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in Chester County, PA

WINTER 2017 The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Lancaster Pet Lovers

+ Pet Pantry +

Pitties.Love.Peace


WE BELIEVE THAT PETS ARE ALSO MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY AND PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN OUR LIVES.

THE SNYDER PET FAMILY

We take this into great consideration in respecting those who want a meaningful pet tribute. We offer: • Individual or Communal cremation at a competitive price • Pet Burials • Keepsake memorial jewelry that holds a small portion of your beloved pet • Pet urns, caskets, and we capture the paw and nose prints for Buddies keepsakes

HEART PAW

PAW RING

PAW KEEPSAKE (holds ashes)

Lititz Pike • 3110 Lititz Pike • 717-560-5100 • www.SnyderFuneralHome.com ebook f Logo

BUDDIETAGS KEEPSAKES

C


+ CONTENTS

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WINTER 2017

Rescue Highlight

FEATURES

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DEPARTMENTS

Lancaster: A County for Pet Lovers Lancaster’s pet community goes beyond the animals. Meet three people who help make our county better for people and pets.

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BY SAMANTHA ST.CLAIR

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Letter From Editor Community Supporters

Tips Quick facts about pets, including species of hamsters and presidential pets

Pet Pantry of Lancaster The Pet Pantry of Lancaster is available to help when pet owners fall on hard times. Learn how the community comes together to provide food, veterinary care, and other services to those in need. BY SAMANTHA ST.CLAIR

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Events Local events from January-March, 2017

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The Good Stu Our favorite products from around Lancaster

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Pet Lover Miss Priss, a friendly and social cockatoo

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Community Interview with Dr. Nasir H. Shah, owner of Red Rose Pet Care Center

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Meet the Breed A beginner reptile, the leopard gecko

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Seasonal Winter tips and facts

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Rescue Highlight Pitties.Love.Peace

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Fun Focus Owning Alpacas

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Specialty Services Pet Emergency Treatment and Specialties

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Health The dangers of antifreeze

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Vet Insights Spaying and neutering Q&A with New Holland Veterinary Hospital

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Behavior & Training Equine winter training goals

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Pet Services Information on various local businesses

16 Pet Pantry

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Around Lancaster Winter pet photos provided by LCP readers

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Information Pet Resources and contact information

of Lancaster County WINTER 2017

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LCP

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

LANCASTER COUNTY PET The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Publisher Cecilia Cove, LLC Editor in Chief Samantha St.Clair Art Director Sally Heineman Sales Helen Venesky Photographers Samantha St.Clair Helen Venesky Contributors Dr. Bryan Langlois, DVM Dr. Diane Tomaskovich, DVM Published by Cecilia Cove, LLC PO Box 44, Marietta, PA 17547 717.406.7811 • lancastercountypet.com

+ Advertising inquiries email: sales@lancastercountypet.com

+ Comments and Feedback: editor@lancastercountypet.com

PLEASE GIVE PET FOOD PET PANTRY OF LANCASTER 26 Millersville Road Lancaster 717.983.8873 petpantrylc.org LCP (Lancaster County Pet) is published quarterly and distributed throughout Lancaster County, PA. All content of this magazine, including design, photos and editorial content is Copyright©2017 by Cecilia Cove, LLC. All rights reserved. No reproduction of printed materials is permitted without the written consent of the Publisher. LCP is a registered trademark of Cecilia Cove, LLC.

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+ E D I TO R’S L ET T E R

COMMUNITY SUPPORTERS WHILE WE HAVE SPENT PLENTY OF TIME ACKNOWLEDGING PETS, WE FEEL IT IS time to dedicate an issue to the people in the community. It is the humans behind the pets, organizations, and businesses that create the beautiful, animal-friendly atmosphere we all love. Through Lancaster County Pet, I have met many wonderful people in all sorts of animal-friendly settings. Those I meet when working around animals never cease to amaze me. They often spend every bit of their free time making the world a kinder place for our furry companions. They devote their skills and their hearts to helping those in need. There is no way to express the amount of gratitude we as pet lovers have for the people who dedicate so much time and energy supporting our pets. It’s important to say that, no matter how much time you have to give, every little contribution creates a ripple effect that enhances our area. It doesn’t take huge acts to create big effects. Shopping local, contributing time or resources to shelters, and participating in pet events are just a few of many ways to show your support. We are a fortunate county in that we have many options for spoiling our beloved pets with beautiful parks, passionate, professional animal services, and quality products. It is important we continue to support all the little things that make our community great. In this edition, we explore several local people and organizations that provide for both the two and four-legged members of the county. In our feature, we highlight three amazing pet owners that are role models in our community. From rescuing to supporting local venues, they present examples of the many ways you too can help make the world a better place. Additionally, we introduce the Pet Pantry, an organization that keeps pets and people together by providing food and affordable services. You will also get to meet a rescue that stands up for misunderstood dogs, a pet bird with a lot of personality, and other inspirational animals and humans. We encourage everyone to do their best to provide support for each other. No matter the contributions you can make, they are always appreciated. Remember, although you may believe your small acts do not make much of a difference, they do. Please share your stories of how you have helped others. We’d love to get to know more of the incredible people we share our lives with, and we hope we can continue to introduce many more of you in the years to come. Enjoy the new year and keep warm!

Samantha St.Clair editor@lancastercountypet.com

Throughout our magazine you’ll find informative bubbles.

HELPFUL TIP

TACKLE DRY WINTER SKIN WITH GOAT SOAP. IT'S RICH WITH NUTRIENTS LIKE PROTEINS, VITAMIN A, B12, B6, E, BETA-CASEIN, AND MINERALS. WINTER 2017

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+ TIPS

TipS to Tails Quick Facts About Pets

THERE ARE MANY SPECIES OF HAMSTERS, BUT ONLY 5 COMMON IN THE PET MARKET Breeds include:

Syrian, Campbells, Winter White, Chinese and Roborovski

Penn Vet is the only veterinary school awarding the Veterinariae Medicinae Doctoris (VMD) degree, which reflects their unique founding through a medical school. Like the visionary Founding Father and physician Benjamin Rush—who proposed Penn Vet back in 1807—their faculty and students are to this day dedicated to both animal and human health for the benefit of the whole world. It’s the only veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet has a longstanding tradition as a global leader in veterinary medicine education, research, and clinical care, with a tradition of compassionate clinical expertise, intellectual rigor, and the pursuit of innovative thinking.

Top 10 Female Cat Names for 2016 Luna Bella Lucy Chloe Lily Mia Sophie Lola Nala Daisy (Source: iheartcats.com)

Which president had the most pets and what were they? PRESIDENT CALVIN COOLIDGE (1923-1929) may have had the most pets. He had a wide assortment of dog breeds, but he also had a number of bird species, domesticated raccoons (one is said to have walked on a leash), a bobcat, wallaby, pygmy hippo, and a bear.

CATS CAN’T TASTE SWEET THINGS DUE TO A DEFECT IN THE SWEET TASTE RECEPTOR GENE, CATS ARE UNABLE TO DETECT SWEET FLAVORS. DOMESTIC CATS SHARE THIS TRAIT WITH THEIR WILD COUSINS, CHEETAHS AND TIGERS.

