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FALL 2015

LCP LANCASTER COUNTY PET

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

The Life of a Service Dog + Wolf & Wolfdog Ownership

+ Feathered Sanctuary Exotic Bird Rescue


IF YOU ARE A DOG RESCUE ORGANIZATION IN NEED OF FINANCIAL HELP... Please contact us. FALL “BOW WOW BINGO” TO BENEFIT “LEO’S HELPING PAWS”

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18, 11:30AM EPHRATA RECREATION CENTER 130 S. ACADEMY DRIVE, EPHRATA

Our mission is to provide financial assistance to dog rescue groups in Pennsylvania and neighboring states, for veterinary care, with a primary focus on puppy mill dogs, in addition to abused and neglected dogs, and to educate the community about puppy mills. 1284 Wheatland Avenue | Lancaster | 717-475-9621 | www.leoshelpingpaws.org 64 LANCASTER COUNTY PET Leo’s Helping Paws is a 501(c)3 non-profit Organization.


+ CONTENTS

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FALL 2015

Rescue Highlight

FEATURES

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DEPARTMENTS

Service Dogs

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The dogs and trainers at UDS show what it takes for a puppy to become an excellent service dog

Letter From Editor Pets changing and improving lives

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BY SAMANTHA ST.CLAIR

Tips Quick facts about pets, from gerbil and hamster information to fall activities

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Wolf Ownership

Events Local events from October-December, 2015

Learn from the Wolf Sanctuary of PA why wolves belong in the wild

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The Good Stuff Our favorites, local artisan products at Drake’s Pet Place

BY SAMANTHA ST.CLAIR

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Pet Lover Mr. Snuggles, the perfect companion

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Community Interview with John Moslander, owner of Call of Doody

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Meet the Breed A stunning breed of horse, the Arabian

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Seasonal 'Tis the Season, tips for you and your pets to enjoy the fall season

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Health All the World is a Litter Box, training your cat

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Rescue Highlight Feathered Sanctuary, a rescue for a variety of exotic birds

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Fun Focus Kleen Acres, a family friendly farm experience

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Real Estate The Hotel Lancaster, a retreat for people and their canine companions

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Nutrition How food could change your dog’s behavior

16 Wolf Sanctuary

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Pet Services Information on various local businesses

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Around Lancaster Fall pet photos provided by LCP readers

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Information Pet Resources and contact information

FALL 2015

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LCP

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Caring for pets... and their people, too.

LANCASTER COUNTY PET

The Source for Pet and Animal Information in Lancaster County, PA

Our doctors provide a range of general medical and surgical services. We can take care of your dog, cat, rabbit, pot-bellied pig, ferret, and a variety of birds. Stop in with your furry or feathered friends and check out our recently remodeled hospital!

Publisher Cecilia Cove, LLC Editor in Chief Samantha St.Clair Contributing Editor Joyce Freiwald Art Director Sally Heineman Sales Helen Venesky Photographers Samantha St.Clair, Helen Venesky

FREE First Exam!

Contributors Bryan Langlois, DVM, Gerry and Dee Strathmeyer, Kaye Ames

VCA HOME DELIVERY

For New Clients Get a Free Pet Health Exam Complete our online form to instantly receive your Free Pet Health Exam coupon for VCA Bridgeport Animal Hospital in Lancaster, PA. Our veterinarians and veterinary staff looks forward to meeting you soon.

Pet Medication and Food Delivery to Your Home Your pet’s medication delivered to your door. Everyone benefits from our unique Home Delivery service, but the biggest winner is your pet, because they will never miss a treatment schedules.

Published by Cecilia Cove, LLC P.O. Box 44, Marietta, PA 17547 717.406.7811 • lancastercountypet.com

+ Advertising inquiries email: sales@lancastercountypet.com

? Primary Care

Advanced Care

Preventive Care

Pet Grooming

VCA Bridgeport Animal Hospital

Pet Boarding

Pet Counseling Care

1251 Ranck Mill Road Lancaster, PA 17602 Phone: 717-393-9074 Fax: 717-393-6619 Mon-Thu 8:00 AM - 7:30 PM Fri 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sat 8:00 AM - 11:30 AM Sun 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM vcahospitals.com/bridgeport

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HAVE ANY FEEDBACK TO GIVE US? Or perhaps you have ideas for topics you’d like to see in our publication or a unique story about your own pet! If so, please contact us at editor@lancastercountypet.com. PHOTO CREDITS: Cover. immanuel001/Shutterstock Pg 1. Michelle Lalancette/Shutterstock Pg 3. Dudarev Mikhail/Shutterstock Pg 4. Camilo Torres/Shutterstock; Kuttelvaserova Stuchelova/Shutterstock; Steve Oehlenschlager/Shutterstock; lightpoet/Shutterstock; Patryk Kosmide/Shutterstock; Melinda Fawver/Shutterstock Pg 5 Victoria Kisel/Shutterstock; Zdorov Kirill Vladimirovich/Shutterstock Pg 22. Javier Brosch/Shutterstock; Telekhovskyi/Shutterstock; Kateryna Yakovlieva/Shutterstock; Robert Hale/Shutterstock; Magdalena Kucova/Shutterstock; Daemys/Shutterstock; Johan Swanepoel/Shutterstock; InBetweentheBlink/Shutterstock Pg 23. Andrey_Kuzmin/Shutterstock Pg 32. VICUSCHKA/Shutterstock

LCP (Lancaster County Pet) is published quarterly and distributed throughout Lancaster County, PA. All content of this magazine, including design, photos and editorial content is Copyright©2015 by Cecilia Cove, LLC. All rights reserved. No reproduction of printed materials is permitted without the written consent of the Publisher. LCP is a registered trademark of Cecilia Cove, LLC.


