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la lumiere Magazine

this believe Fall 2011


Table of Contents

La LUMIERE MAGAZINE Fall 2011 Produced by La Lumiere School Michael H. Kennedy ’86 Headmaster

Colleen Kennedy Judith Kunst

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Beyond the Ordinary Michael Ganz Joseph Huyler Colleen Kennedy Tim Kleihege ’81 Dionne Lovstad-Jones

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Photocredits

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Co-Editors

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Note from the Headmaster

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This We Believe

Connie Devers Falcone ’83

Mike Heffron

Cormac Gahan ’13

Anulé Ndukwu ’12

James Griffin

Rick Newcombe ’69

Kathy Mack ’81

Zach Wisniewski ’12

Michael Dolan ’98

Susan Kozak

Paper

Colleen Kennedy

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ON CAMPUS

La Lumination

Prefect Student Leadership

Athletics at La Lumiere

Connie Devers Falcone ’83

Strategic Plan

Shaw Friedman, Parent ’08 & ’13

Commencement 2011

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Annual Report

Johanna Miller

Annual Giving

Richard Newcombe ’69

Event Donor Listings

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BEYOND CAMPUS

Class Notes

In Memoriam

Athletic Hall of Fame

The Last Word

Board of Trustees Edward Costello ’81

Daniel Hillenbrand ’84 James Kaminski, Chairman, Parent ’08 &’10 Michael Kennedy ’86 Mark Leyden ’77

John Rumely ’69

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Kellene Urbaniak, inkbuzz graphic design

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John Schirger ’84 Ceil Tristano, Parent ’01, ’04 & ’07 Daniel Walsh ’95 Rev. Wayne Watts

Editor’s Note: La Lumiere Magazine is published in-house for Alumni, Parents and Friends of La Lumiere School. Every effort is made to contact all alumni germane to the magazine feature and contents. We welcome communication about our alumni accomplishments, news and current contact information to assist us in our ongoing efforts to improve alumni data.

It is the policy of La Lumiere School not to discriminate in violation of the law on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, or physical or mental disabilities which are unrelated to the ability to work or enjoy the benefits of the School’s programs, facilities, or services. All persons are encouraged to apply.

Mission La Lumiere School provides a college preparatory education based in character, scholarship and faith.


Note from the Headmaster This We Believe. During our reaccreditation process which formally concluded this summer, we as a community have been challenged to ponder what we believe and evaluate how we put those beliefs into action. A self-initiated Strategic Planning process has continued the self-examination, incorporating input from all constituents. We pursued this introspection not for the sake of compliance, but to engender real improvement in our program and for our students. Divergent voices and viewpoints emerged. Consensus was not always reached. Discussion over weighty topics became more pronounced, and still continues to this day. A school motto composed simply of three singular virtues inherently begs big questions of all who study here. What is character for me? What is scholarship for me? What is faith for me? I think of the German poet Rainer Maria Rilke’s spot-on advice: “Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves... Live your questions now, and perhaps even without knowing it, you will live along some distant day into your answers.” The adults who surround each La Lumiere student work tirelessly to equip students with the tools they will need to reach that “distant day.” Inspired by the Edward R. Murrow and National Public Radio series, This I Believe, we are pleased to present This We Believe – La Lumiere as the theme of this magazine. All our featured authors – alumni, students and former and current faculty – jointly articulate the La Lumiere effect: a shared experience of living an examined life and learning the importance of character, scholarship and faith. This I believe.

The adults who surround each La Lumiere student work tirelessly to equip students with the tools they will need to reach that “distant day.”

Meet the Editor Judith Kunst joined the La Lumiere staff in the summer of 2010. She graduated with BA from Tufts University and an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College. She has worked for several nonprofits in administration and development and has been a high school teacher off and on for 12 years. She is an accomplished editor, writer, and award winning poet. Her poetry has appeared in Poetry, The Atlantic, and many other publications. She has edited multiple textbooks, as well as poet Scott Cairn's collection, Love's Immensity. In 2006, she published The Burning Word: A Christian Encounter with Jewish Midrash to acclaim from writers such as Walter Wangerin, Jr., Walter Brueggeman, and Brian McLaren. She presently is the Director of Library Services and teacher of Third Form English at La Lumiere. She is married to La Lumiere Assistant Headmaster, Kevin Kunst, and they have three young boys: Aidan, Jesse, and Elijah. La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 2


this believe This We Believe – La Lumiere is inspired by National

philosophy, a strong defining moment, or a set of

Public Radio’s classic program This I Believe. Based on

guidelines for living in essays of 500 words or less.

the 1950s radio series hosted by Edward R. Murrow, This I Believe has recorded, published, and archived

We received enough response to our invitation that

more than 90,000 essays written by people from all

we’ve decided to expand the project to include

over the world, describing the core values that guide

a special webpage on the La Lumiere website at

their daily lives.

lalumiere.org. We invite you to peruse these pages, visit the website, and, if you wish, contribute your own

For this year’s magazine, we have invited a number of students and faculty, past and present, to share with the La Lumiere community a statement of personal

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essay to This We Believe – La Lumiere.


detectors to volunteer my time in a gym full of children who eventually won my heart.

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Coloring Outside the Lines I believe in coloring outside the lines. It takes courage and creativity to take that first step and move beyond what’s outlined for you. Outside the lines, there is freedom and beauty and imagination. I believe the seeds of my belief were planted far away in La Porte, Indiana where a teacher, Mr. Ed Breslin, late one night in the midst of my frantic paper-writing, told me that I was weird and that I should take it as a compliment. I knew what he meant: I just thought about the world a little differently, and I guess I was glad he recognized something unique in me. But time and life have a way of nudging you toward conformity. Years later, I was falling into the upper class suburban lifestyle: mini-van, soccer mom, country club cocktail parties, designer sunglasses. I felt safe but was utterly restless. So when two young soccer coaches who had trained my daughter approached me to help them expand a new non-profit program they had started teaching soccer, nutrition and life lessons to at-risk youth, it was so unlike anything I was involved in at the time that I was intrigued. I believe when the chance arises, you must take it. So I did something I was taught from the time I was 16 never, ever to do – I drove into Cabrini-Green. Cabrini is one of the most notorious drug-infested, gang-ridden, lawless housing projects in the city of Chicago. I didn’t just drive in; I parked my car, walked into the school that sits right in the middle of all the tenements with their broken-out windows, burn marks, screened caged walkways on each floor that are exposed to the elements, past the food truck and the line of people who looked nothing like me, and through the school metal

In crossing this wide cultural and socio-economic boundary, I colored outside the lines and found that my life took on new hues as a result. I believe that as I learned about the atypical families and tight knit communities that spring up in housing projects, I became smarter. I believe that as the children spoke of the fear they felt when gunshots would ring out on their way to school in the morning, I became more compassionate. I believe that as I shared lessons about nutrition and character, I learned many more and ultimately understood that human beings, no matter how different their life circumstances might be, all feel hope and a need to be loved. Embrace different. Embrace risk. Extend a hand. Be uncomfortable sometimes. You will be deeply rewarded with human connections that color your life with immeasurable richness and beauty. This I believe. Connie Devers Falcone ’83 Manager, Fundraising for Chicago Cubs Charities Colorado College, Notre Dame Law and University of Chicago MBA

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If You Can’t Hear it Now, Listen Harder From birth I was brought up to be a Catholic. I was baptized, I went through first Communion, confirmation, and for the purposes of this essay I am a Catholic. I do believe in God, I do believe that Jesus saved our souls from death – but that’s not what my essay is about. October 13, 2001 was the day my La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 4


mother died. I was four. I won’t get into details – and in fact, I can’t, because I don’t remember much about my mom. That’s what hurts the most. It is almost like she was a sound, and when she died, there was silence. Have you ever been sitting in your house and then suddenly the radiator turns off when you didn’t even realize it was on? Next you hear a different noise. Maybe cars on the street, maybe water running, or maybe even the neighborhood animals. I think back to a book I read called 23 Minutes In Hell. The author, In the devastating silence Bill Wiese, says that of my mother’s absence, I during his journey to hell, he FEELS turned, like any other good darkness and he Christian, to God. God is FEELS silence. I that sound that is always know what he means. In everyday there – even when all life, we can’t other sound has stopped. truly experience darkness or silence. Life might get quieter or louder, but not often do we actually enter true silence. In the devastating silence of my mother’s absence, I turned, like any other good Christian, to God. God is that sound that is always there – even when all other sound has stopped. I believe that everyone has a sound in their life that will remain when all other sounds are gone. They may not know that it is there until the silence comes. But I believe we all will experience silence – even in this noisy world. I am not trying to preach to you and tell you to become a Christian. I am telling you to find a sound that you can use before your life becomes silent. If you can’t hear it now, listen harder. You might not like the sound when you hear it – like most kids, I don’t love going to church – but trust me. The silence is inevitable, but the sound that follows isn’t. Cormac Gahan ’13 South Haven, Michigan

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All Children are God’s Children During the Civil Rights Movement, when I was quite small, my mother determined to make a statement for Christian unity and interracial harmony by taking her children to a black church in our hometown of Birmingham, Alabama. Martin Luther King was alive. The 16th Street Baptist Church had been bombed just a few years before. The Selma March was a recent memory. There was hope and gloom. It was a Pentecostal church, and we were Episcopalians. My mother and her friend took their small children, so there were about eight of us visitors. For that hour or so, I suffered through my first experience of being a religious and racial minority, though our hosts smiled joyfully and invited us to come back. My mother personified what she taught me that night: All children are God’s children. She never allowed us to treat anyone as less than a human being. She was “catholic” long before she became a Catholic late in her life. The Incarnation means everyone born of a woman shares in the life and love of God. My father served in the Army Reserve until 1977, and I can remember him wearing his uniform on nights and weekends for much of my childhood. He would stand tall and proud after he polished his shoes, buttons, and insignia meticulously. I learned that every medal, color, and piece of insignia symbolized something big and historic: World War II service, the occupation of Germany, the occupation of Japan, the Korean War, combat with the 64th Artillery Battalion of the 25th Infantry Division. The towns had names. The men had names. Many were no more, but my father lived because of the sacrifices of others, and so did I. I came to La Lumiere in 1994 to teach history, that is, to tell the story of


human dignity in contrast with human degradation. But long before I went to college or graduate school, my parents had already showed me the way of human dignity and forced me to engage it. James Griffin La Lumiere Faculty 1994-1998 Attorney, Birmingham, Alabama Gordon College and University of Alabama MA

Once I started teaching at the college level, I learned that there are numerous people who do not share my opinion. One student told me at his graduation that no one in his family thought he was smart enough to attend college. I am sure this played a large part in why he waited until he was nearly 40 years old to enroll. Another student told me her husband was not attending her graduation ceremony because he never supported her going to college. And I have lost track of the number of students who have told me they were just “passed through” high school, even though they were ill-prepared for the next level. Today, I believe in the power of encouragement.

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I Believe in the Power of Encouragement Attending a high school like La Lumiere, it was probably easy to take a lot for granted. All we students were, after all, in the same boat. Whether by our own choice or our parents’ decision, we were all there for the same reason – to obtain a good education and move on to college and careers. And if we were not entirely convinced of the value of education, our parents were. Joining in this education conspiracy were our teachers. Why else would we be tortured by weekly compositions and 300-plus word vocab tests? And why else would nobody listen when we said how unfair it all was? While I knew there were less challenging schools, I thought that most parents and teachers would have similar expectations for their students. Pursuing an education is always an admirable goal and I was confident everyone would agree. Who would discourage somebody from pursuing an education?

I think I always realized how lucky I was to have the opportunities I did at La Lumiere. But working with these students has made me realize it is not so much the opportunities that distinguished my experiences While I might not have from theirs. It always been able to is the fact that I had parents appreciate the benefit of and teachers those expectations, it was who believed in the belief that others had me and always in me that allowed those expected more from me. While opportunities to become I might not have reality. always been able to appreciate the benefit of those expectations, it was the belief that others had in me that allowed those opportunities to become reality. The expectation was that I was smart enough or good enough even when I did not share those same feelings. How lucky to have parents and teachers who actually thought I could set and accomplish my goals and who would encourage, even sometimes force, me to try. What might have seemed burdensome and unfair, and frequently the source of my teenage angst, was actually a gift. And one that should not be taken for granted. Kathy Mack ’81 Associate Professor of Legal Studies, Harrisburg Area Community College University of Notre Dame and Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis

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The world could use more great. We all could. Dr. Campbell’s exhortation wasn’t lost on me, just like young Prince Henry rallying his troops to dig deep and find their mettle, like when Kennedy said we’re gonna go to the moon not because it is easy but because it is hard. Great starts small and grows to fit the world that needs it, but it’s ever in short supply.

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“Be great today!”

I like being someone who wants to be great, and I only begrudgingly accept when I fall short of that lofty goal. Somehow, though, one foot follows the other. Today ends and tomorrow begins. And that, I believe, is just another perfect opportunity to be great today. Michael Dolan ’98 Executive Producer, Chicago, Illinois Marquette University

Dr. Peter Campbell would shout this at the tired-eyed students towards the end of each morning meeting. At the time, it felt like a cheeky stab at our blasé teenage attitudes – our general glum response always, “What’s he so chipper about?” But it stuck to my ribs and would come to make a lot more sense as I got older. I’d like to say, “as I matured,” but let’s roll with “as I got older” for the time being. It’s sage advice. Be great today. Not tomorrow. Not yesterday, but right now. Today. When we take an honest inventory of the shape of our lives, do we like what we see? Are we happy? In the right job, in the right relationship, amongst friends and supporters and on and on? Being great encompasses a clear and righteous self-awareness for the greater good, and that mandate has no expiration date. I have fired clients. I have declined job offerings. I have said no to romantic relationships that would have launched another man’s thousand ships. I’ve done these things because, when I asked myself, “Am I being great today?” in any of those contexts, and the answer was a hard negatory, I had to go. Simple as that. Before you know it, you start recognizing a moral compass you may not have even been aware you possessed. And it feels great. And it prevents you from making really stupid mistakes. Now here’s the part where it gets really good. If you apply this mandate to your everyday life, the ripple effect is begun. People notice. It motivates others to be great as well. To borrow from Nietzsche, the mere concept of the superman destroys the notion of the man. Being the best and happiest version of yourself will light fires in those around you, thus destroying the notions of apathy, alienation and pain. It’s true, I swear. 7 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

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Almost a Math Teacher On a warm summer day in 1996, I boarded a South Shore train to Chicago, destined to make the most important decision of my professional life. I was heading to my freshman orientation at DePaul University, during which I would be required to choose the content area of my secondary education major. For my entire life I had been labeled a math genius. I never earned a grade lower than an A in any math course I ever took. My academic advisor looked at this resume and questioned my


reservations about becoming a math teacher. She told me that I would be a great math teacher and would instantly get a job. But prior to arriving at DePaul, I had attempted to tutor students in mathematics and had quickly discovered that I could not make a connection. Mathematical concepts came easy to me, but helping students who were struggling with the material came hard. I became frustrated and, ultimately, gave up. Why? As a future historian, I looked to my past for answers. I was labeled with a learning deficiency as a young child. Due to my inability to read orally, a skill that I still struggle with today, I was placed in a special education reading program during 1st and 2nd grade. Now, as prospective teacher, I remembered what struggling with learning felt like, and the cause of my mathtutoring failure became apparent. If learning something comes easy, you cannot teach that subject well. I could not be a math teacher because I did not know how difficult it was to learn math for a non-math genius.

