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WINTER 2016

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Fostering Lancaster

+ Lancaster City’s K-9 Unit + Operation Scarlet


+ CONTENTS

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WINTER 2016

Rescue Highlight

FEATURES

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DEPARTMENTS

Fostering Pets

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If you are unsure about pet ownership or are wanting to help homeless animals, fostering may be the solution BY SAMANTHA ST.CLAIR

16 Police Canines Discover why police canines are necessary and how they are designed for fighting crime

Letter From Editor Working with animals

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Tips Quick facts about animals, from hybrid wildlife to exotic pets

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Events Local events from January-March, 2016

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The Good Stuff Our favorite products from around Lancaster

BY SAMANTHA ST.CLAIR

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Pet Lover Nike, a flyball superstar and best friend

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Community Interview with Laurie Yost, owner of Playful Pups Retreat

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Meet the Breed A famous breed of goat, the Myotonic goat

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Seasonal Winter Wonderland, caring for your horse this winter

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Health All the World is a Litter Box, part two

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Rescue Highlight Operation Scarlet, a rescue specializing in saving the lives of Shar-Pei

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Fun Focus Owning a Business with Animals

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Real Pet St. Anne’s, a continuing care community that understands the importance of pets

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Nutrition How to be mindful when choosing treats for your pet

16 Lancaster K-9 Unit

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Pet Services Information on various local businesses

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Around Lancaster Winter pet photos provided by LCP readers

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Information Pet Resources and contact information

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LCP

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Caring for pets... and their people, too.

LANCASTER COUNTY PET The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Our doctors provide a range of general medical and surgical services. We can take care of your dog, cat, rabbit, pot-bellied pig, ferret, and a variety of birds. Stop in with your furry or feathered friends and check out our recently remodeled hospital!

Publisher Cecilia Cove, LLC Editor in Chief Samantha St.Clair Contributing Editor Joyce Freiwald Art Director Sally Heineman Sales Helen Venesky, Jen Schmalhofer Photographers Samantha St.Clair, Helen Venesky

FREE First Exam!

Contributors Bryan Langlois, DVM

VCA HOME DELIVERY

For New Clients Get a Free Pet Health Exam Complete our online form to instantly receive your Free Pet Health Exam coupon for VCA Bridgeport Animal Hospital in Lancaster, PA. Our veterinarians and veterinary staff looks forward to meeting you soon.

Pet Medication and Food Delivery to Your Home Your pet’s medication delivered to your door. Everyone benefits from our unique Home Delivery service, but the biggest winner is your pet, because they will never miss a treatment schedules.

Published by Cecilia Cove, LLC P.O. Box 44, Marietta, PA 17547 717.406.7811 • lancastercountypet.com

+ Advertising inquiries email: sales@lancastercountypet.com

? Primary Care

Advanced Care

Preventive Care

Pet Grooming

VCA Bridgeport Animal Hospital

Pet Boarding

Pet Counseling Care

1251 Ranck Mill Road Lancaster, PA 17602 Phone: 717-393-9074 Fax: 717-393-6619 Mon-Thu 8:00 AM - 7:30 PM Fri 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sat 8:00 AM - 11:30 AM Sun 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM vcahospitals.com/bridgeport

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HAVE ANY FEEDBACK TO GIVE US? Or perhaps you have ideas for topics you’d like to see in our publication or a unique story about your own pet! If so, please contact us at editor@lancastercountypet.com. PHOTO CREDITS: Cover. Vlad Siaber/Shutterstock Pg 1. cynoclub/Shutterstock; Vira Mylyan-Monastyrska/Shutterstock Pg 2. Napat/Shutterstock Pg 3. Gridin Alex/Shutterstock Pg 4. Rosa Jay/Shutterstock; Paul Tessier/Shutterstock; brm1949/Adobestock; TOMO/Adobestock; birdiegal/Adobestock Pg 7 aaltair/Shutterstock; Holly Kuchera/Shutterstock, Igor Kovalchuk/Shutterstock Pg 11. Studio Barcelona/Shutterstock Pg 22. ondrejsustik/Shutterstock; Katerina Planina/Shutterstock; artcphotos/Shutterstock; B Calkin/Shutterstock; Anna Hoychuk/Shutterstock; Pg 23. Ermolaev Alexander/Shutterstock Pg 30 ifong/Shutterstock; Action Sports Photography/Shutterstock Pg 32. bbevren/Shutterstock

LCP (Lancaster County Pet) is published quarterly and distributed throughout Lancaster County, PA. All content of this magazine, including design, photos and editorial content is Copyright©2016 by Cecilia Cove, LLC. All rights reserved. No reproduction of printed materials is permitted without the written consent of the Publisher. LCP is a registered trademark of Cecilia Cove, LLC.


+ E D I TO R’S L ET T E R

WORKING WITH ANIMALS Last edition I spoke of how animals improve our lives, and now I want to draw attention to how they improve our work lives. Imagine having your pet join you at work - no more leaving them home alone all day! In today’s society, this is becoming more of a reality, which is excellent news for pet lovers. Many large companies are realizing the stress relieving benefits of allowing animals in the workplace. Small businesses, too, are noticing the benefits of having animals in their shops. The beautiful thing about Lancaster is, you never know when you’ll run into a pet while shopping. I have seen them in various businesses, such as bookstores and hobby stores. People love returning to stores with pets in them. Supporting small businesses is great. Supporting those with pets? Even better! For the lucky ones, working with animals entails having a job that revolves around our furry companions. It’s great seeing the many small businesses in our area that are all about pets. From groomers, to boarders and supply stores, Lancaster has it all. It is a dream job of many to own a pet related business, and while it is hard work, it is becoming an easier venture due to people shopping for their pets more than ever. As with anything, there are downfalls to working beside animals. Suddenly having a dog’s head on your lap while you are busily trying to finish a project, or having your cat decide your keyboard is a great bed while you are trying to send emails can be distracting. But, of course, they are just trying to say you need a break.

Throughout our magazine you’ll find informative bubbles.

HELPFUL TIP

In this edition, you’ll get to view a variety of ways pets are entering the workforce. The Lancaster City Police K-9 Unit is a great example of working alongside loyal dogs as part of the job. L’l Brown Goat shows that goats make great employees. Doglicious Bakery and Playful Pups Retreat show the compassion it takes to run your own pet business. Let’s not forget those working for animals, such as the kitten foster parents featured in this edition. Working for animals on a volunteer basis is a great way to work with animals if your job does not allow it. I’d like to ask all of you - where have you spotted pets at work and what are your favorite pet-friendly businesses?