+ E D I TO R’S L ET T E R

PETS IMPROVE OUR LIVES Most, if not all, of you reading this right now can think of at least one animal that improved your life. Perhaps they were there for you to talk to when your human companions weren’t available, or maybe they brought a smile to your face when you needed it the most. All of us animal lovers can agree, animals have a gift of touching lives. This edition is heavily focused on this topic, and is in dedication to Boris, a very special cat who blessed the publishers of this magazine with 23 amazing years and inspired this venture. Right now I can think of several animals that touched my life. From my very first dog, Shelby, to my current best friend, Tucker, I have always had a dog by my side. They make every day enjoyable, even when it shouldn’t be. But outside of my own pets, I have come across many animals in my time of volunteering at shelters that expanded my knowledge of the compassion they have toward us. In fact, if you ever volunteer, you will notice that even the most sick and injured of animals pour all of their energy into making us happy. It is truly an amazing phenomenon. It’s not just dogs and cats that have this gift. I have seen rats that follow their owners around, bunnies that snuggle on laps, and horses that give friendly nudges to total strangers. All of our companions, no matter their species, make our days better. I’ve met some incredible animals while working on this edition that expand on the idea of animals improving lives. I met service dogs who spend a lot of time and effort in training to help their owners with daily tasks - and they do it because they love to help people. I also met a little dog helping a retired professor in big ways, and rescued birds that show forgiveness. I saw all of these amazing animals and the look in their eyes that proved to me they truly love the people around them. In loving memory of Boris, we’d like to make this fall season about our connection with animals. Think about your current pets and those from your past, or other animals you have worked with. Can you think of an animal who improved your life? We’d love to hear your stories and hope you enjoy reading the stories within this edition of LCP.

Throughout our magazine you’ll find informative bubbles.

HELPFUL TIP

GOAT MILK IS NUMBER ONE! AN ESTIMATED 65% WORLDWIDE DRINK GOAT MILK OVER COW MILK.

FALL 2015

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+ TIPS

TipS to Tails

Pennsylvania eBird is a real time, online program that allows birdwatchers to share their observations. eBird has transformed the way ornithologists report and access information. ebird.org/content/pa/

SPOT Animal Abuse? Call The Pennsylvania SPCA. Report Cruelty: 1-866-601-SPCA

Quick Facts about Pets

Gerbil versus Hamster Though they may look similar, there are many differences between these creatures. M Gerbils have longer tails than Hamsters. M Gerbils are active in the day and night, while Hamsters are nocturnal and active only at night. M Gerbils are more social, while Hamsters enjoy solitude and should be caged alone, not in groups.

SPAY/NEUTER YOUR HOUSE RABBIT

Rabbits are the third most surrendered pet to animal shelters, after cats and dogs. Getting your rabbit spayed or neutered can: Reduce the overpopulation and number euthanized.

There are plenty of activities around Lancaster County this season...hayrides, pick-your-own orchards and pumpkin patches. Before you load your pet in the car, we suggest calling the venue to see if they are pet friendly.

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Improve the health, well-being and longevity of your pet. Reduce unruly behavior, creating better companions. Save on the cost of pet care. (Source: The Humane Society of the United States)

CLAWS If you accidentally trim your pet’s nails too close, use Chapstick Lip Balm to stop the bleeding, the wax will clog the nick. Another remedy is Gold Medal Flour. Dip the paw into flour to help clot the flow.


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+ EVENTS

Events

FALL VENDOR & CRAFT FAIR

OCTOBER

17 KPETS

4 LANCASTER BIRD CLUB

PENN ANIMAL BLOOD BANK 237 Centerville Road, Lancaster kpets.org

6 LANCASTER COUNTY SPCA “A DOG NAMED GUCCI” Ephrata Main Theatre 124 E. Main Street, Ephrata lancasterspca.org

8-17 70th PENNSYLVANNIA NATIONAL HORSE SHOW PA Farm Show Complex & Expo Center 2300 North Cameron Street, Harrisburg panational.org

24 DOGLICIOUS BAKERY PITTIE PARTY & PARADE Humane Society of Harrisburg Area 7790 Grayson Road, Harrisburg humanesocietyhbg.org

NOVEMBER

14 “ART FOUR PAW” AUCTION TO BENEFIT LEO’S HELPING PAWS Ephrata VFW, 141 S. State Street, Ephrata leoshelpingpaws.org

20 LANCASTER COUNTY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION EXTRAORDINARY GIVE DAY (online) extragive.org

21 FUREVER HOME ADOPTION CENTER FALL VENDOR & CRAFT FAIR Four Seasons Golf Resort 949 Church Street, Landisville fureverhomeadoptioncenter.com TAILWAGGER’S TROT

10 HUMANE LEAGUE OF LANCASTER COUNTY TAILWAGGER’S TROT Buchanan Park, Lancaster humaneleague.com

11 WOLF SANCTUARY WOLF AWARENESS DAY 465 Speedwell Forge Road, Lititz wolfsanctuarypa.org

Photo: AlCookPhoto.com

STATE GAME LANDS 220 FIELD TRIP SGL# 220 parking lot Swamp Church Road, Reinholds lancasterbirdclub.org

PA NATIONAL HORSE SHOW

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DECEMBER

5 CHRISTMAS AT IRONSTONE IRONSTONE RANCH 1 Hollinger Lane, Elizabethtown ironstoneranch.com

12 HOWL-A-DAY BAZAAR DELAWARE VALLEY GOLDEN RETRIEVER RESCUE Golden Gateway 60 Vera Cruz Road, Reinholds dvgrr.org HERSHEY BEARS HOCKEY UDS DOG CALENDAR WITH PLAYERS All Weekend Games Giant Center, 500 Hersheypark Drive, Hershey hersheybears.com

A HOLIDAY BIRDIE BONANZA Lancaster Host Resort 2300 Lincoln Hwy East, Lancaster lancasterbirdexpo.com Have an upcoming 2015 Winter Event?

Share it with us!

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS COME IN VARIOUS SHADES AND COLORS. COATS INCLUDE BLONDE, YELLOW AND GOLD.

Events are subject to change. Please contact event host.

FALL 2015

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SOMERSET, A UDS DOG CURRENTLY IN THE SECOND PHASE OF TRAINING WITH LORRIE SNYDER. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: SOMERSET DISPLAYING HOW UDS DOGS ARE TRAINED TO CARRY A VARIETY OF OBJECTS; MILO STANDING ALERT BY HIS OWNER’S SIDE.