I prepared to make a radical decision: I would forgo all logic and choose my passion for history as a career.

Thus, I prepared to make a radical decision: I would forgo all logic and choose my passion for history as career. My advisor told me that I would never get a job because the market was flooded with history teachers. But I knew that I could connect with students in the realm of history. I had experienced the challenge of comprehending basic readings and had struggled to write papers. My own difficulty would allow me to connect with the most important students that I would teach: students who fear and hate the core skills of history, reading and writing. Great teachers realize what makes difficult students difficult – they do not trust or connect with teachers. In fact, they do everything they can to push teachers to give up on them as I once had. I became an effective teacher when I made teaching those students my priority.

I believe that the key to great teaching is connecting with students – in whatever way works. Somehow, my 18-year-old college student self discovered that key, and put me on the path I follow to this day. Mike Heffron La Lumiere Faculty, History Department Chair DePaul University

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Believe in Memories A person’s memory is their history; it dictates where they come from; it guides where they are going. Without memory, all important things lose significance and we, stuck in our confusion, are left with just a shell. I have a great-grandmother. Her name is Gertrude. All my life I have heard stories about how she would crochet my mom and aunts hats for Christmas; these hats were as expected as the four seasons. She would keep an enormous pet pig named Betsy in her backyard when she lived in Barbados, and the pig would stick its snout through the doggy door to get its food. All these events sound like typical grandmotherly fare. But the thing about my great-grandmother is that she has Alzheimer’s Disease, and has no idea who I am. And these tales depicting a spirited and loving woman feel as distant to me as they do to you, since I never knew her before she fell ill. This disease is, in my opinion, the most evil offense against humanity. It robs people of their life source: memory. Yet I know we humans are also committing our own offenses. Humanity is equal parts destructive and fragile. Just as my great-grandmother’s memory is deteriorating at the hand of this disease, nature and wildlife as we know it are disappearing due to humanity’s missteps. I was born in Chicago, Illinois, about 20 blocks from the shores of Lake Michigan. As I was growing up, my family would frequent the beaches and I, all of five years old, would marvel at the lake’s perpetual motion, the waves tickling my feet and then running away. It was then that I realized the lake, my lake, would be La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 8


a symbol of the ever-presence of nature in my life. Today, the Great Lakes region is one of the places in the world most heavily affected by global warming. Our swamplands, once teeming with life, have staled; our dunes have diminished. I am witnessing my idyllic childhood dissolve into dystopia. I fear the day when this land goes the way of my grandmother’s memories, distant and unreachable to my great-grandchildren. I believe in memories and the past – but I want to believe in the future, a future that proves my fears wrong. A place that can learn from the mistakes of the past and create possibilities. A place where my descendants can stand and say, “This is where my great-grandmother played in the sand.” Anulé (Joy) Ndukwu ’12 Serviam Prefect Chesterton, Indiana

Waiting in the car with me was a young math teacher named Larry Sullivan. He was telling me about La Lumiere, a brand-new school that had not even had a single graduating class. The year was 1967, and I would be starting in the fall, repeating my junior year. I had just spent the day on campus, talking mainly with Headmaster Jim Moore. I also met David Kirkby and Ron DeNardo, two members of the faculty and coaches for the sports teams. Mr. Sullivan, who would go on to become headmaster, was incredibly open and welcoming. He was not simply talking – he was listening too. He understood that I had struggled at bigger schools mainly because I kept getting distracted by friends, telephone calls, girls, playing in a band, watching television, driving around, hanging out and doing a million other things that teenagers naturally love to do. He said that La Lumiere would offer a different type of environment: I’d be kept busy from morning to night without all those outside distractions. “We start early at the school with breakfast,” he said. “Then you go back and clean your room before classes begin. You’ll be in small classes all day, with a break for lunch, of course. At 3 o’clock, there are activities, which are mainly sports, and that is followed by a shower and dinner. Then there is study hall at night, with lights out at 10 o’clock.” “What about free time?” I asked. “There is some, but even that is pretty structured,” he said. “Your days will be structured, and that will help you to develop focus.”

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Time Management For Life The sky was pitch-black, and I felt as if I were in the middle of nowhere, looking out at acres of cornfields while waiting for a train to take me home to Chicago. I was a 16-year-old highschool student trying to decide whether to transfer from New Trier, a large public high school in suburban Chicago, to La Lumiere.

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Little did I know how profound his words were and what an impact they would have on my life. Only a few years after that conversation, I found myself sailing through Georgetown University with close to a straight-A average, mainly because I had become so effective at budgeting my time. At La Lumiere, we believe in the importance of structuring your days with productive activities. As an alumnus thinking back to a conversation that took place in the Indiana cornfields nearly half a century ago, I realize that everything I have achieved – a successful business, a happy family, great health, and friends – can be attributed to the lessons of discipline and time management that I acquired at this school. Rick Newcombe ’69 Creators Syndicate, Los Angeles, California Georgetown University


enough to be able to bring their problems to any one in the La Lu community. As a student, having friends from school that I could talk to or just hang out with to get my mind off things, along with words of kindness that some faculty have expressed, has meant more than anything to me. Family is unity. Family is togetherness. Family is there for you when no one else is, when no one else can feel your pain. La Lumiere is my family. Zach Wisniewski ’12 Head Prefect LaPorte, Indiana

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Family is Everything This past summer my grandmother on my father’s side passed away. She fought a long battle with many struggles and proved many people wrong by lasting longer than expected. My grandmother was the matriarch of the Wisniewski household, being the glue that held my family together through thick and thin, providing comfort and advice when and where needed. She had a profound effect on her eight children, thirteen grandchildren, and three great grandchildren. Her passing came as no surprise, so the majority of our big family was able to make the trek to St. Louis for a weekend to make our goodbyes one final time. Most of the family left on Sunday, the 26th of June. My grandma passed the following morning. It was as if one last family gathering, no matter the cause, was all she needed to leave this earth. Seeing her loved ones a final time allowed to her to welcome the gates of heaven. Though the cause that gathered my family was unfortunate, we were still gathered. It showed me again that my family and the love that is shared between us is a very powerful thing. Each member knows what the other is going through and is able to provide comfort and joy against any heartache. As I have a family bearing my last name, I also have a family that bears my school name: La Lumiere. The wonderful and magical essence of La Lumiere is the sense of family between students and their faculty. The bonds created here, I believe, will last a lifetime. As head prefect this year, my goal is to instill and honor the sense of family throughout the community. That a school so diverse and so distinct can also be unified is truly remarkable. At La Lumiere I believe a student should feel comfortable

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A Smile is a Tool I believe that my smile is one my most valuable assets as a teacher. Amazingly, this simple tool enables me to create an atmosphere that is safe, comfortable and, most importantly, one that promotes learning. Last fall, an educator and scientist named Dr. Jo Ann Deak came to our campus and spoke about what new brain research can tell us about teaching and learning. In one session she discussed the effective use of body language and facial expressions while teaching; she specifically mentioned the smile. She maintained that if we smiled at our students they would feel happy, secure and would be more receptive to learning. I bought into what she was saying, but didn’t give it much more thought. A few days later I was teaching a new grammar lesson to my Spanish class. At one point, I looked up at the students and noticed one boy with a silly smile on his face. I kind of chuckled to myself, and continued on with my lesson. When I looked up again I saw La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 10


that the silly smile was still in place. Suddenly it dawned on me - he had gotten the same advice from Dr. Deak, only reversed. She had told the students to smile at their teachers so they would be nice and kind and treat them well. When I realized what he was doing, I started to laugh and so did he, and at that moment we understood that we were both in on the secret. One day when I apparently wasn’t smiling, this same curious student conducted another experiment. He decided to make an angry face at me. I looked up and was surprised to see his surly face. Truthfully, it made me mad. I thought to myself: He is not enjoying class today, but whose fault is that? I am sure it is his! As a result, neither of us felt like smiling, and this was probably a very good indication of how the other students in the class felt. Since then, I have practiced what I learned from this experience, and have come to believe that my smile is truly an effective teaching tool. So whatever my mood, I make an effort to always teach with a smile. When I am rewarded with happy engaged students, my mood is lifted, and the smile on my face becomes nothing but sincere. Sue Kozak La Lumiere Spanish Faculty Northern Illinois University

students will have a long-lasting effect. It’s likely that my birth order as the ninth of ten children has something to do with my comfort level in community; perhaps it’s not coincidence that my spouse is one of eleven. Directly after college I made my first choice to live in community, as a Jesuit Volunteer, sharing a home with six other young people for the purposes of living simply, deepening our spirituality, and working with the poor. My husband and I opted again for community in our shared adult life, choosing seven years ago to raise our children in the La Lumiere community and to dedicate our lives’ work to this unique place. This community has supported me in mourning the deaths of three of my family members, celebrating the birth of our third child, and healing from a difficult illness. I have been lifted by this community in times of joy and carried in times of sorrow. I appreciate the interconnectedness of standing shoulder to shoulder, or entwined in a hug, filled with joy, consolation, commiseration, elation, peace. I believe in the power of community service at La Lumiere. Sharing my experience with current La Lumiere students of traveling to Nicaragua to serve school children has made the experience more powerful for me. It is incredibly affirming to witness the igniting spark as a young person discovers further the depth of their social conscience and their capacity to help those less fortunate. I believe in the power of community prayer at La Lumiere. I savor the silence at morning meeting as Mr. Smith’s says, “Let’s stand…,” and we begin the “The Lord’s Prayer.” Each of us there in the Fine Arts Building follows a different cadence of speaking, thinking, or observing these holy words, yet in that difference we are connected.

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I Believe in Community I believe that living in the “fishbowl” of community engenders selfresponsibility, accountability and a connectedness which demands that we become the best version of ourselves. As an adult member of the La Lumiere community, I work with my colleagues to live out this conviction, with the belief that this small example set for our 11 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

As the school’s Director of Advancement, I have the opportunity to welcome alumni from every decade back to campus. Making La Lumiere a place of homecoming for these graduates has become a personal mission. Not a homecoming in the traditional sense, but a place to truly come home. I believe in living intentionally among people with a shared purpose. It sometimes seems that the adults at La Lumiere share a purpose that diverges from that of its students. Yet when alumni return, I see that education is a purpose broad and deep enough to encompass all our divergences, and that community is the best context in which to pursue it. Colleen Kennedy Director of Advancement, La Lumiere School Boston College and Northwestern University MBA


Welcome t o

Earth Day 2011

Every student at La Lumiere has the chance to leave a distinctive mark on the institution as he or she passes through it. Student paintings that hang on the walls and the annals of athletic and academic awards are measures of dedication and talent that inspire current students in their own pursuits at La Lumiere. Sometimes the mark an alumni leaves is not an object of art or a sports record but an event – a new happening that, if carried on in successive years, can become a school tradition. Such an event was launched last spring by senior Justin Katz in the form of La Lumination, a daylong festival celebrating environmental stewardship and civic responsibility coordinated exclusively by students. Featuring live music, informational speakers, food vendors, and local artisans, La Lumination raised both awareness and funding. Proceeds from the event allowed the school to contribute several thousand dollars to the Save the Dunes Council of Northwest Indiana and establish a scholarship for La Lumiere students active in environmentalism. Area companies, schools, and organizations came forward as leading sponsors for the event. Mike Keen, Director of Sustainability and professor at Indiana University South Bend, gave the keynote address. Additional presentations were made by the Hoosier Environmental Council, the Shirley Heinze Land Trust, the Unity Gardens, and the Save the Dunes Council. Justin Katz reflects, “I was the kid that didn’t want to participate in anything, didn’t want to go to mandatory events, follow dress code, etc. Then I realized how stupid that was – why not try to make the school better and do something I did want to do? The whole thing was a totally lifechanging experience. It taught me how to fundraise, how to network, and how to broach some pretty formidable figures.” The groundwork is laid for current students to organize and support this year’s La Lumination, engendering a culture of environmental stewardship for years to come. Who will carry on this new tradition? La Lumiere would like to thank all of the inaugural year sponsors, especially our lead sponsors, NIPSCO, Renaissance Academy and Kabelin Ace Hardware.

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On Campus

Seven

Years, NO Itch

A Q&A with Headmaster Michael Kennedy ’86

Seven is a number that bears significance in everything from Biblical prophecy to sports playoffs to how we mark and organize time. As the seventh year of his tenure as head of La Lumiere turns into the eighth, Michael Kennedy shares some of his thoughts about the School.

You often characterize the La Lumiere community as a family. Seven years in, how would you describe your role in that family? How would you describe the health and personality of that family? The portrayal of La Lumiere as a family didn’t originate with me, but as Head of School, it is my honor to sustain it as a living metaphor. My role, or my responsibility, is to make sure everyone understands what the term “La Lumiere Family” truly means. First, it’s a way to capture in one word the extent to which students (and teachers!) are both cared for and challenged here. Second, it’s a way to talk about our functionality as a community. As I shared with faculty, staff, and students at the start of the year: La Lumiere is healthy. In all facets of school life, fiscal, programmatic, athletics and arts, and personnel, we are healthy and hoping to build on our well-being. As for personality? I can say we work hard, I can say we have fun – but I think one of our seniors said it best in a recent chapel: we have faith in each other.

You’ve spoken about recent research that attempts to quantify what it really means to be “prepped” for success in college. What is La Lumiere doing right now that gives you confidence about the success – in college and beyond – of future alumni? Dr. Richard Light of Harvard’s School of Education identifies five things independent schools are doing better than other high schools. The National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) 13 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

is quick to point out that these are proven differentiators a student should have as they embark on their college careers: • Willingness to seek advice and assistance from a teacher or professor • Writing skills • Interest in and an ability to collaborate with a classmate • Time management skills • Comfort with and being accustomed to an environment with diversity of all kinds These key skills seem to me a complementary and concrete set of goals to pursue as we stay true to our mission of educating each of our students in character, scholarship and faith. We are very clear with our students, families and faculty of the School’s expectations for them. Though challenging to measure, we place a great value on a student’s resiliency, self-esteem, and ability to handle adverse situations. And we hear over and over of the success our graduates have in college – precisely because of what we expect of them at La Lumiere.