RABBITS ARE VERY ADAPTABLE TO COLD TEMPERATURES UNLIKE HOT TEMPERATURES. WINTER 2016

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+ TIPS

New Pennsylvania Law Outlaws Animal Fighting Paraphernalia

TipS to Tails

The law bans any animal-fighting device, implement, object or drug used in the illegal practice of dog fighting in the attempt to stop these criminal acts.

Quick Facts about Pets

CAPYBARA AN INTELLIGENT AND AFFECTIONATE GIANT RODENT THAT IS LEGAL TO HAVE AS A PET IN PA AND TEXAS.

Currently there are

48 RABBIT BREEDS recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association. The breeds range in size from 2 pounds to over 20 pounds depending on the rabbit.

STATE ANIMAL The Whitetail Deer Pennsylvania designated them as the official state animal in 1959.

WINTER 2016 PET CELEBRATIONS January National Train Your Dog Month Walk Your Pet Month Adopt a Rescued Bird Month

February National Pet Dental Health Month Responsible Pet Owners Month Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month National Prevent a Litter Month Observe a Snowy Owl? They usually only visit Pennsylvania for the winter. To find out more about these majestic raptors or to report a sighting, please visit projectsnowstorm.org.

March Poison Prevention Awareness Month Adopt a Rescued Guinea Pig Month 4 LANCASTER COUNTY PET

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LANCASTER COUNTY

Meet the Coywolf... A new coyote-wolf hybrid. The coywolf is the product of weak versions of wolves and coyotes interbreeding between each other, as well as with dogs. It’s reported that millions now roam North America.


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+ EVENTS

Events

MIGRATION OF SNOW GEESE

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

9 COCKER SPANIEL

6 LOST PAWS OF LANCASTER

1 MIDDLE CREEK WILDLIFE

ADOPTION CENTER INC. MEET AND GREET That Fish Place - That Pet Place 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster cockeradoptions.org

MEET AND GREET That Fish Place - That Pet Place 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster lostpawsoflancaster.org

MIGRATION OF SNOW GEESE Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area 100 Museum Road, Stevens portal.state.pa.us

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PA FARM SHOW COMPLEX & EXPO CENTER PENNSYLVANIA STATE FARM SHOW 2300 North Cameron Street, Harrisburg farmshow.state.pa.us

PA FARM SHOW COMPLEX & EXPO CENTER 14TH ANNUAL PENNSYLVANIA HORSE WORLD EXPO 2300 North Cameron Street, Harrisburg pafarmshowcomplex.com

16 KPETS

16-20

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LANCASTER KENNEL CLUB CELTIC CLASSIC DOG SHOW 334 Carlisle Avenue, York lancasterkennelclub.org

PENN ANIMAL BLOOD BANK That Fish Place - That Pet Place 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster kpets.org

FULL MOON TOUR

23 PET PANTRY OF LANCASTER

7 WOLF SANCTUARY

CAT VACCINE CLINIC That Fish Place - That Pet Place 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster petpantrylc.org

FULL MOON TOUR 465 Speedwell Forge Road, Lititz wolfsanctuarypa.org

24 CRESCENDO TRAINING

DELAWARE VALLEY GOLDEN RETRIEVER RESCUE MEET AND GREET THE GOLDENS Golden Gateway 60 Vera Cruz Road, Reinholds dvggr.org

CENTRE, LLC JACK FROST JUBILEE OPEN FUN HORSE SHOW SERIES 288 South Fairmount Road, Ephrata crescendotrainingcentre.com

30 PET PANTRY OF LANCASTER DOG VACCINE CLINIC That Fish Place - That Pet Place 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster petpantrylc.org

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19 ROCKY CREEK DOG AGILITY PAIN IN THE BUTT 5K 110 Hahnstown Road, Ephrata rockycreekdogagility.com Have an upcoming 2016 SPRING Event?

Share it with us! Events are subject to change. Please contact event host.

20 THAT PET SHOW REPTILES, AMPHIBIANS, SMALL PETS AND MORE That Fish Place - That Pet Place 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster thatpetplace.com

HAMSTERS’ TEETH CONTINUE TO GROW THROUGHOUT THEIR LIVES.

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Fostering Lancaster The importance of fostering in our community written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair

E

veryone knows that the best way to help homeless animals is to adopt. However, that option isn’t available to everyone. Taking on a new pet is a lot of responsibility, especially if you already have others in your home. A great alternative to adoption is fostering, and Lancaster County has a need for plenty of foster homes.

What is Fostering and Why is it Important? The basic goal of fostering is to provide a loving, temporary home for pets while they wait for permanent, “furever” homes. Animals of all types need foster homes, from cats and dogs to rabbits and birds. Finding an organization that needs fostering for the type of pet you wish to help is an essential first step to becoming a foster home. There are many different kinds of fostering systems, which depend highly on which rescue or shelter organization you are planning to volunteer with. Some rescues will require you to take on full financial and care responsibilities of the animal. Others, such as Lost Paws of Lancaster, pay for the majority of the care, including vet costs and some litter and food expenses. This makes fostering possible for more families. “We are only as big as our foster community,” said Kristine, a volunteer with Lost Paws. Like many rescues, fostering is a large part of their program. The more foster homes they have, the more cats they can save. Without foster homes, many of these animals wouldn’t have the opportunity to recover from physical and emotional problems. “We also get the knowledge of knowing what the cats are like in a home setting since our foster families give us a good profile of their personalities,” Kristine said. Adopting a cat from a foster home allows adopters to understand the kind of cat they are adopting. Whether healing a sick cat or socializing a shy one, foster families play an integral role in making pets suitable for their new lives. 8 LANCASTER COUNTY PET


“The basic goal of fostering is to provide a loving, temporary home for pets while they wait for permanent, “furever” homes. Animals of all types need foster homes, from cats and dogs to rabbits and birds.”

LUCY, ONE OF THREE KITTENS BEING FOSTERED BY KAYLA AND TYLER THROUGH LOST PAWS OF LANCASTER.

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+ FOSTERING

How to Make Your Foster Comfortable...

1

Provide a separate, quiet space for your new foster to get adjusted to your home and you.

2

If you have your own pets, If you have your own pets, introduce them to the introduce them to the foster afterthe the fosterslowly slowly after adjustment period. adjustment period.

3

Be patient - it can take time for fosters to get used to you and being handled.