Comparing Human and Dog Brains The temporal pole of the brain, thought to process incoming sounds by generating emotional responses, was believed to be unique to humans. In humans, this area becomes active when voices are heard. After recent studies, it now appears that it becomes active in dogs as well — the first time scientists have observed this in a non-primate. Also, human emotional sounds, such as laughing or crying, activate an area close to the primary auditory cortex in both humans and dogs. Dog vocalizations like angry barking and whimpering created very similar reactions in all studied dogs. 4 LANCASTER COUNTY PET


KLEEN

CRES

Alpaca Farm

Now find our unique alpaca products at John Wright’s Restaurant on Front Street in Wrightsville

WE CARRY • Local authorized Hubbard Feed dealer for all your animal nutritional needs. • Eggs • Pine Shavings

WE PROVIDE • Educational Tours for School Groups, Girl Scouts, Senior Citizen Groups, etc.

COME VISIT OUR PETS Malachi the Camel, Alpacas, Chickens and Peacocks! Contact: Patty McKonly 390 Blue Lane, Columbia, PA 717.471.8634 www.kleenacresfarm.com pattymckonly@comcast.net

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+ EVENTS

MEET AND GREET THE GOLDENS DAY AT GOLDEN GATEWAY

Events JANUARY

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FARM SHOW COMPLEX & EXPO CENTER 2300 N Cameron Street, Harrisburg farmshow.state.pa.us

MEET AND GREET THE GOLDENS DAY AT GOLDEN GATEWAY DELAWARE VALLEY GOLDEN RETRIEVER RESCUE 60 Vera Cruz Road, Reinholds dvgrr.org

8 FELINE SOLUTIONS MEET

11 SNOW MOON TOUR

7-14 PA FARM SHOW

AND GREET THAT FISH PLACE - THAT PET PLACE 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster thatpetplace.com

14 PENN ANIMAL CANINE BLOOD BANK KPETS 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster kpets.org

21 PET PARTNERS STORYTIME BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS LANCASTER 1700 H Fruitville Pike Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17601 barnesandnoble.com

FEBRUARY

4 MEET AND GREET MOSTLY MUTTZ THAT FISH PLACE - THAT PET PLACE 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster thatpetplace.com

11 LOVE YOUR PET DAY THAT PET SHOW THAT FISH PLACE - THAT PET PLACE 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster thatpetplace.com

WOLF SANCTUARY OF PA 465 Speedwell Forge Road, Lititz wolfsanctuarypa.org

18 2ND ANNUAL FUR LOVE GALA ACORN FARMS 3141 Mount Joy Road, Mount Joy 2ndchance4liferescue.org

MARCH

15-19 THE CELTIC CLASSIC

18 SPRING MEET THE RESCUES THAT FISH PLACE - THAT PET PLACE 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster thatpetplace.com

19 TAILS OF COMFORT DINNER KPETS Brethren Village/Wolfe Auditorium 3001 Lititz Pike, Lititz kpets.org

ONGOING EVENTS NAIL TRIM DAYS... JANUARY 7, FEBRUARY 4, MARCH 4 KEYSTONE PET PLACE 100 W. Main Street, Mount Joy keystonepetplace.com FARM AND SHOP TOURS KLEEN ACRES 390 Blue Lane, Columbia kleenacresfarm.com

LANCASTER KENNEL CLUB, YORK KENNEL CLUB AND DELAWARE COUNTY KENNEL CLUB York Expo Center 334 Carlisle Avenue, York wp.thecelticclassic.com

18 LEO’S BIRTHDAY BASH BENEFITS PET PANTRY OF LANCASTER Natural Stone Works 455 Ice Avenue, Lancaster petpantrylc.org

18 PITTIES.LOVE.PEACE ST. PITTIES DAY PARTY Hollywood Casino 777 Hollywood Boulevard, Grantville pittieslovepeace.com

NAIL TRIM DAYS AT KEYSTONE PET PLACE

Have a 2017 SPRING Event? Contact:

events@lancastercountypet.com For additional events, please visit us at lancastercountypet.com Events are subject to change. Please contact event host.

WINTER 2017

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Lancaster: A County for Pet Lovers Stories of those who form our unique pet community written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair


IN ADDITION TO HORSES, LUANN OWNS SIX DOGS AND A CAT. ONE OF HER FRENCH BULLDOGS, EDISON, IS ALSO A REGISTERED THERAPY PET. WITH HER THERAPY ANIMALS, SHE VISITS MANY FACILITIES INCLUDING A LOCAL YOUTH DETENTION CENTER AND NURSING HOMES.

ith parks, riding trails, pet-friendly businesses and a plethora of pet boutiques, it is easy to say Lancaster County loves its animal residents. All of these features wouldn’t be possible without the dedicated people of our community. Behind every rescue, pet related project, and local pet service are the people who make it all possible. While there is no way to express gratitude for each member of our wonderful network of pet lovers, we found some exemplary and diverse role models that proudly represent the county.

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LuAnn Rittenhouse, Vinnie, Gabriel and Charlie For LuAnn, there are few blessings as great as having animals in her life. She has nearly always had pets around her, from tiny hamsters to dogs, cats, birds and more recently, horses. LuAnn’s compassion for animals extends into the pet community through her dedication to rescues as well as her therapy work to support the people of Lancaster. Her story of having KPETS’ first therapy miniature horse began in 2014 at a local auction house when she first met Vinnie and simply couldn’t leave him behind. “I thought I was purchasing him to give him a comfortable place to live out the rest of his life. He was in that bad of condition that I didn’t see him pulling through,” LuAnn said. Vinnie was a mere 50 pounds when LuAnn took him off the auction lot. “When he first arrived at the barn, he wasn’t spooked by anything. Even in his condition, he was kind and gentle. I could tell he would make a great therapy horse,” she said. Despite the odds, he made a full recovery and now weighs a healthy 230 pounds. LuAnn worked with KPETS to enable Vinnie to share his gentle soul with people in the community who need it most. “I love to see people’s faces light up when they experience the love my animals have to give. It gives me a sense of accomplishment and just makes the community a better place.” LuAnn currently has another mini, Gabriel, who is in training to become a therapy horse to follow Vinnie’s path. “Horses are different from other animals,” LuAnn commented. “When I spend time with them they give me serenity and soothe my soul. They give me peace which I've never experienced anywhere else or with any other animal.” LuAnn’s support in the community doesn’t end at her therapy work. She also attends various local events, supports local businesses, and helps local rescues as much as possible. “I want people to remember me for my kindness to animals and the human race, and if I’ve accomplished this, then at the end of my life I will be happy that I’ve made a difference.” WINTER 2017

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KATIE LOVES LANCASTER COUNTY NOT ONLY FOR ITS PET-FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE BUT ALSO FOR THE BEAUTIFUL SCENERY AND COUNTRYSIDES. SHE WOULD LOVE FOR MORE PLACES TO ALLOW PETS AND SPECIFICALLY LOOKS FORWARD TO SEEING MORE RESTAURANTS WITH OUTDOOR DINING.

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ERIC RECOMMENDS PETS FOR FAMILIES WHO ARE ON THE FENCE ABOUT ALLOWING PETS INTO THEIR CHILDREN’S LIVES. “IF PEOPLE QUESTION HAVING PETS WITH KIDS, I 100% AGREE WITH IT. HAVING TIKA HAS TAUGHT MY KIDS SO MUCH RESPONSIBILITY, AND THEY ALWAYS HAVE A FRIEND AROUND.”