This is your third stint at La Lumiere School; what keeps you coming back? I’ve always been motivated by the opportunity to make a difference, albeit on a small scale. Simply put, the Midwest needs a La Lumiere School. I and many others benefitted from this place; it was the foundation for my desire to pursue life-long


La Lumiere gave me opportunities I would not otherwise have had, and it literally changed the course of my life. I wasn’t fully aware of the impact then, but I know it now... learning. My boarding school experience at La Lumiere gave me opportunities I would not otherwise have had, and it literally changed the course of my life. I wasn’t fully aware of the impact then, but I know it now, so I want to play a part in doing the same for current and future La Lumiere students.

How do you move the School forward as a viable 21st century educational institution while still preserving the traditions and essential character of La Lumiere? One way is to listen and keep listening to many voices in the community. The direction and learning coming out of the School’s recent strategic planning process was invaluable, in large part because we had participation from faculty, current parents, parents-of-alumni, and alumni from every decade, some of whom have children as students here now. The Strategic Plan will serve as a compass for our 21st century expedition, keeping the School’s mission as our true north. Another way to move forward with integrity is to identify specific arenas within the institution which are ripe for development. We have a strategy called Areas of Excellence, a term you will hear again and again, which is being applied across our academic and co-curricular programs. This strategy entails taking stock of our already strong offerings and aiming to provide certain mission-appropriate programs with a champion, focus, will, and investment. La Lumiere is turning 50 in an economic era that presents significant challenges for boarding schools; this strategy allows us to enhance our students’ experience while they are here and to heighten our exposure to prospective students. In academics, the first Area of Excellence has been our awardwinning science program. We saw a prime opportunity with our stellar science faculty as champions, we identified needs and devoted resources through the Courageous Vision capital campaign, and now among other accomplishments, we are

expanding into the region’s only four year Environmental Science curriculum, taking advantage of our unique natural setting. In athletics, our basketball program is another Area of Excellence. We updated the facilities by installing a wood floor in Marsch Gymnasium and by adding new scoreboards, thanks to the Class of 1974. Early on we identified a champion in former coach Delray Brooks, and now Alan Huss has taken the helm and is catapulting the program to the national stage. Relative to our minimal investment, this program is having maximum impact.

After more than five years, some would say it’s natural for a Head of School to get restless, perhaps want something new. What lies ahead for you, do you think? My family and I love this school and what is happening here. I’m as limited in my view of the future as anyone else, but if the present is any indication, what lies ahead for me is the joy and the work of making La Lumiere better. There is never a day when any one of us sits back and says we have reached our goals and objectives. We can build on the wonderful diversity we enjoy, we can strengthen the bond we have formed with the alumni, we can increase demand for boarding and day spaces through a comprehensive admissions and marketing plan, and we can strive to strengthen the partnership with our families in the tradition of all good independent schools. What thrills me today is the same thing that thrilled me seven years ago. It is thrilling to watch young women and men mature before my eyes. The maturation process is bound to involve conflict, failure and disappointment. While these occasions are reason for concern, how each student addresses these challenges is how I measure success. La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 14


On Campus La Lumiere Reaccreditation

APPROVED In June of 2010, in the culmination of an active two-year process, La Lumiere was officially reaccredited by the Independent School Association of the Central States (ISACS). The process included a stringent self-study and a three-day onsite visit by a 13-member accreditation team from other independent schools across the Midwest. On granting La Lumiere reaccreditation, Paul Barton, headmaster at The Avery Coonley School, noted, “It is eminently

clear that you have a beautiful campus, dedicated and extraordinary teachers and staff, and a vibrant community of parents and students who benefit from the commitment you have all made to this educational endeavor, and it has been a true privilege to be a part of your journey.”

The ISACS visiting team commended La Lumiere School in particular for its: • Exceptional faculty and staff who are highly-qualified, amazingly flexible, and deeply concerned about the needs of each student; • Diverse and dedicated students who support and care for each other and are authentically engaged in the learning process; • A nurturing school climate which reflects a feeling of family and a high level of connectedness. Recommendations put forth from the visiting committee included: • Creating a comprehensive strategic plan for the next five years; • Developing a plan to establish and build a significant endowment in order to ensure the financial sustainability of the school; • Identifying, developing, and implementing a technology plan that advances all areas of the school. Special thanks goes to Kevin Spingler on the La Lumiere faculty for his leadership throughout the entire accreditation process. The process resumes as we implement the recommendations and prepare for the next cycle of evaluation in an effort to improve continuously.

La Lumiere School is pleased to introduce two new members of its Board of Trustees: Johanna Miller is a name immediately recognizable to many alumni: she taught English at La Lumiere for almost two decades. During those years she filled other roles as well, including Academic Dean, helping then-rookie teacher Michael Kennedy learn the ropes. Now a trustee beginning a three-year term, Johanna says this is an exciting time for the School. “I can’t talk about my life without talking about La Lumiere. It is a privilege to reconnect with the school’s thriving community,” she reflects. Johanna would love to see the arts expand during her tenure, as well as the endowment. 15 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

Dan Walsh graduated from La Lumiere in 1995. He currently serves as Vice President and Business Group Leader for the Heavy Civil Group of Walsh Construction, a four-generation family-run construction business. For the last two years, Dan has brought his expertise in the construction field to the Facilities Committee of the Board of Trustees. His deepened involvement as a full member in the coming term reflects Dan’s support for what he calls the “culture of connectedness” at La Lumiere School. Walsh points to the opportunities he found here as a student for selfresponsibility, accountability, and community as key factors in preparing him for his own life’s work and personal character.


On Campus Academic Decathlon Comes Into Its Own Just three years after entering competition for the first time, La Lumiere’s Academic Decathlon team ranks 1st in Indiana and 7th in the nation. Coaches Emma Wynn and Jaime Frankle ’04 couldn’t be prouder of this year’s team, a group of four seniors, four juniors, and one sophomore that worked together six hours a week from October to April to push their performance to the highest levels. The Academic Decathlon is a team competition which began in 1981 with the belief that everyone’s learning potential can be maximized through competitive challenge. All students on a team must test their knowledge in ten categories: Art, Economics, Essay, Interview, Language and Literature, Mathematics, Music, Science, Social Science, and Speech. “It’s great that there are ten subjects because it lets them tackle a topic so thoroughly,” says faculty coach Emma Wynn. “You can ask them about dancing in the 1920s, for example, and they will get up and perform one. It’s called the Shim Sham.” Each category focuses on an overarching topic: this year The Great Depression and last year The French Revolution. The topic named for the 2012 competition is The Age of Empire. How did they do it? Students broke the vast amount of material into sections and taught it to each other. Seniors carried much of the teaching load, while others took notes, made flash cards, coordinated practice judging sessions, and more. “The onus was on the students,” says Wynn. Former La Lumiere math teacher Dustin Smith initiated La Lumiere’s participation in the 2009 competition, after his own experience as a competitor in high school transformed him from a severely reticent student to a dynamic speaker. Other benefits are clear to Coach Wynn. “The Decathlon gives a team experience to kids who might not get it otherwise, and pushes students to work beyond the parameters of class curriculums. It serves as great preparation, especially in the interview and speech categories, for real-life challenges that are coming their way.” There’s the joy of discovery – one senior fell in love with French opera-and the delight of recognition – Chicago’s Art Institute became familiar territory. At the end of the day, says Wynn, “We had so much fun.”

Faculty Summer

Reading

2011 Made to Sti ck, Chip and Dan Heath 2010 The Path to Purpose, William Damon 2009 Mindsets, Carol Dweck 2008 The Price of Privilege, Madeline Levine Alfie Kohn 2007 The Tipping Point, Malcom Gladwell

Each summer the La Lumiere faculty and staff continue the tradition of ongoing professional development through shared summer reading. A book is assigned to all faculty and staff on topics relevant to educational best practices, human development, and the adolescent experience. During earlyAugust faculty meetings, summer reading is discussed among colleagues in cross-divisional groupings. La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 16


On Campus

Prefect

student

Leadership

For nearly 50 years La Lumiere School has produced leaders who have taken to heart the motto of Character, Scholarship and Faith, and those leaders are helping to mold the future in all walks of life.

To some degree, this prefect system marks a return to an older La Lumiere tradition. During the first decades of the School, the student body elected officers who governed aspects of student life and served as liaison to the faculty and administration. “Sacristans” too were appointed with great responsibility to mold and shape the community with honor and integrity, and to serve at campus masses. The La Lumiere Prefect System is comprised of outstanding upperclassmen who undergo an application process and are selected by peer leaders and a faculty committee. The student prefects are chosen for their character, integrity, 17 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

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The La Lumiere Prefect System challenges eight student leaders each year to serve their school through significant contributions in all areas of the school community – student life, admissions, community service, spiritual life, residential life, and the overall quality of the school experience. These leaders oversee councils comprised of additional selected students, establishing a full range of student ownership and involvement.

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One of the many advantages of an independent school education and a small community like La Lumiere is the leadership opportunity provided to each of its students. A new structure of student leadership for La Lumiere School, modeled after some of the best independent college preparatory schools in the country, has expanded such opportunities for growth.

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leadership on campus and beyond, and for their clear commitment to our School’s mission. Mentor faculty members assist each Prefect as they build their councils, shape their vision for the year, and utilize school resources to bring that vision into being. In its inaugural year, the La Lumiere Prefect System encompasses one Head Prefect, seven Prefects, and 70+ council members – a full 35% of the student body. In Spring 2011, at the announcement of the new student leadership structure, Kevin Kunst, Assistant Headmaster for Academic & Athletic Affairs, summed it up bluntly: “We are giving you the school. What you make of this opportunity and responsibility is in your hands.”


On Campus Co-Curriculars Prefect

All Prefects uphold the motto and vision of the school and what it stands for in word, action and deed.

The Co-Curriculars Prefect is responsible for morale, school spirit, enthusiasm, and shaping student perception about what it means to be a student at La Lumiere School. The primary duties of the Co-

The Head Prefect The Head Prefect must be a senior and is responsible for the overall management

Curricular Prefect include coordinating

John Lake ’12

all student activities including dances,

of the entire Prefect system. He or she

Prom, and other events that affect morale and student attitudes

will willingly perform the duties and

towards their school.

responsibilities of all those who report Zachary Wisniewski ’12

to him, as well as various duties and

Sacristan Prefect

responsibilities unique to this position. The

The Spiritual Life Prefect or “Sacristan” is

Head Prefect is responsible for managing and shaping student

responsible for the promotion of spiritual

perceptions about the rules and regulations that apply to daily

awareness and pursuit of faith within the

life and educating students about the importance of following the

School community. The Sacristan Prefect

Student Handbook in their daily decision making processes.

will also be called on to open a variety of programs with prayer and to serve as a

Devon Carlson ’12

Admissions Prefect

spiritual leader among our students and

The Admissions Prefect is responsible

faculty. He or she is encouraged to coordinate and to facilitate

for assisting in the Admissions Office and

student prayer groups within the School.

working with the Admissions Director. The primary responsibility is to tour

Hospitality Prefect

prospective students and families around

The Hospitality Prefect is responsible

the School. In addition, the Admissions Prefect is responsible for directing a

for student liaison with food service and

Daisy Costello ’13

serves as the student representative

student welcome program for all new students and helping them

for alumni relations. The primary

adjust to life at La Lumiere. He or she will also help with Open

duties of the Hospitality Prefect include

House events.

Brian Tonino ’12

coordinating input and volunteers for all food service on campus including

Serviam Prefect

the traditional Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners and the

The Serviam Prefect is responsible for

Taste of La Lumiere.

developing and maintaining a willingness

Anulé Ndukwu ’12

to serve, cultivating a servant’s heart in

Residential Life Prefect

each faculty member and student. The

The Residential Life Prefects are responsible for providing

Serviam Prefect’s primary responsibilities

leadership among the

will include promoting community service

boarding students,

and announcing service opportunities.

serving as the liaison

In addition, he or she is responsible for assisting the planning

to the faculty and

and implementation of La Lumiere outreach programs for the

maintaining morale

academic year.

and a cohesive residential life at La Lumiere School.

Tae Joon Park ’12

Cheryl Cobbold ’13

La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 18


On Campus In 2010, a strategic planning process was initiated by La Lumiere School with the encouragement of the ISACS 2009 accreditation report. La Lumiere’s previous strategic plan was completed in 2002 and was followed by the Courageous Vision campaign – designed to fund the school’s aim of being the “premier day and boarding school in the Midwest.” The rising demand for a La Lumiere education has brought great vitality to the school and invites a review of school programs and deep reflection on school priorities to ensure that La Lumiere honors its mission and maintains its family-like culture in a new climate with a larger enrollment. The 2011 Strategic Plan document was the work of a 15-member committee which took into account the results of 300 online surveys and 80 written responses from trustees, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of La Lumiere.

At its February 2011 meeting, the Board of Trustees of La Lumiere adopted the Strategic Plan with six areas of focus: Community enrollment, La Lumiere will preserve the signature feature of

challenged, and all students form bonds with friends and faculty mentors that last a lifetime. Faculty and Staff Goal: La Lumiere will identify the distinctive characteristics of its exceptional teachers and staff, recruit individuals who demonstrate those qualities, and retain them with competitive pay, opportunities for professional growth, and a school experience that is unrivalled for its impact on the students. Academic Program Goal: La Lumiere will offer an academic program in the sciences and humanities that tracks the most challenging curricula offered in American high schools. It will emphasize critical thinking and writing across the curriculum while expanding elective courses in technology and the arts.

19 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

Town Hall Meetings

everyone knows everyone, each student is nurtured and

Survey Responses

the school at its founding: a family-like community in which

Groundwork and committee

Goal: As it absorbs the impressive recent growth in


On Campus Co-Curricular Activities

Financial Health and Alumni Relations

Goal: La Lumiere will provide a wide array of both required

Goal: La Lumiere will build a financial plan to support an

and optional co-curricular activities designed to challenge

outstanding college-preparatory education for a small,

students, help them discover their gifts, and help them become

diverse student body. The plan will draw on sound models

well-rounded adults.

of projected enrollment, day-to-boarding student ratio, and market-sensitive tuition. Tuition revenue will be supplemented

Faith Identity

with charitable contributions, endowment income, and grants

Goal: La Lumiere will maintain an atmosphere of Christian

along with support from a vibrant network of alumni who

ideals while preserving the school's Roman Catholic heritage

donate to the school financially, are in close touch with one

and nurturing Catholic students in their faith. The school also

another, and support the aspirations of younger members of

will respect the diverse makeup of our community, supporting

the La Lumiere family.

non-Catholic faculty, staff, and students in the exploration and A complete copy of the Strategic Plan can be found at lalumiere.org.

expression of their own faiths.

