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gıve MAKING CHANGE HAPPEN

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HOW YOU CAN CREATE A BETTER FUTURE | WHO'S MAKING A DIFFERENCE

MAKING CHANGE HAPPEN 2016

INNOVATIVE CHANGE MAKERS | TRANSFORMATIVE PROGRAMS | VISIONARY ACTIVISTS


GIVE LOS ANGELES |

TO HELP families and children across L.A., support the GIVE Los Angeles Challenge at crowdrise.com/ givelosangeles challenge.

Contents 4 GIVING IN L.A. Philanthropic organizations took a big hit during the recession. A look at how the recovery is going and who’s leading the charge.

8 OUT OF THE BLOCK The story of Tray, a foster care system success story with the assistance of a very special organization.

12 HOMEFRONT

gıve Los Angeles

WITH THIS SPECIAL ISSUE WE LAUNCH THE GIVE LOS ANGELES CHALLENGE. JOIN US.

THE TEAM AT LOS ANGELES magazine is constantly inspired by the stories of Angelenos who have made a difference for others in our community. With all of the creative and compassionate people who call our city home, it’s no surprise that so many of us across Los Angeles are engaged in service work and philanthropy that have the power to change lives. What may surprise you, however, is how many nonprofit organizations are vying for awareness, funding, and other resources. At the same time, charitable giving in Los Angeles is still recovering from the $1.6 billion drop that occurred during the lowest point of the recession. In this issue we take a look at the major issues we face as a city, where the money is going, and individuals and organizations that are making an impact in the face of complex problems. The GIVE Los Angeles Challenge is an online fundraising program designed to give an additional platform to the important work of Los Angeles nonprofits and amplify the impact of your donations. The three organizations that raise the most during the Challenge will share a fund of $30,000 above and beyond the dollars raised through your donations. Join us. Let’s change Los Angeles for the better together.

20 THE VISIONARY Melanie Lundquist and her husband, Richard, are investing in a better future for Los Angeles.

24 EFFECTIVE GIVING Q & A with an authority on high-impact philanthropy about how to be a catalyst for change.

84 CHANGE MAKERS Fundraising in action for causes from health to education. COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: DEBORAH RAVEN

Erika Anderson PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, ADVERTISING SALES

Michael Petruncola ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER MARKETING & BRAND INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS

Tracy Seng CONTENT SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR

Mitch Getz

Erika Anderson PUBLISHER

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5900 Wilshire Boulevard, 10th Floor Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-801-0100

PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERTO WESTBROOK

introducing

The solutions to homelessness are elusive. Who is facing the challenge and how it’s going.


JOIN THE

CHALLENGE I

GIVE (Your Name Here)

To build L.A. one child, one family, one community at a time!

1. Go to crowdrise.com/GIVELosAngelesChallenge 2. Learn about the participating non-proďŹ ts and the remarkable work they are doing in L.A. 3. Make a donation by January 3 to the organizations that most inspire you At the conclusion of the challenge, the three organizations who received the most donations will split a prize of $30,000. Plus, each participating organization will keep ALL the dollars pledged to their cause during the challenge Look for the winning non-proďŹ ts to be announced in the March issue of Los Angeles magazine

crowdrise.com/GIVELosAngelesChallenge


GIVE LOS ANGELES |

giving in

PHILANTHROPY IS ON THE RISE, BUT WE HAVE A WAYS TO GO TO REACH PRE-RECESSION LEVELS OF GENEROSITY.

ACROSS LOS ANGELES COUNTY, THERE ARE MORE

L A

than 35,000 nonprofit organizations. Some find homes for pets and some find homes for people. Some prevent sexual and domestic violence and some prevent environmental devastation. Some try to improve the public school system and some try to improve the criminal justice system. Operating at a wide variety of scales, they are all similar in that they’re attempting to meet a need that’s not otherwise being met, whether due to a lack of funding from the public sector or a lack of attention from society in general. These nonprofits are able to function largely because of the generosity of donors and grantmakers. “Part of having a great quality of life in a community like Los Angeles is having strong schools, having strong museums, having strong civic organizations, in addition to having strong hospitals,” says DeAnn Marshall, senior vice president at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. “None of those entities come together without community support.”

BY Nate Berg | ILLUSTRATION Peter Grundy

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L.A. facts

Population 10 million NonproďŹ t organizations 35,000 Locally headquartered foundations 2,500

Typically receive the most donations from individuals

Religious organizations

Where Angelenos rank Percentage of overall income given

Foundation giving

San Francisco 2.4%

2007 2011 2013

Detroit 2.7%

New York 2.6%

Los Angeles 2.8%

$billion 2.24 1.9 2.14

Birmingham 4.8%

Private donations

Memphis 5.1%

Salt Lake City 5.4%

$billion 7.16 5.5 6.4

2006 2009 2014

Where foundation $$ are spent Human services 11%

Arts & culture 11%

Education 19%

Other causes 26%

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ith one of the wealthiest economies in the world, a population of 10 million, and a philanthropic community of more than 2,500 locally headquartered foundations, L.A. has an uncommonly large pool of potential funders for these 35,000 nonprofits. But actual giving in Los Angeles is relatively low. According to a 2014 analysis of giving in the country’s 50 largest cities by The Chronicle of Philanthropy magazine, the L.A. metropolitan area ranked 28th, giving just 2.8 percent of overall income—far below top-ranked Salt Lake City (5.4 percent), Memphis (5.1 percent), and Birmingham (4.8 percent), and just slightly above Detroit (2.7 percent). IRS tax deduction data shows that L.A. County has been slow to rebuild its charitable giving in the aftermath of the recession. In 2006, private donations amounted to $7.16 billion, a number that dropped to $5.5 billion at the nadir of the recession in 2009. By 2014, the latest year for which data is available, the number had climbed back up to around $6.4 billion. “That’s still more than $500 million less than what was reported through deductions a decade ago, before the recession,” says Bill Parent, a philanthropy expert at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs who led a two-year effort studying individual giving in Los Angeles. This research, conducted in partnership with the Annenberg Foundation and the California Community Foundation, has shown that while wages, disposable income, and overall giving are slowly recovering, people are donating less to charitable causes than they did in the recent past. “People will change what they give to, but they give more or less the same amount,” he says. “And as their incomes go up, the tendency is not to increase their giving.” Parent’s findings highlight some of the challenges facing the nonprofit community. “Those are the trends that tell you that the philanthropic infrastructure, that the ability for the region to give money, has been compromised,” says John Kobara, executive vice president of the California Community Foundation. Institutional philanthropists, like private and family foundations, have also been slow to rebuild their grantmaking to what it was before

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the recession. During the worst of it, some foundations saw losses up to 35 percent of their capital value, according to Paul Vandeventer, president and CEO of Community Partners, a nonprofit agency that provides guidance and support to further the success of Southern California philanthropic efforts. The recession “was the biggest capital calamity in private foundation history in the United States,” Vandeventer says. Foundations are rebuilding their assets, but given the volatility of the economy in recent years, Vandeventer says they’re being understandably cautious about where and how they’re spending their money. Despite the sense of caution, foundation giving has been on the rise. According to figures from the USC Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy, total giving by L.A.-based foundations in 2013 was $2.14 billion, up from $1.9 billion in 2011, and only slightly off 2007’s pre-recession mark of $2.24 billion. About a third of the 2013 grant dollars went toward health programs, 19 percent went toward education, and 11 percent went toward both arts and culture and human services. That roughly tracks how individual giving is distributed, though religious organizations typically receive the most donations from individuals. But a lot of that money is not trickling down to local nonprofits. According to Parent’s 2016 UCLA study on individual giving in


post-recession L.A., median revenues of nonprofits across the county fell nearly 50 percent between 2000 and 2013. Part of the reason is that much of the giving happening here is directed outside of the city and the region. That’s occurring across the giving spectrum, from someone mailing a check to a hospital or their alma mater out of state to high-wealth entertainmentindustry donors making large contributions to international aid efforts. “If you’re worried about climate change, the arena for action is less L.A. than in federal policy,” says James Ferris, director of the Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy at USC. “All philanthropy is personal, ultimately.” That doesn’t necessarily mean L.A.’s bigger issues are being pushed aside. Marvin Schotland is president and CEO of the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles, which manages the charitable assets of roughly 1,200 families. He says there’s a growing desire among those families to spread their giving beyond the traditional recipients. “Almost every person who supports their university or the art museum, you’re also going to see them supporting one or two social issues that are important to them and that aren’t being met,” Schotland says. “As the community’s needs shift in terms of what’s required, our donors shift along with them.” In a multicentric, multicultural place like L.A., those needs can

vary significantly. That creates its own problems. “One of the reasons it’s difficult for Los Angeles is its diversity. Communities that give the most are the most homogeneous,” says Parent, pointing to places like Salt Lake City, which has high rates of religion-based giving. “As the city becomes more diverse, as the city becomes less religious and more secular, those are the kinds of trends that make the challenges greater.” L.A.’s diversity is also part of the reason why it’s home to 35,000 nonprofits; there are so many different people and concerns, no one organization—or 1,000, or even 10,000—can meet the demand for services. However, such a crowded field has made it difficult for many of those nonprofits to convince donors that theirs is the one to support. “It’s a hard case to make in a very noisy and distracting environment,” says Kobara. He’s hoping to change that. The California Community Foundation

"ALL PHILANTHROPY IS PERSONAL, ULTIMATELY." JAMES FERRIS, Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy, USC

is currently developing an online guidebook, to be published next spring, that will highlight particularly effective nonprofits working in various sectors as a form of advice for potential donors. Similar guides are available in cities like Washington, D.C., where a publication called the Catalogue for Philanthropy profiles about 300 nonprofits working in areas like immigrant and refugee services, youth education and enrichment, and community and civic engagement. There hasn’t been an equivalent in L.A., Kobara says, partly because it’s a fraught process that’s sure to be controversial. “It’s going to exclude thousands,” he says. But, he argues, something has to be done to improve the way resources get distributed to crucial service providers. “For people who want to get more engaged in issues and community and nonprofits, both financially and from a volunteer standpoint, we need to give them a better starting point, an onramp to engagement.” Getting more donors—be they individuals with $50 to give or major foundations with millions—will be an ongoing challenge for L.A.’s large and growing nonprofit community. There’s no simple way to push L.A.’s charitable giving back up to what it once was. But as the economy improves and more information about effective programs becomes available, the barrier to giving may start to disappear. ♥ W I N T E R 2 0 16 | G I V E L O S A N G E L E S |

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GIVE LOS ANGELES |

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o o out of the

LIKE MANY CHILDREN RAISED IN

the foster care system, Tray T.* learned self-reliance at a very early age. In fact, he was so young when he and his 10 siblings were split up that he doesn’t remember it. “Our mother and father were addicted to drugs and couldn’t take care of us,” Tray says. “We went to two different places: My twin brother and I, along with an older brother and sister, went to my great-aunt’s in Compton, and the others went with my grandmother, who was already a foster parent.” In 2000, Tray’s great-aunt passed away, but her husband, Lorenzo, kept the kids and raised the four of them himself. “We called him Uncle Lo, and he taught me everything,” says Tray, now 24. “He taught

me his work ethic, the drive I have, and the real difference between right and wrong. In the community I grew up in, it’s so easy to get confused, because you might see a faster way up or out. My uncle forfeited his retirement to take care of us,” he says. “He invested in us wholeheartedly emotionally. And because of him, I can read any situation and any person.” That ability might have saved Tray’s life; it certainly saved his sanity. “There were family members who would get crazy,” he says. “There were times when we were with them when they were robbing a grocery store or dealing or doing drugs. A lot of people in my family struggled with drugs, not just my parents. It was hard on us to keep all that in mind and stay focused.”

*Tray T.’s first name is used throughout this article to protect his privacy.