“When kittens come into homes after being with their feral mothers, it takes time for them to adjust to their new surroundings.” 10 LANCASTER COUNTY PET

4

Always keep in touch with

Always keep in touch with the rescue organization and don’t be the rescue organization afraid and don’t be afraid to to ask questions! ask questions!


What is it Like Being a Foster Home? Fostering does more than save lives - it also touches the lives of those involved. Kayla and Tyler of Lancaster began fostering earlier this year after adopting a cat from Lost Paws. “It was something I had always considered, but I didn’t know how to get started. We decided after adopting Skylar in July that it was time to start fostering.” Tyler said. The process was easy for them since the forms for adopting and fostering are similar. Once forms are filled out and you are cleared, your fostering experience can begin. Kayla and Tyler had 3 kittens at the time of our interview together named Lucy, Amy and Burliose. Kittens are unsurprisingly favorites of foster families. Although they are usually fun, there are some considerations to keep in mind. “You have to try to not get too attached. You want to be there for them, but need to stay emotionally distant. We lost some of our first foster kittens to illness and it was rough,” said Tyler. Since they are so young, kittens’ immune systems aren’t strong and they are more prone to illnesses they can’t recover from. “You also have to be ready for them to be difficult at times. They are rescues and most haven’t been in homes.” Tyler explained. Along with health, socialization is one of the top reasons rehabilitation is needed. When kittens come into homes after being with their feral mothers, it takes time for them to adjust to their new surroundings. However, for those with patience and strong hearts, the struggles are nothing in comparison to the joy and satisfaction fostering brings. “Seeing pictures of them in their new homes makes us remember good things happen through this program.” Kristine said. She smiled. “I get Christmas photos from one of my fosters every year.” Letting go of animals can be difficult, but when you keep in mind that you are only a stepping stone in their lives it makes it easier. Sometimes, though, you just can’t help falling in love. Perhaps the biggest warning of all to give to those who are looking into fostering is that “foster failures”, also known as adopting your own foster, are almost always inevitable. In fact, one of the three kittens may be just that. “We’re about 95% sure we’re keeping him,” Tyler joked, speaking of the little grey kitten, Burliose.

Is Fostering for Me? If you are looking to adopt a pet, but don’t know if it is right for you, fostering may be a good first step in pet ownership. Fostering gives new owners the experience of living with animals while having the help and guidance of the rescue along the way.

“It’s definitely given us a lot more knowledge on kittens.” Kayla said. Testing pet ownership before actually owning a pet can mean the difference between animals staying in their homes, and going into rescues. Fostering is a great educational experience that, if practiced more, would allow people to know if an animal is right for them. Sometimes fostering is the best type of ownership, too! “The good thing is, you get to play with kittens all the time.” Kristine explained. “Fostering is for people who never want their cats to grow up.” For those who only want to own kittens, fostering is a good solution. Adult cats also need foster homes and are usually less time consuming, making them a better fit for some. For many, the satisfaction of fostering is seeing cats come out of their shell, or watching sick or injured cats recover. If you think you are ready to take on the adventure of fostering and rehoming for any sort of animal, keep in mind all that comes with it. It takes a strong heart to deal with some of the hardships, and it can be difficult to let go. If you feel you can handle those moments, the end result is very worthwhile. Every foster family provides another home for yet another lost pet, adding to the number that can be saved. If you are unsure about fostering, do more research and see if you have room in your heart and home. Fostering isn’t for everyone, and is just one of many ways to help animals in the community. Lost Paws of Lancaster rescues and rehabilitates cats and older dogs from various backgrounds, including owner surrenders, strays and those pulled from shelters. If you are interested in learning more about their program, visit them online: lostpawsoflancaster.org

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+ THE GOOD STUFF

IN 2015, AMERICANS SPENT MORE THAN $60 BILLION ON THEIR PETS. CUSTOMERS PREFER SMALL BUSINESSES VS. BIG-BOX STORES.

Our favoriteS Products from local businesses

2 ALCOTT RETRACTABLE LEASHES

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Reflective sides and belts for ultimate visibility Small to large dogs • 1 yr. warranty 16' belt (no cords) with soft grip handle • $19.99-$29.99 Keystone Pet Place 100 W. Main St., Mount Joy 717.492.0027 • keystonepetplace.com

VISIBILITY LED COLLARS Fits 10'' x 28'' • 3 glow modes Battery life is 144 hours • $12.99 Keystone Pet Place 100 W. Main St., Mount Joy 717.492.0027 • keystonepetplace.com

3

GOLD DOG BRACELET The perfect accessory for any dog lover Finch Jewelers 1841 Columbia Ave., Lancaster 717.293.3333 • finchjewelers.com

5 STARMARK TREAT BALLS

4 THE GILDED PUPPY COAT 30 designs of fleece including plaids, licensed characters, geometric, stripes, animal prints, and more • $40.00+ The Gilded Puppy 717.917.8909 etsy.com/shop/TheGildedPuppy

A sturdy, bouncy play ball Add a treat for additional fun $11.99+ Drake’s Pet Place 1874 Lincoln Hwy., East Lancaster 717.290.1131

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+ PET LOVER NIKE HITTING THE FLYBALL BOX, WHICH POPS THE BALL OUT FOR HIM TO CATCH AND RETURN TO HIS OWNER.

TODAY, TOP FLYBALL SPEEDS ARE AROUND 3.4 SECONDS!

Flyball Superstar An ideal mix of athlete and best friend written by Samantha St.Clair

F

lyball is a canine sport quickly gaining popularity. As a fast paced relay race, it is certainly exciting. Two teams of four dogs race head to head, jumping over four jumps to retrieve a ball and take it back to their owner. It is one of a few canine sports where there is teamwork between dogs. There is a member of Lancaster County who represents the ideal candidate for the sport. His name is Nike and he is owned by Kim and Eric Foster of Quarryville. Nike is a sport bred dog, born in Michigan. His breeder is part of one of the top flyball teams in the nation. When Nike was born 9 years ago, the ideal mix for this sport was what he is: border collie mixed with Staffordshire bull terrier, otherwise known as a border staffy. Today, that has changed to the border collie and whippet mix. Well bred sport dogs are both excellent at what they are bred to do and also make great family pets. “At trials he is very noisy and shows a lot of enthusiasm,” Kim said. With that enthusiasm, Nike has had a long and great career. At his top speed he could do his flyball pass in 3.7 seconds. The length of the flyball course is 102 feet - so Nike is one fast little pup! Typical of his mix, he is a great all around dog with intelligence,

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At his top speed he could do his flyball pass in 3.7 seconds. The length of the flyball course is 102 feet - so Nike is one fast little pup!

speed and devotion. In the flyball scene he has high energy, and just like a switch, when there is no ball or box in sight, he is calm and loves to eat, sleep and cuddle. While Kim has several other dogs that participate in flyball, she said there is no other dog like him. He is the one that gave her and her husband the “flyball bug” and made them fall in love with the sport. He has an excellent drive for his work and a love for his family, providing them with the best companion they could ask for. “He is my heart dog,” she said. Everyone Nike meets loves him, too. He has wiggled into the hearts of others he has met and has even been an inspiration for people to try flyball or get their own sport dogs. With his sweet temperament and flexibility between work and home life, he has impressed many. However, it doesn’t take a sport mix to run flyball. Anyone who has a dog that loves tennis balls and can tolerate the organized chaos of a flyball trial can catch the bug too!