Goal: La Lumiere will maintain an atmosphere of Christian ideals while preserving the school’s Roman Catholic identity and nurturing Catholic students in their faith. The

Faith Identity

school also will respect the diverse makeup of our community, supporting non-Catholic faculty, staff, and students in the exploration and expression of their own faiths.

Rationale: “The cause of the human person will only be served if knowledge is joined to conscience.” Those words, written by Pope John Paul II in his encyclical on Catholic universities, express the combined call to “character, scholarship, faith” that distinguishes La Lumiere. In a world of accelerating scientific advances, where human capacities are growing in every area but virtue, moral development is essential to personal growth. At La Lumiere, we strive to form the moral character of our students based on the teachings of Christ.

18

Adoption

Plan Formation

Committee Work

Draft of Written Plan

Small School, Big Results The 2011 La Lumiere School Strategic Plan

Co-Curricular Activities Athletics program Arts program

Goal: La Lumiere will provide a wide array of both required and optional co-curricular activities designed to challenge students, help them discover their gifts, and help them become well-rounded adults.

Rationale: The human qualities and abilities that make for a good life cannot be learned in an academic program alone. They come also from lessons in skill and character learned outside the classroom. That is why co-curricular activities are a crucial and required feature of La Lumiere School. They enhance the students’ education, strengthen relationships with teachers, and deepen the community bond.

Athletics program

Goal: All La Lumiere students will be required to participate in at least one competitive athletic program per year to help them develop teamwork, discipline, make friends, become fit, and feel part of the school.

Rationale: Sport is life lived at high velocity. It demands discipline, teamwork, stamina, and the emotional balance needed to lose with grace and win with class. Athletics can teach crucial lessons of life in a single season -- whether one is athletically gifted or not and whether one will play beyond high school or not. This is why athletics have been an emphatic feature of the La Lumiere experience since its founding -because sports are an incomparable coach of character.

Arts program

Goal: La Lumiere will offer introductory opportunities in the fine arts and performing arts to give students an experience in self-discovery and self-expression while offering more advanced students the chance to develop their talents at a higher level.

Rationale: Experience in the arts is owed to all students to help them explore their gifts, nurture their creativity, and help them learn to express themselves in vivid and distinctive ways. At a time when many of the world’s best-selling products are blends of art and engineering, art is not an academic luxury. Art is vital instruction in the many dimensions of self-expression and important practical knowledge for those who want to make a living in a world that loves beauty.

16

La Lumiere Magazine 2011 | 20


The La Lumiere Athletic Program has a long and proud tradition. Today, the names have changed, the buildings and fields have changed, the number of sports offerings have changed – but what has not changed is the pursuit of excellence that is inspired in those who put on the Laker uniform. The school’s strategic plan names two requirements for all scholar-athletes: that each participate in at least one season where the afternoon obligation is fitness related, and that each participate in at least one “team experience.” When every student is investing time every afternoon, opportunities abound for teachers and coaches to connect with young people. Improved facilities are also a central focus of the Athletic Department. Recent improvements include a new floor and new scoreboards for Marsch Gymnasium (thanks to the Class of 74!), a new dedicated softball field, new dugouts, enhanced infield and expanded new clay for the baseball field, and an entirely new football game field with new goal posts and a new scoreboard. Another part of our recent strategic plan is to closely examine new varsity sports, in addition to the 15 currently offered,

Every La Lumiere student who steps on the field or the court is challenged in mind, body, and spirit, is impacted by great coaches, and is asked to do more than he or she thought possible. Is there a better way to spend an afternoon?

that might fit into the La Lumiere model and benefit our student community. We hope to continue these efforts over the upcoming years in conjunction with a renewed focus on resource management and good stewardship.


La Lumiere School Lakers

Cover It Live Blog 3:06 Fumble. Lakers recover the ball. 3rd and 3 3:05 Comets punt. Lakers will start on their own 17 3:04 3 and out for the Comets

Area of Excellence: Basketball

3:00 1 minute to kick off. Coloma will receive the ball first

It’s now been six years since we began developing the basketball

12:52 Welcome to the live webcast for our game between the La Lumiere Lakers and the Coloma Comets. Kick off is scheduled for 3:00 pm CST

program into La Lumiere’s first Area of Excellence in the athletic arena. The growth initiated by coach Delray Brooks is being built upon by Alan Huss, on the national stage. Last year, the team finished 20-9, and the prospects for 2011-2012 are even greater despite a more challenging schedule. Under Coach Brooks, La Lumiere players went on to play at Purdue and Northwestern. Scholar-athletes from last year’s team under

Follow La Lumiere Athletics on lalumiere.org

Coach Huss will be taking the floor this winter for Columbia University and Valparaiso, and this year’s team already has verbal commitments to Purdue, Indiana, Southern Illinois, and New Mexico. As we go forward, the athletic department will aim for similar success in our other programs, and

La Lumiere School Lakers

lalumiereschool blog

certain sports like soccer (22-7 over the past two seasons), boys’ tennis (undefeated in 2011), and baseball (12-3 last spring) are already building that foundation. We have been fortunate to advance the basketball program while remaining true to our mission. While the caliber of the basketball team is a change from the level most will remember from their own La Lumiere days, the present students have rallied around this particular Area of Excellence, just as they have in support of our other Area of Excellence, Science and our Science Olympiad teams.

lalumiereschool Just two hours until kickoff for Football’s home opener. Follow live at http://ow.ly/6qMmX · reply · retweet · favorite lalumiereschool Not able to make it to the football game this week? Follow live at http://ow.ly/6p98N · reply · retweet · favorite lalumiereschool La Lumiere Tennis Defeats East Chicago Central http://ow.ly/6mQGM · reply · retweet · favorite lalumiereschool BLUE OUT! Go Lakers! http://t.co/oIL7ze7 · reply · retweet · favorite lalumiereschool I posted a new photo to Facebook http://t. co/0WNnEPc · reply · retweet · favorite lalumiereschool La Lumiere Girls Cross Country Wins New Buffalo Invitational http://ow.ly/6ie7W · reply · retweet · favorite


On Campus Ask Director of College Counseling and veteran English teacher Dr.

aspect of his or her life as a student. When we read a name out

Pete Campbell to define his job, and he’ll start by defining what it

loud that kids haven’t heard before, that’s a good thing.”

isn’t. It’s not his job to get students admitted to the college of their choice – or of their parents’ choice – or even of his own choice

Before he can help students get acquainted with a college, of

for them. Rather, it’s his job to help students learn the art and skill

course, he must get acquainted with it himself. Without a doubt,

of making good decisions. Learning how to research, how to think

Dr. Campbell has completed many more “college tours” than

critically, how to evaluate data, and how to communicate clearly –

any of his students. These personal visits to a diverse array of

these are the skills a college-bound student must develop.

schools undergird a working knowledge of college publications

application to colleges is part of the educational experience, not an adjunct to it.” This is why, at La Lumiere, the work

academic subjects. “I don’t believe that college is for job training, nor is it some kind of prestige contest. Research suggests that this generation will throughout their adult lives have multiple careers – not multiple

SAT engineering La Lumiere

College

ACT

jobs! How do you prepare for that? By gaining a wide range of skills. A liberal arts education is by far the best way to do that.”

Pete’s delight is to get kids acquainted with schools they might not have otherwise known about. He does this through one-on-one advising sessions, through alumni who come back to campus, through a family-linked online database and planning resource, and even through morning meeting. Announcing seniors’ acceptances and having them sign banners for each college sends a message to other students, no matter what their year. “We’re a college prep school,” he says, “and we want everyone to be aware of this 23 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

Do colleges have distinct

Tour

University

seriousness as work required for

of professional organizations.

academic

and more) is accorded the same

resume

skills, resources, and interests,

scholarship education

Counseling

resumes, assessing individual

values

he assigns (creating and revising

and from colleagues in a number

support

interview

says, “a student’s search for and

recommendations from alumni

Dr. Campbell

“If my job is done right,” Pete

Resources

Liberal Arts

and websites, and complement

personalities? Absolutely, Pete asserts – but he doesn’t believe kids can discover them until they actually go. That’s why the emphasis on life skills is so important: you need them not only to follow the path you’ve envisioned, but also to navigate the path you haven’t. There’s one life skill that La Lumiere’s Director of College Counseling values above all others. He is, after all, an English teacher. How best to position yourself for college acceptance? Pete Campbell says, “Read! Read a lot!”


On Campus

Commencement

2011 La Lumiere Magazine 2009 | 21


I

’ll wager some of you are a bit anxious about the adventures

Graduates, I contend that the soundness of your decisions will

tomorrow, next month, or next year may bring – a class of young

determine the course of your future, but please, when you’ve

adults, about to graduate, you’re wondering how you will fare in the

given your best on a tough call and it’s dead wrong, hold your

complex, often spectacular and always challenging world waiting at

head high. The people who matter will understand, and on that

the end of Wilhelm Road…

score, when you reach adulthood, if you have three truly loyal friends, you are a fortunate person. Respect and honor your

As you proceed into that great wide open – whether it involves

steadfast companions and make good on your commitments to

college, graduate school, your careers, partnerships, marriage, raising

them – not just those who matter, but anyone to whom you’ve

children, starting or contributing to companies – you will be faced

given your word.

with making choices and increasingly difficult decisions…Start with very simple examples: Did you wonder whom to invite to the prom? Did you confront a classmate who may have cheated on a math test? Did you have the courage to step in to defend a bullied classmate? …These are basic right and wrong calls, perhaps more choices than decisions. Sure they may require some fortitude, but they are straightforward, occur every day and in each case I’ve just cited you already know the right answer. But, please believe me, the complexity of the decisions beyond La Lumiere become substantially more complicated. Many may require deep introspection and intense soul searching. For example, will you honor the vows you may take? Will step up to your job responsibilities and fire that very close friend when it’s absolutely justified? Will you decide to slightly enhance your resume to better compete for that perfect job? Then, as an adult, you may be faced with choices which are really tough. Do you honor a relative’s request to end a human life when there is no chance of a healthy recovery? Do you forgive a life-long friend after he or she has severely wronged you or your family?

David Moore ’70 David Moore, Class of 1970 and eldest son of La Lumiere’s founding headmaster, James R. Moore, returned to campus to address the 53 graduates at the 44th Commencement Ceremonies.

Will you confront your child when you suspect a drug or alcohol problem? The ethical quality of your decisions and the fortitude with which you stand by them will become the cornerstone of your character. …When facing a complicated choice, think of three people whom you regard with the deepest sense of respect. Then think of how they would react if you described your dilemma and, then, your decision. This just may help you move in the right direction.

25 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

Moore graduated from Colgate University with honors in English, earning three varsity letters in football and the honor of Most Valuable Player in 1973. He returned to La Lumiere to teach and coach for two years before joining IBM and then later the search firm Russell Reynolds. After four years with Russell Reynolds, he left to form his own firm. During the next 13 years his firm, Lynch, Miller Moore became the leading U.S. executive search firm serving private equity clients. Moore continues to enjoy his work today, and spending time with his wife Pam, children and grandchildren.


Headmaster’s Award - Christopher S. Balawender For 35 years, Chris Balawender has educated, mentored and coached countless La Lumiere alumni. Affectionately known as “Doc Booms,” our resident historian and longest-tenured faculty still coaches football and track, and continues to conduct his final exams in a scholar’s robe. Chris and his wife Grace raised their two sons, Mark ‘99 and Peter ‘01 on La Lumiere’s campus. In recognition of his outstanding support of La Lumiere School’s mission and ideals, and in appreciation for his commitment to excellence and invaluable leadership to our school, Chris was awarded the 2011 Headmaster’s Award. In awarding the honor, Headmaster Kennedy called Chris a true “school man” in every sense of the term, quoting James R. Moore’s definition, as having the “courage to affirm, the commitment to dedicate one’s life, and the passion to persevere.” Doc Booms is certainly La Lumiere’s original Renaissance man.

Alumni Memorial Award - Sydney Jane McBride For four years, Sydney McBride approached school life at La Lumiere with optimism and zeal. In her senior speech, Sydney’s advisor, Karen Lawson, said, “I’m not sure you realize how brightly your light has shined at La Lumiere and just how many lives you have subtly touched with your poise, gentle demeanor, service leadership and genuine caring. You showed us that true renaissance women do exist.” Sydney was awarded the Alumni Memorial Award as the student who epitomized the La Lumiere ideal. In addition to her challenging academics, Sydney organized recycling awareness campaigns, community service activities and, as the head of the Blue Key Society, led by example for many younger students. She left a lasting impression on faculty and students alike and is certainly having the same effect at Earlham College.

Senior Award for Stellar Academic Performance........................................................................................................................Mackenzie O’Brien James R. Moore Scholar Athlete Award................................................................................................................................................ Robert Bartels Alan R. Hannan Unsung Hero Award.............................................................................................................. Cesar Robles and Theresa Siedlecki Trustees Award for Leadership Based on Character......................................................................................................................... Robert Bartels Headmaster’s Award for Growth and Distinction................................................................................................. Justin Katz and Hans Guentert The One of Us Award.................................................................................................................................................Justin Katz and Sydney McBride The Alumni Memorial Award–The Person Who Best Portrays the La Lumiere Ideal ............................................................ Sydney McBride Senior Award for Service to Younger Students........................................................................................................................................ Conor Luck

Student Body President - Robert J. Lake There’s a phrase that Dr. Campbell likes to use, a phrase I here present in heavy air quotes not as a way of declining the doctor his due respect but as a way of ensuring that I am not docked for plagiarism later on: “Wishing won’t do it.” Of course, being contrarian, I must disagree. My rebuttal is that it often takes a wish to get you there…If you don’t have a dream, you can’t try to achieve it. So doing doesn’t do it, not without wishing. If you keep on a set path that isn’t working without trying to adapt yourself, you’ll find yourself in a dead end….If you at some point wind up looking at yourself in the philosophical mirror and you find that the star that you wished upon has gone supernova, don’t dwell on the loss of a direction in your life, but celebrate the birth of something brighter and louder and more colorful. Look at what’s going wrong and ask yourself if it’s going wrong because it’s going wrong, or if it’s going wrong because it’s not as you planned. And if you never wished upon the star in the first place, then you should start at some point, because it only burns so long as you can be there to help it along.