+ S E RV I C E D O G S

The Life of a Service Dog And the people who help them grow

written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair

The life of a service dog is ďŹ lled with learning, dedication and a lot of fun. From the very ďŹ rst stages, to when they are in their permanent residence, everything about their training is doing what they love to do: working with and helping people. FALL 2015

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+ S E RV I C E D O G S

PHASE ONE: Puppy Raisers

A service dog’s career begins when they are puppies. The first command they learn is “watch me”. They will use this command throughout their lives, as it teaches them to focus on their owner. This and various other skills are learned during their time with a puppy raiser, one of the many important people that make the UDS service dog program a success. “Checking in and focus is very important for a service dog. That’s why they start playing watch me games when we receive them at 8 weeks old.” Linda Rineer, a puppy raiser, explained. Socializing them to other dogs and strange environments is another huge part of this first phase, in addition to learning all of the commands they will need to know to be successful. Linda stressed that all aspects of learning are meant to be fun for both the handler and the dog. “I celebrate each and every accomplishment,” said Linda. While it can be difficult to let the dogs go, watching them succeed is what makes the training program so enjoyable for her. Since UDS keeps the dogs within 2 ½ hours of Lancaster County, trainers can keep in touch with them and their handlers as long as both are inclined to do so. “I often say I don’t lose a dog, I gain a friend. I remain an open door for people who get my dogs.” “You have that goal of helping the dog realize their dream of becoming a service dog.” Linda said. “When I first started, I thought there was no way I could give them up. But when you watch them grow and learn, it makes it all worth it.” All of Linda’s dogs have successfully become full time service dogs. She is currently raising her 9th dog for the program, Willow, and wants to continue raising many more dogs. As this is the biggest phase of their training, it takes someone who is dedicated, consistent and knowledgeable to be a puppy raiser.

PHASE TWO: Skill Advancement

At around 18 months old, the dogs are moved from their puppy homes to their second phase trainers. By this point, the dogs

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should already know their most needed skills. Retrieving items from dimes to pill bottles, opening doors, carrying bags and turning the lights on and off are just a few of the many amazing skills they obtain. During the second phase, they shape these skills and build more skills to fit the individual needs of their future handlers. Lorrie Snyder, a second phase trainer, has been working with UDS for over 6 years. She receives the dogs after they are out of their puppy raiser homes, and they either live with her or another second phase trainer. She also runs training classes that help puppy raisers with their dogs. “We kind of become like a family,” Lorrie said, referring to everyone involved in the program. By working closely with everyone in the system, she ensures there is as much success with the program as possible. Lorrie also takes part in the placement process, where handlers and dogs are tested and trained together to make sure they are safe and capable in public. Generally, dogs are placed at around 2 years old. “One of the best parts is when people come back and say how much their dog means to them and helps them.” Lorrie said. “They definitely change a life, and sometimes many lives.”

PHASE THREE: Placement

Only around 50% of service dogs make it into a placement home to do their intended job. The others, such as those with an unsuitable personality or poor health, are either adopted to their trainers or to another loving home. Milo is one of the ones who made it to his placement and is helping his new owner with daily tasks. “Retrieval is the most helpful. Sometimes he opens doors,” said Lance Hosler, Milo’s owner since November 2014. Milo joins him on outings whenever he can, and is constantly by his side, even when they are at home and the work vest is off. They formed a tight bond that began before Lance even knew he would be his.


“I was so excited when I heard Milo would be my dog,” he said, the excitement still showing as he thought back on how Milo became a part of his life. Before he knew Milo would be his service dog, Lance worked with him in a class and loved him. “I wanted him before they said he would be mine.” Ever since then, they have been nearly inseparable. Of course, there is still a lot for the duo to learn. Lance admitted that he thought training would be done, but it never really ends. They are constantly learning more about each other. Milo still has more to learn about the world around him, too. He gets excited around other dogs still, and sometimes loses focus. “If the commands don’t work right away, treats do.” Lance joked as he demonstrated how quickly Milo’s attention turned to him when he had a treat in his hand. Although the dogs are in their full time positions and are seen as “working dogs”, they continue to learn and have fun. “He doesn’t think helping me is work,” Lance explained. While Milo does enjoy doing other activities, such as playing fetch, he is never out of Lance’s sight. To him, the most important part of life is doing the job he loves.

ADDITIONAL SERVICE DOG FACTS: M The reason service dogs wear a vest that says “Ask before petting” is because they need to be focused on their owners at all times. M In order to be considered a service dog, a dog must be able to do 3 tasks to mitigate the person’s disabilities. M The number one task that service dogs perform is retrieval. M When service dogs have their vests on, they know they are at work.

TOP: SOMERSET TURNING A LIGHT SWITCH ON BOTTOM: SOMERSET DISPLAYING THE UDS SERVICE DOG VEST THAT REMINDS HER TO STAY FOCUSED ON HER JOB. OPPOSITE, LEFT: WILLOW HOLDING A PILL BOTTLE SHE JUST PICKED UP FOR HER OWNER; RIGHT: MILO WITH OWNER LANCE, SHOWING THE CLOSE BOND SERVICE DOGS FORM WITH THEIR OWNERS; RIGHT: WILLOW DEMONSTRATING A BOW.

WANT ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE SERVICE DOG PROGRAM? Contact Lori Breece, 717.715.8753 lorib@udservices.org udservices.org


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+ THE GOOD STUFF

Our favoriteS

PET ARTISANS ARE SKILLED CRAFTSPEOPLE THAT MAKE PET PRODUCTS BY HAND. ITEMS MAY RANGE FROM FURNITURE TO ART.

written by Gerry and Dee Strathmeyer

W

hile we all know that Gerry and Dee Strathmeyer at Drake’s Pet Place are passionate experts when it comes to your pet’s diet and their grooming needs, they also carry some unique and locally handmade items. Here are a few of the many pet related products made here in Lancaster County by local artisans at Keystone Wholesale Market that are available at Drake’s Pet Place.

1

2

3

4

1 RAISED METAL DINERS durable and attractive, $17.99+

2 CAT PRINT on reclaimed wood, perfect for all cat lovers’ homes, $9.99

3 ART handmade and framed with reclaimed wood, $17.99

4 DOOR KNOB LEATHER STRAP WITH BELLS handmade and available in small, medium and large sizes, $30.00+

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+ PET LOVER

M

r. Snuggles, a 10 year old Bichon Frise, is the perfect example of what dogs can do for our lives. He is owned by Dr. Catherine Weaver, a 79 year old retired professor who learned through him just how much she loves dogs. She grew up in Lancaster County and was around farm dogs when she was younger, but never had a dog of her own before he chose her. “This little dog climbed into my heart and I shut the door,” said Dr. Weaver as she glanced at Mr. Snuggles, relaxing on his bed outside where the two of them enjoy spending time together. “We are together 24/7. He eats when I eat and he sleeps when I sleep. We travel together, too.” Thanks to a friend, he was brought into her life as a puppy. “My friend told me I either needed to get a husband, or a dog. I was 69 then, and I decided at my age I couldn’t train a husband, but I could train a dog.”

“We are together 24/7. He eats when I eat and he sleeps when I sleep. We travel together, too.” His name suites him quite well, as he certainly is a charming little snuggler and has been since he was a puppy. His full name, Mr. B.J. Snuggles, represents how much he means to her. “I wanted to name him after my father in some way.” She said, explaining that the B.J. stands for Benjamin Joseph, the names of her uncle and father.