Kim and Eric Foster are the owners of the Dogtown Flyball team and have trained many flyball dogs. There are various resources around Lancaster County for flyball training and to get your dog on a flyball team if you are interested!


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Lancaster City’s K-9 Unit The Lancaster City Police Department has a large number of community heroes, four of which are canines written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair

I

had the privilege of attending a training day with the K-9 Unit and learned that police canines do more than just detect narcotics and take down criminals. Their lives are similar to most of ours - complex but with enjoyable moments of simplicity. They spend long hours training, working and constantly learning, but return home at night to normal lives as part of the family. Though, to a working canine, their job is the real bliss of life. Watching a working dog is an amazing sight. They are full of enthusiasm and velocity while at work. For the entire day I spent at the training session, the dogs never calmed down. When they recognized they were about to be presented with a task, barking erupted from all of the patrol vehicles in a chorus of eager dogs wanting their turn in the spotlight. Along with enthusiasm, these dogs have many other attributes that make them extraordinary officers. Their breeds play an integral role. “These dogs were bred for their intelligence, willingness to please, and love for work,” said Officer Ryan Hockley. His dog, Leo, is now seven years old and has served Lancaster for nearly his whole life. Leo is a German Shepherd (GSD) and the police department also has two Belgian Malinois and GSD mixes, and a purebred Malinois. Both breeds would be bored without their work. The boundless energy they displayed throughout their training day was incredible, as I know typical house dogs would be done after one run across the large field the dogs crossed several times throughout the day in addition to their other tasks. Their bark and bite also make them perfect for the job. As large, fast and strong dogs, they are intimidating. “Most people surrender when they learn we have a dog,” said Officer Hockley. Proper biting techniques are learned to ensure the dogs take down perpetrators correctly. This is taught by those wearing bite suits during training by guiding the dog to bite the upper arm.

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OFFICER DAVE RACHOR WITH 8 YEAR OLD GSD AND MALINOIS MIX, TOM.

OFFICER BEN BRADLEY WITH 2 YEAR OLD WODAN, THE UNIT'S ONLY BOMB DETECTION CANINE.

OFFICER STEVEN ALEXANDER WITH 2 YEAR OLD GSD AND MALINOIS MIX, AXEL.

OFFICER RYAN HOCKLEY WITH 7 YEAR OLD GERMAN SHEPHERD, LEO.

TOP TO BOTTOM: OFFICER ALEXANDER PREPARING TO RELEASE AXEL ON A “PERPETRATOR” DURING TRAINING. OFFICERS ALWAYS GIVE SEVERAL WARNINGS BEFORE RELEASING THEIR DOGS; LEO, ONE OF THE UNIT’S OLDEST MEMBERS, DISPLAYING THAT POLICE DOGS HAVE TIME TO RELAX, TOO.

The dogs are useful in all situations, from dealing with one person to huge crowds, as their barking is enough to make a rowdy group disperse. When an officer arrives on a scene with a dog, people often give in on their own without the need to actually use the dog. Canines make the lives of their partners easier, though it takes time to hone their skills. “They have to be well trained before they are out on the streets,” said Officer Dave Rachor. Trained dogs create safety for the public, their handlers, and themselves. Their training is continual throughout their careers. The ability to follow basic and advanced instructions at superb levels of obedience helps with every aspect of their career and home life.

OPPOSITE: (TOP): TOM WITH HIS TUG REWARD AFTER ITEM DETECTION TRAINING; (BOTTOM): OFFICER BRADLEY, PREPARING WODAN FOR TRACKING WORK.

“At home, they are great family dogs. They are good with kids and are a lot more quiet when off duty.” Officer Ben Bradley commented. They are also great with the public and know the difference between times when they are on patrol, and times when they are attending events or spending time with the general public. Perhaps just being dogs makes them ideal for the job. They are loyal, eager to please, and make strong connections with their handlers. Every dog in the training field kept their eyes on their respective officers, following their lead. Additionally, dogs’ heightened senses allow them to get work done much faster than their human counterparts. Someone hiding in a building can be found in mere minutes. They also just love doing their work which is a strong attribute in canines. “They are like any other dog. What makes your dog enjoy sitting? The toys or treats or praise they get for doing it. Our dogs are just like them, they just know cooler tricks,” said Officer Steven Alexander. Rewards are an integral part of the entire process. While the dogs enjoy typical rewards - commonly toys - they also perceive getting a bite on a person as a reward. To them, their work is a fun challenge.

The K-9 Unit dogs are versatile companions that serve many purposes for Lancaster City. They are trained for patrol duties and detection for items such as narcotics or bombs. They keep our officers safe as they rush into dangerous situations to find perpetrators before alerting their handlers, giving officers a safer entry into unknown situations. These animal heroes are in our city to keep it as safe and crime free as possible for all of us. counts,” Darlington said. WINTER 2016

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+ COMMUNITY LAURIE YOST WITH HER HOUND MIX SAMSON.

Q&A Laurie Yost (Owner of Playful Pups Retreat)

More about LAURIE YOST

written by Samantha St.Clair

PLAYFUL PUPS RETREAT is a boarding facility that opened in 2010. They offer daycare services, overnight lodging, training and grooming. The staff at Playful Pups consists of dog lovers who are trained in dog behavior and handling. All staff knows each dog individually, so owners have the peace of mind that their pups are left in the best of care. If you need a place for your companion to stay during the day or for a week long vacation, Playful Pups supplies the best retreat for your dog!