Annual Report

July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011

Financial Summary Sources of Revenue

Chairman’s Message

Tuition and Fees

La Lumiere is thriving! The School’s record enrollment, highly successful academic and athletic teams, and the start of a promising prefect leadership program are all examples of our recent successes. La Lumiere is fortunate to have a cohesive community which understands that philanthropy can support and nurture the School’s mission. This is especially true as we approach the 50th Anniversary of the founding of our School.

Annual Fund and Other Donations

$453,086

Capital Campaign

$530,353 $76,090

Uses of Revenue Instructional Services

$1,013,625

Student Activities

$139,056

Food Services

$269,230

Plant Operating

$863,843

Admissions

$86,135

General and Administrative

$1,410,451

Capital Campaign

$15,969

Other Expenses

$200,798

TOTAL

$3,999,107

Sources of Revenue Investment Income Capital Campaign Annual Fund and Other Donations

The true measure of the health of a community like La Lumiere is the level of engagement of its constituents. As you can tell from the past year’s successes at our School, our School is vibrant and its future is indeed bright.

James W. Kaminski, Parent ’08 & ‘10 Chairman, Board of Trustees

$219,392

TOTAL $4,467,194

As donors to our School, you make all of this possible. The School is building a bright future for its students in large part because of the donations received through your philanthropy. In addition to monetary donations, many of the School’s constituents participated in the strategic planning process. The “gift of time” donated to our School in conjunction with the strategic planning process was critical. I want to thank each of you for your words of advice during this important time, and am pleased to report that there is much to look forward to as we embark on the five year strategic plan for La Lumiere.

Sincerely,

Auxiliary Services

Investment Income

This past year was exciting for everyone associated with La Lumiere. Notable achievements include the reaccreditation of the School by ISACS; the commencement of a strategic planning process which resulted in the implementation of an updated plan; and the completion of the successful Courageous Vision campaign. Additionally, the School’s operating budget for the past year was in the black – a tribute to the stewards of our School. Gifts and pledges to La Lumiere in 2010-2011 totaled $983,439. Thanks to the income generated through those donations, including successful events and the tremendously vital gifts to the Annual Fund, we were able to fund academic and athletic programs, launch a capital improvement projects, and provide our faculty with professional development opportunities. Additionally, the gifts to our School allowed it to offer families of current students much – needed financial assistance.

Thank you in advance for continuing to offer your time, treasure and talent to La Lumiere School.

$3,188,273

Auxiliary Services Tuition and Fees

Uses of Revenue

Other Expenses Capital Campaign

General Administrative

This report includes donors whose gifts were received between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Every effort has been made to ensure that the printed information is accurate. If there are any omissions, please contact our Development Office at 219.326.7450.

Instructional Services

Plant Operating Admissions

Student Activities Food Services


Founders Society $25,000 and above Mrs. William P. Linnen Unity Foundation of La Porte County

God’s Hand Society $10,000 - $24,999 Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McKenna, Sr. Daniel Murphy Scholarship Foundation Mr. David N. Rentschler ’77 Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Valleau ’80 Bridget ’86 and David Van Eekeren The Vanderboegh Family

Trustees Society $5,000 - $9,999 Anonymous Mr. E.M. Bakwin Mr. and Mrs. John A. Buck Ned ’81 and Caroline Costello Mr. John C. Coughlin ’80 Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan ’83 Robert J. Hiler Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Fred S. Hirt Mr. and Mrs. James Kaminski Anne and Joe Linnen ’84 Dan and Tricia Luck Mrs. Rosemary A. Mennen Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel

Leadership Society $2,000 - $4,999 Mr. Paris Barclay ’74 and Mr. Christopher Mason Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Buck ’86 Jack and Meg ’81 Caplice Mr. and Mrs. Gary Davis Mr. Richard A. Everist, Jr. ’73 Connie ’83 and Charlie Falcone The Michael W. and Jean D. Franke Family Foundation Michigan City Area Schools Mr. Seong-Ju Heo and Mrs. Yu-Jung Shin John ’71 and Catherine Hiler John ’74 and Amy Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. William Igoe ’74 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Jaffee Shirley H. and Richard M. Jaffee Family Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Peter C. Kesling La Lumiere School Parents Association Dr. and Mrs. John M. Langley ’74 Mr. Ki Ho Lee and Mrs. Djie Min Suh Dr. David and Johanna Miller Mrs. Barbara Moore Mr. and Mrs. John A. Prouty ’93 Mr. Michael Riley ’78 Mr. William A. Roberts Arlene & John Rose Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schirger ’84 Mr. and Mrs. Bryan P. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Smith ’77 Mr. Anying Teng and Mrs. Xiaohong Yang Dr. and Mrs. Pietro Tonino Mr. Dean J. Uminski Mr. and Mrs. H. David Wood ’77 Mr. Moo Yeol Yoo and Ms. Hyun Jung Kim

Headmaster’s Club $1,000 - $1,999 Anonymous (3) Dr. and Mrs. Jamil Ahmed Joy Allen M.D. Automated Data Systems, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Barr Dr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Daly III

Mr. Shaw R. Friedman and Hon. Greta Friedman General Insurance Service, Inc. Mr. Tim Grote ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Hillenbrand ’84 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Hurley ’77 Michael ’86 and Colleen Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kilcoyne Mr. Timothy J. Kleihege ’80 and Mrs. Catherine Miller Kleihege ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Klekamp ’88 Mr. and Mrs. David Knight Dr. Kee Byoung Lee and Dr. JeongMi Park Mr. Man Gyoon Lee and Mrs. Mi-Jung Kim Mr. Yong Lee and Mrs. Ki hye Kim Mr. and Mrs. Mark Leyden ’77 & The Fieldhouse Dr. Xavier Llor and Mrs. Merce Llor Mr. and Mrs. James E. Mack The Maroney Family Mr. John T. McCarthy Mr. Edward W. McNabola ’85 Miller’s Mechanical, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Ikeadi M. Ndukwu Jonathan and Susan Nesbitt Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Newcombe ’69 NIPSCO Mr. Hyung Taek Park and Mrs. Jin Hee Ahn Dr. JeongMi Park and Dr. Kee Byoung Lee Minesh and Archana Patel Stephen Paul ’74 Carl and Eloise Pohlad Family Foundation Mr and Mrs.Joseph P. Gaffigan Renaissance Academy Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Roszkiewicz John ’69 and Christine Rumely Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schornack Mr. and Mrs. Victor P. Smith ’86 Tom ’97 & Sarah Sullivan Three Oaks Spokes, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Michael Tristano Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Walsh, Jr. ’95 Wells Fargo Foundation Education Matching Gift Program Paul and Dana ’97 Whiting C. Joseph Yast ’70 and Helen Krowicky Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Yemc Mr. Byung Hoon Youn

Lakers Club $250 - $999 Anonymous (4) Dr. and Mrs. Herand Abcarian Mr. and Mrs. Ken R. Andert Mr. James M. Bachner Chris and Grace Balawender Nancy and Bill Barnard BiddyMurphy.com, the Gahan Family Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Blas Dr. and Mrs. Raymond A. Bonomo ’88 Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Bransfield Christiaan Corthier ’91 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Craig Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Craig ’79 Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Crane Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Crepeau ’78 Current Electric Inc. D&L Wood Products, Inc. Jan and Anneke Dekker Mr. Michael E. Delgado ’85 Mr. George Demos ’95 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Edwards ’79 Mr. and Mrs. Steven Embree ’74 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Fox III Franciscan St. Anthony Health

Michigan City Mr. and Mrs. James Leigh Friedman Goldman Sachs & Co. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Granger Mr. and Mrs. William Grimmer Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gronemeyer Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Gumz ’89 Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Gumz Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Gumz ’88 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hackl ’81 Mrs. Gretchen R. Hannan Dr. Christopher Hartnett ’71 and Dr. Linda Hartnett Mr. and Mrs. Patrick T. Hemphill, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Dale Holdsworth Joe Hostetler ’72 Imagination Station Mr. Leonard P. Jennings ’86 Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Johnston ’73 Mr. Andrew E. Jones ’98 and Mrs. Alexis A. Pontius-Jones ’99 Leon and Norma Kaminski Gintaras and Chris Karaitis Ryugo ’92 and Hana Kato ’93 Janice, Jeffrey, Josh ’08 & Justin ’11 Katz Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Kemper Dr. and Mrs. James R. Kennedy Mr. Patrick B. Kennedy Amy and Tim Kennedy Dot Kesling Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kitlas Mr. and Mrs. Anton Kobe Mr. and Mrs. George L. Koehm Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kunst John & Mary Lake & Family Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lake Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Larkin ’86 Leadership La Porte County Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Leyden ’78 Dr. Robert M. Liddell ’75 Mr. and Mrs. William P. Lingle Mr. and Mrs. Roland C. Lovstad Mr. and Mrs. Gregory G. Mack ’90 Ms. Kathleen A. Mack ’81 Mr. and Mrs. John Marsch ’70 Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. McCabe ’86 Dr. and Mrs. Brian McGuckin Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Miltenberger Mr. and Mrs. Algirdas Mockaitis Richard and Jane Mooradian Mr. James M. Morrison, Jr. ’82 Dr. Mariam Nasidi Mr. and Mrs. Jay A. Nawrocki ’68 Rick and Maryann Newell Mr. and Mrs. Kevin C. Nolan ’72 Mr. and Mrs. Blake H. O’Halloran Ms. Mary C. O’Malley Oak Partners Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pagels Michael Johannes ’69 and Paula Paul Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Quirk ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Peter L. Ramirez ’80 RBC Foundation - USA Ted Reese ’87 & Family Mr. Peter M. Rodgers ’74 and Dr. Beth E. Whitted Sarah Rose ’87 Dan ’84 and Jean Rosshirt Tom Rosshirt ’77 Round the Clock Family Dining Jim and Judy Sarwark Ms. Pamela M. Schaetzle Clem Schaub ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Schermer

Katherine Kerrigan Shannon ’79 Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Shannon ’73 Jeanie and Jeff Shuck Charles and Celene Siedlecki Jordon and Melissa Sklut Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey G. Sparrow ’78 Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Sparrow ’76 Diane and Andy Sperling ’87, OneSource Mr. Kevin C. Spingler Mrs. Ann Stasukaitis Stor-it-Now! Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Sullivan ’83 Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin B. Tang Samuel Thomas ’90 Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Totten Mr. and Mrs. Argelio Trevino Ms. Sarah Tristano ’04 Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Webster Mr. Martin Whalen and Ms. Kathleen Kennedy ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Whitlow ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Bradley H. Wire Mr. Robert J. Zimmermann, Sr.

Annual Giving 2010-2011

Giving By Level

Contributors Club up to $249 Anonymous (3) Miss Natalee Allenbaugh ’09 American Child Care, Inc. David and Shawn Armstrong Mr. and Mrs. David R. Ashley ’79 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Babcock Mark ’99 and Jenifer ’00 Balawender Mr. and Mrs. Brett Balhoff Dr. Heather A. Bankowski ’95 Ms. Katherine Bankowski ’05 Mr. Matthew Barnicle ’88 Don and Cindy Berchem Mr. Doron Blake and Ms. Emma Wynn Mr. and Mrs. Garry Blumenfeld Mr. Lucas Blumenfeld ‘03 Caitlyn Bolton ’02 Mrs. Margaret S. Bolton Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. Boy Ms. Devon T. Brennan ’02 Mr. Edward J. Breslin Ms. Connie Bratton Mrs. Mary H. Brockway Mr. and Mrs. Donald Brooks Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Brown Mr. and Mrs. Mathew L. Buchanan John Buzia ’78 Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Cains Dr. and Mrs. Peter Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Cobbold Miss Caroline M. Coleman ’08 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Coleman Mr. David A. Collins ’77 and Mrs. Patricia J. Julian Mrs. Helen U. Collins Ambrose Marc Conroy ’90 Mrs. Joan M. Costello Ms. Marybeth N. Cremin Mr. and Mrs. Peter Crowe ’85 Mr. and Mrs. John P. Daly ’77 Mr. and Mrs. Drew Danik Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Demski ’79 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald DeNardo Tripp ‘86 and Christian Devers Mr. and Mrs. Willard R. Dorman ’76 Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Duggan ’77 Miss Elizabeth W. Dumelle ’10 John & Cynthia Dumelle Rodulfo Eguizabal & Brenda A. Eguizabal Eisenhauer Family


Annual Giving 2010-2011

Mrs. Joan Emmanuel Mr. Tom Falcone Jaime Frankle ’04 Stephanie Frankle ’06 Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Fraze Dr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Ganster ’69 Ms. Chris E. Good Mr. Michael Grote ’85 Hillary V. Guenther ’05 Mrs. William Hain Alan R. Hannan ’78 Mike and Cindy Heffron Mr. Matt Herald ’96 Mr. and Mrs. Burton Hochberg Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hock Mr. and Mrs. John Hogan Mrs. Rita J. Hollingshead Mr. and Mrs. Todd Holloway Holly’s Restaurant & Pub Horizon Bank Ms. Sara Horn ’94 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Hostetler ’77 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Hruskoci Stephanie A. Hurley ’79 Mrs. Anna Hutsko Mr. Joseph P. Huyler Mr. Akira Ichijo ’93 Indiana Association of School Principals Intercontinental Subscription Service, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. K. Brian Jones Terry and Frances Jones Mr. and Mrs. Jerrald T. Kabelin Mr. and Mrs. Terrence Keay Natalie Bergren Keigher ’96 Mr. Duane M. Kelley Ms. Sarah B. Kennedy ’89 Mr. and Mrs. John Kerrigan ’84 Mr. Thomas Kerrigan ’72 Dr. and Mrs. Robert O. Kinney ’78 Mrs. Kim Kniola Justin Knoll ’10 Ruth Knoll Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kochanny Bernie and Sue Konrady and Family Mr. and Mrs. David Kozak Mr. and Mrs. Keith K. Krause ’94 Peter Krop ’83 Helga M. Lake-Mark Ms. Laura LaLone The Lavidge Company Frenda Levin Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. Lischer Mia Lischer ’94 Ms. Elizabeth M. Lovelace ’89 Ms. Dionne Lovstad-Jones Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Luther Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey C. Mackey ’86 Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Marfise Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Marsch ’72 Mr. and Mrs. Larry Martin Jeffrey and Ruth Mashak Mr. and Mrs. Daniel R. McArdle ’70 Mr. and Mrs. Richard McBride McDonald’s Restaurants of La Porte County McDonald’s Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Paul McDonnell Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McKenna, Jr. ’75 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McNamara Mr. Thomas McQuillan ’83 Mr. Eugene P. Meegan ’70 Ms. Kayla B. Mensch ’05 Mr. Vernon J. Moore, Jr. TMM Insurance Services, Inc. Colleen Morrison ’97 Ms. Sue Morse