DR. WEAVER WITH MR. SNUGGLES IN THEIR LANCASTER COUNTY HOME.

THERE ARE NUMEROUS HEALTH BENEFITS WHEN SENIORS HAVE PETS. THEY CAN HELP IMPROVE OVERALL HEALTH, MOOD AND EASE THE LOSS OF FAMILY.

The Perfect COMPAnion A dog that shows how much canine companions can change our lives written by Samantha St.Clair

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Mr. Snuggles is treated like a member of the family. He has his own recliner right next to hers, and is chauffeured in her car, or as she likes to call it, his limo. He is well behaved, friendly, calm, and even knows how to use a litter box designed just for him. The Bichon trinkets and photographs of him throughout their home show her love for both him and the breed. For Dr. Weaver, he makes the perfect companion. “He added another dimension to my life that makes it more peaceful and enjoyable. I like to say he gentled me. I’m a much more laid back person with him around. He makes me smile and laugh all the time with his antics. He doesn’t even have to do anything to make me smile, I smile just looking at him.”


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Wolf & Wolfdog Ownership Think owning a wolf would be cool? Think again. Not only is owning a wolf illegal in Pennsylvania, it is also incredibly difficult to properly care for and maintain them as pets written by Samantha St.Clair

he beautifully haunting sound of distant howls at night is not something you get to hear in Pennsylvania, and it’s been that way for over 100 years. That is, of course, unless you visit the Wolf Sanctuary of PA, one of the only places in the state where wolves may grace you with their howls.

T

The fear of wolves is embedded deep in history and still lingers on today. This fear contributed to the hunting of wolves, which is why they no longer exist in the wild in Pennsylvania. Hunting is detrimental to their packs, as they cannot bounce back as quickly as other canid species, such as coyotes. Since they are an intricate network of family, when members of their packs are removed it hurts the entire pack. “Family is what’s important to them,” Dawn Darlington, owner of the Wolf Sanctuary of PA, noted as she explained pack behavior. “That’s one of the reasons they don’t escape our enclosures, they don’t want to leave their families.”

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So why is it that wolves, who are so attached to family, do not have a place in people’s homes? Part of it is due to Pennsylvania and several other states creating laws that prevent the average family from owning wolves. Pennsylvania has a zero tolerance policy, so any wolf or wolfdog is illegal to own. In fact, it was these laws that made the Wolf Sanctuary open over 30 years ago. With no grandfather clause, the laws against owning them left many without homes as people were forced to relinquish their pets. “My parents knew there was a need for a sanctuary for the wolves that were losing their homes,” explained Darlington. The new laws prohibited people from owning any content of wolf without exotics permits. In order to get these permits there are various, strict requirements. “All of our fences are here for a reason.” Darlington said as she pointed out the three layers of fencing for the enclosures. “It keeps people and the wolves safe.”


They are not dangerous, though. Darlington explained that none of her wolves are there because they hurt anyone. Most are there due to neglect or people relinquishing them for other various reasons, but never because they actually harmed their owners. However, another reason they are not and should not be present in home life, and the reason laws are in place, is the fact that they simply do not make good pets.

happy_hour/shutterstock

Photo: Chuck Rineer

The reality is, wolves are difficult pets because they are just that wolves. They were designed to live in the wild, and when taken from their natural home, they create problems for their owners. While some people may be able to handle wolf behaviors, most people who try to own wolves get them because they think a wolf is beautiful or would make a neat pet. They don’t think about the lifestyle it requires to properly care for a wild animal.

“We get calls weekly from people who find out that wolves aren’t for them,” Darlington said. “They love to destroy things.” Darlington said. “And they don’t like to be in small spaces.” They often become destructive when left in a house, tearing up doors, walls, floors - anything they think will lead them to freedom. They are also masters at escaping fenced in yards. The type of freedom the wolf sanctuary provides for them is more ideal. Most packs are given at least 2 acres of space, which is something most people cannot provide. Owners also have a difficult time with training and socializing. Wolves are shy and will hide behind their owners to avoid guests, which makes ownership less enjoyable. They are also highly intelligent, which can easily get them into trouble as they learn to outsmart their owners’ attempts to control them. Unlike domesticated dogs, they are not easy pets to take with you to parks or other places, are not as trainable, and are overall far more independent. While wolves will bond to their owners, they are not the social, outgoing symbol our canine companions stand for today. However, despite all of their needs and the laws against ownership, many in Pennsylvania still try to own them. “We get calls weekly from people who find out that wolves aren’t for them,” Darlington said. The wolf sanctuary services areas outside of Pennsylvania, too, taking in wolves in need from various locations across the United States. Darlington seeks to educate people on wolves in an effort to promote conservation and to prevent people from getting pets they cannot handle. “I suggest that people get a pet that suits their lifestyle. Getting a wolf, or any animal, without committing to their needs is not good for the owner or the animal,” said Darlington.

Photo: Chuck Rineer

There are other ways to have wolves in your life while obeying the laws and respecting their lives. Spread awareness about wolves to help them gain more protection in the wild. Visit sanctuaries such as the Wolf Sanctuary of PA, where you can be close to the wolves and enjoy their beauty while also learning a lot about them. There is no reason to own a wolf as a pet. Wolves can still be a part of your world without taking away the natural freedom they love and need. You can learn more about wolves and wolfdogs by visiting wolfsanctuarypa.org for tour times and events held on the grounds at Wolf Sanctuary of PA. Wolf Sanctuary of PA receives no federal or state funding but exists solely on the gracious and generous donations of its patrons and tour income. “Every penny counts,” Darlington said.

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+ COMMUNITY JOHN MOSLANDER WITH HIS GERMAN SHEPHERD, LEXI.

Q&A

John Moslander (Owner of Call of Doody) written by Samantha St.Clair

CALL OF DOODY is a pet waste removal service in Lancaster County that provides an affordable, customer focused alternative to doing the dirty work yourself. As the leaves are changing this fall, you should be out spending time with friends and family, enjoying bonfires and watching football instead of worrying about pet waste removal. Allow Call of Doody to take care of that job.

LCP: What made you decide to start this business? JM: My family thought long and hard about the services we could offer. I am all about kids and pets and wanted a business that supported them both. This business does that. By removing pet waste from yards, I create a safer environment for kids, while making pet ownership easier on families. LCP: Most people wouldn’t like this kind of job - why did you choose this business over another pet related business such as dog walking? JM: It was the business we felt was needed locally, and were comfortable with to start. We also supply home delivery and gourmet dog biscuits and are planning to expand in the future to offer additional services that our customers need. We did a lot of research to make sure our business was very customer friendly.