Jackson Lukacs and Tika At only seven years old, Jackson is an upstanding member of the community and someone who is already fully invested in the needs of animals around him. From an early age, he always gravitated to animals, and that likely will never change. “Ever since he was really young he would cut pictures of dogs and cats out of magazines and newspapers to hang on the wall,” Eric Lukacs, Jackson’s father, recalled. “Now he has Lancaster County Pet and doesn’t need to do that anymore. He collects every edition he comes across and reads every bit of it, even when it is challenging for him.” Jackson’s entertainment always involves animals. Instead of watching sports, he watches the Puppy Bowl and the National dog show, and when it comes to his time playing outdoors, he’d rather spend it saving lives. In the fall of 2015, Jackson, along with his brother, Alex, and their friend were playing outside when a small kitten approached them. They immediately noticed something was wrong with her eye. Their first action was not to play with her or ignore her, but to take her to one of their neighbors that practices veterinary medicine. When the kitten was returned outside after being treated, she would

continue to visit the kids every night to play with them. Their next step was speaking to their parents to propose the idea of adopting her. “It had taken no more than 72 hours before I made up my mind and we brought her into our family,” Eric said. “She couldn’t be a better decision, and I am very proud of my kids for helping her.” Tika’s name was chosen by Jackson, based on his favorite childhood book featuring “Tika Tiger.” While Tika’s eye infection caused her to go blind in one eye, it is without a doubt her life was saved from further complications thanks to the compassion of some of our youngest community members. “I want to become a veterinarian to continue helping animals,” Jackson said. The smile on his face was proof enough that he will always love saving the lives of animals. Jackson has plans to stay in Lancaster when he does become a veterinarian, so there is certainly a bright future ahead for our county and Jackson.

Katie Summerford and Rudy Katie can’t remember a time when she didn’t love animals. As a child, she would ask for a pet every Christmas. Her wish was finally granted when she turned 13 and received her first dog. Years later, she

brought her pug Rudy home. For nine years Rudy has brought her and her family unconditional love and devotion. To Katie, there is no better friend than a dog. “I always tell my son that Rudy is his brother. He is very much a beloved member of the family. He is a great snuggler and always listens to me when I talk. I admire all he does for me,” she said. It is Katie’s love for Rudy and Lancaster that leads her to shop locally. “It’s great that we have small businesses as opposed to only chain stores. One of our favorite places is That Fish Place - That Pet Place. Rudy can go with me, and I always know the staff there will be friendly and helpful. I also love that they host a lot of events, and I often attend those events. Rudy enjoys getting his holiday pictures done there, and it’s great that they benefit good causes.” In addition to local shops, Katie supports other events in the area and is appreciative of how many pet-friendly parks there are that both her son and her four-legged companion can enjoy equally. “Lancaster has changed a lot in recent years. I cannot wait to see how it advances in the future to be even more accommodating to pets.”

WINTER 2017

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Host a Pop-Up and Earn Free Clothes! COLLEEN OPPENHEIM, Fashion Consultant 610-864-6120•lularoecolleenoppenheim@gmail.com Facebook: LuLaRoe:: Colleen’s LuLaLovelies Join the Movement that is blessing lives and making dreams come true! Contact me for further information!

COMING SOON!!!!

Join the Barnstormers for “Lancaster Pet Fest” April 29 & 30, 2017 Hosted by: 2017

Presented by:

LCP LANCASTER COUNTY PET

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: 717-509-4487 Ashley Eisenbeil – aeisenbeil@lancasterbarnstormers.com Rachel Deyle – rdeyle@lancasterbarnstormers.com

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+ THE GOOD STUFF

Our favoriteS Products from local businesses...

1 WINTER SCARF Fits right over your dog’s head and can be easily adjusted for comfort. • $19.95 Orvis Outlet Lancaster 35 South Willowdale Drive, Lancaster 717.394.9674

2

CAT WARE FURNITURE

LEATHER LEAD AND COLLAR Handmade and sourced in Lancaster $19.95 to $39.95 Drake’s Pet Place 1874 Lincoln Highway East, Lancaster 717.290.1131

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3

Stain resistant carpet, all parts made in the U.S.A. • $39.99 Keystone Pet Place 100 West Main Street, Mount Joy 717.492.0027 • keystonepetplace.com

CHILLY DOG SWEATER Bunny Hoodie Sweater, all handmade. $34.99 to $36.99 For the Love of Dog 17 West Market Street, Marietta 717.604.1196

5 PHARM-ALOE K-9 ALOE TREATS Helps support a strong immune system, soothes digestive system, improves joint function and more. $11.99 • Pharm-Aloe.com 717.806.1035

CAPTURE PET STAIN AND ODOR NEUTRALIZER

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Eliminates the toughest pet stains and odors. • $9.99 Certified Carpet 1855 Columbia Avenue, # 65, Lancaster 717.394.3731 • certifiedcarpet.com

WINTER 2017

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+ PET LOVER that wasn’t her calling,” Lynn commented as Miss Priss danced on her arm and sang, showing off to the small crowd gathering around them. “She absolutely loves to show off and meet new people.” While Miss Priss is a star at heart, she enjoys her time with her owner, Lynn, more than her fame. Lynn brought Miss Priss home 16 years ago, and the two have become inseparable. While she owned several birds before, she never made the connection she’s made with her. “She brings me peace and joy and keeps my life interesting.” Miss Priss and Lynn have a special bond, but Lynn does caution people to do their research before getting their own birds. “Miss Priss is great, but she can be temperamental. She is like a typical five year old child. If she sees something she wants and I don’t give it to her, she’ll start screaming. They need constant entertainment, require a lot of dedication, and have a very long lifespan. They are great companions for people who know what they are getting themselves into and are ready for the commitment.”

Miss Priss A bird with personality and showmanship written by Samantha St.Clair

W

hen you visit local pet stores, probably one of the last pets you’d expect to see out with their owner is a bird. However, for Lynn, there is no other companion she’d rather take with her to the store than her Moluccan cockatoo, Miss Priss. Lynn knew early on that her exuberant

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cockatoo was destined to be a social bird. Miss Priss loves affection and attention, and she is a frequent flyer at That Fish Place - That Pet Place, one of her favorite locations for making new friends. “Some birds are trick birds, and I tried that with Miss Priss, but she let me know

For Lynn, she is entirely happy she brought Miss Priss into her life. “It’s worth all the work. Her personality… she’s just amazing. She keeps me humble. She’s very loving and very smart.” Miss Priss has learned how to say quite a few words, knows how to open doors, and is great at communicating with people. “When she wants someone to pet her, she will raise her foot to tell me she would like attention from them.” If you are lucky enough to run into Miss Priss in public, the pair will gladly talk about their journey together. If you are really lucky, Miss Priss will give her approval, and you can pet this precious and loving bird.