WITH THE GUIDANCE OF EXTENDED FAMILY MEMBERS, TEACHERS, AND UNITED FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN, FORMER FOSTER CHILD TRAY T. GAINED THE CONFIDENCE HE NEEDED TO OVERCOME THE ODDS, GET A COLLEGE EDUCATION, AND START ON THE PATH TO A SUCCESSFUL CAREER. BY Peg Moline | PHOTOGRAPHY Lisa Romerein


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ray and his twin knew education would be the way out. Growing up, they walked to middle school past King/Drew Magnet High School (ranked a silver medalist and one of America’s best high schools in 2008 and 2009 by U.S. News & World Report). “We would walk by and say, ‘We have to go to that school,’” Tray says. “We were definitely motivated. That school was our goal. We competed to get in.”

supports kids in the foster care system and helps them get a college education. Founded in 1979 by children’s advocate and philanthropist Nancy Daly, UFC aims to change the face of foster care through its 11-year education Once he was enrolled, Tray saw the program that starts with foster high school as a great opportunity children in seventh grade and not just to make friends, but also guides them through the completion to get to know his teachers, who of a bachelor’s degree at a fourchallenged him. “I was the class year college. Its Pathways program clown, so I had to make sure I stayed helps them after they emancipate focused.” Tray’s biggest challenge, from care up to age 25 by providing he says, was English. “I loved math; emotional support and serviceEnglish, not so much. But I still enriched housing, so they have a had to take AP classes in it. I was so safety net until they are firmly in afraid I wouldn’t do well enough to adulthood. Eighteen- to 24-year-olds go to college.” transitioning out of foster care The classes Tray did best in have come to light as a sadly were math and economics. “I love neglected sector. numbers and what you can do “The national outcomes for kids with them. How you can paint a who begin their lives in the foster care picture, especially when it comes to system are shocking,” says Catherine investing,” he says. “My uncle was Atack, UFC’s director of development. in construction, so he knew how to “Nationally, only 13 percent of foster work and work. You need to know kids will go to college, and less than geometry and how to make a profit. 3 percent get their bachelor’s degree. That’s what he did; that’s what we The hurdles these young people face did and still do.” are overwhelming. We currently serve Tray saw that his passion for 1,400 kids of the 30,000 foster homes numbers and a good education could in Los Angeles.” By contrast, 100 help him turn his percent of the foster back on the negative youth in UFC’s College opportunities in his Readiness program neighborhood. He for four or more years had always thought graduate high school, “THE NATIONAL college would never 97 percent of that OUTCOMES FOR be an option, but group are eligible to KIDS WHO BEGIN an English teacher go on to college, and, at his high school on average, 70 percent THEIR LIVES saw his potential of the organization’s IN THE FOSTER and introduced College Sponsorship CARE SYSTEM him to the United students graduate with ARE SHOCKING.” Friends of the a bachelor’s degree. CATHERINE ATACK, Children (UFC), a “Tray was fortunate United Friends of the Children Los Angeles–based to have one solid place nonprofit that to call home,” Atack


DEFYING THE ODDS Tray graduated with a degree in finance and is now working at AIG.

says. “It’s not unusual for kids to have as many as 60 different placements in their lives, and each time there’s a move, there is an educational impact. Tray and his brother are examples of what is possible when programs like ours get the funding they need. “Nancy created UFC with the board around her kitchen table,” Atack says. “She vowed that everyone would be treated like our own children, and that we would work to give them the future we’d give our own family.” “It really is about taking advantage of opportunity,” Tray says. He finished his degree in business finance at Cal State Northridge and is now a regional marketing associate at AIG insurance and financial services corporation, which involves serving as a financial advisor for the company’s retirement clients. His dream is to continue to work in client interaction and teach personal finance. He also continues to work with UFC to share his experience and “help guide younger UFC kids through their journeys,” he says. And he knows that he has not only UFC to thank, but a community as well. “The gifts I received are not only from UFC, but also from individuals who believe in UFC’s mission.” “Tray is one of our most serving volunteers,” Atack declares. “That’s why he’s not playing sports and music. He and his brother have a staunch belief that by paying it forward, they can help other kids.”

UFC events do seem to make up a big chunk of Tray’s social life. “I love volunteering,” he says. “I like going to events like networking mixers and panels. Coming up, we have our food and wine event, Cultivate LA.” Tray also loves scary movies, reading about stocks, and hanging out with friends. Among Tray’s most striking qualities are his warm smile, his rascal charm, his optimism, and his upbeat gratitude. His happiest memory of childhood is the Christmas when he and his brother got their first bikes. “We would ask for a lot of things, but never really received them—that game or system we always wanted,” Tray remembers. “But when we were 9 or 10, we got bikes and always cherished them so much.” And while self-reliance certainly helped Tray to attain his achievements, he acknowledges how vital the funding and support he

received from UFC has been. “My counselors gave me the confidence to go the next step [by saying] that I deserved the next step, deserved to be in college and then to graduate, to intern at Wells Fargo and Warner Bros., and then apply for and get a job,” he says. “I was able to use my entrepreneurial mind and start laying out the path that would get me where I wanted to go. “My children might not have to start in the hard place I did,” Tray says, “but I will teach them to treat everyone the same, whether it’s the president or a janitor. We are all human and each individual has amazing capacity. I’ve learned to honor and respect those who came before and paved our way.” ♥ PEG MOLINE is a writer and editor who lives in

Mar Vista; her most recent book is The Doctor's Book of Natural Health Remedies (2014).

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GIVE LOS ANGELES |

BY Nate Berg

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PHOTOGRAPHY (LEFT): SONGQUAN DENG

n homefront o

SOME OF L.A.’S WEALTHIEST PHILANTHROPISTS AND FOUNDATIONS ARE SETTING THEIR SIGHTS ON SOLVING THE CITY’S MOST CHRONIC SOCIAL DILEMMA— PROVIDING HOUSING FOR THOSE WITHOUT IT. BUT EVEN THE MEGA-DONORS CAN’T TACKLE THE PROBLEM ON THEIR OWN.


PHOTOGRAPHY (RIGHT): ED FREEMAN

OS ANGELES is one of the wealthiest cities in the world. If it were a country, its roughly $700 billion gross domestic product would rank it among the top 20 richest nations. From entertainment to aerospace to technology, the city is replete with high-earning industries and the wealth they create. More than 125,000 millionaires call L.A. home. And yet L.A. is also beset by widespread inequity and poverty. Countywide, more than 46,000 people are either homeless or sleeping in shelters on any given night, according to 2016 point-in-time counts. The number of people sleeping on the street increased 12 percent from the prior year and 38 percent from 2013. More than 19 percent of people are living below the poverty line. Most of the new jobs expected to be created over the next five years will require low skills and provide low wages.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: ED FREEMAN

t

hough these issues are well known by the city’s political establishment and civil society in general, solutions to these wide-reaching problems are elusive. Facing the challenge directly, some of the city’s most powerful philanthropists and foundations are putting their money into these issues, collectively granting hundreds of millions of dollars toward addressing the city’s most entrenched and intractable social quandaries.

“Los Angeles, and Southern California for that matter, is increasingly becoming a place of haves and have-nots,” says Fred Ali, president and CEO of the Weingart Foundation. Since its founding in 1951, the organization has made nearly $1 billion in grants to Southern California nonprofits, and recently refocused its entire grantmaking enterprise around addressing issues of equity in L.A. Others are taking a similar approach. The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation has focused more than $90 million specifically on addressing chronic homelessness since 1990. The Annenberg Foundation has launched LA n Sync, a partnership between philanthropists, businesses, and academic organizations that work together to win major federal grants for civic projects. And United Way of Greater Los Angeles has created a multi-foundation task force that’s raising hundreds of millions of dollars to address poverty, housing, and homelessness across the county. Of course, local, county, and state governments are also involved in ongoing efforts to fund homeless services and provide shelter and housing. But many argue that the philanthropic community is using its deep pockets to kick-start bolder action—both on the streets and in government policymaking circles. “Philanthropy is really in a good place right now in Southern California,” Ali says. “Philanthropy, unlike a lot of other areas in the country, is really working well together in collaborative projects and leveraging our dollars with others.” Institutional philanthropy contributes about $2 billion a year in L.A. County. No longer content to just get their names on museum wings and university buildings, the city’s biggest and wealthiest foundations have recently refocused on the pressing issues facing Los


Angeles. And though their funding is distributed in many directions, the main players in local philanthropy are united in focusing a large chunk of their giving on what is undeniably the city’s biggest issue: homelessness.

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES

j

OHN MACERI is one of the leading forces fighting L.A.’s homelessness epidemic. He’s executive director of The People Concern, a Santa Monica–based nonprofit formed from the merger of OPCC and Lamp Community that focuses on poverty and homelessness. It’s one of the largest social service agencies of its kind in Los Angeles County and supports thousands of homeless people and victims of domestic violence every year. Like his counterparts working in Skid Row and across the county, Maceri takes a systemic view of homelessness, seeing it as an extreme manifestation of poverty that has been exacerbated by a severe lack of affordable housing. “It’s really the perfect storm,” he says. “You have a tight, expensive real-estate market, and we’re not adding new affordable units to the inventory fast enough to replace the housing that’s being lost either through being torn down or through gentrification or redevelopment.” Vacancy rates for various types of housing in L.A. have generally hovered between 2 percent and 5 percent for the past few years. “So there’s an imbalance,” Maceri explains. “We have a housing crisis, which we’ve had really for a long time, but it’s accelerated in the last several years, which has contributed to our increase in homelessness.” The intuitive way to counteract homelessness is simply to build more housing. The growing consensus among experts, service providers, researchers, and practically everyone working around issues of

homelessness is that the best way to eliminate chronic homelessness is to build and operate what’s known as permanent supportive housing—housing with on-site or connected social, medical, mental health, substance abuse, and case management services. Studies show that supportive housing reduces homelessness, often at a lower cost than providing maintenancefocused services like soup kitchens and shelters. Maceri says philanthropic donors—the large grantmaking

we’ve been able to do that has been innovative,” Maceri says. Philanthropic institutions are recognizing the power they wield. Some are even taking on an almost activist role. United Way of Greater Los Angeles recently reorganized its institutional mission away from the foundation’s traditionally neutral stance and into the arena of policymaking and advocacy. It is now focused almost entirely on issues of poverty and homelessness—and on finding ways to ensure its grants and

“PRIVATE PHILANTHROPY REALLY CAN BE AND HAS BEEN THE CATALYST FOR A LOT OF THE WORK THAT WE’VE BEEN ABLE TO DO THAT HAS BEEN INNOVATIVE.” JOHN MACERI, The People Concern

institutions as well as individuals mailing in checks—have been crucial for The People Concern’s efforts to expand the supply of housing for formerly homeless individuals. About 30 percent of the organization’s funding comes from philanthropy every year, and he says it’s far more nimble than the slow and often restricted funding from government grants and programs. “Private philanthropy really can be and has been the catalyst for a lot of the work that

funding can make a measurable impact on those problems. One of its key efforts was the 2010 launch of Home For Good, a plan to end chronic and veteran homelessness created in partnership with the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. As part of that plan, United Way of Greater Los Angeles established the Funders Collaborative, a unique, coordinated effort by more than a dozen local philanthropies that combine funding to propel local programs to


home is where the art is The homeless and those living in extreme poverty or with mental illness have a safe and nurturing place for self-expression at the Village, an interim housing facility in Skid Row, where The People Concern operates the Lamp Arts Program studio and creativity center. A selection of artworks is available for purchase at lamp_artproject.imagekind. com. Proceeds support the artists and the Lamp Arts Program: lampcommunity.org.

Window KEITH L. JACKSON I am 48 years old and was raised in Los Angeles. I served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1983 to 1989. I have worked various jobs, but my proudest position was as a docent at the California African American Museum for five years. My last profession was as a teacher's aide for a private company. In October of 2010 I lost my job. My wife and I struggled to keep up, but by mid-2011 we became homeless. We are now living in separate transitional facilities. I was told about the Lamp program and have been a part of it ever since. The photo class has helped me extend my creative freedom. I might live in Skid Row, but I am not helpless. My ambitions are unlimited as I strive to live a better life.

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build and operate housing for the homeless. Launched with $1 million in seed money from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the Funders Collaborative is made up of some of the major philanthropic institutions in Los Angeles, including The California Endowment, the W. M. Keck Foundation, and the Weingart Foundation. They meet monthly with local public sector entities to decide where funding should go and how it can be leveraged to pull in even larger grants from the state and federal government. Since the Funders Collaborative was established in 2011, the philanthropies have contributed about $34 million and helped to house more than 5,700 chronically homeless individuals and veterans. Elise Buik, president and CEO of United Way of Greater Los Angeles, says philanthropists have to be more proactive to achieve these kinds of results. “I think that some circles of philanthropy and even some philanthropists are nervous to move into the policy arena, are nervous to move into the advocacy arena,” Buik says. “If philanthropy really wants to have an impact, I firmly believe it’s a space we have to be in. We have to be working with the public sector, and the public sector includes the city, the county, the school district, almost any major system that is serving the population that we seek to serve.” But that also means recognizing the forces that may hamper progress. Many in the philanthropic sector have a certain level of frustration with Los Angeles and California, where elected officials’ term limits are often at odds with the magnitude of issues like homelessness. Philanthropy, especially the larger foundations, can take the long view. “In a community where we have public and private sector transience, the institutions that are here to stay and have been here a long time, we have a different mantle of responsibility,” Buik says. In recent years, that has spurred

philanthropists to seek out ways their funding can lead to tangible progress. The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation launched a strategic initiative in 2010 aimed at ending chronic homelessness, and has since approved roughly $70 million in related grants. “That’s a pretty big number,” says Andrea Iloulian, the foundation’s senior program officer focusing on homelessness. “But when you look at what it costs to build one building, that’s not going to make a huge dent. So what we do is we get out there and try to find ways to really leverage other resources.” One of the ways they’ve done that is to partner with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. An under-recognized problem of homelessness is its outsize impact on the public health-care sector. Often, homeless individuals rely on ambulances and emergency room services for their health care, from the routine to the extreme, all at a high cost to the public. “Sometimes it’s $150,000 a year on one person. And they’re still homeless,” says Marc Trotz, director of the Housing for Health Division at the Department of Health Services. Seeing how much public-health money was being spent on homeless individuals and understanding the effectiveness of permanent supportive housing as a tactic for getting people off the streets, the Hilton Foundation granted the Department of Health Services $4 million in 2014 to develop a program that converts some health-care funding into housing subsidies for the homeless. It’s an idea the department’s director, Mitchell Katz, M.D., first implemented while leading the Department of Health in San Francisco. At a cost of roughly $20,000 per person per year, the approach of putting people in permanent supportive housing ends up creating a significant amount of savings for the health department. The Hilton Foundation’s $4 million infusion helped convince the county


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Night Cherry Blossom Tree KAREN IVETTE ZALDANA I was born and raised in El Salvador during the civil war. Homelessness is such a heavy word in itself: the cold concrete, cold weather, thirst, hunger, fear. I decided to reach out to Lamp for help and guidance because I was able to find trust and understanding. Art is saving my life. I will continue with my mental health recovery, and I still have the keys to my permanent supportive housing unit!