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LCP: What is your favorite part about the job? JM: Meeting the dogs and owners - the relationships I’ve built are important to me. Another part I enjoy is giving back to the community we serve. I have volunteered and participated in various events for shelters and groups such as Leo’s Helping Paws and others. LCP: Why should people hire for pet waste removal instead of doing it themselves? JM: Number one, it needs to be done regularly and we recognize many people would rather spend the time with their families. Many pet owners don’t know about zoonotic diseases, bacteria and possible parasites that are in pet waste. Included in the service is a deodorizing spray that acts as a bug repellant to make the yard even more enjoyable. Waste removal services keep the yard clean for everyone, pets and children included.

More about JOHN MOSLANDER… M FAMILY OWNED Call of Doody is family owned and began in November 2014. The entire family makes decisions for the company together. M PROFESSIONAL: John provides timely, individualized services to all his customers. After each visit he leaves a gift bag with information, as well as a homemade treat for the resident pet, to let customers know he was there. M PETS: John owns a German Shepherd named Lexi, 3 cats named Stewart, Carlos and Charlie, and a turtle, all rescued.

Call of Doody 888-537-5048 callofdoody.org


Can I Crash at Your Place for a While? The success of our rescue program relies on the number of foster homes we have available. The more foster homes we have, the more dogs we can save! We need volunteers to provide short-term in-home care for our dogs in need until they are adopted. All food and veterinary care is paid for by Pitties.Love.Peace. Fostering can last from a week to several months. We rescue dogs from high-kill shelters, rehabilitate the sick, love and train unsocialized dogs, and maintain a 100% spay/neuter program. Our goal is to find safe and loving forever homes for all of our rescues. Make a difference in a dog’s life, become a foster today. Foster applications available online at www.pittieslovepeace.com

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+ MEET THE BREED

Arabians written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair

A

rguably the most beautiful breed of horse, the Arabian is easily distinguishable from other horses. It is no surprise with their unique attributes that they are the third most popular breed in the country. With characteristics and a personality that reect the history of the breed, the Arabian catches the attention of all. The history of the Arabian can be traced back to times when they lived in the desert, owned by nomadic tribes. Everything about this breed shows an ability to live in desert conditions. Large nostrils and well sprung ribs allow them to take in more air and their larger feet are a trait for mobility in sand. All of these attributes account for their incredible endurance and versatility. They are a breed that can participate in almost any sport, thriving in endurance events where they are nearly impossible to defeat. They are also a very healthy breed, staying sound for longer. This soundness even makes insuring them cheaper than other breeds. The Arabian’s intelligence and friendly disposition make them a great breed to work with and own. They love people and are very interested in interacting with their owners. This can again be traced back to their history, where they lived in tents with people. A friendly horse was a requirement for close quarter living. Along with being friendly, they are also sensitive, which requires an understanding from owners. This sensitivity makes them easier to reason with, which causes their training to be more mental than physical. Their empathy is so great that if they see another horse getting in trouble it upsets them. Due to their sensitivity, the Arabian requires a partnership with their owner. Owners need to be as sensitive to their horses as their horses are to them. They are not a good breed for people who are looking for a work horse and don’t intend to develop a strong relationship. For people looking for a partner, this athletic and versatile breed will certainly deliver.

Information gathered from Kriss Phelps, owner of the Crescendo Training Centre in Ephrata. Kriss has trained and shown Arabians since 1984. crescendotrainingcentre.com

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+ S E A S O NA L

'Tis the Season

You can feel the chill in the air, the leaves change colors, and local produce is ready to harvest. We compiled some tips to keep your pet both safe and healthy this active season.

SHEDDING Fall is when cats, dogs and rabbits naturally prepare for their winter coats by shedding. Frequent brushing will remove the hair and distribute healthy oils produced by skin follicles. Rabbits are unable to regurgitate hairballs so it is very important to brush them regularly. Please ask your pet specialist which comb is best for each as fur differs.

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Chocolate and sweets should never be given to pets; both contain artificial sweeteners that can be poisonous.

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If you plan to put a costume on your pet, make sure it doesn’t interfere with your pet’s mobility or breathing. Never leave your pet unattended in a costume.

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That black cat crossing your path is no different than any other - you will not have bad luck. Sadly, many black cats, and dogs, do face misfortunes and are often the hardest pets to adopt out. Look beyond colors when choosing your best friend - look for the personality that matches you.

THANKSGIVING For a pet safe holiday, it is best to avoid giving turkey carcasses or bones. Both will splinter when chewed and can get caught in the esophagus and intestinal tract. Also, side dishes such as stuffing or fruitcake may contain onions, garlic or raisins, which are toxic and may cause anemia (destruction of red blood cells).

IT’S THE HOLIDAYS, SO WE ARE SHARING MORE TIPS...

PURE PUMPKIN is a good source of fiber for rabbits, dogs and cats. Please check with your pet food specialist if your pet is on a specific diet.

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OATMEAL OR OATS are nutritious for dogs and cats, being naturally high in “good” nutrients and low in “bad” ones. Also, fish love Quaker Oats.

APPLES SLICES are a good treat for cats, dogs and rabbits. They are a good source of fiber as well as vitamin A and C.

HOLIDAY GIFTS As winter begins and the many holiday festivities start, don’t forget your best friend! Pets love to receive gifts just as much as their owners. Some even love to unwrap gifts! While getting someone a pet for the holidays may surprise them and make for a good gift opening video, it is not a good idea. Pets should be adopted with everyone involved from the start. Often times “gift pets” end up in shelters.


+ H E A LT H

All The World Is A Litter Box:

boxes in our home allow one cat to ‘guard’ them preventing the other cats from using them?”

Inappropriate Elimination Issues in Cats Part 1 written by Bryan Langlois, DVM

“HE IS PEEING EVERYWHERE!!!” “SHE JUST WON’T USE THE LITTER BOX!!!” “HOW CAN I FIX THIS??” These are some of the most often asked questions of vets when it comes to cat behavior issues. Being a shelter veterinarian, I probably get asked this type of question more than most, and “inappropriate elimination” is the number one reason cats are surrendered to shelters. Fortunately, with a little education and some potentially easy fixes, you can often correct the problem without having to resort to the painful decision of surrendering your faithful feline friend. The key to fixing it is understanding why it is occurring, and that always starts with a trip to your vet. While often times the problem is behavioral in nature, it is vital to rule out a possible medical issue with your cat. No amount of changes or behavioral modification is going to work if the problem is medical. Medical issues that can lead to inappropriate elimination can range from infections (UTIs), kidney disease and diabetes to parasites or gastrointestinal problems. Another possibility is if your cat is getting older and/or is suffering from an issue such as arthritis. This can make it difficult for him/her to get to a litter box that is in the basement or far away from them. Getting your cat a complete physical exam and being able to describe to your vet exactly what is occurring will go a long way towards a positive resolution.