Pet Pantry of Lancaster County Meeting the needs of pets to keep families together written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair


[

[

THE PET PANTRY OF LANCASTER COUNTY STARTED AT A TABLE IN A LOCAL BOOKSTORE WHEN THREE COMPASSIONATE PEOPLE FORMED THE OUTLINE OF A PROGRAM THAT WOULD FAR EXCEED EXPECTATIONS IN A MERE FIVE YEARS. IN 2011, THEY HAD THEIR FIRST FOOD DRIVE AT THE TAILWAGGER’S TROT AND STARTED SUPPORTING 18 FAMILIES. TODAY, THEY SERVE AN AVERAGE OF 212 FAMILIES THAT INCLUDES 245 DOGS, 536 CATS AND AN ASSORTMENT OF OTHER ANIMALS. TO FEED THESE PETS, THEY PROVIDE AROUND 5,000 POUNDS OF DRY FOOD AND 1,400 CANS OF SOFT FOOD MONTHLY. THE SUPPORT THEY PROVIDE THE COMMUNITY CONTINUES TO GROW AS THEY ADD AND RENOVATE VARIOUS PROGRAMS

THE MISSION “Our reasons for starting this program all differ in some way. My reason for doing this is because I overheard someone lost their job and was having a hard time feeding their pet. Our veterinarian, Dr. Bryan Langlois, had a different reason: he saw too many pets getting surrendered to shelters for reasons we could help prevent by starting a program like this,” Melody Sanders, President of the Pet Pantry commented. “While we have varied reasons for starting the program, the bottom line is the same for all of us. We want to benefit the area’s animals.” Since their start, the Pet Pantry has enacted several new programs and now offers the food bank, a cat rescue, a thrift shop, feral cat trap-neuter-release (TNR), lower-cost spay and neuter services, and veterinary care on a case by case basis. In the future, they want to expand to a larger facility that will provide land and the ability to house rescued dogs and horses. “We have big goals, but we always take everything in small steps. We set a reasonable goal and reach it before moving onto the next one, which I think is why our program is so successful. We learn as we go and master one thing at a time.” Starting in 2017, the Pet Pantry will be entering a partnership with Lost Paws of Lancaster. “This is a huge step for us. They have a large foster network, a lot of resources, and both of us have people experienced in animal welfare on our teams. Realistically, I’d like to see 800 cats rescued and rehomed in 2017.” Their next major goal is to be able to accept dogs into their rescue facility, as they currently rely on fosters for canine rescues. “The premise of the entire program remains the same as we continue to expand. We’re founded on the idea that owners come across hard times. We want to help people keep their animals and help find new homes for animals when they cannot remain in their current situation.”

COMMUNITY SUPPORT “I think we get a lot of support from the community because our program not only helps families, but it also teaches responsibility. We do not hand food out to everyone. People who donate to us know their food is going to families who truly need it and are doing their best to support their pets,” Melody said. The Pet Pantry has several regulations when it comes to joining their program. All pets on the program must be spayed or neutered and up to date on vaccines. Additionally, families cannot add more pets while they are on the program. “We do not give away veterinary services or items, but we do provide affordable care. Through our thrift store, people can buy beds, leashes, collars, toys and more for very little money. We also offer lowercost vaccines and spay/neuter surgeries. We want to see the people in our program spending money on their pets in some way to show they are dedicated to their

animal’s well being.” Any money they expect from families for vet care and items goes straight to the program to help more community members.

“All of our accomplishments are thanks to donations. Monetary donations, food, and any pet related items for our thrift store are always needed. We cannot add more people to our food program until we know we can sustain them. Cat food is like gold to us and our most needed item,” Melody said. When you support the Pet Pantry, you support the entire community. They help several area rescues through their lowercost veterinary services, supply TNR clinics to reduce feral cat colony problems, rescue animals in need, and, of course, help families going through difficult times. If you are interested in supporting this community organization, please visit them online to learn more: petpantrylc.org


+ COMMUNITY

Q&A

DR. SHAH WITH DANDY

Dr. Nasir H. Shah, DVM Owner of Red Rose Pet Care Center

RED ROSE PET CARE CENTER is a veterinary practice offering services to dogs, cats, and pocket pets. Conveniently located near downtown Lancaster, this veterinary clinic is readily available for owners and their pets. The clinic’s owner, Dr. Shah, and his staff are dedicated to providing affordable, high quality medical services. By building strong relationships with pet owners, Dr. Shah helps people keep their pets on the right track to long, healthy, and happy lives.

LCP: What do you love about being a veterinarian? NS: It is the perfect profession to treat those who cannot speak. I can see in pets’ eyes when they are asking for help. You get to talk to owners and piece together what is wrong with their pet. The best part is when the pets recover thanks to the efforts of everyone involved.

LCP: What is your most memorable case? NS: I have so many memorable cases, I could write a book on them. I love hearing updates about pets I have helped. Just recently I learned that a rescued puppy, who had a broken leg that I fixed, lived out the rest of their life in a great home. Those are the stories that make this job rewarding.

LCP: What do you provide to the community? NS: Since 1983 I have provided clients with affordable veterinary care in Lancaster County. I believe it is important that people have a service they can afford when it comes to their pet’s health. Veterinary medicine shouldn’t be so expensive that people cannot care for their pets.

LCP: What piece of advice would you give to people when it comes to veterinary care? NS: I cannot express enough how important wellness exams are, especially for senior pets. When pets receive regular wellness exams, it is far easier for us to catch health concerns before they are untreatable. When we see problems early, we can resolve them far better than when they come up later. Yearly exams are something many people don’t provide for their pets, and they should.

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More about DR. NASIR H. SHAH M EXPERIENCED: Dr. Shah has been a veterinarian for over 40 years. He began as a large animal vet who now enjoys his small animal practice. M HELPFUL: No matter who calls, even if they are not clients, Dr. Shah is happy to answer questions and help people find appropriate treatments for their pets. M COMMUNITY: Dr. Shah loves the small city feeling of Lancaster. He admires that it’s a close-knit community that loves pets. M FAMILY: When Dr. Shah isn’t working, he loves spending time with his grandchildren.

Red Rose Pet Care Center 717-435-8035 redrosepetcarecenter.com


Call Today!

995 Fruitville Pike Lititz, PA 17543

717-569-6151

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8am-6pm Sat. 8am - 12pm. Sun. 4pm-6pm

OUR FAMILY TREATING YOUR PETS

10% off ANY PURCHASE

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good until 3/31/17

#1 Kennel in Lancaster County for 15 years “One of the Top Groomers” in Lancaster County for 15 years

PET BOARDING DOGGIE DAYCARE PROFESSIONAL GROOMING WINTER 2017

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+ MEET THE BREED

Leopard Gecko A cute reptile for beginners

“HERP” COMES FROM THE WORD “HERPETOLOGY”, WHICH IS THE STUDY OF REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS.

written by Samantha St.Clair

I

f you have an interest in reptiles, but don’t know where to start, the leopard gecko may be the right choice for your first herp. This low maintenance, friendly reptile is known as a “gateway herp” because they often make people fall in love with owning reptiles. One of the key features of the leopard gecko is its large array of colors and patterns, known as “morphs”. For the beginner gecko owner, morphs can make it more fun and interesting picking your first pet. For those who want to expand on their gecko ownership, breeding for new morphs can be exciting. Because the leopard gecko isn’t overpopulated, breeding can be done ethically and adds to the experience. Breeding certainly isn’t the only way to make reptile ownership fun. Leopard gecko setups require a variety of structures for enrichment and stress control. Setting their environments up, and watching them explore those environments, is rewarding. Leopard geckos are a good all age pet. They are great for kids, as they are handleable and relaxed. Many other species of gecko are not so tame. In fact, some tropical geckos are nearly impossible to handle and are equivalent to owning fish where they are there for observation rather than touching. While they can be handled, handling of leopard geckos should always be monitored as they are fragile. Squeezing them too tightly or dropping them

can result in injuries. Instead of holding them all the time, try letting them explore! They make great office companions as they are content to roam around your desk while you work. The low maintenance of the leopard gecko may be its biggest perk. They require a minimum of a 20 gallon tank for their environment, with more space necessary if you want more than one. Their tanks can be lined with paper towel for easy changing, or other materials if you do your research to discover which cage liners are safest and suit your individual care capabilities. This species is one of the easiest to manage when it comes to heat and moisture needs, which can be supplied with dome or under tank heating. Additionally, they certainly do not require constant attention like many furry companions and are happy being left alone. The one downfall for many is that they do best eating live bugs, so you will need to learn to manage bugs in the process. The leopard gecko’s size and personability set it apart from many other reptiles. They are cute, small, and not the least bit dangerous. Often times reptiles get a bad reputation, but this species is out to set the record straight: reptiles are great pets! They allow people to have interesting animals from other parts of the world in their home. Once you get started with something as cute as the leopard gecko, don’t be surprised if you wind up with more fascinating reptiles in the future!