Boat ANTHONY BOGAN I am 24 years old. I ended up homeless due to violence with me and my mom in 2010–2012. My experience on Skid Row has been a tough one. I wish houses were cheaper to buy in L.A. I got into the Lamp Art Studio in 2013 through a friend who introduced me. I am an artist here and I love it so much. I have done several abstract paintings that I love. I am enrolled in college for business administration.

Halo Street Art GLORIA MCKINNEY My journey to Skid Row began with a job loss. I worked for 15 years, the building was sold, and the new owner came with a new employee. Without a paycheck I couldn't pay rent, so I gave up my apartment. My family wanted me to stay with them, but I did not want to be a problem for anyone. A friend told me about the Union Rescue Mission. I phoned them, they had a bed, and that's where I went. A flyer about Lamp was posted at the building where I live now. I became a member. The rest is history. I plan to have a jewelry business.

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to contribute another $14 million toward the effort. Since 2014, the subsidies have been used to provide housing for nearly 2,000 people. Trotz says the county is on track to deliver another 1,700 subsidies by the end of 2016. “We really look for those little catalytic opportunities to help the nonprofit community get even more out of generally what is public money,” Iloulian says. All this philanthropic attention has influenced action in the public sector. In early 2016, the city released its comprehensive homeless strategy, which calls for roughly $2 billion in funding over the next 10 years. The current budget includes $138 million in funding for homelessness programs, a fourfold increase from the previous year. And the county also approved its own plan to address homelessness, augmenting its typical $50 million homelessness budget with an additional $100 million aimed at 47 specific strategies, all of which will be enacted by the end of the fiscal year in June, according to Phil Ansell, director of the county’s homelessness initiative. “There has been extremely rapid progress in the implementation of the approved strategies,” says Ansell. “That implementation effort has brought together literally thousands of government employees and community providers.” Building on that momentum, the city of Los Angeles placed Proposition HHH, a $1.2 billion bond measure to construct permanent supportive housing, on the November ballot. And the county Board of Supervisors will decide in December on another ballot initiative for the spring 2017 citywide elections that would raise $355 million annually for homelessness efforts. Ansell says the level of collaboration between the city, the county, service providers, and civic organizations has been greater in recent years than ever before, largely thanks to the philanthropic community dedicating years of effort to the issue of homelessness. “And in so doing, those philanthropic organizations played a critical role in preparing the

“WE REALLY LOOK FOR THOSE LITTLE CATALYTIC OPPORTUNITIES TO HELP THE NONPROFIT COMMUNITY GET EVEN MORE OUT OF GENERALLY WHAT IS PUBLIC MONEY.” ANDREA ILOULIAN, The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

terrain for the emergence of the Los Angeles County homeless initiative and the complementary effort by the city of Los Angeles,” he says.

VEN WITH ALL this momentum coming from both the philanthropic community and the public sector, it can be challenging to rally individuals to support efforts on homelessness. “There’s a level among some individuals of donor fatigue or compassion fatigue,” says Maceri of The People Concern. “You ask most Angelenos, ‘Do you care about homelessness? Are you concerned about homelessness?’ and they say yes. You ask them, ‘Are you willing to pay for it?’—that’s a different answer. Are you willing to tax yourself for it? If you’re a homeowner, are you willing to pay more in property taxes over a long period of time? Are you willing to pay more in sales tax?” While the philanthropic community has taken big steps toward addressing homelessness in Los Angeles, even the wealthiest foundations can only do so much. The $2 billion that philanthropy donates every year in L.A. County is being increasingly directed toward the issue of homelessness. And it’s making measurable progress. But individuals in the county collectively give three times as much, more than $6 billion annually. Where that money goes will depend on what causes people want to support and what problems they really want to solve. ♥ NATE BERG is a Los Angeles–based journalist

who writes about cities, design, and technology.


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GIVE LOS ANGELES |

the visionary

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PASSIONATE DONOR AND CO-OWNER OF A REAL-ESTATE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY WITH HER HUSBAND, RICHARD, MELANIE LUNDQUIST WORKS TO HATCH INNOVATIONS THAT MAKE THE MOST OF PHILANTHROPIC DOLLARS.

MELANIE LUNDQUIST is a fervent believer in giving back to the community. Not just in this season of Thanksgiving, but all year—and all life—long. It’s an attitude the Southern California philanthropist says she got from her mother: “She told me,” Melanie says, “‘When you leave this world, it better be a better world.’” And that’s a message that Melanie and her husband, Richard, have taken to heart, using their considerable resources to improve their community, particularly in the areas of education and health. The Lundquists own Continental Development Corporation, which has built and managed premium hotel property, shopping plazas, and medical facilities throughout California, among many other commercial and retail real-estate ventures. They are also responsible for a $50 million gift to the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, $10 million to the Lundquist Cardiovascular Institute, plus $3 million for additional ER beds and $50 million for a new patient tower all at the Torrance Memorial Medical Center, as well as countless other pledges to institutions and initiatives in the region. Why? Says Melanie, “Richard and I support Warren Buffett’s comment that this is society’s money. We’re temporary stewards.”

BY Joan Tapper | PHOTOGRAPHY Lisa Romerein

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SCHOOL DAY Melanie Lundquist during a site visit to 107th Street Elementary/ Magnet School in Los Angeles.


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orthright, down-toearth, enthusiastic, and proactive, Melanie is now stepping further into the limelight by advocating for a new kind of philanthropy that is in tune with our times. “There’s so much at stake in this country,” she says. “If someone has found a way to change systems, it should be shared. Entrepreneurs have creative and problem-solving skills. We need not just money, but also their expertise and a public-private partnership.”

Nowhere is that more obvious than in education, notes Melanie, who attended L.A. public schools. “I went to Riverside Drive Elementary, Millikan Middle School, and U.S. Grant High School, and I got a phenomenal education. But money is no longer there from the state.” So in 2007 she signed on to help Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa establish the nonprofit Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, which was created to transform underserved schools and give those students a highquality education. She and Richard pledged $5 million a year for the next 10 years. “The Partnership is in its ninth year,” she says, “and we’ve accomplished a lot. We’re doing something no one else is doing the way we’re doing it. It’s time to get the word out on the Partnership and philanthropy.”

OW A RESIDENT of the South Bay, Melanie, 67 and a proud third-generation Angeleno on her father’s side, points to a family tradition of helping others. Her maternal grandparents, who emigrated from Poland around 1904, moved to Los Angeles when her mother was a few months old. “My grandfather became a business owner,” she says, “and a member of the L.A. Merchants’ Association, which founded a home for Jewish tuberculosis patients that eventually became the City of Hope. My mother went to college at USC in 1925 and joined the AEPhi sorority because she wanted to establish a dental clinic for impoverished kids. To this day it still exists, but in a slightly different form. “My mother did a lot of fundraising for causes,” Melanie continues. “She was good at it, and when I was 7, I said, ‘I want to do what you’re doing.’ She took me over to, I think, March of Dimes. I had to sign for a can and went door-to-door on my block. I knocked on the door and asked for money…and I haven’t stopped since.” She hasn’t been shy about fundraising for various nonprofit institutions, and when it comes to their own contributions, she and Richard don’t wait to be asked. Though they once preferred to donate anonymously, that changed in 2005, when the Torrance Memorial Medical Center wanted to establish a cardiovascular unit for $10 million. “I actually had been a volunteer at the med center for 11 years, from 1985 to 1996,” Melanie muses. “I was the little lady at the front desk on Thursdays from 4:00 to 7:00.” A decade later, the Lundquists were helping to find the right donor for the hospital when they decided to step up themselves. “I have a real thing about women’s heart health,” she explains. Then they threw in $3 million to expand the ER, which was burdened with additional patients

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as other hospital emergency rooms closed. “At that point the hospital convinced us that if you’re going to benefit the community, you have to go public, so other people will follow.” That’s why in 2013, when the Lundquists gave the funds for the patient tower, they agreed to put their name on it. Craig Leach, CEO of the Torrance Memorial Medical Center, says, “They gave $50 million to name the tower. But when we made the announcement, they said, ‘This has a naming life of 25 years. And before that, if anyone is willing to give $1 more than we did, they can take our name off.’ That is an unbelievable testament to having the community served. Most donors are approached for a specific purpose, but [the Lundquists] are proactive. Melanie wants to know how to improve health care positively. She asks, ‘How else can we help you serve the community better? What’s next?’” That same sense of purpose has governed Melanie’s efforts on behalf of the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools. The nonprofit organization, which operates under a memorandum of understanding with the Los Angeles Unified School District, manages 19 public elementary, middle, and high schools in Boyle Heights, South L.A., and Watts, serving 14,000 students out of more than 655,000 total in the 1,302-school district, the nation’s second largest. “We cherry-pick schools from the bottom,” Melanie says. “If you want to push good things into a system, you have to work inside the system. It’s not easy, but I don’t like easy things. I want to solve the big things. It’s the hardest work you’ll ever do, but also the most gratifying.” The keys to the program are innovative instructional leadership, community partnerships, and family engagement with an aim to educate college-ready students. Along with year-round professional development and more resources for teachers,

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there’s an emphasis on leadership— by principals, teacher-coaches, even by the students themselves. Families get involved in weekend workshops that help them be better advocates for their kids, and sometimes prompt parents to get a GED or go on to college themselves. These are not charter schools. “Our schools are under union contract,” Melanie says. Teachers and principals are paid by the district; Partnership for Los Angeles Schools money goes into a separate foundation and is used for the 50-member team of teachercoaches, the CEO, and the academic advisers, among others. Restorative justice programs— promoting ways to resolve conflicts and ensure respect for one another— are offered to some degree in all schools. Other emphases are determined by each school. As pilot programs prove successful, they can then be implemented in the district at large. “The Partnership is about capacity, scalability, and

what goes on firsthand. She regularly visits the schools, meets with the principals, talks with the students. “The beneficiaries of what you’re doing deserve to see the face and know the person behind the check,” Melanie says, “because the kids ask, ‘Why are you doing this?’ And I say, ‘Because you’re worth it.’ Poverty does not equal destiny. I believe that.” “Melanie is vice-chairman of the board,” notes Joan Sullivan, CEO of the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools. “She was an early funder and visionary, and she hasn’t taken her foot off the gas. She’s generating ideas all the time. In this sector there’s often a lack of continuity. The tenure of the superintendent is too short; reform efforts come and go. But the Lundquists have made a sustained commitment over time to our highest-need schools. The Partnership is there for the long haul, and the students and families deserve that commitment.” Their 10-year pledge is now

“I WANT TO SOLVE THE BIG THINGS. IT’S THE HARDEST WORK YOU’LL EVER DO, BUT IT’S ALSO THE MOST GRATIFYING.” MELANIE LUNDQUIST

sustainability,” says Melanie. “Those three things have been important since the beginning.” The results have been impressive. From July 2008 to 2015–16, suspensions dropped from 21 percent to 3 percent, and graduation rates more than doubled from 36 percent to 77 percent. Math and English language arts scores have improved dramatically at individual schools. Perhaps the biggest change is the widespread expectation that students at these schools can and will succeed and go on to college. Melanie is committed to seeing

winding down, but the commitment evidently will continue. “It’s likely that we’ll recommit to a program of eight to ten years,” says Melanie, who hopes “to have other foundations and more diversity in the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools. Everybody needs to get into the game.” While the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools and the Torrance Memorial Medical Center have received the greatest “investments”— Melanie’s word—she has served on a number of boards of other institutions, but not merely for the privilege, she insists. “The reason to

be on a board is to bring resources and results, and build something. I’m not doing it to watch how they’re spending the money. If you don’t trust the group, you shouldn’t be giving them money. I stay on a board if I feel I can move things forward. If I’ve done that, I get off and make room for someone else.” Then she laughs and admits, “I like to be a committee of one. I like to get things done myself.” Among the groups that have benefited is the California Science Center. Located next to USC, the popular museum is run by the state, offers free admission charge, and is filled with interactive exhibits. It’s also home to the space shuttle Endeavour, thanks to the Lundquists’ last-minute gift of $2 million. Melanie had just finished co-chairing a $165 million capital campaign for the center not long after NASA decided to distribute its retired shuttles to institutions around the country. “The Science Center wrote an application,” Melanie remembers. “The cost was $14 million to decommission it, decontaminate it, and get it to L.A. It was worth so much more!” NASA did visit the site, and with three or four months to raise the money, the center had come up with about $12 million. But time was running out. “We wanted to have the Endeavour, but without the money it would have gone to Texas,” Melanie says. Angeleno pride carried the day. “Philanthropic dollars are precious,” Melanie continues. “We can’t afford not to utilize them. That’s why we choose what we’ll do. Good education and good health are basics for society…and our two main things. Some philanthropists say, ‘This group is lucky to have me.’ Not us. I’m lucky to have the groups. They’ve given me the opportunity to make a difference, to do something meaningful.” ♥ Santa Barbara-based JOAN TAPPER writes frequently about people, places, and the arts and is the author of eight books.

