influence on the development of the gardens

Chosen route portrayed Lords influence on the development of the gardens


The final montage is intended for the visitor to feel as though they are holding Repton’s Red Book and looking back through time. Key features of the garden have been incorporated to depict the developments that have occurred over the generations of Egerton ownership. A blurred view of Lady Mary’s Walk can be seen in the distance, giving the impression that the book is resting on a desk in the mansion. The images are placed in chronological sequence to work in conjunction with the reverse map. The book tells a story and entices the visitor to step out and explore and experience ‘Tatton Through Time’.

Images showing development of colour on chosen montage

Final presentation of montage

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Rendition

Tatton Through Time | strolling through several hundred years of change in gardening taste


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Rendition

Tatton Through Time | strolling through several hundred years of change in gardening taste

Tatton Through Time Tracing the footsteps of the Earls, Barons and Lords 1

7

Walled Kitchen Garden

2

Broad Walk

3

Maze

17 4

4

Arboretum

5

Leech Pool

6

Charlo!e’s Garden

7

Choragic Monument

8

White Walk

9

Mercury Pool

10

Italian Garden

11

Conser vatory

12

Fernery

13

‘L’ Border

14

Rose Garden

15

Tower Garden

16

Golden Brook

17

Japanese Garden

18

Afr ican Hut

16

18 Finish

5

2

3

15 14

9

1

13

Images showing development of colour on chosen map route

A hand rendered style has been used as opposed to a technical drawing to sympathise with the original methods used to map the garden.

8 6

10

The chosen route is designed to educate as well as enable the entire garden to be explored. Existing pathways are incorporated into the new route. Visitors are taken on a chronologically ordered experience, starting with Samuel Egerton’s kitchen garden and concluding at Maurice Egerton’s African Hut, the last addition to the garden before being handed over to the National Trust.

11

12

Final presentation of map

Start

By strolling along the route, the visitor can become absorbed in the passage of time and the development of the garden design. The final postcard is intended to be 1 of a series of 3, depicting the Lords and their time at Tatton in the house, gardens and parkland.


All members of the Tatton Narratives event group had the same goal in mind: to assist Tatton Park and The National Trust in developing the routes of the visitors by capturing the essence of a number of themes explored. Having worked as a team for most of the analysis stages of the design enabled the end postcards to have a similar end result.

Top image illustrating presenting findings for alternative routes taken by the Lords of Tatton. Above image showing compilation of postcards produced as a result of research and creative design.

| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | Conclude

End | sharing of results


| Event 11 | TATTON NARRATIVES | End

Tatton Through Time | strolling through several hundred years of change in gardening taste Tatton Narratives was an event investigating the themes of memory and narrative histories of the Tatton Park and its people. The aim was to peel back the layers of time so as to develop an understanding of how life was lived by the individuals and social groups throughout the generations on the Tatton Park estate. The initial site visit was an ideal way to become immersed in the project and to imagine what it would have been like to visit the house and grounds as a visitor hundreds of years ago. The hour long stroll from the gated entrance to the mansion house was walked in small groups, each group following a slightly different route. Being in a mixed group of architects and landscape architects enriched the experience and allowed an exchange of views from differing perspectives to be considered. Conversations raised awareness of individuals skills and strengths and in particular I was made aware of my own latin plant knowledge being recognised. My role within the group developed further when setting up an online folder as a means of sharing generic images and reading material. This worked well for initial analysis stages though it wasn’t used as much during the later design stages when individual approaches started to take shape. Group discussions in the studio were invaluable for piecing together thoughts and ideas about the history, and more specifically the changing demographics of Tatton. During the event I worked proactively and provided the basis for a timeline which we then further developed. Presenting our individual findings to the team enabled further discussion and constructive feedback. I recognise that I feel relatively comfortable in this situation which enabled me to make a useful contribution.The springboard of stimuli energised the project and created a motivating working momentum. As the project developed the focus of my role in creating a visitors route based on the lords became clear and defined. By understanding the Lords of Tatton and their importance to the estate, a central piece of Tatton’s history could be recognised. The final product was an A5 postcard. On one side, a photomontage and on the other an alternative route around the landscaped gardens, highlighting the key features introduced by the Lords of Tatton. By bringing the groups ‘postcards’ together there was a real sense of achievement both with the end product and the cooperative response that had underpinned the work. Although the final products were produced by individuals it was clear that the group had worked together and focussed on the achieving a shared goal.


Tatton narratives portfolio