Information provided by Forgotten Friend Reptile Sanctuary. Visit their website to learn about available reptiles and to find more resources: forgottenfriend.org. Alternatively, learn more from the Lancaster Herpetological Society: lancasterherp.com

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WINTER 2017

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+ S E A S O NA L

Winter During winter time, our beloved babies will need a little extra care. Below is a list of tips to protect your pet from seasonal dangers. Warm Fireplace or Winter Wonderland? If your pet is normally outdoors, you may want to consider bringing them inside for the winter. Staying outside for long durations during the freezing months can lead to frostbite and other cold weather ailments. Keep your pet warm and cuddly this season by inviting them indoors.

Fur is Not Enough If circumstances leave your pet out in the cold, consider how you would feel outside. Would a fur coat keep you comfortable, probably not? Your pet’s fur does not protect them from bitter temperatures. If it's too cold for you, it’s too cold for them. Do your best to provide them with warm shelter.

Packing on the Calories If there are outdoor animals that simply cannot be brought inside, keep their dietary needs in mind. Because it takes more energy to stay warm, outdoor pets need to eat more during the winter. Fresh water is also essential, so you should monitor water sources to ensure they are not frozen.

Winter Dieting While outdoor animals need more food, indoor pets need less food during the winter. Because your pet will be cooped up when it’s cold, they will not burn calories as they do during other times of the year. They can’t sleep away their calories in front of a warm fire so you may need to adjust their food portions.

February is National Pet Dental Awareness Month Pets are particularly prone to dental disease because they often do not have their teeth cleaned as frequently as their humans do. Veterinarians say animals need teeth brushing and dental care, just like people. When an animal’s dental health deteriorates, lesions in the mouth and gums can become pathways for bacteria to enter the body. Dental problems can lead to infections affecting your pet’s heart, liver, and kidneys. Clean those teeth!!

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The natural mating season of cats in the Northern Hemisphere is from March to September. Chinese Zodiac 2017, Year of the Rooster The Chinese New Year 2017 is the Year of the Red Fire Rooster. It starts January 28th 2017 and extends to February 15th 2018. This is the year when you will need to work hard and be patient in order to achieve your goals and dreams.


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Pitties.Love.Peace Finding sanctuary for the world’s most misunderstood dogs written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair

he term “pit bull” brings about a lot of varying, strong emotions in people. For some, pit bulls are a symbol of what the media portrays them as - aggressive and tough. For others, pit bulls are a symbol of companionship, fun, and love. It's hard for many people to see the real side of dogs labeled as pit bulls and Pitties.Love.Peace is one organization that is trying to change the misconceptions about the breed.

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“I was one of those people who believed the media,” Laurie Yost, founder of Pitties.Love.Peace said. “I adopted my first bully breed mix, Bailey, 15 years ago and didn’t realize she was a bully breed mix until I took her to the vet. When I was told she had pit bull in her, I was unsure. The only experience I had was the negativity I saw on the news. Bailey changed everything I thought about the breed. She grew into an amazing dog, and my perspective changed. It’s thanks to her that I fell in love with the breed and it’s thanks to her that Pitties.Love.Peace was formed.” Pitties.Love.Peace is primarily a local rescue, as they realize there are endless dogs in need close to home. Dogs that enter the rescue are given medical care and training as necessary before they are available for adoption. To Laurie, adopting out healthy, sound

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dogs is always important, but even more so when running a bully breed rescue. “We have an even greater responsibility to have good breed ambassadors. It’s important for us to place dogs that are well balanced, so they can live fulfilling lives and spread awareness on how incredible bully breeds are.” When dogs are adopted from Pitties.Love.Peace, the rescue’s role in the dogs’ lives does not end. If owners run into training difficulties or little quirks with their adopted companions, they will gladly help them find the right path to resolving issues. If problems exceed an owner’s capabilities, or they are no longer able to keep their dog for any number of reasons, they will always take their dogs back. Once a dog is adopted from the rescue, its family is part of the rescue’s family forever. “The most gratifying part of having the rescue is saving dogs that would otherwise be euthanized. The second best part is seeing those dogs blossom in their new homes and seeing how happy their owners are,” Laurie said. There are plenty of dogs waiting to blossom into beautiful companions. Learn more about how you can help these wonderful dogs find their happy forever homes by visiting Pitties.Love.Peace online: pittieslovepeace.com


EDUCATION IS KEY Nationally, pit bull type dogs are surrendered to shelters more than any other kind of dog, and they are usually the most difficult to adopt out. “Pit bull” is not a breed, but rather a label placed on dogs with certain characteristics. The closest breed is the American Pit Bull Terrier. Purebred American Pit Bull Terriers are rarely in the shelter network. A better term is to call these mixes “bully breed mixes.” Bully breed mixes do great in sports such as agility, nose work, flyball, and obedience. Finding them a job is the best way to give them an outlet for their energy. While there are very energetic bully breed mixes, the vast majority are flexible and enjoy exercise as much as they enjoy cuddling on the couch. Bully breed mixes often make great therapy dogs because they are so in tune with people and enjoy human companionship. In addition to being great athletes and therapy dogs, pit bull type dogs have also gone on to be police canines. Aggressive? Owners describe these dogs as goofballs, clowns, and cuddle bugs.


CCP Chester COUNTY PET

LCP LANCASTER COUNTY PET

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The premier resource for connecting the Lancaster County, PA Community with pet and animal related information, services and events!

sales@lancastercountypet.com 717.406.7811


+ FUN FOCUS about owning alpacas is getting to run my shop,” Patty commented. “I enjoy interacting with customers, and most of all, I love selling high-quality products that they love.”

Owning Alpacas More than just fluffy faces written by Samantha St.Clair

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hile there is no argument the cute factor is enough of a reason to love alpacas, there are many other reasons these farm animals make delightful barn companions. Adding onto their entertaining natures, they are easy keepers and top fiber producers. Their high-quality fleece creates a whole new world for owners interested in its crafting abilities. Patty McKonly, the owner of Kleen Acres Farm, began her alpaca adventure in 2008 when her husband saw alpacas at a show and thought it would be a good idea to own them. While it was his idea, Patty became the operator of both the farm and her quaint country store. It didn’t take her long to fall in love with the alpacas and all they offered. “I love animals, and I love the fiber, so it worked out perfectly. I have become quite a fiber fanatic because of them.” Alpacas produce many items - from socks, sweaters, and scarves, to small felt animals. Clothing items are a big hit at Patty’s store, and she has many repeat customers that can’t get enough of their alpaca accessories. “What I love most

For those interested in starting a farm or farmette, Patty recommends starting even smaller than alpacas. “I started with chickens, and I recommend it to anyone looking to get into farm animals. Chickens are easier to sell than alpacas if you discover farming isn’t for you. Alpacas also live much longer, with lifespans averaging 25 years, so once you get them, you may have them for a long time.” Despite the significant commitment, alpacas are good beginner farm animals due to their easy care requirements. For the most part, they take care of themselves. “Another thing to keep in mind is alpacas are not very social animals; they are more cat-like in nature. It is not impossible to get a friendly, social alpaca, but it takes a lot of time and dedication to make them companion animals. They are more viable as fiber producers and enjoy their time in the field with their herd more than with humans. As long as you don’t mind having an animal that is more for observing than cuddling, they are great.” Owning a farm comes with a lot of fun aspects, though Patty cautions people to really think and do their research before starting such a venture of their own. “It’s a lot of work operating a farm, and there are a lot of expenses that go into owning animals. If you are ready for the financial and time commitments, however, it is a very rewarding path.”