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GIVE LOS ANGELES |

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DO YOU WANT TO BE A CATALYST FOR CHANGE IN YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY, BUT HAVE NO IDEA WHERE TO BEGIN? INTERVIEW BY Jolia Allen

HERE, LESLIE CRUTCHFIELD, a leading authority on high-impact philanthropy and author of Do More Than Give: The Six Practices of Donors Who Change the World, takes a time-out from advising nonprofits and philanthropic organizations on scaling social innovation to share her ideas for how you can go beyond check writing and maximize your impact locally.

Q

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What do you recommend for someone who wants to make a real difference in his or her community, but has no idea where to begin? Leverage the local expertise that already exists in the Los Angeles area. You don’t have to start from scratch. You have a great resource in L.A., the California Community Foundation (CCF; calfund.org). It’s a place where donors can pool their resources. You can make a donation to a community foundation, and then the foundation helps grant it out. CCF has the beat on what’s happening locally; they know many, if not all, of the key nonprofit players. Take a look at what the foundation is funding and highlighting, because they’ll do studies to try to understand the unique challenges and problems that face people living in the L.A. area. And then there are two private foundations in California that I would take a look at—if you want to find out what the billionaires and the high-net-worth donors in Los Angeles are doing and giving to, then you can look at the The Broad Foundation (which is focused specifically on education, science, and the arts; broadfoundation.org) and The California Wellness Foundation (calwellness.org).

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Q

When considering whom to give to, how can I identify a local nonprofit and measure its impact? Look at the CCF website because the foundation will have highlighted nonprofits that it has vetted and knows will be good places to give money. There’s also a national resource called Charity Navigator (charitynavigator.org). It’s a ratings site that tracks more than 5,000 nonprofits. It looks at their budgets, how much they spend, and the kinds of programs they do. It gives the organizations ratings based on efficiency, and is also moving to try to rate their impact. And then you also have United Way (unitedwayla.org). If a nonprofit is not on the list of United Way or CCF, it’s worth trying to find out why. Is it not well managed? Is it not delivering on its mission?

a

Q

What are the most effective ways to maximize my impact in my area? You can give financially, directly to a nonprofit, but just make sure to do your research to find out if it’s viable and delivering on its mission. Beyond check writing, you can also give your time. Historically,

a

people have volunteered with churches, for instance, and that’s a good place to look for opportunities because most churches and synagogues have really vibrant volunteer programs. You can also look online at volunteermatch.org, a volunteer-matching organization that will help you find things in L.A. Think about what skills you have to give beyond just your time. Most people working in L.A. have an industry or a profession, and those skills are really valuable to nonprofit organizations. The Taproot Foundation (taprootfoundation.org) can help you leverage your professional skills to help a nonprofit do what they do better.

Q

What’s your single best piece of advice for people who want to make a difference? Act locally, think systemically. Donors or volunteers often lose the forest in the trees. Always think about the underlying factors, the systemic issues that lead to the problems that you’re trying to address. You’ve got to look upstream, as the saying goes. One of the contributing factors to homelessness, for instance, is the inability to survive and afford housing on a minimum-wage job. So think about what you can do in the immediate term—like giving blankets and warm meals to people who are hungry and living on the streets—but also think about what’s causing this in the first place and how you can get involved at that level. And look for nonprofit organizations that are thinking systemically as well. ♥

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A PLACE CALLED HOME Mission Founded in 1993 to provide safety, love and support for kids facing adversity in a tough neighborhood, A Place Called Home is an oasis in South Central Los Angeles where proven programs in education, wellness, and arts empower young people to PTWYV]L[OLPYLJVUVTPJJVUKP[PVUZHUKKL]LSVWOLHS[O`M\SÄSSPUN purposeful lives. Each day, hundreds of youth ages eight to 21 and their families come through the doors of our 35,000 square foot campus to access a comprehensive array of services and opportunities to improve their lives, including: • second-grade through college-preparatory academic support and scholarships • high school dropout recovery • vocational preparation and placement • licensed mental health counseling • fresh meals and grocery distribution • life skills development • multidisciplinary arts instruction • recreation and organized sports • urban agriculture and nutrition instruction • empowerment to make positive community change

How you can help All of APCH’s programs are free. APCH depends on financial support from individuals like you, and we promise to put your dollars to work immediately and effectively. Your investment will help transform the lives of hundreds of youth and families. Please donate today at apch.org/Give-LA. APCH welcomes volunteers from across Los Angeles and around the world to help provide free programs and services for disadvantaged youth and families. Interested in volunteering or taking a tour? Learn more at apch.org/get-involved.

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How you can help 9HPZPUNH^HYLULZZPZJYP[PJHSPM^L»YLNVPUN[VVULKH`JOHUNL[OL JV\YZLVM(SaOLPTLY»Z@L[[VKH`HUKPU[V[OLM\[\YL^LHSZVOH]L [VJHYLMVY[OVZLSP]PUN^P[OHUKHMMLJ[LKI`[OPZKPZLHZL-VY[OPZ ^LULLK@6<¯[V]VS\U[LLY[VHK]VJH[LHUK[VKVUH[L5V V[OLY(SaOLPTLY»ZVYNHUPaH[PVUOHZ[OLHIPSP[`^LKV[VPTWYV]L[OL lives of those impacted. Go to alzgla.org or call /,37(3A to learn more or to donate.

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P H O T O C R E D I T: H A N N A H B E N E T

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CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL LOS ANGELES Mission We create hope and build healthier futures. Anywhere health care is provided for children battling lifethreatening cancers, heart defects, brain disorders, spinal deformities and more, you see the impact of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. With 139,000 children treated last year through more than 528,000 visits, more kids receive care from CHLA than anywhere else in the region. When hospitals and caregivers run out of options to save a child, they often turn to our experts – at our main campus or one of our regional outpatient centers in Arcadia, Encino, Santa Monica, South Bay and Valencia. Knowledge is power, and we openly share ours – from research that improves care globally, to a legacy of 1,200 California pediatricians trained by compassionate CHLA faculty.

How you can help Every gift counts. CHLA provides care that is partially or completely unreimbursed for more than 70,000 children every year. We bridge that difference one gift at a time through members of our community. Support the health of our city’s children with a gift to CHLA’s Live L.A. Give L.A. campaign. Your generous gift will give critical, lifesaving care to children in L.A. and around the world who come to us for hope and healing. Please give generously at CHLA.org/GiveLA.

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CITY OF HOPE Mission City of Hope is transforming the future of health. Every day we [\YUZJPLUJLPU[VWYHJ[PJHSILULÄ[>L[\YUOVWLPU[VYLHSP[`>L accomplish this through compassionate care, innovative research, and vital education focused on eliminating cancer and diabetes. ©City of Hope 2012 Services offered at City of Hope City of Hope is a world-renowned research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases. *P[`VM/VWLZJPLU[PÄJHJOPL]LTLU[ZHYLJVTWSLTLU[LKI`H focus on compassionate, personalized patient care. At City of Hope, each patient works closely with a multidisciplinary team of preeminent, nationally respected clinicians who collaborate to create individualized treatment plans. City of Hope is one of only 47 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, the highest designation possible from the National Cancer Institute.

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WE

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FOR THE FUTURE

We are City of Hope doctors, advancing science that saves lives. Our research has led to four of the most widely used cancer-fighting drugs and the development of synthetic insulin. We have performed more than 13,000 bone marrow and stem cell transplants with unparalleled survival rates. It’s not enough to promise future cures. We must find them sooner. This is what drives us every day. Your generous support can help us find the answers. Donate today at CityofHope.org


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CAST (COALITION TO ABOLISH SLAVERY & TRAFFICKING) Mission ;OL*VHSP[PVU[V(IVSPZO:SH]LY` ;YHMÄJRPUNVY*(:;WYV]PKLZ SPMLZH]PUNZLY]PJLZ[VZ\Y]P]VYZVMO\THU[YHMÄJRPUNHUKTVIPSPaLZ JP[PaLUZ[VI\PSKHM\[\YL^OLYLTVKLYUZSH]LY`UVSVUNLYWSHN\LZ V\YJVTT\UP[PLZV\YJP[`VYV\Y^VYSK *(:;OHZILLUHWPVULLYPU[OLJY\ZHKL[VLYHKPJH[LTVKLYU ZSH]LY`HUK[OLPYLMMVY[ZOH]LHWYVMV\UKPTWHJ[PU[OLSP]LZVM Z\Y]P]VYZVMO\THU[YHMÄJRPUNPU3VZ(UNLSLZ:PUJL *(:; OHZZLY]LK[OPZYLNPVU»ZTVZ[]\SULYHISLHUKJOHTWPVULKTVKLSZ VMYLZPSPLUJLHUKLTWV^LYTLU[*(:;WYV]PKLZJVTWYLOLUZP]L ZLY]PJLZ[VV]LYZ\Y]P]VYZLHJO`LHYPUJS\KPUNLTLYNLUJ` YLZWVUZLJHZLTHUHNLTLU[ZOLS[LYSPMLHUKQVIZRPSSZ[YHPUPUN SLNHSHK]VJHJ`HUKWLLYSLHKLYZOPWWYVNYHTTPUN;OYV\NO WHY[ULYZOPWZ^P[OOLHS[OJHYLVYNHUPaH[PVUZNV]LYUTLU[ILULÄ[Z HNLUJPLZSH^LUMVYJLTLU[HUKJ\S[\YHSHUKMHP[OIHZLK JVTT\UP[`NYV\WZ*(:;PZHISL[VWYV]PKLZ\WWVY[H[L]LY` WOHZLVMHO\THU[YHMÄJRPUNZ\Y]P]VY»ZQV\YUL`[VMYLLKVT

How you can help /\THU[YHMMPJRPUNPZ[OLZLJVUKSHYNLZ[JYPTPUHSLU[LYWYPZLPU[OL <:HUK*(:;JHUUV[[HJRSL[OLPUQ\Z[PJLVMTVKLYUZSH]LY` HSVUL@V\YKVUH[PVUNVLZKPYLJ[S`[VOLSWPUNZ\Y]P]VYZVMO\THU [YHMMPJRPUNVU[OLPYQV\YUL`Z[VZHML[`HUKOLHSPUN4HRPUNHSPML [YHUZMVYTPUNJVU[YPI\[PVU[VKH`^PSSLUZ\YL[OH[[OPZNLULYH[PVUVM Z\Y]P]VYZPZV\YSHZ[ 5042 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 586 Los Angeles, CA 90036 (213) 365-1906 castla.org facebook.com/castlosangeles twitter.com/castla

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IT ENDS WITH US .


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COLLEGE TRACK Mission College Track’s mission is to empower students from low-income communities to graduate from college. From the summer before ninth grade through college graduation, College Track’s 10-year program removes the barriers that prevent students from earning their college degree by providing them with comprehensive HJHKLTPJZ\WWVY[SLHKLYZOPW[YHPUPUNÄUHUJPHSHUKJVSSLNL advising, and scholarships in order to turn their talent, hope, and hard work into an attainable vision for their future. By providing students with holistic resources and unique opportunities, College Track enables students to identify their purpose and earn their way into the colleges and careers they desire and deserve.

How you can help Both ongoing and one-time volunteer opportunities are available at College Track’s centers in Boyle Heights and Watts. We’re always looking for professionals to mentor students, speak on career panels, or host students for a job shadow. College Track relies on the generous donations of individuals, foundations, corporations and the local community to deliver high-quality services to our students. We are extremely grateful for contributions of any size, which will help us support more students to reach their dream of a college degree.

2130 East First Street Los Angeles, CA 90033 (323) 360-0730 collegetrack.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/college-track-givela2016 36

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I can If he can, I can become a college graduate

If she can, I will earn my four-year degree

If they all can, I will absolutely become an agent of change

College Track To learn more about how College Track is empowering young people to earn a four-year college degree and become agents of change, go to: collegetrack.org


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CRAYON COLLECTION Mission Crayon Collection is a nonprofit organization that collects and reallocates crayons to create a social shift from a culture of international wastefulness to a mindful culture within communities that is supportive of teachers and students, art education, and the environment.

We have enlisted Los Angeles artists in our new Artist Rotation Program to provide interesting art projects using these donated crayons to infuse arts education back into these Title 1 elementary schools that, sadly, no longer have arts education programs. Drop off your crayons at select Wells Fargo branches. For more info go to crayoncollection.org/wellsfargo.