The first thing to do if the issue is behavioral is determine if your cat is truly “marking” or just “peeing” on objects. The easiest way to determine this is that true “marking” involves small amounts of urine often sprayed onto vertical surfaces, such as windowsills or walls. Regular “peeing” will occur on horizontal surfaces such as the floor or carpets. Knowing this will help your vet figure out exactly what is going on. It is then important to examine why your cat is suddenly doing this. To help, think of any types of changes that may have occurred in the time just prior to your cat exhibiting this behavior. Remember that cats are very much creatures of habit and even small changes can cause behavior changes. Some questions to ask yourself include: “Did a new animal recently come into or leave the family?”, “Was there any type of remodeling or construction done on the house or apartment?”, “Did a new family member come home or leave for college or move out?” Next you must look at your home environment and how it is set up for your cat. Sometimes drawing a diagram of how your house is laid out will help your vet immensely. Some questions to ask yourself on this front include: “How many litter boxes do I have in the house, and where are they located?”, “What kind of litter do I use, and has it changed recently?”, and “Does the layout of litter

Also, remember that cats have great memories. Even one bad experience in a litter box can make them reluctant to use it in the future. This bad experience can be something as simple as a noise that startles them. All the cat thinks is, “I was in this box and something bad happened, so I am NEVER going to go into it again!!” Getting a different type of litter box or just moving the location, so the cat does not make that association, may fix the problem. In the next issue of Lancaster County Pet, we will discuss how we work to correct some of the other behavioral issues and talk about how medications may or may not help. In the meantime, be sure to think about some of the issues that were mentioned here if your cat is having a problem such as this and use the questions to be able to give your vet as much information as possible. While inappropriate elimination is one of the biggest reasons cats are surrendered to shelters, it is also one of the easiest of behavioral problems for us to fix, if we understand that it may take some patience to solve.

BRYAN LANGLOIS, DVM is the Medical Director at Pet Pantry of Lancaster County, PA. He also serves as a Board of Trustees Member of PVMA and The Pennsylvania Veterinary Foundation, AVC 2005.

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+ RESCUE HIGHLIGHT

Feathered Sanctuary Exotic Bird Rescue The birds make the choice written by Samantha St.Clair photographed by Samantha St.Clair 24 LANCASTER COUNTY PET


+ RESCUE HIGHLIGHT

f you have thought of owning a bird, you may be surprised to know the best way to get that bird is through adoption. Adopting not only helps with preventing the increasing number of homeless animals, but also creates an easier experience than getting a young bird. Through adoption, you can skip the juvenile stage where they may become aggressive or misbehave as they test their owners.

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The Feathered Sanctuary in Kirkwood provides the perfect environment for people to find their best match when looking for a feathered friend. They work with the birds to ensure they are fit to go into homes and provide time for people interested in getting a bird to bond with one before taking it home. Bonding can take weeks or even months, but it is worth the time spent as it lessens the possibility of issues once the bird is home. There are many reasons that birds end up in rescues. People often get them without realizing the time it takes to care for them. They are not animals you can set in a cage and let go; they need quality, one-on-one time with their owners. They are very intelligent animals that thrive in an environment that allows them to use that intelligence in positive ways. They are also messy and can be noisy. Their long lifespans go without explaining that they are a long term commitment, even a lifelong commitment depending on the bird. Often times they even outlive their owners. With the right people, however, birds can make excellent pets. They love positive reinforcement, training with the use of rewards, so training them can be fun for both owner and pet. They are fun to watch and interact with, and the relationship they can form with their owners is something the Feathered Sanctuary says is indescribable. If you are looking to adopt, it is best to visit with all of the birds at the Feathered Sanctuary in order to find the one that is right for you. This is not a process based on which bird you like the looks of most. Often times you will find that the bird who catches your eye won’t be the bird that captures your heart. Volunteering is a great way to both learn about birds before owning one, and to begin the bonding process with a bird. The Feathered Sanctuary is always in need of volunteers for every aspect of the rescue. Visitors are also welcome and the Sanctuary gladly allows time for relationships to establish. Currently the Sanctuary has found homes for over 1,200 birds since starting in 2003. With around 80 birds currently in the rescue, maybe you can find a new feathered friend.

1674 Kirkwood Pike, Kirkwood, PA 17536 • 717.529.2966 Thursday & Friday 12-7; Saturday & Sunday 12-5 fsebr.webs.com

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Humane Pennsylvania believes that the best way to keep pets happy and healthy at home is to make sure they have access to high quality and affordable veterinary care! Humane Veterinary Hospitals Lancaster and Reading are open to the public and accepting new patients! 2195 Lincoln Highway East, Lancaster, PA 17602 (717) 826-9762 lancaster@hvhospitals.org 1801 N. 11th St., Reading, PA 19604 (610) 921-VETS (8387) reading@hvhospitals.org

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+ FUN FOCUS

Kleen Acres Farm A friendly farm where everyone gets along and has fun written by Samantha St.Clair

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he fall season is perfect for field trips and getting out of the house for a day of fun. While planning your fall season, make Kleen Acres Farm one of your destinations! Operating since 2006, the farm was started out of a love for the gentle nature of alpacas, as well as the beautiful fleece they produce. It is owned by animal lovers and is home to many different species, from a camel, to cats, chickens, peacocks and of course many alpacas. The tours at Kleen Acres are interactive, allowing guests to not only learn about farm life, but to be part of that life. From collecting chicken eggs, to petting the various farm animals and learning about how alpaca fleece is turned into finished products, guests of all ages learn a lot and enjoy their time on the farm. Individual families or larger groups are welcome to schedule farm tours. After the tour, guests can stop in the gift shop area and get their very own alpaca fleece product. From alpaca toys to socks that people can’t get enough of, there are many products that the beautiful, warm and light alpaca fleece is made into. Starting in November the Christmas shop at Kleen Acres is open for people to purchase the perfect gift for family, friends, or themselves! This year there will be more than alpaca products available, as other vendors that sell items such as tea, spices, honey and jewelry will be there. There will surely be something there for just about anyone, so stop in, enjoy a tour, and grab that perfect something to end a great day.