MORE INFORMATION M Kleen Acres Farm is home to 23 Suri

alpacas and a variety of other farm animals. Contact Patty today to learn about the warm and beautiful alpaca products her farm offers: 717.471.8634

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IZZY

We carry items for cats and dogs, including food, treats, bedding, toys and hygiene products. We also special order anything for small animals, birds and fish!

17 W. Market Street, Marietta Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday 717-604-1196 • facebook.com/lovedogsPA

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Before the Pet Shop Your Puppy Lived Here His MOTHER Still Does End Puppy Mills DON’T SHOP RESCUE or ADOPT

Visit our website to volunteer! UnitedAgainstPuppyMills.com

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Compassionate Emergency and Specialty Health Care for your Pet.

At Pet Emergency Treatment and Specialties, we understand that your pet is a special member of your family that deserves quality care. When your pet needs services outside of your regular veterinarian’s expertise, you can count on our team of specialists to offer compassionate care in a variety of specialties including cardiology, dermatology, internal medicine, oncology, ophthalmology, radiology, surgery and acupuncture. Our specialists will work in tandem with you and your regular veterinarian to find the best solutions for your pet’s care.

Our Emergency Service is open Monday through Thursday from 6:00pm to 8:00am and from 6:00pm on Friday through 8:00am Monday morning and 24 hours per day on all major holidays. Our caring, professional staff is here to help when your regular vet isn’t available. Our full-service facility with on-site Veterinarians can handle your pet’s illness or injury right away. 30 LANCASTER COUNTY PET

PET EMERGENCY TREATMENT AND SPECIALTIES 930 North Queen Street Lancaster, PA 17603 Telephone (717) 295-7387 www.lancasterpetemergency.com


+ S P E C I A LT Y S E R V I C E S

Pet Emergency Treatment and Specialties (PETS) When your best friend is facing a health concern, it is important to find veterinary care with someone you trust. PETS has been offering compassionate emergency veterinary care in Lancaster County since 1990 with the opening of their Emergency Services Department. In 2010, PETS expanded this vision to include specialized veterinary care for pets requiring care beyond the expertise of their primary care veterinarian. Working with primary care veterinarians, PETS’ team of veterinary specialists offers the highest level of veterinary care to each and every patient. Today, PETS operates with 8 specialty departments led by outstanding veterinarians committed to your pet’s health. ACUPUNCTURE Pamela Datsko, DVM Acupuncture is the science of strategically placing needles to assist the body in self-healing. Acupuncture is commonly used to alleviate pain, decrease side effects from chemotherapy, aid in the support of declining organ functions, and can even lessen anxiety. Animals do well with this therapy and often fall asleep during a treatment. CARDIOLOGY Dr. Ellen Davison Cardiologists assist pets with problems involving the heart and circulatory system. The Cardiology Department uses advanced imaging to assess the condition of the heart. Afterward, they form a continuing care plan with the owners and their primary care veterinarian to improve quality of life and the longevity of their pet. DERMATOLOGY Dr. Kevin Shanley Dermatology problems in pets are common and include symptoms of itching, hair loss, sores, odor, dandruff, redness and inflammation. Dermatologists work to relieve skin conditions related to allergies, infections, autoimmune disorders, and parasites. Through the Dermatology Department, animals with skin conditions are treated so they can live happier, itch and pain-free lives.

INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Sarah Dowling, Dr. Matthew Krecic, Dr. Damon Rodriguez The Internal Medicine Department uses a team approach, working with your primary care veterinarian to provide the most optimal care for patients with complicated medical disorders. Internists obtain thorough histories, perform detailed physical exams, and use advanced diagnostic tests to manage endocrine, urinary, lung, liver, intestinal, and brain disorders. OPHTHALMOLOGY Dr. Brady Beale The Ophthalmology Department is dedicated to working with you and your primary care veterinarian to develop a treatment plan for problems associated with the eye. In addition to diagnosing, they provide treatment through medications and surgery when necessary. Outfitted with state of the art equipment, they are able to provide the best outcome for your pet’s eyes. ONCOLOGY Dr. Craig Clifford The Oncology Department understands the emotional impact that a diagnosis of cancer can have. The oncology team offers compassionate healthcare through services including chemotherapy, radiation therapy (off site), immunotherapy, and clinical trials evaluating cutting edge

INTERNAL MEDICINE DOCTORS, DR. DOWLING AND DR. RODRIGUEZ OBTAINING LAPAROSCOPIC LIVER BIOPSIES THROUGH TWO SMALL INCISIONS THE SIZE OF A PENCIL ERASER. SARAH LAUDENBERGER, CVT CLOSELY MONITORS THE PATIENT UNDER ANESTHESIA.

therapies. They treat all types of cancers and their primary focus is maintaining and improving your pet’s quality of life. RADIOLOGY Van W. Knox IV, VMD, DACVR (Dr. Knox) A Radiologist has gone through intense, formal training in all aspects of radiology, including radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The Radiology Department uses all of these to diagnose and properly treat diseases such as heart disease, cancer, liver and kidney disease. SURGERY Dr. Brian Bretz, Dr. Carlos Hodges Surgeons specialize in an array of surgical procedures including soft tissue surgery, neurosurgery, and orthopedics. The Surgery Department routinely performs procedures ranging from ACL repairs to lung biopsies. Whether it is emergency treatment or repairs to maintain your best friend’s quality of life, your pet will be in knowledgeable hands.

PET EMERGENCY TREATMENT AND SPECIALTIES is located at 930 North Queen Street in Lancaster. 717.295.7387 lancasterpetemergency.com

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+ H E A LT H

It Only Takes a “Shot” The Dangers of Antifreeze to Your Pets

ANTIFREEZE IS A LIQUID, TYPICALLY ONE BASED ON ETHYLENE GLYCOL, WHICH CAN BE ADDED TO WATER TO LOWER THE FREEZING POINT.

written by Bryan Langlois, DVM

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he cold chill in the air this time of year means that many of us will begin the oh so fun task of making sure our vehicles are ready for Old Man Winter and whatever he may throw at us. One of those tasks can involve topping off or completely changing out the antifreeze in your car. It is important to exercise great caution if you store or work with antifreeze anywhere near where your faithful feline or cuddly canine might be able to get at it. A few licks can be deadly for them. The ingredient that makes antifreeze so valuable in keeping our cars cooling systems from completely freezing up, ethylene glycol, is the same ingredient that can cause a chain of events leading to severe acute kidney failure and shut down in your pets. Once ingested, the ethylene glycol is broken down into more toxic ingredients that then cause damage to kidneys, eventually causing the kidneys to completely fail. Once this damage starts, it can be very hard for us as veterinarians to be able to do anything to help save your pet.