The Crayon Collection teaches children about recycling and philanthropy via the crayon, something that is very near and dear to a child’s heart. Many kids in the U.S. believe that getting a new four-pack of crayons each time they dine out is normal and [OH[[OLJYH`VUZNVPU[V[OL[YHZOVUJL[OLTLHSPZÄUPZOLK;OL Crayon Collection shines light on this mindset. It raises awareness that children just a few miles away may have zero crayons as well as teaching about the negative impact these crayons have on the environment. We believe that society today must shift gears into what we call “eco-normal”—still-good items should not be trashed, ever. We believe that the children of today hold the keys to the health of our environment and we hope that this seed of awareness via the crayon will parlay into a mindful and environmentally aware adulthood.

How you can help Many of us go to restaurants where we see crayons getting tossed in the trash. You can ask your local restaurant or café to save the crayons diners leave behind and then donate those to a nearby school in need of supplies. Or you can ask your school, local community center, church, temple, or library to set up a Crayon Collection bin so that everyone can donate their gently used crayons to kids and schools in need. These crayons will be used to promote arts education and help alleviate the environment from nondecomposable paraffin wax crayons.

Crayon Collection would like to thank our sponsor, Wells Fargo, for making our participation in GIVE Los Angeles possible.

149 South Barrington Avenue, Suite 649 Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 435-8497 crayoncollection.org

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DAVID LYNCH FOUNDATION Mission ;OL+H]PK3`UJO-V\UKH[PVUHJUVUWYVÃ&#x201E;[VYNHUPaH[PVU ^HZJYLH[LKPU[VYLK\JL[V_PJZ[YLZZHUK[YH\THHTVUNH[ YPZRWVW\SH[PVUZPUJS\KPUNPUULYJP[`Z[\KLU[Z]L[LYHUZZ\MMLYPUN MYVT7;:+HUK[OLPYMHTPSPLZHUK^VTLUHUKJOPSKYLUZ\Y]P]VYZ VMKVTLZ[PJ]PVSLUJL ;OL-V\UKH[PVU»ZWYVNYHTZHYLIHZLKVU[YHPUPUN[OLZL WVW\SH[PVUZPU[OLL]PKLUJLIHZLK;YHUZJLUKLU[HS4LKP[H[PVU [LJOUPX\L;4OHZILLUZJPLU[PÃ&#x201E;JHSS`WYV]LU·PUV]LYWLLY YL]PL^LKZ[\KPLZ·[VYLK\JLZ[YLZZWYVK\JLPTTLKPH[LHUK ZPNUPÃ&#x201E;JHU[YLZ\S[ZHUKPTWYV]LWO`ZPJHSOLHS[OHUKLTV[PVUHS ^LSSILPUN;4JHUIL\ZLK[OYV\NOV\[SPMLHUKPZLHZ`[VWYHJ[PJL +3-»Z^VYRPU3(ZJOVVSZPU\UKLYZLY]LKULPNOIVYOVVKZOHZ WYVK\JLK[YLTLUKV\ZYLZ\S[ZPUJS\KPUNOPNOLYNYHK\H[PVUYH[LZ HUKV\Y]L[LYHUZWYVNYHTZOH]LZOV^UZPNUPÃ&#x201E;JHU[PTWHJ[VU T\S[PWSL7;:+Z`TW[VTZPUJS\KPUNYLZ[M\SZSLLWHUKYLK\J[PVUPU WZ`JOV[YVWPJTLKPJH[PVU\ZL

How you can help +VUH[PVUZ[V[OL+H]PK3`UJO-V\UKH[PVU»Z3(VMMPJL^PSSOLSW PUTHU`^H`ZZ\JOHZIYPUNPUNTVYLZJOVVSJOPSKYLU[LHJOLYZ HUKZJOVVSSLHKLYZPU[V[OLHJJSHPTLK8\PL[;PTLWYVNYHTMVY \UKLYZLY]LKZJOVVSZHUKPUJYLHZPUN[OLU\TILYVM]L[LYHUZ^OV JHUHJOPL]L[OLKLLWYLSPLM[OH[;4WYVK\JLZ;OLZLWYVNYHTZIYPUN UL^SP]LZHUKWVZZPIPSP[PLZ[VWHY[PJPWHU[Z[OLPYMHTPSPLZHUK[OLPY JVTT\UP[PLZ=PZP[KH]PKS`UJOMV\UKH[PVUVYNSVZHUNLSLZKVUH[L

(323) 852-3004 davidlynchfoundation.org/losangeles-donate

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Healing and Transforming Lives The David Lynch Foundation reduces toxic stress and trauma in at-risk populations through the evidence-based Transcendental Meditation technique. www.davidlynchfoundation.org/losangeles-donate


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HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF GREATER LOS ANGELES Mission Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles (Habitat LA) brings people together to build homes, communities, and hope. As the [VWUVUWYVÃ&#x201E;[OVTLI\PSKLYPU[OLNYLH[LY3VZ(UNLSLZHYLH^P[O Ã&#x201E;]LJVUZLJ\[P]L*OHYP[`5H]PNH[VY:[HYYH[PUNZ/HIP[H[3(OHZ WHY[ULYLK^P[O]VS\U[LLYZKVUVYZHUK/HIP[H[OVTLI\`LYZ[V I\PSKYLUV]H[LHUKYLWHPYOVTLZSVJHSS`HUK^VYSK^PKLZPUJL  [YHUZMVYTPUN[OLSP]LZVM[OV\ZHUKZVMPUKP]PK\HSZHZH YLZ\S[VMOH]PUNHKLJLU[HUKHMMVYKHISLWSHJL[VJHSSOVTL /HIP[H[OVTLV^ULYZOLSWI\PSK[OLPYV^UOVTLZHUKWH`HU HMMVYKHISLTVY[NHNL<S[PTH[LS`/HIP[H[3(»ZNVHSPZ[VYL]P[HSPaL neighborhoods and communities, create better educational V\[JVTLZMVYJOPSKYLUIYLHR[OLJ`JSLVMWV]LY[`I`LTWV^LYPUN [OYV\NOOVTLV^ULYZOPWHUKLUNHNL[LUZVM[OV\ZHUKZVM ]VS\U[LLYZ[VOLSWBuild a Greater Los Angeles.

How you can help ;OLYLHYL]HYPV\Z^H`Z[VWHY[ULY^P[O/HIP[H[3(HUK^LULLK `V\YZ\WWVY[[VZLY]LTVYLSV^PUJVTL3VZ(UNLSLZMHTPSPLZ5V L_WLYPLUJLPZYLX\PYLKQ\Z[HKLZPYL[VI\PSKHIL[[LY[VTVYYV^ ;OYV\NO]VS\U[LLYPUNVUV\YI\PSKZP[LZVYKVUH[PUNZLY]PJLZ M\UKZVYL]LU`V\YVSKJV\JO[VV\Y9L:[VYLZL]LY`VULJHUOLSW MHTPSPLZHJOPL]L[OLZ[HIPSP[`HUKZLSMYLSPHUJL[OL`ULLK[VI\PSKH IL[[LYM\[\YL1VPU\ZI`]PZP[PUNOHIP[H[SHVYN[VKVUH[L[VKH`

8739 Artesia Boulevard Bellflower, CA 90706 (310) 323-HOME (4663) habitatla.org

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Help more families

build a better tomorrow Donate today at www.habitatla.org

Building a Greater Los Angeles @HabitatLA


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INNER-CITY ARTS

C

Mission Inner-City Arts—a leading provider of quality arts education for underserved children and youth—is a creative oasis and a vital partner in the work of creating a safer, healthier, and more creative Los Angeles. Students K-12 visit Inner-City Arts to work with teaching artists in fully-equipped studios, receiving hands-on instruction in a range of visual, media, and performing art forms. Equally essential to Inner-City Arts’ mission, the Inner-City Arts Professional Development Institute provides training for LA-based educators, college students, school administrators, and others dedicated to bringing top-quality arts education to the students in our city. Inner-City Arts also supports community growth by engaging families and community members through performances and cultural events hosted on their one-acre campus in downtown’s skid row area.

How you can help Inner-City Arts exists because of the support from people like you who believe in its’ mission. You can support their efforts and help provide access to quality arts education for more than 5,000 Los Angeles youth by lending a hand to volunteer, or by making a vital contribution today. Every donation received allows them to continue exposing students to the transformational power of creativity.

720 Kohler Street Los Angeles, CA 90021 (213) 627- 9621 inner-cityarts.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/inner-city-arts-givela2016 44

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ES R L E G HEI N A T S K O C L P UNLO L E H TH YOU

E V I T L A A I E T N R C POTE

Learn how you can support our mission, and the next generation of LA artists: INNER-CITYARTS.ORG


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ANZE KOPITAR, TYLER TOFFOLI AND BAILEY VISITING WITH A PATIENT AT CHLA

KINGS CARE FOUNDATION Mission The LA Kings are proud to be an integral part of the L.A. community. With the help of players, alumni, and staff, the organization is committed to creating opportunities, raising funds, and driving awareness for educational, recreational, and health-related causes. A cornerstone of the team’s outreach is [OL2PUNZ*HYL-V\UKH[PVU[OL[LHT»ZH^HYK^PUUPUNUVUWYVÄ[ children’s charity. Since 1996, KCF has donated over $9 million in monetary and in-kind support to local organizations. Among the foundation’s ongoing pledges are a $1 million commitment to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, a $2 million commitment to Ronald McDonald House Charities, a $2.5 million commitment to Discovery Cube LA, and, new to this season, a $1 million commitment to the Los Angeles YMCA to implement street hockey in all locations and sponsorship of the annual Youth Leadership Program at Peace Over Violence, Los Angeles.

JONATHAN QUICK HELPING A CHLA PATIENT WITH A REHAB SESSION

How you can help Throughout the season, there exist many opportunities to work with KCF and their partners on many of these initiatives. Opportunities include donation of tickets, money, services, and goods at various drives and events sponsored by the Kings. Please visit lakings.com/kingscare for more information.

LA KINGS PLAYERS ALEC MARTINEZ AND NICK SHORE DONATING BLOOD AT CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL LOS ANGELES

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300 Continental Boulevard, suite 500 El Segundo, CA 90245 (310) 535-4467 LAKINGS.COM/KINGSCARE


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THE LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA SOCIETY Mission We Have One Goal: A World Without Blood Cancers The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest ]VS\U[HY`OLHS[OHNLUJ`KLKPJH[LK[VÃ&#x201E;UKPUNJ\YLZMVYSL\RLTPH S`TWOVTHHUKT`LSVTH33:L_PZ[Z[VÃ&#x201E;UKJ\YLZHUKLUZ\YL HJJLZZ[V[YLH[TLU[ZMVYISVVKJHUJLYWH[PLU[Z33:M\UKZ SPMLZH]PUNJHUJLYYLZLHYJOHYV\UK[OL^VYSKHUKWYV]PKLZMYLL PUMVYTH[PVUZ\WWVY[ZLY]PJLZHUKKPYLJ[Ã&#x201E;UHUJPHSHPK[VWH[PLU[Z 6\YNVHSPZ[VJYLH[LH^VYSK^P[OV\[JHUJLYUV[ZVTLKH`I\[ [VKH`6\YRL`WYPVYP[PLZ^PSSLUZ\YL[OH[33:OLSWZJHUJLYWH[PLU[Z SP]LIL[[LYSVUNLYSP]LZ33:OHZKLKPJH[LKP[ZLSM[VILPUNVULVM [OL[VWYH[LK]VS\U[HY`OLHS[OHNLUJPLZPU[LYTZVMKVSSHYZ[OH[ KPYLJ[S`M\UKV\YTPZZPVU*\YYLU[S`[OL*HSPMVYUPH:V\[OSHUK *OHW[LYM\UKZ TPSSPVU[V^HYKYLZLHYJONYHU[ZPUV\YHYLH[VÃ&#x201E;UK HJ\YLHUKLYHKPJH[LJHUJLY

How you can help (ZHWHY[PJPWHU[]VS\U[LLYVYKVUVY[V33:`V\^PSSIL THRPUNJVU[YPI\[PVUZI`OLSWPUN[VM\UKSPMLZH]PUNYLZLHYJO HUKZ\WWVY[PUNWH[PLU[ZLY]PJLZWYV]PKPUNOVWL[VWLVWSL^P[O ISVVKJHUJLYZ+VUH[L[VKH`H[^^^SSZVYNKVUH[L0UHKKP[PVU each campaign and department within LLS provides volunteer VWWVY[\UP[PLZ[VKVUH[L`V\Y[PTLHUK[HSLU[Z5VTH[[LY[OL[PTL JVTTP[TLU[VYH]HPSHIPSP[`33:JHUMPUKHTH[JO[OH[ILZ[Z\P[Z [OLULLKZHUKPU[LYLZ[ZVMH]VS\U[LLY-VYTVYLPUMVYTH[PVU JVU[HJ[\ZH[VY]PZP[SSZVYNJHSZV

4929 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 800 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 342-5800 lls.org/calso GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/lls-givela2016 48

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we can see the end of cancer from here.

These people are a new generation of blood cancer patients. They live normal lives, some managing their condition without lots of pills or treatments with discouraging side effects, thanks to discoveries funded in part by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. And these discoveries apply to many different kinds of cancer. Almost half the new cancer therapies BQQSPWFECZUIF'%"CFUXFFOBOEXFSFmSTUBQQSPWFEGPSCMPPEDBODFSQBUJFOUT  many with research supported by LLS. Forget someday. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making cures happen today. Are you aware of how close we are to many new life-saving breakthroughs? Or how you can help?