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Tours are usually scheduled on Fridays, but accommodations can be made. Tours are by appointment only Handicap accessible, allowing wheelchairs and strollers. Group tours are available for nursing homes, daycares, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts and more. There is a minimal fee for group tours. Groups should not exceed 12 people. Contact Patty McKonly at 717.471.8634 or visit Kleen Acres’ website: kleenacresfarm.com

ALPACAS AND CAMELS ARE VERY INTELLIGENT ANIMALS, WITH ALPACAS ACTING MORE LIKE CATS AND CAMELS ACTING MORE LIKE DOGS.

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+ R E A L E S TAT E

ly real , taff el! I e staff S t o r h . Th aste ndly s Lanc frie ncaster y treat t tel pet a n o L pe a a H l m a g r e n e a t t i De e Ho , gave m were no r be h o t f u e at th you k yo ee m y wi p tay Than ed my s ppy to s amily. If to sta or a pu f d f y a a o enj lways h el like have h n scary a d e fe was ade me , I woul have be m ad a e ld t l u o o and h ey h ped w y h l t t a d l d h n sai t he frie gers. T acey them. I ter on n r a G r st as ill oin me. Lanc nd B ld j like ris a e I cou e about K , s s r mor wne k ecau My o stay b d learn Dog Par n t a e a gre to see s to th . k aces them any wal open sp m l u our eautif my b king and r ma ause o f u k yo ; bec Than s happy r e owne they ar py! n ap e h wh am y, I happ

The Hotel Lancaster A pet friendly hotel in the heart of the city written by Samantha St.Clair

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very dog owner knows the feeling of going on vacation without their pet. Dogs start to become uneasy when they see their owners packing bags, concerned about getting left behind. It is difficult to leave your best friend behind when you travel. Rest assured, Lancaster has the perfect solution: stay at The Hotel Lancaster, a pet friendly hotel in the heart of the city.

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Whether it is family or friends visiting for the upcoming holidays, or people interested in viewing the beautiful autumn scenery in the county this fall, there is no reason their companions cannot join them. The Hotel Lancaster staff loves having new guests, of both the two and four-legged kind, and enjoys visiting with both in the lobby area. They also have many repeat customers who love the friendly and charming atmosphere of the hotel. The knowledgeable hotel staff are also available to offer suggestions of places to visit as well as to help guests find their destinations. There are many activities in the surrounding areas, as The Hotel Lancaster is situated in the middle of all of the city life. There are canine activities in the area, such as visiting nearby Musser Park or simply enjoying a walk down the street. It is advised that you spend your entire vacation with your pet, as they don’t like to be left alone in new places.

28 LANCASTER COUNTY PET

With many amenities, including a complimentary continental breakfast, close parking, free Wifi and a newly opened fitness room for the two-legged guests, and of course the ability bring your dog, The Hotel Lancaster is certainly a gem the county has to offer for visitors of all kinds. For more information on The Hotel Lancaster visit thehotellancaster.com

THE AVERAGE DOG SLEEPS ABOUT 12 TO 14 HOURS PER 24-HOUR CYCLE.


+ NUTRITION

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Behavior therapy using food written by Kaye Ames

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fter fifty-four years of working with dogs and their behavior, I find the thought of food having a significant effect on a dog’s behavior fascinating. More and more research is being done on this subject and some conclusions of the research are that in many cases food manipulation is of benefit whether the dog is exhibiting aggression or is just very excitable and over reactive. Some of the findings at Tufts University in Massachusetts conclude that if your dog is showing territorial behavior, using a lower protein food along with higher carbohydrates can lower the dog’s reactive tendency along with, in some cases, has extinguish the behavior all together. The idea of carbs being calming, note appropriate carbs, and using the lower protein allows the amino acid tryptophan to have a mood stabilizing effect on the brain. The elimination of preservatives along with food coloring is also of importance. My thought would be to feed the dog using the same theory as feeding a child with ADD. See “The Well-Adjusted Dog” by Dr. Nicholas Dodman of Tufts University. Dr. Jean Dodds of the University of California encourages the use of functional foods, such as healthy vegetables, meats, and grains. Grains today are not as healthy as they were years ago. I remember walking through an oat field and eating raw oats and putting the stem in my mouth as if I was a farmer. I would not do that today. Because of how grains are grown and processed today, grains can lower the amino acids needed for health. Of great interest to me is the Chinese Medicine Theory of using certain foods, based on hot or cool tendencies of the food, and how it affects behavior. A hot food can feed a negative behavior, while a cool food can help to calm the negative behavior. The book “Four Paws Five Directions” will give you a very clear picture of this theory along with lists of hot, cool, and neutral foods. There is so much information on behavior therapy using food. I hope that I have given you just enough information to spark your interest in pursuing the theory of how food could possibly change your dog’s behavior. Enjoy a peaceful journey with your dog.

KAYE AMES is the owner of Kaye Ames School For Dogs in Lancaster. Kaye is a well-known and respected dog behaviorist with over 50 years of experience in grooming, animal health care and dog training.

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+ P ET S E RV I C E S

Sit and Stay

CATS TYPICALLY SPEND BETWEEN 30 AND 50 PERCENT OF THEIR DAY GROOMING THEMSELVES.

Below are just a few of the many businesses in the area.

Photography Tips: Dogs

• A tired dog makes a great model. • Treats or toys are a mandatory aid when photographing dogs.

• Make sure the photo shoot is contained with in a small area to lessen distractions.

• It is usually best to photograph one pet at a time, as it can get difficult trying to get more than one to cooperate. Take them each out for individual attention - they’ll love it!

• When using props or costumes make sure that neither will restrain or stress the dog as this may cause them to react by biting due to fear.

DAYCARE

PET SITTERS

When looking for a fantastic place for your four-legged friend to frolic and socialize, these reputable kennels provide a safe and healthy environment.

Demanding work schedules, out-of-town trips or even an ill pet’s needs may cause a loving pet owner stress. You will find these experienced and passionate pet care professionals are happy to watch over your furry family members.

Canine Country Club 888 N. Penryn Road, Manheim, PA 17545 717.665.2710 caninecountryclubinc.com Dog Town Pet Resort 671 W. Main Street, Palmyra, PA 17078 717.641.3629 dogtownpetresort.com Greenlin Pet Resort 600 Schoolhouse Road Middletown, PA 17057 717.944.9848 greenlinkennel.com

GROOMERS If your canine or feline friend is in need of some fur and nail styling, there is no shortage of passionate and professional groomers here in Lancaster.