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So how much does your dog need to ingest to cause all these horrible things to happen? No more than the amount you can pour into your average shot glass is enough to kill an average sized dog in the 40-60 pound range. Just a few licks are all it takes to poison a cat. This is why we get so worried anytime even a small amount might have been taken in by your pet. Why would your dog or cat want to drink this toxic substance up so readily? Well, because it has a very sweet taste to it. Some companies have added a bittering agent to it in order to make sure pets are less likely to seek it out, but this is not a guarantee by any means that they won’t. Remember too that it is not just your pets you have to worry about. Any amount spilled out in the environment can be taken in by a stray cat, other wildlife, or even your neighbor’s dog while out on a walk. So make sure ANY spill is cleaned up completely. You don’t want to be the one responsible for the horrible death of another creature by not cleaning a spill up. Signs that your pet may have ingested antifreeze can be subtle at first. They may

just appear a little more sedated or even “drunk” in a way. Often times pets are sleeping and these signs are missed. The more serious signs then develop such as vomiting, lethargy, possibly urinating more than normal, rapid breathing, having difficultly standing up, and potentially seizures. If there is ANY remote possibility that your pet may have gotten into antifreeze, you must contact your vet or the local emergency clinic IMMEDIATELY! There are things that your vet can do to try and treat your pet once antifreeze is ingested, but it has to be done very early, often within the first 12 hours or sooner. As we all prepare for winter’s blast of cold by tending to our cars and trucks, please remember to make sure your pets cannot get near even the smallest amount of antifreeze. Clean up any spills completely, and make sure to contact your veterinarian if you have any questions or suspicions of your pet drinking some. Remember…it only takes a “shot”!!

BRYAN LANGLOIS, DVM is the Medical Director at Pet Pantry of Lancaster County, PA


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+ VET INSIGHTS

Are there any risks with the procedure? As with any anesthetic procedure, there is some risk involved with spay or castration. Hemorrhage, blood clots, allergic or anaphylactic reactions to medications, and respiratory or cardiac arrest are all very real, though extremely rare complications of surgery. Advances in anesthetic drugs, anesthetic monitoring, pain medications, and the younger age surgery is performed have all greatly reduced the incidence of complications post-operatively.

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When is the right time to get my pet spayed or neutered? The age of pet sterilization is made on a case by case basis but general guidelines include very early surgery for cats, especially indoor/outdoor and feral cats because they are fertile at such a young age. Cats can often be neutered by 12 weeks of age to prevent unwanted pregnancy. While early surgery is possible in dogs as well, larger breed dogs may benefit from attaining 6 months of age to ensure greater joint strength later in life. Research is ongoing to determine the exact best age but we advocate before a female’s first heat and before a male begins lifting his leg to mark territory.

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VET INSIGHTS

Spaying and Neutering

Q&A DR. DIANE TOMASKOVICH (New Holland Veterinary Hospital)

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Are there behavioral benefits? Behaviorally, spay/neuter reduces the desire for pets to roam, marking territory for dogs, spraying in cats, and behaving aggressively or territorially with other animals or humans.

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Will spaying or neutering cause my pet’s personality to change? Spaying or neutering will minimally affect the personality of any pet, but it does depend in part on the age at which it is performed. Animals that are older when neutered may mellow after surgery, though behaviors that become ingrained may not change after neutering at an older age.

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SAMMY the office cat

Photo by Emily Ash

What are the health benefits of getting my pet spayed or neutered? Female animals benefit from spaying (ovariohysterectomy) in several ways. By removing their ovaries and uterus, you are eliminating the chance of them becoming cancerous, and it also reduces the chance of mammary cancer later in life. Spaying also eliminates the possibility of uterine infections which can be life threatening. It also eliminates the chance of accidental pregnancy. Males benefit similarly in eliminating the chance of testicular cancers, decreasing the chance of prostatic cancer, and decreasing the chance of venereal infections.

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+ B E H AV I O R & T R A I N I N G

Winter Training Goals Take advantage of winter with these equine activities written by Samantha St.Clair

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ith the show season at bay, for many riders, winter is a time for relaxing. While it may be tempting to curl up by a warm fire for the next few months, it is actually the perfect time to concentrate on your skills and catch up with your horse’s needs. “Winter is excellent for working on your equitation. Fixing problems or habits you may have developed during your show season are much easier to address in the off-season,” commented Darlaina Pope, a local riding instructor. “Working on hand position, body position, and balance are all winter goals that will prepare you for spring shows.” With an indoor arena and some dedication, these simple objectives will keep you focused even when it’s tempting to fall back on practice. MONKEY BEAR

DARLAINA WITH PONY, MONKEY BEAR

For those who do not have access to an indoor arena and are working with limited space, there are plenty of other activities to keep you and your horse occupied in the colder months. If your horse has any small quirks that interfere with regular tasks, take the opportunity to focus on those issues. Some tasks to work on include tacking, leading, loading in and out of a trailer, and standing correctly for grooming. Strengthening your bond with your horse during this time is also rewarding. Bonding activities can range from grooming to going on light trail rides with friends when the weather permits. “Additionally, this is a suitable time for people to get their horse’s care in check. Getting routine veterinary and dental care managed is perfect in the off-season. It’s also good to try alternative therapies or supplements to get your horse into show shape,” Darlaina said. Providing for them physically and giving them some mental relaxation in the winter may be the best remedy for a performance ready horse in the spring.

On those cold, snowy days when you’re cooped up in your house, catching up on research is an ideal way to pass the time. Reading articles, watching online courses, attending seminars, or going to trade shows are ways you can improve yourself as a rider while staying indoors. Alternatively, you may want to try riding lessons to hone in on flaws in your riding. Lessons are valuable in winter since training barns have horses and knowledgeable instructors on sight to help you strengthen your horsemanship. For those who are new to the riding world, this is an option for you, too. Because riding facilities have indoor arenas, it’s an exciting way to escape the snow and have some fun with equines!

DARLAINA POPE has worked with horses for 23 years and currently owns three horses and a pony. To Darlaina, her animals are a blessing, and she is thankful for every moment she can spend with them. If you are interested in riding lessons with a passionate and professional instructor, contact Darlaina at 717.344.6783 to get started!

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+ P ET S E RV I C E S

Sit and Stay

HEAT LAMPS ARE ONE DIRECT WAY TO APPLY HEAT TO A BIRD WHEN IT IS VERY COLD.

Below are just a few of the many businesses in the area

GROOMERS

PET SITTERS

If your canine or feline friend is in need of some fur and nail styling, there is no shortage of passionate and professional groomers here in Lancaster.

You will find these experienced and passionate pet care professionals are happy to watch over your furry family members.