LCP: What made you decide to open Playful Pups Retreat? LY: I have always been a dog lover. There was nothing like this in our area. I used to live in California and there were upscale pet businesses everywhere. I wanted to provide that kind of service here. LCP: What is it like to own your own boarding facility? LY: I love it. The dogs are amazing and the clients are incredible to work with. It is, however, a tremendous amount of work. It is a 24/7, 365 days a year business. It can be exhausting. Even with a day off I have things I need to do. Boarding is a greater responsibility because we are caring for cherished pets. While it can be tiring, it is definitely rewarding and enjoyable – every day is playing with dogs! 18 LANCASTER COUNTY PET

LCP: What would you say made you fall in love with dogs? LY: When I was a kid, we always had dogs. There’s just something about the devotion and companionship a dog gives. Seeing that wagging tail and how in love with you they are… there is simply nothing else like it. LCP: Why would you recommend putting a dog in daycare? LY: If you have an energetic dog that likes other dogs, daycare is a great way to let them have fun while you are away. They have companionship while you are gone, and often will be tired at night when you bring them home after a day at work. Dogs are pack animals, and if they like other dogs, they benefit from being around them.

M PASSIONATE: Laurie is well known for her love of dogs. She not only runs Playful Pups, but also runs a bully breed rescue, Pitties.Love.Peace. M KNOWLEDGEABLE: The free time Laurie doesn’t spend on rescuing, she often spends learning more about dogs. She knows there is always more to learn, and has a special interest in behavior and nutrition. M PETS: She owns many dogs, including an Akita, a Rottweiler and several bully and pitbull type dogs. Laurie is a lover of all breeds, though she says Great Danes are at the top of her list. M HOME: Laurie was born in Hershey, but grew up in Texas and lived in many other places. However, she came back to Lancaster County because she loves the beauty of central PA.

717-689-3408 playfulpupsretreat.com


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+ MEET THE BREED

Myotonic Goat written by Samantha St.Clair

T

here is one breed of goat that stands out among the rest. While all goats can make excellent pets, the Myotonic goat has a lot of characteristics that make it ideal for first time and long time goat owners alike. While Myotonic may not sound familiar to you, you may recognize its more famous name - the Fainting Goat. Yes, that’s right, the goat that becomes so excited that it literally falls over. This breed is well known for that particular trait, though many misconceptions are held about the condition they have. Myotonia congenita is a genetic condition which leads to the goats’ muscles tensing for a little while after they are panicked or excited. “Fainting” is not the right word for what happens to them, as the condition only affects their muscles and doesn’t actually make them unconscious. As the goats get older they often don’t fall over when their muscles tense. Instead, they simply remain still until the sensation passes. While many people love watching silly videos of Myotonic goats, many are also concerned about their health. Don’t worry, no goats are harmed due to this condition. It causes them no pain and in fact helps them build muscle mass. They are actually a sturdy breed with no major health concerns.

“mowers”. Compared to other goat breeds, the Myotonic goat has a docile temperament. Due to this, they even get pushed around by small pygmy goats at feeding time! They make excellent, gentle pets for kids when handled and socialized. They are also quite intelligent and can even be taught to perform tricks! On top of all of this, they are a truly American breed. It is believed that the Myotonic goat is the only goat breed founded in the United States, originating in Tennessee. They have a plethora of coat colors and patterns, from chocolates splashed with white to tri-colors and everything in between. As a medium sized breed, they are ideal for handling. Best of all, fainting aside, they are sure to keep their owners smiling with their bright personalities. Lancaster County has its very own Myotonic goat herd which is something to be proud of considering the breed is rare. Goat Flower Farm, located near Mount Joy, is home to over 40 Myotonic goats. Please contact Carol Ellis if you are interested in learning more about her goats, the breed, or getting your very own “fainting” goat! M These goats are easy keepers, great mothers, don’t

Although a meat breed, these goats are commonly kept as pets due to their sweet, relaxed temperaments. Their silly antics make them a much loved breed which lands them into good homes where they are often companion animals or pasture

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challenge fencing and are good at cleaning up yards! M Myotonic goats are famous in the animal world, appearing

in various viral videos, television shows and commercials! goatflowerfarm.com


Can I Crash at Your Place for a While? The success of our rescue program relies on the number of foster homes we have available. The more foster homes we have, the more dogs we can save! We need volunteers to provide short-term in-home care for our dogs in need until they are adopted. All food and veterinary care is paid for by Pitties.Love.Peace. Fostering can last from a week to several months. We rescue dogs from high-kill shelters, rehabilitate the sick, love and train unsocialized dogs, and maintain a 100% spay/neuter program. Our goal is to find safe and loving forever homes for all of our rescues. Make a difference in a dog’s life, become a foster today. Foster applications available online at www.pittieslovepeace.com

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+ S E A S O NA L

Winter wonderland

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Dog Breeds that Love Cold Weather M Akita

WINTER HORSE CARE

Their undercoat is thick and soft, providing nice insulation in cold weather.

If it snows, be sure to keep the paths to feed, water and the manure pile clear. To help keep your horse clean, use dry shampoos while grooming. Dirt and sweat doesn’t usually stick to the hair. Increase hay 10% for every 10℉ below freezing. Make sure you have plenty of feed and bedding, in case there is a bad snow and the trucks cannot deliver. Consider heated water buckets in each horse’s stall as an alternative to freezing water buckets. It is important that horses stay hydrated over the winter months. Monitor weather and make turnout decisions based on conditions. Clean feet of packed ice/snow when your horse returns to the barn. Consider snow pads for horses with shoes. This helps with snow freeze on their front feet. Ask your vet for more information. If a horse needs a blanket, ensure it is in good condition, clean and free of tears. Older horses enjoy blankets for protection. Courtesy of Greystone Manor Therapeutic Riding Center

M Alaskan Malamute This arctic breed can remain outside longer than most other breeds in very cold climates.

M Saint Bernard This breed is credited with saving freezing and helpless travelers during snowstorms.

M Siberian Husky This breed was developed in the harsh Siberian Arctic, where it was used to haul cargo long distances across frozen tundra.

M Tibetan Mastiff Originally from the Himalayas, they have an immense double coat that keeps them insulated.

MORE SEASONAL TIDBITS: GROUNDHOG DAY. We are proud to have the official groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, as a Pennsylvania resident. Our 130th year with him will be celebrated on Tuesday, February 2, 2016. VALENTINE’S DAY. Roses are not toxic to cats, but they do have thorns. There is risk for trauma to the mouth and paws from the thorns. If a large amount is ingested, a bowel obstruction may result. In honor of ST. PATRICK’S DAY, we’ve listed some of the top Irish dog breeds. They are: Irish Red Setter • Irish Red & White Setter • Irish Terrier • Glen of Imaal Terrier • Irish Water Spaniel • Kerry Blue Terrier Irish Wolfhound • Kerry Beagle • Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier. If you’re looking for your next four-legged Irish breed companion, consider adopting from your local shelter or a breed rescue. You’ll both be in luck.