Mr. and Mrs. Madhukar Murarka Mr. and Mrs. James J. Murphy ’85 Mr. William Murphy ’68 Mr. and Mrs. Alan D. Murray Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Nawrocki, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Newcombe ’73 Susan Smith Newell ’83 Gayle Nicosia Mr. H. Jerome Noel ’69 Mr. James M. O’Brien ’70 Mrs. Kara Odom ’06 Tim and Jackie Ohlund Mr. and Mrs. T. Michael Osterman ’81 Ms. Alexandra R. Pagels ’03 Trish and Tim Preheim Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Prinz, Jr. Mr. Kevin Proud ’99 Ms. Kerry E. Quirk ’05 Ms. Emily Rellinger Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Rentschler, Jr. ’76 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen P. Rentschler ’73 Ms. Elena Royal Ms. Kasey Ryan ’95 Sauers Buick Pontiac Cadillac Paul and Sara Schrauben Mr. and Mrs. James E. Shaw II ’83 Mr. and Mrs. John C. Shoop Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Siwietz ’74 Mr. Donald Snedden Mr. Samuel Snyder and Mrs. Kathryn M. Uryga Snyder ’98 Chris and Debbie Stueck Mr. and Mrs. James F. Sullivan Larry & Bonnie Sullivan John and Ann Sweeney Mr. Gregory Thoman ’71 Mr. and Mrs. David E. Tincher Mr. and Mrs. Jason D. Tincher ’98 Marly Rose Tristano ’07 Mrs. Barbara Troy Mr. James A. Tungate ’04 Meg & Matt ‘86 Tym Michael & Patricia Tym John and Rachel Uryga Mr. Michael Uryga ’95 Andy ‘84 and Mo ’83 Vear Mr. Edo Velovic ’96 Vendramini Construction Mr. Thomas E. Verkuilen ’68 Mr. and Mrs. James R. Vollbracht ’85 Mr. Carter Wagner ’09 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Walinski Mr. Alec Wall Mr. Kevin Walsh Miss Charmaine Washington ’09 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Webster ’83 Linda and Craig Weigel Ms. Helen Welsh Mr. and Mrs. Don Wenig Michael J. Williams ’90 Mr. Michael J. Williams ’86 Mr. Taylor O. Wright IV ’80 Mr. and Mrs. William H. Wymer Christopher Wyse ’84 Mr. and Mrs. John M. Yarger Mr. and Mrs. John R. Yast ’75 Mr. and Mrs. William Zegers ’75

Giving By Constituency Board of Trustees Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Costello ’81 Dr. Charles and Mrs. Connie ’83 Falcone Mr. Shaw R. Friedman and The Honorable Greta Friedman Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Hillenbrand ’84 Mr. and Mrs. James W. Kaminski Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Kennedy ’86 Mr. and Mrs. Mark Leyden ’77 Mr. and Mrs. Douglas L. Newcombe ’73 Mr. and Mrs. John C. Rumely ’69 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schirger ’84 Mr. and Mrs. Randolph M. Smith ’77 Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Tristano Rev. Wayne Watts Mr. C. Joseph Yast ’70 and Ms. Helen Krowicky Emeritus Trustees Dr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Daly III Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Hurley ’77 Terry and Frances Jones Anne and Joe Linnen ’84 Mrs. William P. Linnen Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. McKenna, Sr. Mr. H. Jerome Noel ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Paul ’69 Trish and Tim Preheim Mr. David N. Rentschler ’77 Arlene and John Rose Larry and Bonnie Sullivan Former Trustees Anonymous Dr. and Mrs. Herand Abcarian Mr. Paris Barclay ’74 and Mr. Christopher Mason Mr. and Mrs. Garry Blumenfeld Mr. and Mrs. John A. Buck Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Gumz John ’71 and Catherine Hiler Joan and John Hillenbrand Mr. Duane M. Kelley Dr. and Mrs. James R. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. James E. Mack Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Marfise Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McKenna, Jr. ’75 Dr. David and Johanna Miller Mrs. Barbara Moore Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Nawrocki, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Quirk ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Rentschler, Jr. ’76 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schornack Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Valleau ’80 Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Webster Class Agents Mr. Nicholas A. Adams ’99 Mr. John Angsman ’71 Ms. Devon T. Brennan ’02 Mrs. Margaret M. Caplice ’81 Mr. Christiaan J. Corthier ’91 Mr. Thomas M. Crepeau ’78 Mr. James B. DeMartini ’70 Mr. Richard A. Everist, Jr. ’73 Mr. Thomas A. Hostetler ’77 Mr. William D. Igoe ’74 Mr. Bradley M. Johnston ’73 Mr. Timothy J. Kleihege ’80 Mr. Keith K. Krause ’94 Mr. Michael W. Larkin ’86

Mr. Guy W. Lenardo ’76 Mr. Kevin C. Nolan ’72 Mr. John C. Rumely ’69 Mr. Andrew A. Vanderboegh ’88 Mr. Andrew D. Vear ’84 Miss Charmaine V. Washington ’09 Mrs. Dana A. Whiting ’87 Faculty and Staff Mr. and Mrs. Ken R. Andert Chris and Grace Balawender Mr. and Mrs. Brett Balhoff Mr. Doron Blake and Ms. Emma Wynn Mr. and Mrs. Mathew L. Buchanan Dr. and Mrs. Peter Campbell Rodulfo Eguizabal & Brenda A. Eguizabal Mr. Tom Falcone Jaime Frankle ’04 Mike and Cindy Heffron Mr. and Mrs. Patrick T. Hemphill, Sr. Mr. Joseph P. Huyler Michael ’86 and Colleen Kennedy Mr. Patrick B. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kochanny Mr. and Mrs. David Kozak Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kunst Mr. and Mrs. William P. Lingle Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Luther Mr. and Mrs. Paul McDonnell Mr. and Mrs. Jay Miller Ms. Sue Morse Mr. and Mrs. Alan D. Murray Dr. Mariam Nasidi Ms. Mary C. O’Malley Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pagels Ms. Elena Royal Ms. Kasey Ryan ’95 Mr. and Mrs. Bryan P. Smith Mr. Donald Snedden Mr. Kevin C. Spingler John and Rachel Uryga Mr. Alec Wall Linda and Craig Weigel Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Yemc Former Faculty and Staff Mark ’99 and Jenifer ’00 Balawender Mr. Edward J. Breslin Mrs. Mary H. Brockway Mr. and Mrs. Drew Danik Mr. and Mrs. Ronald DeNardo Ms. Dionne Lovstad-Jones Dr. David and Johanna Miller Mrs. Barbara Moore Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Quirk ’69 Larry and Bonnie Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Webster Mr. Robert J. Zimmermann, Sr. Current Parents Anonymous (4) Joy Allen M.D. David and Shawn Armstrong Mr. James M. Bachner Nancy and Bill Barnard Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Barr Ms. Connie Bratton Mr. and Mrs. Donald Brooks Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Brown Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Cains Mr. John and Mrs. Margaret Caplice ’81 Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Cobbold Ned ’81 and Caroline Costello Ms. Marybeth N. Cremin Mr. and Mrs. Gary Davis Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Duggan ’77


Alumni Parents Anonymous (4) Dr. and Mrs. Herand Abcarian Dr. and Mrs. Jamil Ahmed Joy Allen M.D. Chris and Grace Balawender Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bartels, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Garry Blumenfeld Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Blas Mrs. Margaret S. Bolton Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. Boy Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Bransfield Mrs. Mary H. Brockway Mr. and Mrs. Donald Brooks Mr. and Mrs. John A. Buck Jack and Meg ’81 Caplice Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Coleman Mrs. Helen U. Collins Mrs. Joan M. Costello Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Crane Dr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Daly III Mr. and Mrs. Ronald DeNardo John and Cynthia Dumelle Mr. Shaw R. Friedman and Hon. Greta Friedman Ms. Chris E. Good Mr. and Mrs. William Grimmer Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Gumz Mrs. Gretchen R. Hannan Robert J. Hiler Foundation Joan and John Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hock Mrs. Rita J. Hollingshead Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Hruskoci Mr. and Mrs. K. Brian Jones Terry and Frances Jones Mr. and Mrs. James Kaminski Gintaras and Chris Karaitis Mr. Jeffrey Katz and Dr. Janice Katz Mr. and Mrs. Terrence Keay Dr. and Mrs. James R. Kennedy Dot Kesling Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kilcoyne Ruth Knoll Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lake Dr. and Mrs. John M. Langley ’74 Mrs. William P. Linnen Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. Lischer Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Luther Mr. and Mrs. James E. Mack Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Marfise Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Maroney Mr. and Mrs. Larry Martin Mr. and Mrs. Richard McBride Mr. John T. McCarthy Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. McKenna, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McNamara Mrs. Rosemary A. Mennen Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller Richard and Jane Mooradian Mrs. Barbara Moore Mr. Vernon J. Moore, Jr. Dr. Mariam Nasidi Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Nawrocki, Jr. Gayle Nicosia Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pagels Trish and Tim Preheim Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Prinz, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Quirk ’69 Arlene and John Rose Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Roszkiewicz Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schornack Paul and Sara Schrauben Mr. and Mrs. John C. Shoop

Charles and Celene Siedlecki Mr. and Mrs. Bryan P. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey G. Sparrow ’78 Larry and Bonnie Sullivan John and Ann Sweeney Mr. and Mrs. David E. Tincher Mr. and Mrs. Michael Tristano Michael and Patricia Tym John and Rachel Uryga Mr. and Mrs. Allen Vanderboegh Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Webster Linda and Craig Weigel Ms. Helen Welsh Mr. and Mrs. Don Wenig Michael J. Williams ’90 Mr. and Mrs. Bradley H. Wire Mr. and Mrs. William Zegers ’75 Mr. Robert J. Zimmermann, Sr. Grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Babcock Mrs. Joan M. Costello Jan and Anneke Dekker Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Fraze Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Granger Margaret F. Hiler Mr. and Mrs. John Hogan Mrs. Anna Hutsko Shirley H. and Richard M. Jaffee Mr. and Mrs. Jerrald T. Kabelin Leon and Norma Kaminski Dr. and Mrs. James R. Kennedy Dr. and Mrs. Peter C. Kesling Helga M. Lake-Mark Mrs. William P. Linnen Mr. and Mrs. Roland C. Lovstad Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Schermer Charles and Celene Siedlecki Mrs. Ann Stasukaitis Mr. and Mrs. James F. Sullivan Mrs. Barbara Troy Mr. and Mrs. Allen Vanderboegh Mr. and Mrs. William H. Wymer Mr. and Mrs. Herb F. Yekel In Memory of Robert Corthier Christiaan Corthier ‘91 In Memory of Larry Frankle Anonymous In Memory of Fred Romain Hirt Mr. and Mrs. Fred S. Hirt In Memory of Ruth Roberts will.i.am In Memory of Richard G. Schaub, Sr. Clem Schaub ’69 In Memory of Barbara Troy Dr. and Mrs. James R. Kennedy Bernie and Sue Konrady and Family In Memory of Michael A. Verkuilen Mr. Thomas E. Verkuilen ’68 In Memory of Geraldine Mc Nichols Zimmerman Mr. Robert J. Zimmermann, Sr. In Honor of Dr. William Brock Samuel Thomas ‘90 In Honor of Lauren & Justin Dekker Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Granger In Honor of Robert J. Lake John and Mary Lake & Family

In Honor of Our Military Forces in USA & Overseas Mr. and Mrs. Garry Blumenfeld Lucas Blumenfeld ’03 In Honor of Christopher Nicosia’s 40th Birthday The Lavidge Company In Honor of Jeff & Jason Tincher Mr. and Mrs. David E. Tincher Friends Anonymous Mr. E.M. Bakwin Bernie and Sue Konrady and Family Mr. Donald J. Eisenhauer and Dr. Mary Jane Eisenhauer Mrs. William Hain Amy and Tim Kennedy The Lavidge Company Mr. Kevin Walsh Businesses Anonymous The Art of Dentistry American Child Care, Inc. Automated Data Systems, Inc. Current Electric, Inc. D&M Excavating, Inc. D&L Wood Products, Inc. Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City General Insurance Service, Inc. Goldman Sachs & Co. Holly’s Restaurant & Pub Horizon Bank Imagination Station Indiana Association of School Principals Intercontinental Subscription Service, Inc. Leadership La Porte County Michigan City Area Schools Miller’s Construction Service, Inc. Miller’s Mechanical, Inc. McDonald’s of La Porte County Newby Lewis Kaminski Jones LLP NIPSCO Oak Partners Inc. OneSource Round the Clock Family Dining Sauers Buick Pontiac Cadillac Swanson Center Three Oaks Spokes, Inc. TMM Insurance Services, Inc. Vendramini Construction

Annual Giving 2010-2011

John & Cynthia Dumelle Mrs. Joan Emmanuel Mr. and Mrs. John J. Fox III Mr. and Mrs. James Leigh Friedman Mr. Shaw R. Friedman and Hon. Greta Friedman Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gahan Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gronemeyer Mr. Tim Grote ’83 Mr. Seong-Ju Heo and Mrs. Yu-Jung Shin Mr. and Mrs. Fred S. Hirt Mr. and Mrs. Burton Hochberg Dale and Therese Holdsworth Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Jaffee Gintaras and Chris Karaitis Mr. Jeffrey Katz and Dr. Janice Katz Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Kemper Dot Kesling Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kilcoyne Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kitlas Mr. Timothy J. Kleihege ’80 and Mrs. Catherine Miller Kleihege ’83 Mr. and Mrs. David Knight Mrs. Kim Kniola Mr. and Mrs. Anton Kobe Mr. and Mrs. George L. Koehm John & Mary Lake & Family Ms. Laura LaLone Mr. Man Gyoon Lee and Mrs. Mi-Jung Kim Dr. Kee Byoung Lee and Dr. JeongMi Park Mr. Ki Ho Lee and Mrs. Djie Min Suh Mr. Yong Lee and Mrs. Ki hye Kim Frenda Levin Dr. Xavier Llor and Mrs. Merce Llor Ms. Dionne Lovstad-Jones Dan & Tricia Luck Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Luther Jeffrey and Ruth Mashak Dr. and Mrs. Brian McGuckin Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Miltenberger Mr. and Mrs. Algirdas Mockaitis Richard and Jane Mooradian Mr. and Mrs. Madhukar Murarka Mr. and Mrs. Alan D. Murray Dr. and Mrs. Ikeadi M. Ndukwu Mr. and Mrs. David Neil Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Newell Mr. Jonathan Nesbitt and Dr. Susan Nesbitt Tim and Jackie Ohlund Mr. Hyung Taek Park and Mrs. Jin Hee Ahn Minesh and Archana Patel Ms. Emily Rellinger Mr. William A. Roberts Ms. Pamela M. Schaetzle Paul and Sara Schrauben Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Siedlecki Jordon and Melissa Sklut Chris and Debbie Stueck Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Tang Mr. Anying Teng and Mrs. Xiaohong Yang Dr. and Mrs. Pietro Tonino Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Totten Mr. and Mrs. Argelio Trevino Mr. Dean J. Uminski Bridget ‘86 and David Van Eekeren Mr. and Mrs. Robert Walinski Ms. Helen Welsh Mr. Martin Whalen and Ms. Kathleen Kennedy ’83 Mr. and Mrs. John M. Yarger Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Yemc Mr. Moo Yeol Yoo and Ms. Hyun Jung Kim Mr. Byung Hoon Youn