Find out at lls.org/calso or call 310-342-5800.


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LAANE (LOS ANGELES ALLIANCE FOR A NEW ECONOMY) Mission Our vision is to build an economy rooted in good jobs, thriving communities, and a healthy environment. We know that too THU`MHTPSPLZPU3VZ(UNLSLZ^VYROHYK`L[ÄUK[OLTZLS]LZZ[PSS struggling to get by. Over the past 20 years, LAANE has helped to pass new laws to ensure hard work pays and to create good green jobs that protect our environment. Our projects have served as a model for cities across the country. From supporting QVI[YHPUPUNWYVNYHTZPULULYN`LMÄJPLUJ`HUKZVSHYWV^LY[V increasing jobs in waste and recycling, we are helping to make Los Angeles a better city for all.

How you can help Your donation will help to improve the lives of working Angelenos. LAANE will use your contribution to make great changes for economic and environmental justice in Los Angeles and beyond. This last year, we celebrated raising the minimum wage for hundreds of thousands of working families. We look forward to continuing our groundbreaking work with your support.

464 Lucas Avenue, Suite 202 Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 977-9400 laane.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/laane-givela2016 50

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Building a city that works good jobs thriving communities a healthy environment


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LA FAMILY HOUSING Mission LA Family Housing helps people transition out of homelessness and poverty through a continuum of housing enriched with supportive services. As a real estate developer and homeless services agency, LA Family Housing has provided solutions to end homelessness since 1983. Last year, LAFH helped 6,429 individuals in [OLÄNO[HNHPUZ[OVTLSLZZULZZHUKWV]LY[`. We meet clients where they are and design our supportive services to HJJVTTVKH[L[OLPYZWLJPÄJULLKZ We know what works to end homelessness in people’s lives. Our success is based on a model of an individualized approach to meet each program participant’s unique needs. This model connects participants to permanent housing and helps them achieve longterm housing stability through a full continuum of services.

LAFH offers a variety of volunteer opportunities for individuals, families, and corporate groups, including a monthly volunteer orientation where you will learn more about homelessness and how you can be part of the solution.

How you can help • • • •

Provide everything that a family needs to move into an apartment Coordinate a donation drive with co-workers or friends Host an on-site birthday party Share your special skills and talents!

Please contact volunteer@lafh.org or (818) 255-2775 to get started. 7843 Lankershim Boulevard North Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 982-4091 lafh.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/la-family-housing-givela2016 52

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HOME

is

stability

LA FAMILY HOUSING KEPT MY FAMILY TOGETHER PHYSICALLY AND EMOTIONALLY. MY CHILDREN AND I ARE NOW FULL OF HOPE AND POSSIBILTY.

Gina and her kids faced many challenges. Then she began to lose her sight. Then her family became homeless. See how Gina overcame her struggles with LA Family Housingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help at

www.lafh.org


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LOS ANGELES FIRE DEPARTMENT FOUNDATION Mission /V\ZLÃ&#x201E;YLZ*HYHJJPKLU[Z*OLTPJHSZWPSSZ,HY[OX\HRLZ-YVT TLKPJHSLTLYNLUJPLZ[VTHQVYKPZHZ[LYZ[OL3VZ(UNLSLZ-PYL +LWHY[TLU[T\Z[ILWYLWHYLKMVYHU`[OPUN@L[THU`(UNLSLUVZ KVU»[YLHSPaL[OH[ WLYJLU[VM[OL3(-+»ZI\KNL[PZHSYLHK` LHYTHYRLKMVYZHSHYPLZHUKILULÃ&#x201E;[Z^OPJOTLHUZJY\JPHS LX\PWTLU[HUKZ\WWSLTLU[HS[YHPUPUNT\Z[ILWHPKMVY\ZPUNM\UKZ MYVToutside[OLÃ&#x201E;YLKLWHY[TLU[ ;OH[»Z^OLYL^LJVTLPU;OL3VZ(UNLSLZ-PYL+LWHY[TLU[ -V\UKH[PVUPZ[OL3(-+»ZZPUNSLSHYNLZ[ZV\YJLVMWYP]H[L Z\WWVY[:PUJL^L»]LKVUH[LKTVYL[OHU TPSSPVU[V[OL KLWHY[TLU[-YVTWYV]PKPUNÃ&#x2026;HZOSPNO[ZHUKUPNO[]PZPVUNVNNSLZ [VYLWSHJPUNÃ&#x201E;[ULZZLX\PWTLU[HUKYHPZPUNTVUL`MVY`V\[O WYVNYHTZ[OL-V\UKH[PVUYLSPLZVUWYP]H[LKVUH[PVUZ[VZ\WWVY[ [OLÃ&#x201E;YZ[YLZWVUKLYZZ^VYU[VZ\WWVY[\Z

How you can help >L^VYRKPYLJ[S`^P[O[OL3(-+HZZLZZPUNP[ZNYLH[LZ[ULLKZHUK KPYLJ[PUNM\UKZ^OLYL[OL`»SSNV[OLM\Y[OLZ[;OLKLWHY[TLU[YLSPLZ VU\Z·HUK^LYLS`VUyou·[VOLSW\ZZ\WWVY[[OLTLUHUK^VTLU ^OVZLY]LZVZLSMSLZZS`(NPM[[V[OL-V\UKH[PVU[VKH`THRLZV\Y JP[`ZHMLY7LYPVK;OLM\[\YLVM3(»ZZHML[`PZPU`V\YOHUKZ

1875 Century Park East, Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310) 552-4139 supportlafd.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/LAFD-givela2016 54

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The future of LAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety is in your hands.

www.supportlafd.org


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LOS ANGELES FOOD POLICY COUNCIL Mission ;OL3VZ(UNLSLZ-VVK7VSPJ`*V\UJPSPZHUVUWYVÄ[KL]V[LK[V[OL OLHS[OZ\Z[HPUHIPSP[`HUKMHPYULZZVMMVVKPUV\YYLNPVU>LILSPL]L HSSJVTT\UP[PLZKLZLY]LHJJLZZ[VNVVKMVVKNYV^UPUH^H` [OH[YLZWLJ[ZWLVWSLHUK[OLWSHUL[6\YTPZZPVUPZ[VWYVTV[L JP]PJLUNHNLTLU[HUKWVSPJ`ZVS\[PVUZ[OH[HKKYLZZO\UNLYOLHS[O KPZWHYP[PLZLU]PYVUTLU[HSZ\Z[HPUHIPSP[`HUK^VYRPUNJVUKP[PVUZ ^P[OPUV\YSVJHSMVVKZ`Z[LT >LKVV\Y^VYR[OYV\NOJYVZZZLJ[VYWHY[ULYZOPWZYLZLHYJOHUK WVSPJ`HUKJVU]LUPUNSLHKLYZ[V^VYRJVSSHIVYH[P]LS`>VYRPUN [VNL[OLY^P[OZ[HRLOVSKLYZPUNV]LYUTLU[I\ZPULZZHUK[OL UVUWYVÄ[JVTT\UP[`^LOH]LZ\JJLZZM\SS`PTWSLTLU[LKWVSPJPLZ [VPTWYV]LZJOVVSMVVKHUKZLUPVYTLHSZWYVTV[L\YIHUMHYTZ HUKJVTT\UP[`NHYKLUZHUKÄNO[[OL¸MVVKKLZLY[¹JVUKP[PVUZ MHJPUNTHU`SV^PUJVTL(UNLSLUVZ

How you can help :\WWVY[MVY[OL3VZ(UNLSLZ-VVK7VSPJ`*V\UJPSNVLZHSVUN^H`[V I\PSK[OL.VVK-VVKTV]LTLU[>LJVUULJ[HUKJH[HS`aLO\UKYLKZ VMPUKP]PK\HSZHUKVYNHUPaH[PVUZHJYVZZ[OLYLNPVU[OYV\NOK`UHTPJ ^VYRPUNNYV\WZLUNHNPUNW\ISPJL]LU[ZHUKV\YPUUV]H[P]L JVTT\UP[`KYP]LUYLZLHYJOHUKWVSPJ`HWWYVHJO)`HKKYLZZPUN[OL MVVKZ`Z[LTHZH^OVSL`V\YZ\WWVY[WYVTV[LZZ\Z[HPUHISLMHPY MVVKPUHM\UKHTLU[HS^H`/LSWTHRL3(H.VVK-VVKYLNPVU·H WSHJL^OLYLMVVKPZOLHS[O`HMMVYKHISLZ\Z[HPUHISLHUKMHPYMVYHSS

305 East First Street Los Angeles, CA 90065 (213) 473-3537 goodfoodla.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/los-angeles-food-policy-council-givela2016 56

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LOS ANGELES POLICE FOUNDATION Mission The mission of the Los Angeles Police Foundation is to create partnerships to provide resources and programs that help the police perform at their highest level and to enhance Los Angeles Police Department community relations. The Los Angeles Police Foundation is an independent, not-forWYVÄ[VYNHUPaH[PVU[OH[WYV]PKLZJYP[PJHSYLZV\YJLZHUK]P[HSZ\WWVY[ to the police department. From essential equipment and state-of[OLHY[[LJOUVSVN`[VZWLJPHSPaLK[YHPUPUNHUKPUUV]H[P]LWYVNYHTZ that would otherwise be unfunded, the support we provide directly PTWYV]LZW\ISPJZHML[`PTWHJ[ZVMÄJLYYLHKPULZZHUKLUOHUJLZ our quality of life. As the largest source of private funding for the police department, we are passionately dedicated to ensuring that Los Angeles remains America’s safest major city.

How you can help We welcome the support of the Los Angeles community through donations and involvement in the Chief’s Circle, Women’s Partnership, and other events we host throughout the year.

633 West Fifth Street, Suite 1210 Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213) 489-4636 lapolicefoundation.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/police-foundation-givela2016 58

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#stoptheviolence www.lapolicefoundation.org


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RYOYA, AGE 16, NEW JERSEY

LOS ANGELES RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE Mission The Los Angeles Ronald McDonald House believes that healing happens together. We provide a “home away from home” for families of seriously and critically ill children during their most KPMÄJ\S[[PTL;OL/V\ZLIYPKNLZHJJLZZ[VJHYLH[WYLTPLY medical facilities, such as Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and Mattel Children’s Hospital, for families who must travel long distances. By keeping close to their hospitalized children, providing emotional and physical comfort and support during a JOPSK»ZPSSULZZHUKHSSL]PH[PUNZVTLVM[OLKHPS`HUKÄUHUJPHSZ[YLZZ of being displaced, we ensure that families can focus on what’s most important—healing their sick child.

EDNA, AGE 16, MEXICO

How you can help Volunteer opportunities for individuals are available yearround. Corporate and community groups can participate in our cornerstone Meals of Love program that serves over 250 “homecooked” meals to families at the House each year or Days of Service, helping to care for and enhance the House itself. Our community fundraiser, Walk for Kids, happens every April, and we encourage supporters to host their own events and Wish List drives to help us meet the everyday needs of the House.

4560 Fountain Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 644-3000 rmhcsc.org/losangeles

KHAYLIE, AGE 2, BELIZE

GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/ronald-mcdonald-house-givela2016 60

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“I get my strength from my mom.” – Ana Paula Age 4, Panama Has called the House “home” since 2014

# Ke e p i n g Fa m i l i e s C l o s e


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LAUP Mission LAUP builds opportunity for all our children by ensuring they receive the best start in life with high-quality early learning L_WLYPLUJLZ;OL`LHYZIL[^LLUIPY[OHUKHNLÄ]LYLWYLZLU[ a critical window when the architecture of a child’s brain is developing, building the foundation for all future learning. Your donation supports this growth by improving the quality of early learning programs, classrooms, environments, and educators. LAUP offers innovative strategies to engage parents in their children’s learning, conducts research to evaluate successful outcomes, and advances public policies that invest in America I`W\[[PUNJOPSKYLUÄYZ[5V^TVYL[OHUL]LYLHYS`LK\JH[PVU has the nation’s attention. Join us as we continue to build a strong foundation for public investment in quality early care and education in California.

How you can help Your donation helps LAUP lay the groundwork for building children’s cognitive, emotional, and social development. Providing children with quality care and education during this critical window not only benefits them but also strengthens the long-term social and economic well-being of Los Angeles. We invite you to join the conversation by engaging with parents, working with government leaders, and talking with your child’s caregiver or teacher. Visit laup.net for tools to help you connect with your local community.