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+ H E A LT H

All The World Is A Litter Box:

USE A CLEANER THAT HAS ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY AND NO SCENT TO IT, SUCH AS NATURE’S MIRACLE, TO CLEAN URINATION SPOTS.

Inappropriate Elimination Issues in Cats Part 2 written by Bryan Langlois, DVM

“I WANT THAT PILL THAT MAKES HIM STOP PEEING ALL OVER THE PLACE, DOC.” That is the comment most frequently heard by vets when we encounter this problem. In Part 1 of this topic we addressed potential causes of inappropriate elimination. Now let’s look at some possible fixes. I want to state right off - there is no “magic pill” for this. Owners have to understand that, unless it is a medical issue, it sometimes can be a little bit of trial and error to find a solution. Let’s begin with some easy litter box fixes. The first thing to look at is the ratio of cats to the number of litter boxes. There should always be at least one more litter box in the home than the number of cats you have. This makes it so your cat always has a litter box that cannot be guarded by another cat. If you have a very timid cat that is often scared away by other cats, having a litter box in the area where that cat spends most of his/ her time will also help. Next is location. There should be 1 litter box per floor of your home. It should also be someplace that can be easily accessed by an older cat that may be suffering from arthritis. Think about it. If you had bad arthritis and it was harder to walk would you want to go down or up 2 or 3 flights of stairs to use the bathroom? They should also be in a location where the cat feels

safe and can see their surroundings. Hiding a litter box in a closet or under a flight of stairs may not be the best for your cat as it can make them feel vulnerable. Type and size of litter box is also important. Covered litter boxes were created for the comfort of the human nose, not cats. Going from a covered to uncovered box may be all you need to do. Most litter boxes are too small for your cat as well. The best type of litter box for your cat is actually one of those plastic storage bins for under your bed. It is the perfect size and depth, and less expensive than most store bought litter boxes.

medication may or may not be appropriate for your cat. Remember that, just like in people, many anti-anxiety drugs can take a full month before they reach peak effect. You can also talk to your vet about other options such as pheromone treatments and some nutraceutical options. This problem is one that we see as a reason cats are surrendered to shelters or euthanized far too frequently. It can be a very frustrating problem to deal with. However, if you talk to your vet about it and agree to work with them to find a solution, you will find that it can be solved fairly easily.

Type of litter can also be experimented with. Another reason your cat may go right outside the litter box is if they don’t like the litter. Sometimes you need to have a different type of litter in each box to appease all the cats in your household. Keeping the litter clean at all times can also help. If everything has been ruled out, there certainly is a possibility that anxiety can play a role. For proper medicating of that condition, you need to have a good conversation with your vet about what

BRYAN LANGLOIS, DVM is the Medical Director at Pet Pantry of Lancaster County, PA. He also serves as a Board of Trustees Member of PVMA and The Pennsylvania Veterinary Foundation, AVC 2005.

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+ RESCUE HIGHLIGHT

MEET BRISKY! WHILE BRISKY IS A MIX, SHE IS STILL BEAUTIFUL AND HAS A LOT OF LOVE TO GIVE. BRISKY HAS BEEN WITH OPERATION SCARLET FOR 5 YEARS AND WOULD LOVE TO JOIN YOUR FAMILY! SHE ADORES PEOPLE, BUT WOULD PREFER TO BE THE ONLY PET.

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+ RESCUE HIGHLIGHT

Operation Scarlet When you rescue a dog, they know you’ve given them a second chance written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair

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f you see a Shar-Pei around Lancaster, there’s a good chance they are from Operation Scarlet. Many of the over 1,200 dogs rescued since 1991 were adopted locally. This success can be attributed to the grandmother who got founder Dawn Hertzog interested in the breed. “My grandmother was the catalyst,” said Dawn. Her grandmother, who was fascinated by a Shar-Pei she saw in a magazine, could not own one of her own. Instead, she promised one to Dawn so long as she could see him regularly. Dawn ended up with her first Shar-Pei, Beijing, and her first rescue, Scarlet, not too long after. While Scarlet was only with Dawn for two months before passing, she left an impact on her life that resulted in the formation of Operation Scarlet. Thanks to that beautiful, sweet girl, many Shar-Pei from around the world have been given a second chance in her memory. Dogs have been rescued and adopted internationally and all have incredible stories to tell such as one dog that went home on a private plane! The love people give these dogs shows that people become enthusiastic about the breed once they own one.

The breed originated in China. They come in a variety of colors and coat types - including short and fluffy hair in shades of cream to black. The amount of wrinkles also differs. Along with a diversity in looks, there is also a variety in personalities. Shar-Pei are known for their flexible lifestyles and doing what their owners enjoy doing. If you like to watch movies, your pup will too! If you enjoy exploring, so will your Shar-Pei! However, individual dogs differ. This is why Operation Scarlet is diligent about their adoption process, ensuring dogs end up in homes most suited for them. Those interested in adopting must first be approved, and then are required to visit the rescue for an interview. The process may seem like a lot, but in the end, it ensures dogs are placed in the right homes where they can thrive. The dedication of Dawn and the volunteers of Operation Scarlet is tangible. Each have an incredible love for the breed and care about each and every dog that passes through the rescue. If your interest has been captured, learn more about the rescue, their mission, and how you can adopt or help by visiting their website: operationscarlet.com

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+ FUN FOCUS

Owning a Business with Animals

GOATS’ MILK IS LOADED WITH ESSENTIAL NUTRIENTS AND VITAMINS.

Featuring L’l Brown Goat Milk Soap written by Samantha St.Clair

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any have had the thought cross their mind: wouldn’t it be fun to own my own business? Even better, a business involving animals. For Peggy Broome, the venture of owning an animal related business began with a little brown goat named Iris Azalea. Thanks to that little Nigerian Dwarf goat, Peggy now lives the dream of many, owning her own business which is aptly named L’l Brown Goat Milk Soap. “Owning my own business and working with animals, that’s what I enjoy about it,” Peggy said. She enjoys the flexibility of the job and also loves that animals are a part of it. She also has a passion for her soaps and a lot of knowledge about the product, something any business owner needs to succeed.