Annual Giving 2010-2011

Giving By Class Year 1968 Mr. William Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Jay A. Nawrocki Mr. Thomas E. Verkuilen 1969 Dr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Ganster Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Newcombe Mr. H. Jerome Noel Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Paul Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Quirk John and Christine Rumely Clem Schaub 1970 Mr. and Mrs. John Marsch Mr. and Mrs. Daniel R. McArdle Mr. Eugene P. Meegan Mr. James M. O’Brien C. Joseph Yast and Helen Krowicky 1971 Dr. Christopher Hartnett and Dr. Linda Hartnett John and Catherine Hiler Mr. Gregory Thoman 1972 Joe Hostetler Mr. Thomas Kerrigan Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Marsch Mr. and Mrs. Kevin C. Nolan 1973 Mr. Richard A. Everist, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Johnston Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Newcombe Mr. and Mrs. Stephen P. Rentschler Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Shannon 1974 Mr. Paris Barclay and Mr. Christopher Mason Mr. and Mrs. Steven Embree John and Amy Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. William Igoe Dr. and Mrs. John M. Langley Stephen Paul Mr. Peter M. Rodgers and Dr. Beth E. Whitted Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Siwietz 1975 Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McKenna, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John R. Yast Mr. and Mrs. William Zegers 1976 Mr. and Mrs. Willard R. Dorman Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Rentschler, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Sparrow 1977 Mr. David A. Collins and Mrs. Patricia J. Julian Mr. and Mrs. John P. Daly Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Duggan Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Hostetler Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Hurley Mr. and Mrs. Mark Leyden Mr. David N. Rentschler Tom Rosshirt

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Smith Mr. and Mrs. H. David Wood 1978 John Buzia Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Crepeau Alan R. Hannan Dr. and Mrs. Robert O. Kinney Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Leyden Mr. Michael Riley Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey G. Sparrow

Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Larkin Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey C. Mackey Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. McCabe Mr. and Mrs. Victor P. Smith Meg and Matt Tym Mr. Michael J. Williams 1987 Ted Reese Sarah Rose Dana A. Whiting

1979 Mr. and Mrs. David R. Ashley Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Craig Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Demski Mr. and Mrs. John J. Edwards Stephanie A. Hurley Katherine Kerrigan Shannon

1988 Mr. Matthew Barnicle Dr. and Mrs. Raymond A. Bonomo Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Gumz Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Klekamp Mr. and Mrs. Andrew A. Vanderboegh Bridget and David Van Eekeren

1980 Mr. John C. Coughlin Mr. Timothy J. Kleihege Mr. and Mrs. Peter L. Ramirez Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Valleau Mr. Taylor O. Wright IV

1989 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Gumz Ms. Sarah B. Kennedy Ms. Elizabeth M. Lovelace

1981 Jack and Meg Caplice Ned and Caroline Costello Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hackl Ms. Kathleen A. Mack Mr. and Mrs. T. Michael Osterman 1982 Mr. James M. Morrison, Jr. 1983 Connie and Charlie Falcone Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan Mr. Tim Grote Mrs. Catherine Miller Kleihege Peter Krop Mr. Thomas McQuillan Susan Smith Newell Mr. and Mrs. James E. Shaw II Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Sullivan Mo Vear Mr. and Mrs. Michael Webster Mr. Martin Whalen and Ms. Kathleen Kennedy

1990 Ambrose Marc Conroy Mr. and Mrs. Gregory G. Mack Samuel Thomas 1991 Christiaan Corthier 1992 Ryugo Kato 1993 Mr. Akira Ichijo Hana Kato Mr. and Mrs. John A. Prouty 1994 Ms. Sara Horn Mr. and Mrs. Keith K. Krause Mia Lischer 1995 Dr. Heather A. Bankowski Mr. George Demos Ms. Kasey Ryan Mr. Michael Uryga Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Walsh, Jr.

1984 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. John Kerrigan Anne and Joe Linnen Dan and Jean Rosshirt Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schirger Andy Vear Christopher Wyse

1996 Mr. Matt Herald Natalie Bergren Keigher Mr. Edo Velovic

1985 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Crowe Mr. Michael E. Delgado Mr. Michael Grote Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. McNabola Mr. and Mrs. James J. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. James R. Vollbracht Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Whitlow

1998 Andrew E. Jones Mrs. Kathryn M. Uryga Snyder Mr. and Mrs. Jason D. Tincher

1986 Patrick and Jane Buck Tripp and Christian Devers Mr. Leonard P. Jennings Michael and Colleen Kennedy

2000 Jenifer Balawender

1997 Colleen Morrison Tom and Sarah Sullivan

1999 Mark Balawender Alexis A. Pontius-Jones Mr. Kevin Proud

2002 Caitlyn Bolton

Ms. Devon T. Brennan 2003 Mr. Lucas Blumenfeld Ms. Alexandra R. Pagels 2004 Jaime Frankle Mr. James A. Tungate Ms. Sarah Tristano 2005 Ms. Katherine Bankowski Hillary V. Guenther Ms. Kayla B. Mensch Ms. Kerry E. Quirk 2006 Stephanie Frankle Mrs. Kara Odom 2007 Marly Rose Tristano 2008 Miss Caroline M. Coleman 2009 Miss Natalee Allenbaugh Mr. Carter Wagner Miss Charmaine Washington 2010 Miss Elizabeth W. Dumelle


Reconnect

Rekindle

Annual Golf Outing & Alumni Reunion September 2010 Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Webster Joe Yast ’70 and Helen Krowicky

Justin Knoll Eagle Sponsorship The Vanderboegh Family Eagle Sponsorship Bridget ‘86 and David Van Eekeren Par Sponsorship Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Buck ’86 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan ’83 Mr. and Mrs. Victor P. Smith ’86 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Walsh, Jr. ’95 Hole-in-One Car Sponsor Sauers Buick Hole Sponsors BiddyMurphy.com, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Gahan Ned ’81 and Caroline Costello Creekwood Inn Current Electric Inc. D & M Excavating, Inc. Davis Disability Group, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Davis Mr. and Mrs. Mark Leyden ’77 The Fieldhouse Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan Dr. and Mrs James R. Kennedy McDonald’s Restaurants of La Porte County Miller’s Construction Service, Inc. Miller’s Mechanical, Inc.

Faculty Sponsors Ned ’81 and Caroline Costello Mrs. Ellen M. Frankle (2) Mr. and Mrs. Todd Holloway Mr. and Mrs. Mark Leyden ’77 Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Leyden ’78 Mr. and Mrs. John Marsch ’70 Mrs. Barbara Moore Michael Johannes ’69 and Paula Paul TMM Insurance Services, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Webster Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel Donations Anonymous (3) General Insurance Services, Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Craig La Lumiere School Parents Association Dr. Robert M. Liddell ’75 Mrs. Barbara Moore Mr. and Mrs. James R. Vollbracht ’85 Paul L. and Dana A. Whiting ’87 Auction Donors Tom Barry ’82 Craig ’89 and Sandra Hiler Peter Hillenbrand ’80 Christopher Hurley ’77 Jack Kennedy ’80 Michael ’86 and Colleen Kennedy David Kirkby Kyle Korver, Chicago Bulls

May 2011 The Kentucky Derby Bridget ’86 and David Van Eekeren The Preakness Stakes Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Jaffee Dan and Tricia Luck David and Johanna Miller Dr. JeongMi Park and Dr. Kee Byoung Lee Dr. and Mrs. Pietro Tonino Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel The Belmont Stakes Automated Data Systems, Inc. (4) Dr. and Mrs. Jamil Ahmed Mr. James M. Bachner Current Electric, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Davis Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Joseph L. and Billie-Faye Granger Mr. Tim Grote ’83 John ’71 and Catherine Hiler

Mr. and Mrs. James Kaminski Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Kemper Mr. and Mrs. David Knight Mr. and Mrs. Anton Kobe Mr. and Mrs. Mark Leyden ’77 The Fieldhouse Dr. and Mrs. Brian McGuckin Miller’s Mechanical, Inc. Jonathan and Susan Nesbitt Mr. and Mrs. Blake H. O’Halloran Jeanie and Jeff Shuck Diane and Andy Sperling ’87, OneSource Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin B. Tang Mr. Martin Whalen and Ms. Kathleen Kennedy ’83 Tom and Susie Yemc Racehorse Owners Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Blas Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Bransfield Mr. John and Mrs. Margaret Caplice ’81

C. Joseph Yast ’70 and Helen Krowicky La Lumiere School Long Beach Country Club Mark McNabola ’77 Ted McNabola ’85 Mike Miller, Miami Heat Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Newcombe ’69 Mike Nolan ’69 Pottawattomie Country Club Renaissance Academy and the McHugh Family John ’69 and Christine Rumely Skip Strzelecki, St. Andrew’s Products The Tonino Family Auction Purchasers Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Buck ’86 Ms. Jennifer Connelly–Steel ’81 Ned ‘81 and Caroline Costello Mr. Joseph R. Crane ’90 Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Cronin ’70 Mr. James B. DeMartini ’70 Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gronemeyer Joan and John Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. Patrick M. Mannix ’70 Mr. and Mrs. John Marsch ’70 Mr. Eugene P. Meegan ’70 Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Newcombe ’69 Mr. James M. O’Brien ’70 Mr. Phillip Smith and Ms. Jennifer A. Pastrick Smith ’80 Bridget ’86 and David Van Eekeren Mr. Art Walker Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Whitlow ’85 Mr. and Mrs. John R. Yast ’75

Current Electric, Inc. D&L Wood Products, Inc. Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Connie ‘83 and Charlie Falcone The Fieldhouse, Merrillville Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gahan Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Granger Hola Mexico Cartel Mr. and Mrs. Anton Kobe The Lake Families Land O Frost Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller Newby, Lewis, Kaminski & Jones, LLP Rick and Maryann Newell Oak Partners Inc. John ‘69 and Christine Rumely Charles and Celene Siedlecki Jordon and Melissa Sklut Sophomore Grandparents Sophomore Parents Faculty Sponsors Anonymous (14) Mr. James M. Bachner (2) Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Bransfield Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Crane (2) Mr. and Mrs. Gary Davis (2) Mr. George Demos ’95 Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Fraze Mr. Timothy J. Grote ’83

Paddle Raise – for team uniforms Anonymous Mr. John and Mrs. Margaret Caplice ’81 Ned ’81 and Caroline Costello Mr. John C. Coughlin ’80 Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Mr. Michael E. Delgado ’85 Connie ‘83 and Charlie Falcone Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Gaffigan ’83 Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gronemeyer Joan and John Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. James Kaminski Mr. and Mrs. David Knight Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Larkin ’86 Anne and Joe Linnen ’84 Mrs. William P. Linnen Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. McNabola ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Peter L. Ramirez ’80 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Schirger ’84 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Tristano Ms. Sarah Tristano ’04 Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Whitlow ’85 C. Joseph Yast ’70 and Helen Krowicky Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel Special Thanks Tom Barry ’82 Flowers With Jazz Peter Hillenbrand ’80 auctioneer Long Beach Country Club Diane and Andy Sperling ’87, OneSource Sauers Buick Sterling Cut Glass -

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Holdsworth (2) Mr. and Mrs. Terrence Keay Ms. Sarah B. Kennedy ’89 Amy and Tim Kennedy Dr. and Mrs. James R. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kilcoyne Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kitlas (2) Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Knoll Mr. and Mrs. Richard McBride Richard and Jane Mooradian Gayle Nicosia (2) Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Paul ’69 Jim and Judy Sarwark Mr. and Mrs. Robert Walinski Event Underwriters General Insurance Services, Racehorse Insurance Underwriter Round the Clock Family Dining, Dessert Underwriter Donors Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Bransfield Mrs. Gretchen R. Hannan Mr. and Mrs. John Hogan La Lumiere School Parents Association Auction Item Donors Anonymous Hannah Ashbaugh

Annual Giving 2010-2011

Return


Annual Giving 2010-2011

The Rentschler Family

Auction Item Donors Athena Greek Restaurant Adrenalin Fitness Albano’s Villa David and Shawn Armstrong The Art of Dentistry Back Road Brewery Bad Habitz Beach Combers Cleaning, Inc. Bentwood Tavern Best Western La Porte Hotel & Conference Center Beyond Pink Inc, Beyond the Ordinary Photography Martin Binder Jeweler Mr. John and Mrs. Margaret Caplice ’81 Bittersweet Ski & Snowboard Area Mat Blair Golf Academy at Briar Leaf G.C. Susan Block Interior Design Body Color Tanning Salon Briar Leaf Golf Course Buffalo Wild Wings Carpenter & Capt, Chartered The Chicago Cubs The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis Coach Candy Basketball Camp Frances Corsbie, Avon Representative Creative Memories - Laura Gould Marc & Leslie Danesi, Stray Dog Bar & Grill Marc & Leslie Danesi, Trattoria Enzo Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Deep River Water Park Friends Fenker’s Home Furnishings and Gifts Barbara Friedman Jim Gaffigan ’84 and Jeannie Noth Gaffigan Generations Hair Salon Gold Clipper Pet Boutique & Spa Good to Go by Lucrezia Billie-Faye Granger Ted Grzywacz Gypsy’s Bundle