888 South Figueroa Street, Suite 800 Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 416-1200 laup.net GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/LAUP-givela2016 62

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Inspire+ Educate+ Engage. THE MUSIC CENTER Mission As Los Angeles’ premier performing arts center, The Music Center seeks to transform lives through the power of the arts and serve PUHSLHKLYZOPWYVSLHZP[YLKLÄULZ[OLHY[ZPU[OLZ[JLU[\Y`HUK IL`VUK)`WYLZLU[PUN^VYSKJSHZZHY[PZ[PJL_WLYPLUJLZPUJS\KPUN J\S[\YHSS`YLSL]HU[HUKTLHUPUNM\SWYVNYHTTPUNHUKVWWVY[\UP[PLZ for lifelong learning, The Music Center seeks to empower [VTVYYV^»ZJYLH[P]LSLHKLYZ;OL4\ZPJ*LU[LY\UKLYZ[HUKZ [OLHY[ZJHUPUZWPYL[OLUL_[NLULYH[PVUVMZ[YH[LNPJYPZR[HRLYZ who can contribute to a more conscious cultural dialogue and, \S[PTH[LS`THRLHWVZP[P]LPTWHJ[VU3VZ(UNLSLZ[OLUH[PVUHUK [OL^VYSK

How you can help Make a contribution and become a member of The Music Center HUKKPYLJ[S`LUYPJO[OLSP]LZVM(UNLSLUVZ@V\YJVU[YPI\[PVUTHRLZ P[WVZZPISLMVY;OL4\ZPJ*LU[LY[VWYVK\JLHY[PZ[PJL_WLYPLUJLZVM [OLOPNOLZ[JHSPILYPUJS\KPUNMYLLHUKSV^JVZ[W\ISPJWYVNYHTTPUN HUKPUUV]H[P]LLK\JH[PVUHSWYVNYHTZ:\WWVY[[OLHY[Z:\WWVY[ ;OL4\ZPJ*LU[LY 135 North Grand Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 972-3359 musiccenter.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/themusiccenter 64

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more likely to be a

VOLUNTEER

more likely to be a

COLLEGE GRADUATE

more likely to be

more likely to be a

EMPLOYED

RISK-TAKER

I am tomorrow’s creative leader. I am, because of the arts.

more likely to be an

ENGAGED STUDENT

THE ARTS MAKE IT HAPPEN. Unlock a child’s potential to be a game changer for good. For the community. For Los Angeles. For the world.

SUPPORT THE ARTS

Give now: crowdrise.com/themusiccenter Information sourced from Americans for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY Mission Every day, schoolchildren from all over Los Angeles arrive at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County to explore the halls and gardens with their classmates. They encounter— ÄYZ[OHUK·[OL^VUKLYVMV\YUH[\YHSHUKJ\S[\YHS^VYSKZ The students get up close to monumental dinosaurs in the Dinosaur Hall, marvel at spectacular gems and minerals, and look at animal scenes from faraway places. But there are local wonders too, and personal connections to make. They stroll through the )\[[LYÅ`HUK:WPKLY7H]PSPVUHUKPU[LYHJ[^P[OPUZLJ[Z[OL`»SS]PL^ differently when they leave. They see real scientists doing work. They learn about how animals in the city thrive in the Nature Lab, and travel through 500 years of L.A. history in the Becoming Los Angeles exhibition. Discover L.A., Discover the World.

How you can help Not every child has access to field trips, and not every parent can HMMVYK[VTHRL[OLQV\YUL`[V[OLT\ZL\T:V^LHYLSH\UJOPUN a new bus scholarship, and with your generous donation, NHM will provide free transportation and free admission to thousands of students from underprivileged schools—many of whom have never been to the museum before. Our education staff will offer hands-on experiences for both the kids and teachers that will guide them on their exploration of the transformed indoor-outdoor NHM. A few hours at NHM can spark curiosity and passion that lasts a lifetime. It shows these kids that science, history, and nature are not far away, untouchable things—they are real, and they are available for them right now. Help bring school children to the 5H[\YHS/PZ[VY`4\ZL\T0M[OLRPKZJHUNL[OLYL^L»SSKV[OLYLZ[

900 Exposition Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-DINO nhm.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/nhm-givela2016 66

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A NEW WAY TO

GIVE WHEN TRANSPORTATION AND ADMISSION ARE FREEâ&#x20AC;¦ SCIENCE AND NATURE CAN BE DISCOVERED Your donation to the Natural History Museum allows thousands of local school children to engage with exhibits, gardens, hands-on activities, and real science. Give today at crowdrise.com/nhm-givela2016 and your donation will be matched dollar for dollar by our corporate partner Learn more about school visits at NHM.ORG


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PARA LOS NIÃ&#x2018;OS (FOR THE CHILDREN) Mission -V\UKLKVU:RPK9V^PU 7HYH3VZ5P|VZPZHUVUWYVÃ&#x201E;[ LK\JH[PVUHUKZVJPHSZLY]PJLZVYNHUPaH[PVUKLKPJH[LK[V[OL Z\JJLZZVM3(»ZULLKPLZ[JOPSKYLUHUKMHTPSPLZ>P[OZP_LHYS` LK\JH[PVUJLU[LYZHUK[OYLLJOHY[LYZJOVVSZZLY]PUNZVTL SV^PUJVTLJOPSKYLUHNLZZP_TVU[OZ[V`LHYZ7HYH3VZ 5P|VZWSHJLZLK\JH[PVUH[[OLJVYLVMP[ZTPZZPVU[VIYLHR[OL J`JSLVMWV]LY[`>LWYV]PKLHJVTWYLOLUZP]LZVJPHSZLY]PJLZ TVKLS[OH[PUJVYWVYH[LZOPNOX\HSP[`LK\JH[PVUMHTPS`Z\WWVY[ HUKTLU[HSOLHS[OZLY]PJLZWHYLU[LUNHNLTLU[HUKJVTT\UP[` I\PSKPUNVWWVY[\UP[PLZ7HYH3VZ5P|VZZLY]LZV]LYJOPSKYLU `V\[OHUKMHTPSPLZLHJO`LHY

How you can help 7SLHZLQVPU\Z^P[OHKVUH[PVUVM`V\Y[PTL[HSLU[VYMPUHUJPHS Z\WWVY[0U[LYLZ[LKPUSLHYUPUNTVYL&*VU[HJ[\ZH[PUMV' WHYHSVZUPUVZVYN[V[V\YHZJOVVSZVJPHSZLY]PJLZZP[LTLL[V\Y MHTPSPLZVYH[[LUKHUL]LU[

5000 Hollywood Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90027 (213) 250-4800 x 555 paralosninos.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/para-los-ninos-givela2016 68

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PARTNERSHIP FOR LOS ANGELES SCHOOLS Mission The mission of the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools is to transform schools and revolutionize school systems to empower all students with a high-quality education. ;OL7HY[ULYZOPW»ZUL[^VYRPUJS\KLZ 3VZ(UNLSLZ<UPÃ&#x201E;LK:JOVVS KPZ[YPJ[3(<UPÃ&#x201E;LKZJOVVSZHJYVZZ[OL)V`SL/LPNO[Z:V\[O3VZ (UNLSLZHUK>H[[ZJVTT\UP[PLZZLY]PUNZ[\KLU[Z;OL` HYLHUVUWYVÃ&#x201E;[VYNHUPaH[PVU^OVZLTVKLSJVTIPULZ[OLYPNVYHUK innovation of instructional leadership programs with authentic community partnerships and family engagement to transform district W\ISPJZJOVVSZHUKSLHK[YHUZMVYTH[PVUHSZ`Z[LT^PKLYLMVYTZ The Partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s model is comprised of three core elements: .YLH[3LHKLYZ·OPYPUNKL]LSVWPUNHUKZ\WWVY[PUN[OLILZ[ WYPUJPWHSZ[VY\U7HY[ULYZOPWZJOVVSZ"/PNOS`,MMLJ[P]L;LHJOPUN· LUZ\YPUNL_JLSSLUJLPUJSHZZYVVTPUZ[Y\J[PVUI`LTWV^LYPUN [LHJOLYZ[OYV\NOWYVMLZZPVUHSSLHYUPUNSLHKLYZOPWKL]LSVWTLU[ HUKJVHJOPUN"HUK,UNHNLKHUK,TWV^LYLK*VTT\UP[PLZ· JVSSHIVYH[PUN^P[OJVTT\UP[`WHY[ULYZHUKLUNHNPUNWHYLU[ZHUK MHTPSPLZMYVTV\YULPNOIVYOVVKZ[V^VYR[V^HYKHJVTTVU]PZPVU of healthy communities and schools. :PUJL[OL7HY[ULYZOPW»ZMV\UKPUN[OLUL[^VYR»ZOPNOZJOVVS NYHK\H[PVUYH[LPUJYLHZLKI` MYVTWLYJLU[[V WLYJLU[HUKVULOPNOZJOVVS·4H[O:JPLUJL;LJOUVSVN`4HNUL[ Academy at Rooseveltâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;was one of only two high schools in all of 3(<UPÃ&#x201E;LK^P[OHWLYJLU[NYHK\H[PVUYH[LPU

to implement their model and achieve significant results for the Z[\KLU[ZMHTPSPLZHUKJVTT\UP[PLZ^LZLY]L

How you can help

-VYTVYLPUMVYTH[PVUNV[VWHY[ULYZOPWSHVYN

(SSVM[OL7HY[ULYZOPW»ZWYVNYHTTPUNPZM\UKLKI`PUKP]PK\HSZHUK MV\UKH[PVUZPU[LYLZ[LKPULUZ\YPUNLX\P[HISLHJJLZZ[VHOPNO X\HSP[`LK\JH[PVUHSL_WLYPLUJLMVYHSSZ[\KLU[Z(UKILJH\ZL[OL 7HY[ULYZOPWZLLRZ[VJYLH[LHTVKLS[OH[PZYLWSPJHISLHUKZJHSHISL ¶[OL`RLLW[OLJVZ[ZSV^0[JVZ[ZQ\Z[ WLYZ[\KLU[HUU\HSS`

1055 Wilshire Boulevard, #1850 Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 201-2000 partnershipla.org

Please donate today!

GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/partnership-for-los-angeles-schools-givela2016 70

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Transforming schools across Los Angeles to ensure all students have access to a high-quality education. Proudly serving 15,000 students in grades K-12, across 19 school campuses in the Boyle Heights, South Los Angeles, and Watts communities. Since its founding in 2007, the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools has delivered on its promise to dramatically improve the highest-need schools in Los Angeles. The Partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s network high school graduation rate increased by 114% and they have seen signiďŹ cant progress across each and every academic performance indicator. The Partnership is proving that school transformation can be scaled more broadly with a modest investment of resources - less than $675 per student.

www.partnershipla.org


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PIECE BY PIECE Mission Piece by Piece offers mosaic art workshops and training to homeless, recently homeless, and low-income individuals. With art space at Skid Row Housing Trust’s Star Apartments, Piece by Piece works collaboratively with Skid Row Housing Trust to offer art programming to formerly homeless individuals who struggle with mental illness, substance abuse disorders, or other medical conditions. The programs focus on improving quality of SPMLI`LUJV\YHNPUN^LSSULZZJVUÄKLUJLHUKZVJPHSPU[LYHJ[PVU helping participants to develop skills and build connections within a supportive community. Each workshop is tailored to different levels of interest and experience. Piece by Piece participants can develop marketable skills that lead to opportunities to earn income—making a big difference in day-to-day life.

How you can help You can help support this innovative program by purchasing mosaics through Piece by Piece’s online store and at pop-up events, or donate glass, tile, mirror, and other materials. They make four tons of recycled materials into art each year. Visit piecebypiece.org to learn more about corporate engagement programs, event sponsorships, volunteer opportunities, and branded gifts. Learn more about Skid Row Housing Trust’s permanent supportive housing by visiting skidrow.org, and get involved in solutions to homelessness.

1317 East Seventh Street Los Angeles, CA 90021 (213) 683-0522, Ext. 601 piecebypiece.org | skidrow.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/piece-by-piece-givela2016 72

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PRESENT NOW Mission The mission of Present Now is to assist mothers and their children who are entering domestic violence shelters. By providing “presents” consisting of both necessary and specialty items for the children, we can alleviate some of the initial stress of entering a shelter while also bringing some measure of joy during this time of acute crisis. The Present Now Presents Program consists of three gifts. The Presence of Mind Box is given to each child in September, ÄSSLK^P[OZJOVVSZ\WWSPLZZ\P[LK[V[OLJOPSK»ZHNLHUKNYHKL level. The Presence of Love Box is delivered to each child on =HSLU[PUL»Z+H`,UJSVZLK^PSSILHUHNLHWWYVWYPH[LKPNP[HS[V` and/or learning device. The Presence of Being Box is presented [VJOPSKYLUVU[OLPYIPY[OKH`,HJOIV_^PSSPUJS\KLHYLZ[H\YHU[NPM[ card for the family to enjoy a birthday dinner out on the town and ingredients for a homemade cake to be prepared by the family in [OLZOLS[LY;OPZIV_^PSSHSZVPUJS\KLHUV\[Ä[HNLHWWYVWYPH[L[V` and book. With all three of these boxes, our goal is to create hope and some measure of comfort all year long for the child.

How you can help In 2014, in the state of California, there were 5,784 victims of domestic violence served every single day. There were 496,972 reports of child abuse and neglect. We need your help. Your contribution to our Presents Program will allow the mothers and children who are suffering from domestic ]PVSLUJL[VMPUKWLHJLHUKIYPUN[OLTQV`,]LY`JOPSKKLZLY]LZH present, especially when their family is suffering. Please visit our website to view our Presents wish list and for upcoming volunteer opportunities. presentnow.org.