Drake’s Pet Place 1874 Lincoln Hwy. E, Lancaster, PA 17602 717.290.1131 facebook.com/Drakes-Pet-Place

Deb’s Pet Buddies Lititz, PA 17543 717.283.4438 debspetbuddies.com

Renee’s Pet Grooming Village Center at Mountville 117 Oak Ridge Drive Mountville, PA 17554 717.285.3330 reneespetgroomingsalon.ieasysite.com

Petwatch Plus Pet Sitting Service 717.738.3370 petwatch-plus.com

That Groom Room 237 Centerville Road, Suite A Lancaster, PA 17603 717.484.9758 thatpetplace.com/that-groom-room-menu

There are many pet treats and baked goodies found in various grocery stores and specialty shops. Unfortunately, some contain ingredients that will add unwanted pounds or may not provide any nutritional value. We prefer our credible local Pet Bakeries here in the Lancaster area. Be mindful of the following tips when choosing the best for your furry family member: • Focus on nutritional health • Grain free is always better • Locally sourced ingredients • Organic and non-GMO Pet Bakery information courtesy of Tami Haines of Doglicious Bakery, LLC 717.405.5318

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Pause Awhile With Samantha 680 Cloverleaf Road Elizabethtown, PA 17022 717.824.6152 facebook.com/pawsamantha

Once Upon a Dog Tail Lancaster, PA 717.575.2656 onceuponadogtail@yahoo.com onceuponadogtail.com

TRAINING Lancaster County boasts some of the best when it comes to Canine Obedience Training Schools and their expert training techniques. Whether you have a puppy, adult rescue or a senior, these professionals can make life much more harmonious between you and your best friend.

PET BAKERIES It is the season for goodies and our pets should certainly be able to indulge! Try one of our local bakers and leave the “perfect pet treats” to the pros.

Dog Sense, LLC 440 Stoney Lane, Lancaster, PA 17603 717.509.5652 dogsensewithwendy.com

Doglicious Bakery, LLC 90 West Main Street, Lebanon, PA 17042 717.405.5318 dogliciousbakery.com

Kaye Ames School for Dogs 809 New Holland Avenue Lancaster, PA 17602 717.201.3401 kayeames.net

Just Four Dogs & Cats Pet Bakery Serving Lancaster and Central PA 717.756.7519 justfourdogs.com Two Pups Pastries 717.341.7844 twopupspastries.com

Playful Pups Retreat 850 Milton Grove Road N. Elizabethtown, PA 17022 717.689.3408 playfulpupsretreat.com The Dog Boss, LLC 717.989.0309 thedogboss.net


+ AROUND LANCASTER

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Dozer is a rescue from the LCSPCA in Mountville

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Bridget, an Australian Shepherd mix, laying down after a January 2016 snowstorm

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Ghidorah in her Jeep

Nora from Lititz

Penny and Lincoln are both dalmatians

Ghidorah is a 1 year old fancy rat (Rattus norvegicus)

Buddy the Chihuahua and Penny the Jack Russell

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Champ, a lab wearing a red jacket in snow

Thor, a 5 year old baby from Conestoga

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Furry Encounters

“LIKE US ON FACEBOOK” to stay updated on what our next theme will be and for information on submitting your pet’s photo for the next edition!

Dillon, a Border Collie mix, running at Wolgemuth Park, Elizabethtown

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+ I N F O R M AT I O N

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BIRD RESCUES

Pet resources

ANIMAL SUPPORT AGENCIES 2nd Chance 4 Life Rescue Foster network for dogs PO Box 549 Elizabethtown, PA 17022 2ndchance4liferescue.org BARK Borough Animal Response krew 43 N Clinton Street York, PA 17404 • 717.880.2957 westyorkbark.org Delaware Valley Golden Retriever Rescue Golden & Labrador retrievers rescue 60 Vera Cruz Road Reinholds, PA 17569 • 717.484.4799 dvgrr.org Furever Home Adoption Center, Inc. All volunteer, no kill, cage free facility 5984 Main Street East Petersburg, PA 17520 • 717.560.6400 fureverhomeadoptioncenter.com Helping Hands for Animals Resource for caretakers and friends of stray and feral cats Lancaster, PA • 717.687.7297 helpinghandsforanimals.org Humane League of Lancaster County Shelter, Adopt, Educate & Protect 2195 Lincoln Highway E. Lancaster, PA 17602 • 717.393.6551 humaneleague.com Lancaster C.A.R.E.S Coalition for Animal Rescues, Education and Services 5984 Main Street East Petersburg, PA 17520 717.983.8878 • lancastercares.org Lancaster County Animal Coalition Building a better community through compassion to animals PO Box 363 • Elizabethtown, PA 17022 facebook.lancastercountyanimalcoalition Lancaster County SPCA Shelter, humane care and adoptions of stray and unwanted animals 848 South Prince Street Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.917.6979 lancasterspca.org

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Leo’s Helping Paws Assistance to dog rescue groups 1284 Wheatland Avenue Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.475.9621 leoshelpingpaws.org Lost Paws of Lancaster Animal Rescue PO Box 551 Lititz, PA 17543 • 717.725.3136 lostpawsoflancaster.org Mostly Muttz Rescue, Inc. All-volunteer, foster based canine rescue PO Box 406 Gilbertsville, PA 19525 mostlymuttz.org One Dog at a Time ODAAT Humane rescue group helping dogs 225 Meadow Woods Drive Lewistown, PA 17044 • 888.509.2011 onedogatatime.us PAWS Cat Rescue No-kill animal rescue and spay/neuter Petsmart • 1700 Fruitville Pike Lancaster, PA 17601 • 717.957.8122 pawsofpa.org Pet Pantry of Lancaster County Helping avoid the surrender of a family pet due to the lack of resources 26 Millersville Road Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.983.8878 petpantrylc.org

Feathered Sanctuary Exotic Bird Rescue 1674 Kirkwood Pike Kirkwood, PA 17536 • 717.529.2966 featheredsanctuary.com

LARGE ANIMAL LAW ENFORCEMENT Large Animal Protection Society PO Box 243 West Grove, PA 19390 • 610.869.9880 largeanimalprotectionsociety.org

EMERGENCY SERVICES ORCA Organization for Responsible Care of Animals 401 East Orange Street Lancaster, PA 17602 • 717.397.8922 orcarescue.org

PETS Pet Emergency Treatment Services 930 North Queen Street Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.295.7387 lancasterpetemergency.com

THERAPY SERVICES KPETS Pet Enhanced Therapy Services 630 Janet Avenue Lancaster, PA 17601 • 888.685.7387 kpets.org

WOLF RESCUE Wolf Sanctuary of PA 465 Speedwell Forge Road Lititz, PA 17543 • 717.626.4617 wolfsanctuarypa.org

LCP LANCASTER COUNTY PET

lancastercountypet.com


GETTING TO THE ROOT OF YOUR PET’S HEALTH Oral Health in Dogs and Cats: Caring for your pet’s teeth and gums plays a critical role in helping them to enjoy a long, happy and healthy life. Without proper dental care, plaque and tartar buildup can lead to periodontal disease. If left untreated, periodontal disease can result in tooth loss, red, swollen and tender gums, gum recession, bleeding, pain and bad breath. Infection caused by periodontal disease can also enter the bloodstream, and potentially affect the heart, liver and kidneys. Schedule your pet's dental exam today! 20% OFF DENTAL CLEANING SIGNS OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE:

BEFORE

(mention LCP)

• • • • • • • • • • •

Acting hungry but being reluctant to eat Dropping food out of their mouth Refusing to play with their toys Halitosis or bad breath Rubbing or pawing at their face Salivation or drooling Sneezing and Nasal discharge Facial Swelling Red swollen gums Loose teeth Listless and just not acting right

823 Rohrerstown Road Lancaster, PA 17601 (717) 393-TAIL (8245)

Hours: Monday-Friday 8AM-6PM Every other Saturday 8AM- 12 NOON

AFTER

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www.happytailslancaster.com

Winter 2017