None of the business would be possible without her Nigerian Dwarf goats. With milk high in butterfat content, their milk provides the best moisturizers among goat breeds. Aside from helping produce high quality soap, the goats also bring a lot of joy to Peggy’s life. Each goat has their individual personalities, keeping the Broome farm lively. Chickens, cats, dogs and horses also live on the farm, making this business a dream come true for any animal lover. However, Peggy likes to remind people wanting to start their own business that, while fun, it is a lot of work. Her business has grown a lot from when she started out with that one little brown goat. Her home is filled with soaps and her life is filled with creating her products and attending local venues to sell them. Having animals as employees adds to the work since their care takes time. There is never a dull moment around the Broome farm with this ever growing business. Perhaps the most important part to starting a business is making sure it is something you truly love to do and would enjoy doing daily. Of course, Peggy loves what she does and enjoys interacting with her customers. By appointment, you may visit her farm to purchase soaps and learn more about what it takes to operate a farm animal business. While you are visiting, you can also meet the goats behind the product!

MORE INFORMATION M

If you would like to schedule a visit to learn more about the business, the soaps or the goats, please contact Peggy online at lilbrowngoat.com or by phone at 717.872.6172. Her and her goats would be pleased to meet you!

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+ REAL PET

TILLIE, A LAKELAND TERRIER THAT LIVES WITH HER OWNER IN COTTAGE LIVING, BRINGS JOY TO EVERYONE WHO INTERACTS WITH HER.

St. Anne’s written by Samantha St.Clair

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t. Anne’s is a special continuing care community in that it understands the benefits pets bring to people. While the campus is home to 250 human residents, it is also home to several furry and feathered companions. When people move to the community, they can be comforted by the knowledge that animals will remain a part of their lives. Pets weren’t always part of the St. Anne’s atmosphere. In the 1990s, Dan Lytle, administrator of personal care, brought two rescue dogs to the facility. Since then, a lot has developed as the staff recognized that animals play a vital role in people’s everyday lives. A pet committee was formed to take care of the costs of the facility owned animals. The committee relies on fundraisers and donations to cover food, vetting and other needs.

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People come here to live and thrive and pets are a part of that The joy these animals bring to residents makes them an important part of the community. Many residents either can no longer care for pets themselves, or had to leave their companions behind. The animals at St. Anne’s are pets to all who live and work there. They make St. Anne’s their home as much as the residents do and consider all who live and work there to be their family. They have been known to brighten the days of many. They also make great companions for people to talk to, and are great conversation starters among residents. The facility currently owns two dogs, several cats, and a few birds. St. Anne’s is selective about their facility pets. They must be able to adapt to such a large environment and be model citizens in their behavior. Those living in the

cottages, villas and apartments can bring their own companions with them, but must be able to care for them. St. Anne’s provides many additional benefits for its residents. They have activities, personal care, therapy and a variety of other comforts and necessities on campus. They also have friendly staff who knows every resident - including the furry ones. When choosing a continuing care facility, it is important to ensure you or your relatives are in a place that feels most like home. What could possibly feel more like home than having a dog by your side or cat on your lap to start or end your day?

3952 Columbia Ave, West Hempfield Twp., PA 17512 • 717.285.5443 StAnnesRC.org


+ NUTRITION

Healthy Snacking A note on choosing the right snacks, presented by Doglicious Bakery written by Samantha St.Clair

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here’s no doubt treats make our dogs happy. They come running when they hear the treat box shake, and stare at you intently as they wait for you to give them one. But when you pull out your dog’s box of treats, do you know what you’re feeding them? The wrong snacks can have an impact on their lifelong health. Unhealthy treats make for unhealthy pets and expensive vet bills. There are many bad ingredients you should look out for when purchasing treats - and many popular treats are full of them. These unhealthy snacks are full of chemicals, preservatives and fillers. Some of the big items to avoid are corn, wheat and soy, which dogs don’t digest well. Salt, too, is a huge problem in many snacks. And then there’s the “Meat”. Several meat labels should be avoided, including “Meat and Bone Meal” and “Meat Flavor”. Look for specifics. You need to know the meat source. Also, if you’re staring at a box with a long list of ingredients you can’t even pronounce, you’re most likely buying an unhealthy snack. When looking for a treat, you want to find one that doesn’t contain fillers, is grain-free, and lists a specific meat source. The fewer the ingredients, the better. Knowing where your treats come from and what they contain is important for your best friend’s health. While you may not see the side effects of bad foods early on, they can affect your dog years down the road. Finding the right foods for your dog can help them live longer, healthier, and happier lives. Be adventurous in your treat search! Do your research on what is and isn’t good for your canine friend, as this only touched on some basics. Speaking with a pet nutritionist is a great place to start, as they can make recommendations based on individual dogs. Always consult with your veterinarian before making changes to your dog’s health plans.

DOGLICIOUS BAKERY is a local pet food and health store owned and operated by Bruce and Tami Haines. With interest in nutrition and health, they promote healthier living for pets with their homemade treats, raw diets, and holistic remedies. To contact Doglicious you can visit them online, or call them: dogliciousbakery.com / 717.405.5318

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+ P ET S E RV I C E S

Sit and Stay

BEARDED DRAGONS GET THEIR NAME FROM THEIR ABILITY TO MAKE THEIR THROAT RESEMBLE A BEARD.

Below are just a few of the many businesses in the area DAYCARE When looking for a fantastic place for your four-legged friend to frolic and socialize, these reputable kennels provide a safe and healthy environment.

Oscar’s Pet Resort 521 Willow Road Lancaster, PA 17601 717.397.0726 oscarspetresort.com Playful Pups Retreat 850 Milton Grove Road N. Elizabethtown, PA 17022 717.689.3408 playfulpupsretreat.com Waggin Tails Pet Camp 880 Oberlin Road Middletown, PA 17057 717.930.0103 waggintailspetcamp.com

D’tails 850 Milton Grove Road North Elizabethtown, PA 17022 717.361.8245 facebook.com/Dtails2011 Renee’s Pet Grooming Salon 117 Oak Ridge Drive Mountville, PA 17554 717.285.3330 reneespetgroomingsalon.ieasysite.com

PET SITTERS Demanding work schedules, out-of-town trips or even an ill pet’s needs may cause a loving pet owner stress. You will find these experienced and passionate pet care professionals are happy to watch over your furry family members.

Deb’s Pet Buddies Lititz, PA 17543 717.283.4438 debspetbuddies.com

GROOMERS If your canine or feline friend is in need of some fur and nail styling, there is no shortage of passionate and professional groomers here in Lancaster.