1323 Lincoln Boulevard, Suite 240 Santa Monica, CA 90401 (424) 330-0002 presentnow.org

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

RAND CORPORATION Mission You want answers. You want government that works, a healthy and safe neighborhood, schools that prepare your children for the future. You want a new vision for the rush-hour trap that is the 405. At RAND, we’re working on it. 9(5+PZHUVUWYVÄ[PUZ[P[\[PVU[OH[OLSWZPTWYV]LWVSPJ`HUK decisionmaking through research and analysis. We represent a community of top researchers, engaged citizens, and donors invested in solutions, not sound bites—in the belief that good research lights the way for good decisions. We pursue answers to some of the toughest problems we face, across the world and right here in L.A. We’re your hometown think tank, Los Angeles. And we know that for research to make a difference, it can’t just change minds; it has to change lives.

How you can help Join us in pursuit of answers. Our donors are informed, engaged, curious about the world, and eager to play a role in making it better. They don’t just read the headlines; they participate in the policy conversation through year-round events at RAND and the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Become a member of the RAND community through our Policy Circle or RANDNext. Your gift supports open, honest, evidencebased research that helps make the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous.

1776 Main Street Santa Monica, CA 90401 (800) 757-4618 rand.org

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Your gift to RAND supports research and analysis that improve lives.

“Philanthropists need to determine the highest priority in their giving. As a scholar, as an academic, and especially as a philanthropist, my highest priority is impact— moving toward serious and enduring solutions, to effect improvement, not just change. RAND embodies all of that. That’s why I give to RAND.” —SHARON S. NAZARIAN, PH.D. RAND DONOR

Join us. www.rand.org

C O R P O R AT I O N

The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to public policy challenges to help make communities throughout the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous. RAND is nonprofit, nonpartisan, and committed to the public interest.


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UNITED WAY OF GREATER LOS ANGELES Mission <UP[LK>H`VM.YLH[LY3VZ(UNLSLZPZHUVUWYVÃ&#x201E;[^VYRPUN[VLUK WV]LY[`>LILSPL]LPUH^VYSK^OLYLL]LY`VULOHZHJJLZZ[VH X\HSP[`LK\JH[PVUZ[HISLOV\ZPUNHUKHZ[LHK`QVI·[OLRL`Z[V HIYPNO[LYM\[\YL>LPKLU[PM`[OLYVV[JH\ZLZVMWV]LY[`HUK^VYR Z[YH[LNPJHSS`[VZVS]L[OLTI`HK]VJH[PUNMVYZ`Z[LTZHUKWVSPJ` JOHUNLM\UKPUN[HYNL[LKWYVNYHTZHUKKLZPNUPUNSVUN[LYT ZVS\[PVUZ[V[OLTVZ[WYLZZPUNWYVISLTZMHJPUN3VZ(UNLSLZ^P[O JYVZZZLJ[VYWHY[ULYZ 6\Y^VYRMVJ\ZLZVUOLSWPUNOVTLSLZZPUKP]PK\HSZHUKMHTPSPLZ TV]LPU[VWLYTHULU[OV\ZPUNVU[VHWH[O^H`[VZ[HIPSP[`" WYV]PKPUNZ[\KLU[Z^P[O[OLZ\WWVY[[OL`ULLK[VNYHK\H[LOPNO ZJOVVSWYLWHYLKMVYJVSSLNLHUKJHYLLYZ"HUKOLSWPUNOHYK ^VYRPUNMHTPSPLZHUK]L[LYHUZILJVTLÃ&#x201E;UHUJPHSS`Z[HISL

How you can help 6]LYWLVWSLOH]LILLUOV\ZLKI`V\Y/VTL-VY.VVK PUP[PH[P]L"WLYJLU[VM3(<:+Z[\KLU[ZHYLUV^NYHK\H[PUN TLL[PUN<*HUK*:<HKTPZZPVUYLX\PYLTLU[ZJVTWHYLK[VQ\Z[ WLYJLU[PU"HUK^L»]LOLSWLKWSHJL]L[LYHUZPU[V QVIZ>P[O`V\YKVUH[PVU^LJHUTHRLHUL]LUIPNNLYPTWHJ[HUK [YHUZMVYT[OV\ZHUKZTVYLSP]LZ4HRLHKPMMLYLUJLHUKKVUH[L [VKH`I`]PZP[PUN\UP[LK^H`SHVYN 1150 South Olive Street, Suite T500 Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 808-6220 volunteer@unitedwayla.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/united-way-la-givela2016 78

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

XPRIZE FOUNDATION Mission ?790A,HJUVUWYVÃ&#x201E;[PZ[OLNSVIHSSLHKLYPUKLZPNUPUNHUK PTWSLTLU[PUNPUUV]H[P]LJVTWL[P[PVUTVKLSZ[VZVS]L[OL^VYSK»Z NYHUKLZ[JOHSSLUNLZ6\Y4HZZP]L;YHUZMVYTH[P]L7\YWVZLPZ[V ¸I\PSKHIYPKNL[VHI\UKHUJLMVYHSS¹ ?790A,\ZLZNHTPÃ&#x201E;JH[PVUJYV^KZV\YJPUNPUJLU[P]LWYPaL[OLVY` HUKL_WVULU[PHS[LJOUVSVNPLZ[VTHRL_]Z PTWHJ[PU[OL NYHUKJOHSSLUNLKVTHPUZMHJPUNV\Y^VYSK 6\YWOPSVZVWO`PZ[OH[\UKLY[OLYPNO[JPYJ\TZ[HUJLZPNUP[PUN YHWPKL_WLYPTLU[H[PVUMYVTH]HYPL[`VMKP]LYZLSLUZLZPZ[OLTVZ[ LMÃ&#x201E;JPLU[HUKLMMLJ[P]LTL[OVK[VKYP]PUNL_WVULU[PHSPTWHJ[HUK ZVS\[PVUZ[VNYHUKJOHSSLUNLZ

(J[P]L?790A,JVTWL[P[PVUZPUJS\KL[OL TPSSPVU.VVNSL 3\UHY?790A,[OL TPSSPVU59.*6:0(*HYIVU?790A,[OL TPSSPVU.SVIHS3LHYUPUN?790A,[OL TPSSPVU8\HSJVTT ;YPJVYKLY?790A,[OL TPSSPVU:OLSS6JLHU+PZJV]LY`?790A, [OL TPSSPVU)HYIHYH)\ZO-V\UKH[PVU(K\S[3P[LYHJ`?790A, HUK[OL TPSSPVU0)4>H[ZVU(0?790A,

How you can help ;OLYLHYLZL]LYHS^H`Z[VNL[PU]VS]LKPU?790A,»ZTPZZPVU[V I\PSKHIYPKNL[VHI\UKHUJLMVYHSS6\YTVKLSZPTWS`KVLZUV[ ^VYR^P[OV\[W\ISPJWHY[PJPWH[PVU@V\JHUILJVTLHJVTWL[P[VY KVUH[L[V[OLMV\UKH[PVUVYOLSW\ZZWYLHK[OL^VYK-VYTVYL PUMVYTH[PVUWSLHZL]PZP[_WYPaLVYNVY'?790A,VU;^P[[LY

800 Corporate Pointe, Suite 350 Culver City, CA 90230 (310) 741-4880 xprize.org GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/xprize-givela2016 80

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

YOLA (YOUTH ORCHESTRA LOS ANGELES) Mission Through Youth Orchestra LA (YOLA), the LA Phil and its community partners provide free instruments, intensive music training, and academic support to students from underserved neighborhoods, empowering them to become vital citizens, leaders, and agents of change. YOLA serves children with the greatest needs, fewest resources, and little or no access to instrumental instruction. The inspiration for YOLA comes from El Sistema, the dynamic Venezuelan youth orchestra movement that nurtured LA Phil music and artistic director Gustavo Dudamel. Like El Sistema, YOLA is designed to act as an agent of social change—connecting children and their families to a musical experience with the potential to transform the community, create opportunities for achievement across social strata, and instill a sense of self-worth in its participants.

How you can help With generous donor support, the LA Phil will expand and deepen YOLA’s offerings in the coming years, reaching more underserved children across Los Angeles and serving as a model and resource for El Sistema-inspired programs across the country. YOLA is made possible through LA Phil partnerships with Harmony Project, Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA), the EXPO Center – a City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks facility, and the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts.

151 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 972-3457 laphil.com/yola GIVE Los Angeles Challenge: crowdrise.com/la-philharmonic-givela2016 82

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“ Music is a fundamental human right.”

It has been a dream to see YOLA grow and to watch how these students have changed on an artistic level, and also as citizens. Gustavo Dudamel, Music & Artistic Director, Los Angeles Philharmonic

OUR PARTNERS

GUSTAVO DUDAMEL Music & Artistic Director


GIVE LOS ANGELES |

BY Jolia Allen

ochangeo

FOUR INSPIRING WAYS PASSION AND DOLLARS ARE COMING TOGETHER TO BRING ABOUT MEANINGFUL CHANGE.

makers HIGH SCHOOL REIMAGINED

Tomorrow’s givers One Sunday a month, at Kehillat Israel reconstructionist congregation in Pacific Palisades, a group of about 60 teenagers meets to discuss social issues, research organizations, and ultimately evaluate grant proposals and fundraise for the organizations they select—efforts that resulted in the gifting of $35,000 last year. The program’s name—Kehillat Israel Tzedakah Teens (KITT)—speaks to its mission: Tzedakah is often translated as “charity” or “giving,” but it actually comes from the Hebrew word for “justice.” In 2015, $5,000 was gifted to L.A. Family Housing, an organization dedicated to providing affordable housing and supportive services to homeless and low-income households. The award was presented at KITT’s annual banquet, where Stephanie Klasky-Gamer, president and CEO of L.A. Family Housing, spoke about what it’s like to not have a house. “A house is just so fundamental and something that our kids have never needed to worry about before,” says Rabbi Carrie Vogel, director of the congregation’s Jewish Experience Center. The recipients weren’t the only ones who benefited. “It’s such a powerful experience for them,” Vogel says of the KITT participants. “They feel really proud of themselves, and

If we can thank Apple for helping the world go mobile, we can now thank Steve Jobs’ widow, education advocate Laurene Powell Jobs, for helping a planned Los Angeles charter high school go mobile to better serve L.A.-area homeless and foster teens. RISE High, the brainchild of L.A. educators Kari Croft and Erin Whalen, received $10 million as one of 10 winning proposals in XQ: The Super School Project, a competition funded by Powell Jobs to inspire innovative models for high schools nationwide. “In addition to the brick-and-mortar facilities throughout the L.A. region, RISE will provide a mobile resource center that supports students across the city and meets a variety of their academic and personal needs,” says Whalen, RISE High co-team lead. “The bus will be equipped with hygiene products, Wi-Fi, study materials, laptops, and charging ports to allow students to maintain access to a safe space where they can continue to reach their goals.” LEARN MORE by visiting xqsuperschool.org.

it’s just something that they’re not going to get from being on a sports team or in a play.” SUPPORT KITT by visiting ourki.org. SUPPORT L.A. Family Housing by visiting lafh.org/ how-you-can-help.

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An everybody-wins auction Thanks to the Culver City–based online platform Omaze, for just $10, you can enter to win a dream experience—like getting flown to Boston to have pizza and beer with Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, and Tom Brady—while simultaneously supporting noble causes such as curing childhood cancer, combating climate change, and advocating for animal rights. GET STARTED by visiting omaze.com.

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Kids Helping Kids What could be more meaningful than teaching kids the power of giving— and then giving them the tools to do so? Last year, 250 kids between the ages of 4 and 18 raised an impressive $800,000 for other kids through the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) Junior Ambassadors program. With just a few clicks (and parental consent), any child can become a Junior Ambassador by pledging to raise $1,000. Then, the training kicks off with a workshop series that teaches kids the fundamentals of charity and fundraising and helps them organize fundraising events for a CHLA cause that speaks to them. EpiPals, a remarkable organization spearheaded by Junior Ambassadors and sisters Amanda and Catherina Gores, spreads awareness about food allergies and distributes EpiPens to low-income families. The program has raised more than $840,000 for a cause that’s close to the sisters’ hearts, since their younger brother Charles has severe food allergies. GET ACTIVE by visiting chla.org/ junior-ambassadors.


where business meets goodness.

The Bloc isn’t just a building with vibrant businesses, it’s an investment in a city we love and a future that benefits generations to come. The Ratkovich Company has been a force in philanthropic projects and a champion of sustainability in Los Angeles for over 30 years. With partners National Real Estate Advisors and Blue Vista Capital Management, The Bloc proudly supports philanthropic organizations who are re-imagining DTLA, from City of Hope and United Way, to Inner City Arts and the @TheBlocLA

SkidRow Housing Trust.

#TheBlocLA

TheBlocLA.com


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GIVE Los Angeles 2016  

Introducing GIVE Los Angeles. With this special issue, we launch the GIVE Los Angeles Challenge. Join us. www.crowdrise.com/GIVELosAngelesCh...

GIVE Los Angeles 2016  

Introducing GIVE Los Angeles. With this special issue, we launch the GIVE Los Angeles Challenge. Join us. www.crowdrise.com/GIVELosAngelesCh...

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