D’tails 850 Milton Grove Road North Elizabethtown, PA 17022 717.361.8245 facebook.com/Dtails2011

Cats

• These feline models make the rules, just take many photos.

• Try using a sheet or blanket for backdrops - they can easily be draped over any surface you can get your cat to sit on!

• If your cat likes toys, that makes it easier! Use whichever toys can attract attention to get cats to look in the direction you want them to.

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Gochenauer Kennels 995 Fruitville Pike, Lititz, PA 17543 717.569.6151 gochenauerkennels.com Renee’s Pet Grooming Salon Oakridge Drive, Mountville, PA 17554 717.285.3330 reneespetgrooming.com Uptown Petz 2351 Oregon Pike, Suite 103 Lancaster, PA 17601 717.917.3836 uptownpetz.com

Deb’s Pet Buddies Lititz, PA 17543 717.283.4438 debspetbuddies.com Once Upon A Dog Tail Services the Lancaster Area 717.575.2656 onceuponadogtail.com Your Place or Mine Pet Sitting 811 South 16th Street Columbia, PA 17512 717.330.6519 Facebook.com/ yourplaceorminepetsittingpa

PHOTOGRAPHERS Our pets are our family so it is no surprise that having professional pet photo of them is a must.

B.S. Photography Info@BSPhotography.net BSPhotography.net facebook.com/BS-Photography Carrie McKenna Photography 207 Roosevelt Circle Ephrata, PA 17522 717.538.8606 carriemckennaphotography.com Crevan Night Photography CrevanNight.com facebook.com/CrevanNight Tanya Hopkins Photography P.O. Box 72645 Thorndale, PA 17372 484.639.4743 tanyahopkins.com


+ AROUND LANCASTER

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Olive in Landisville

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Thor, a rottweiler, in Conestoga

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Mason, a beagle/basset hound mix in Manor Township

Hazel, two year old black lab in Millersville

Vinnie the Mini Horse at Petersheim Farm

Emma, a cavalier, in East Petersburg

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Furry Encounters

“LIKE US ON FACEBOOK” to stay updated on what our next theme will be and for information on submitting your pet’s photo for the next edition!

Pepper (top) and Bella (bottom) of Ephrata

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+ I N F O R M AT I O N

i Pet resources

HORSE RESCUE Noble Hill Rescue 2002 Noble Road Kirkwood, PA 17536 • 717.529.2358 noblehillrescue.org

ANIMAL SUPPORT AGENCIES

THERAPY SERVICE

Furever Home Adoption Center, Inc. All volunteer, no kill, cage free facility 5984 Main Street East Petersburg, PA 17520 • 717.560.6400 fureverhomeadoptioncenter.com

KPETS Pet Enhanced Therapy Services 630 Janet Avenue Lancaster, PA 17601 • 888.685.7387 kpets.org

WOLF RESCUE

Help Find Sophie A Lost/Found Pet site facebook.com/HelpFindSophie

BIRD RESCUES

EMERGENCY SERVICES

Humane League of Lancaster County Shelter, Adopt, Educate & Protect 2195 Lincoln Highway E. Lancaster, PA 17602 • 717.393.6551 humaneleague.com Lancaster C.A.R.E.S Coalition for Animal Rescues, Education and Services 237 Centerville Road, Suite 2 Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.381.2275 lancastercares.org Lancaster County SPCA Shelter, humane care and adoptions of stray and unwanted animals 848 South Prince Street Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.917.6979 info@lancasterspca.org Lost Paws of Lancaster Animal Rescue P.O. Box 551 Lititz, PA 17543 • 717.725.3136 LostPawsofLancaster.org PAWS Cat Rescue No-kill animal rescue and spay/neuter Petsmart 1700 Fruitville Pike Lancaster, PA 17601 • 717.957.8122 pawsofpa.org

Feathered Sanctuary Exotic Bird Rescue 1674 Kirkwood Pike Kirkwood, PA 17536 • 717.529.2966 fsebr.webs.com Lair of Dragons Bird Rescue Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.431.8599 lairofdragonsbirdrescue.com

GOLDEN RETRIEVER RESCUE Delaware Valley Golden Retriever Rescue, Inc. 60 Vera Cruz Road Reinholds, PA 17569 717.484.4799 dvgrr.org

Wolf Sanctuary of PA 465 Speedwell Forge Road Lititz, PA 17543 • 717.626.4617 wolfsanctuarypa.org

ORCA Organization for Responsible Care of Animals 401 East Orange Street Lancaster, PA 17602 • 717.397.8922 orcarescue.org

PETS Pet Emergency Treatment Services 930 North Queen Street Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.295.7387 lancasterpetemergency.com

DOG PARK Beau’s Dream Dog Park 901 Buchanan Avenue Lancaster, PA 17605 facebook.com/BeausDreamDogParkBuchanan

LARGE ANIMAL LAW ENFORCEMENT Large Animal Protection Society Large Animal Abuse/Neglect Reporting P.O. Box 243 West Grove, PA 19390 • 610.869.9880 largeanimalprotectionsociety.org/_LAPS/

LCP LANCASTER COUNTY PET

lancastercountypet.com Pet Pantry of Lancaster County Helping avoid the surrender of a family pet due to the lack of resources 26 Millersville Road Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.983.8878 PetPantryLC.org Leo’s Helping Paws Financial assistance to dog rescue groups 1284 Wheatland Avenue Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717.475.9621 leoshelpingpaws.org

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Diane Hodges, DVM with Belle

NEW CLIENTS FREE Microchip ($36 VALUE)

or Nail Trim ($16 VALUE)

with this ad.

It is the mission of Happy Tails Animal Hospital to provide exceptional patient care through client education and complete health maintenance throughout the life of each pet. Our goal is to provide the very best preventative care not only to keep your pet healthy, but also to provide the highest quality medicine in times when your pet’s health is ailing. Below is a list of some of our hospital services. We are excited to show you all that we have to offer. We are proud of our hospital, and would love to take you on a “behind the scenes” tour upon your request. • • • •

Internal Medicine Surgery Dentistry Radiology

• Pet “drop-off” Service • Referral Consultation • Pharmaceuticals

823 Rohrerstown Road Lancaster, PA 17601 (717) 393-TAIL (8245)

Hours: Monday-Wednesday 8AM-7PM Thursday-Friday 8AM-6PM Every other Saturday 8AM- 12 Noon

find us on facebook

www.happytailslancaster.com SPRING 2015

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Lancaster County Pet Fall 2015  
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