Peace of Mind, LLC Lancaster and Lititz areas 717.435.6241 peaceofmindllc.net

Deb the Dog Groomer 1027 Dillerville Road Lancaster, PA 17603 717.394.8134 debthedoggroomer.com

Your Place or Mine Pet Sitting 811 South 16th Street Columbia, PA 17512 717.330.6519 facebook.com/ yourplaceorminepetsittingpa

PET FRIENDLY ACCOMMODATIONS Most devoted pet owners will tell you that they would prefer their four-legged companions join them on out of town visits and vacations. We thought these “pet friendly” accommodations would offer comfortable lodging.

Best Western Premier Eden Resort & Suites 222 Eden Road Lancaster, PA 17601 717.569.6444 edenresort.com Hawthorn Suites by Wyndham Lancaster 2045 Lincoln Highway E. Lancaster, PA 17602 717.290.7100 hawthorn.com Lancaster Host Resort and Conference Center 2300 Lincoln Highway E., Route 30 Lancaster, PA 17602 717.299.5500 lancasterhost.com The Hotel Lancaster 26 East Chestnut Street Lancaster, PA 17602 717.394.0900 thehotellancaster.com

Winter Riding Tips: 1. If trail riding in icy or snowy conditions, specific horseshoes providing traction should be used to avoid injury to horse and rider. 2. Heavier horses used to pull sleighs or wagons in snow should have special horseshoes on their front two hooves. 3. If riding on grass or soft surfaces, even in the cold temperatures, horseshoes are not needed. 4. Blankets are not always necessary to use while riding in cold temperatures. However, the horse should be taken inside immediately and sweat should be brushed off. A drying blanket should be applied to soak up any moisture. 30 LANCASTER COUNTY PET

THANKS TO: Howie Zeamer – Manager, Nookside Stables, Manheim, PA 30 LANCASTER


+ AROUND LANCASTER

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Sami loves the white stuff in Lancaster

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Thor in Conestoga

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Bailey, a Kentucky Mountain Horse and a therapy horse, at her farm in Londonderry Township

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Gilda and Phoebe sharing snow time in Millersville

Memphis in Cornwall

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Lexi catches some air at her home in Millersville

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Furry Encounters

“LIKE US ON FACEBOOK” to stay updated on what our next theme will be and for information on submitting your pet’s photo for the next edition!

Holly is looking gorgeous in white in Millersville

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+ I N F O R M AT I O N

EMERGENCY SERVICES

i Pet resources ANIMAL SUPPORT AGENCIES 2nd Chance 4 Life Rescue Foster network for dogs P.O. Box 549 Elizabethtown, PA 17022 2ndchance4liferescue.org Doberman Pinscher Rescue of PA, Inc. Oxford, PA 19363 • 610.255.0623 dprpa.org Furever Home Adoption Center, Inc. All volunteer, no kill, cage free facility 5984 Main Street East Petersburg, PA 17520 • 717.560.6400 fureverhomeadoptioncenter.com Help Find Sophie A Lost/Found Pet site facebook.com/HelpFindSophie Humane League of Lancaster County Shelter, Adopt, Educate & Protect 2195 Lincoln Highway E. Lancaster, PA 17602 • 717.393.6551 humaneleague.com

Leo’s Helping Paws Financial assistance to dog rescue groups 1284 Wheatland Avenue Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.475.9621 leoshelpingpaws.org

PETS Pet Emergency Treatment Services 930 North Queen Street Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.295.7387 lancasterpetemergency.com

Lost Paws of Lancaster Animal Rescue P.O. Box 551 Lititz, PA 17543 • 717.725.3136 lostpawsoflancaster.org

LARGE ANIMAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

PAWS Cat Rescue No-kill animal rescue and spay/neuter Petsmart 1700 Fruitville Pike Lancaster, PA 17601 • 717.957.8122 pawsofpa.org Pet Pantry of Lancaster County Helping avoid the surrender of a family pet due to the lack of resources 26 Millersville Road Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.983.8878 PetPantryLC.org

BIRD RESCUES Lancaster C.A.R.E.S Coalition for Animal Rescues, Education and Services 237 Centerville Road, Suite 2 Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.381.2275 lancastercares.org Lancaster County SPCA Shelter, humane care and adoptions of stray and unwanted animals 848 South Prince Street Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.917.6979 info@lancasterspca.org

LCP LANCASTER COUNTY PET

lancastercountypet.com

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ORCA Organization for Responsible Care of Animals 401 East Orange Street Lancaster, PA 17602 • 717.397.8922 orcarescue.org

Feathered Sanctuary Exotic Bird Rescue 1674 Kirkwood Pike Kirkwood, PA 17536 • 717.529.2966 fsebr.webs.com

Large Animal Protection Society Large Animal Abuse/Neglect Reporting P.O. Box 243 West Grove, PA 19390 • 610.869.9880 largeanimalprotectionsociety.org/_LAPS/

THERAPY SERVICES Greystone Manor Therapeutic Riding Center Equine assisted activities for children and adults with special needs P.O. Box 10724 Lancaster, PA 17605 • 717.615.9222 greystonemanortrc.org KPETS Pet Enhanced Therapy Services 630 Janet Avenue Lancaster, PA 17601 • 888.685.7387 kpets.org

WOLF RESCUE Wolf Sanctuary of PA 465 Speedwell Forge Road Lititz, PA 17543 • 717.626.4617 wolfsanctuarypa.org


Diane Hodges, DVM with Belle

NEW CLIENTS FREE Microchip ($36 VALUE)

or Nail Trim ($16 VALUE)

with this ad.

It is the mission of Happy Tails Animal Hospital to provide exceptional patient care through client education and complete health maintenance throughout the life of each pet. Our goal is to provide the very best preventative care not only to keep your pet healthy, but also to provide the highest quality medicine in times when your pet’s health is ailing. Below is a list of some of our hospital services. We are excited to show you all that we have to offer. We are proud of our hospital, and would love to take you on a “behind the scenes” tour upon your request. • • • •

Internal Medicine Surgery Dentistry Radiology

• Pet “drop-off” Service • Referral Consultation • Pharmaceuticals

823 Rohrerstown Road Lancaster, PA 17601 (717) 393-TAIL (8245)

Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8AM-7PM Thursday-Friday 8AM-6PM Every other Saturday 8AM- 12 Noon

find us on facebook

www.happytailslancaster.com


Lancaster County Pet Winter 2016  
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