Hacienda Mexican Restaurants Hamilton Grove The Harbor Grand Heart & Vascular Institute at Indiana University La Porte Regional Health System Hearthwoods Custom Furnishings Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari I Street Family Tavern Indianapolis Zoo Mary Ivanovich Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Jaffee Timothy Jeffry Salon Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Johnson Steve and Ellen Johnson Judee’s, Inc. Kaber Floral Company Keith Krause ’94 Kemps Office City Klein Tools Charitable Foundation, Tom Klein ’80 La Lumiere School L.R. Men’s Clothier & Tuxedoes Ladies Fitness Zone Frenda Levin Long Beach Country Club Dan and Tricia Luck Jeffrey Mader, DDS Jill Mewbourne-Carlson Marina Grand Resort Martin’s Super Market The Master Brands Group Corp. Rhonda McBride McCullum Architects Modern Machine Namaste Center for Holistic Education Dr. Mariam Nasidi Marc T. Nielsen Interiors Mike and Jill Nygren Brian Oedzes Pamper Your Pooch Pet Salon Jill Mewbourne-Carlson Virginia Phillips Popolano’s Restaurant Portofino Grill

Posh Day Spa Potawatomi Zoo Pottawattomie Country Club Mrs. Pat Rampage Red Arrow Roadhouse Scott ’76 and Anne Rogers Roger and Pauletta Schuster Mr. and Mrs. Matthew A. Schuster Shedd Aquarium Mr. Donald Snedden Solid Waste District of La Porte County Julie Sosa Spire Catering & Event Planning, LLC St. John Lutheran School Sharon Starr Top Rated ebay seller State of Mind Salon and Day Spa Stop 50 Wood Fired Pizzeria Jordon and Melissa Sklut Threadless Tip Tee Toe Golf Shoes Dean Uminski Urban Fitness The Warehouse Washington Park Zoo Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. Westbrook, Jr. Dionne Wisniewski Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel Tom and Susie Yemc Youche Country Club

Restricted Donors

Scoreboard Donors

In Kind

La Lumination

Anonymous Mr. Dennis Babcock Mr. Edward J. Costello ’81 Raymond E. Daly Scholarship Fund Mr. Timothy J. Grote ’83 Indiana Association of School Principals Mr. Daniel S. Jaffee Janice, Jeffrey, Josh ’08 & Justin ’11 Katz Mr. John Keigher La Lumiere School Parents Association Linnen Memorial Fund Michigan City Area Schools Daniel Murphy Scholarship Foundation Mr. Jonathan Nesbitt Mr. David N. Rentschler Mr. Bryan P. Smith Mr. Donald D. Snedden Wal-Mart - Michigan City Dr. Herb J. Yekel

Mr. Paris Barclay ’74 and Mr. Christopher Mason Mr. and Mrs. Steven Embree ’74 John ‘74 and Amy Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. William Igoe ’74 Dr. and Mrs. John M. Langley ’74 Stephen Paul ’74 Mr. Peter M. Rodgers ’74 and Dr. Beth E. Whitted

Anonymous (2) Ned ’81 and Caroline Costello Rick and Elizabeth Dekker The Honorable and Mrs. Frank Dolan Mr. and Mrs. Gregory J. Dudeck Edwards Brothers, Inc. Mr. Tim Grote ’83 Gordon Food Service Heston Hills La Lumiere School Parents Association Dan and Tricia Luck Mr. and Mrs. Brian Meyer Mr. and Mrs. Jay Miller Miller’s Construction Service, Inc. The Newberry Library Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Newcombe ’69 Mr. Jasson T. Patton and Dr. Carolina M. Lopez Kim Sauers, Sauers Buick Pontiac Cadillac GMC Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Vanderboegh ’88 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Walsh, Jr. ’95 Martin Whalen Office Solutions Mr. and Mrs. John Yarger

American Child Care, Inc. The Art of Dentistry The Caplice Family The Creekwood Inn The Eisenhauer Family General Insurance Service, Inc. Holly’s Restaurant & Pub Horizon Bank Imagination Station Intercontinental Subscription Service, Inc. Janice Englander Katz Kabelin ACE Hardware La Lumiere School Parents Association Leadership La Porte County Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Siwietz ’74 The McBride Family NIPSCO Purdue North Central Renaissance Academy Roxy Music Sauers Buick Pontiac Cadillac Stor-it-Now! The Swanson Center Unity Foundation of La Porte County Vendramini Construction

Run for the Roses - continued

LIVE Auction Item Purchasers Anonymous Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Mr. Shaw R. Friedman and Hon. Greta Friedman Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gahan Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Granger Michael & Nicole Guenin Dot Kesling Mr. and Mrs. David Knight Mr. and Mrs. John Lake Mr. John L. Leinweber and Mr. James A. Laughlin Jim and Judy Sarwark

Jeanie and Jeff Shuck Jordon and Melissa Sklut Tony & Pattie Kobe Mr. Art Walker Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel Paddle Raise – for Moore House sun room David and Shawn Armstrong Mr. John and Mrs. Margaret Caplice ’81 Jan and Anneke Dekker Rick and Elizabeth Dekker Mr. Tim Grote ’83 Mr. and Mrs. James Kaminski Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Kemper Michael ’86 and Colleen Kennedy Mr. Patrick B. Kennedy Mr. Timothy J. Kleihege ’80 and Mrs. Catherine Miller Kleihege ’83 Mr. and Mrs. David Knight Mr. and Mrs. Anton P. Kobe Dr. Kee Byoung Lee and Dr. JeongMi Park Mr. and Mrs. Roland C. Lovstad Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Miltenberger Mr. and Mrs. Algirdas Mockaitis Ms. Mary C. O’Malley Jim and Judy Sarwark Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Schermer Mr. and Mrs. Bryan P. Smith Dr. and Mrs. Pietro Tonino Mr. and Mrs. Argelio Trevino Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Totten Mr. Martin J. Whalen and Ms. Kathleen A. Kennedy ’83 Dr. and Mrs. Herb J. Yekel Mr. and Mrs. Herb F. Yekel Tom and Susie Yemc Special Thanks Parent Chairwomen, Pattie Kobe and Kim Yekel Kwik Kopy Printing, Crown Point La Lumiere Faculty & Staff Tree House Café, John and Casey ’86 Allen Sterling Cut Glass, Mr. Steve Rentschler ‘73 Corbin Wagner, Set Designer


May 2011 32 | La Lumiere Magazine 2009

La Lumiere Magazine 2010 | 27


Class Notes

Return

Reconnect

Rekindle

La Lumiere School Annual Golf Outing & Alumni Reunion September 2011


Beyond Campus Beyond Campus Class Notes

La Lumiere School Parents Weekend October 2011

Bonfire

La Lumiere Magazine 2009 | 33


Beyond Campus

Mary Ellen (Maier) Spelger ’87 and Zolile Mtimkulu ’87 Jamie Igoe Black, grandson of Bill Igoe ’74

Guy Meikle ’95

Chloe Isabella Abbs, daughter of Melissa Abbs ’95

Ned Brown ’70

Dave Webster ’84

Class of 1970

Class of 1987

La Lumiere received an update from Ned Brown this summer. After 30 years, Ned has given up his place in New Jersey and will be living/working in Washington, DC and Charleston, SC. Professionally, Ned has decided to split his career over the next four years between government work on behalf of his clients and writing. Ned has his first novel (fiction) about one-third complete. He has an agent and two potential publishers. We look forward to hearing how this second career turns out – the best of luck to Ned!

Mary Ellen (Maier) Spelger visited with classmate, Zolile Mtimkulu, during a trip to South Africa in February, 2011. Mary Ellen has been living in Guam for the past four years but returned to the States this summer.

Class of 1974 Bill and Kate Igoe welcomed their first grandchild into the world. Jamie Igoe Black was born to their daughter Clair and her husband Hugh Black.

Class of 1984 Dave Webster, head coach of the Dickinson College men’s lacrosse team, was named Coach of the Year for the second straight season and led the Red Devils to a conference title in their first appearance at the Centennial Conference.

Class of 1990 Nathaniel S. Bennett and his wife Susan Bouches welcomed their first child, Jordan Lily Bennett, into the world on April 10, 2011. The family lives in Massachusetts where Nathaniel manages a computer company and Susan runs a biology lab at Harvard University.

Class of 1995 Guy Meikle continues to make a name for himself and Nana, the restaurant where he is Executive Chef. Nana received a 2011 Michelin Guide Chicago Bib Gourmand award, and Guy and Nana were featured on Diners, Drive-ins and Dives, a Food Network show this fall. On a personal note, Guy married Tiffany Johnson summer 2011. Melissa Machaj Abbs and her husband Trevor welcomed a second daughter, Chloe Isabella, to the family on May 10, 2011.

Tom Sullivan ’97 with Chris Balawender in Krakow, Poland

Class of 1997 Tom Sullivan sent La Lu greetings and well wishes from his new home. The teachers and environment of La Lumiere made the world seem like a smaller place and it encouraged me to travel and see the world. I met my wife in Rome and now work and live in Warsaw. Thanks for playing a part in motivating me to expand my horizons, and I wish you and your families nothing but the best. Thanks again for contributing to my success!”

Class of 1998 The murder of Chicago high school student Derrion Albert compelled Michael Dolan and Brian Dinsmore, executive producers of A Plate Apart, to develop a reality show that would


Beyond Campus

Brian Dinsmore and Michael Dolan ’98 Laura Miller ’07

Sarah (Tristano) Valdivia Buenrostro ’04 and Jenny Tristano ’01 bridesmaids for Caleb Philips ’08 and Marly Tristano’s ’07 wedding in August Mark Balawender ’99 with baby Leah

Macie Francis ’08 (left)

highlight positive inner-city teens and offer them a ticket to a brighter future via the culinary arts. The show takes six deserving high school students and pairs them with culinary mentors from Kendall College. These culinary mentors will help the students to carve out a better future, literally, as the students will compete for a paid apprenticeship at Michael Kornick’s mk the restaurant. The pair is currently interviewing production networks in LA looking for the best home for the show. Fellow Laker Paris Barclay ’74 provided Michael with some very helpful advice and guidance. The scholarships will be awarded to the teens regardless of whether the show is picked-up. The pilot episode won a 2011 Webby Award for Outstanding Reality Series.

Class of 2002

Class of 1999

Class of 2007

Jenifer (Shreve) Balawender ’00 and husband Mark Balawender welcomed Leah Marie Balawender into the world on August 13, 2011. “Doc” Booms and his lovely wife, Grace, are thrilled to be grandparents!

Caitlyn Bolton is currently attending Harvard, working on her Masters Degree in Land Management. Caitlyn earned a Bachelors Degree from the University of Colorado, Boulder and has worked as an Environmental Engineer tracking the West Nile virus and re-planting native plants. It’s been a busy year for the Tippy family. Jeff Tippy and his wife Jessica recently moved into a new home in Henderson, Kentucky and welcomed their second child, Mason, born on May 23, 2011. Mason joins sister Ava who is three (but thinks she is much older...). Jessica and Jeff will celebrate their fifth wedding anniversary on 11-11-11.

Laura Miller, a member of the U.S. National Rugby team, spent the summer training at the Olympic Training Center in San Diego, California with an eye on the Nations Cup in 2011 and the World Cup in 2014.

Class of 2008 Macie Francis, a student at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Fashion Department, recently earned a $25,000 scholarship and a summer internship with fashion design company Thakoon in New York City. Macie said, “I am so thankful for my college and all the opportunities it has provided me, but I could not have made it to this school or stayed in this school if it wasn’t for La Lumiere. THANK YOU FOR EVERYTHING!! This picture was taken right after Ikram Goldman awarded me the scholarship in front of all the guests! Talk about having the jitters; I could hardly contain my tears of joy. Luckily my model held my hand as we walked the runway. Caleb Philips ’08 and Marly Tristano ’07 were married on the La Lumiere campus, August 20, 2011. Sarah (Tristano) Valdivia Buenrostro ’04 and Jenny Tristano ’01 served as bridesmaids. La Lumiere Magazine 2009 | 31| 40 La Lumiere Magazine 2011


Beyond Campus In Memoriam Tom N. Ringo, Long Beach, IN – August 14, 2010 Father of Peter A. Ringo ’83 Geraldine Zimmermann, La Porte, IN – August 22, 2010 Mother of Robert J. Zimmermann, Jr. ’78 and former faculty spouse Judith Z. Magenis Robert Hillenbrand “Hill” Smith ’74, Indianapolis, IN – October, 29, 2010. Brother of Randolph M. Smith ’77 Jose D. Sanchez, M.D., La Porte, IN – October 30, 2010 Father of Jose M. Sanchez ’73 David Kalapsa ’80, Hines, IL – November 12, 2010 Brother of Steven M. Kalapsa ’76 Robert J. Zimmermann, Sr., La Porte, IN – January 29, 2011 Father of Robert J. Zimmermann, Jr. ’78 and former faculty spouse Judith Z. Magenis John “Jack” Gregory Daly, Hinsdale, IL – February 5, 2011 Father of J. Brendan Daly ’09 Andrew Driscoll Corr ’87, Cincinnati, OH – March 1, 2011 Edward Francis Cashman ’76, Flagstaff, AZ – April 5, 2011 Theodore C. Compall M.D, Chicago, IL – May 29, 2011 Father of Thomas Compall ’73 and Thaddeus Compall ’72 Charles M. Bransfield, Jr. ’72, Aurora, CO – July 13, 2011 Brother of Daniel Bransfield ’78 and Thomas F. Bransfield ’79 Ann Newcombe, Evanston, IL – September 2, 2011 Mother of Richard S. Newcombe ’69 and Douglas L. Newcombe ’73

Head of School’s House As part of the Courageous Vision capital campaign, La Lumiere School received an anonymous gift dedicated to the construction of a new Head of School house on campus. The groundbreaking for this faculty house will take place this fall. The Head of School’s house will provide public gathering space on campus for students and our greater community. The design of the new campus home mirrors elements of the original Moore House and our campus vernacular.

Mary C.Valleau, North Andover, MA – October 3, 2011 Former faculty and parent

A Slam Dunk by the Class of ’74 In the fall of 2010, the class of ’74 approached the school with a proposition. They wanted to make a class gift to La Lumiere. The timing was perfect – we were in the market for new scoreboards for the Marsch Gymnasium. The scoreboards in the “new” gym were getting old, and with our varsity men’s team playing on a national level, it was time to install shot clocks. Thank you! Scoreboard Donors Mr. Paris Barclay ’74 and Mr. Christopher Mason Mr. and Mrs. Steven Embree ’74 John ‘74 and Amy Hillenbrand Mr. and Mrs. William Igoe ’74

41 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

Dr. and Mrs. John M. Langley ’74 Stephen Paul ’74 Mr. Peter M. Rodgers ’74 and Dr. Beth E. Whitted


Beyond Campus - Reunions 100 La Lumiere supporters hit the links on September 16, 2011 at the 17th Annual Laker Golf Outing. Another 100 joined the golfers that evening for cocktails, dinner and a live auction. The generosity of our alumni, parents and friends ensured that our Golf Outing was a smashing success. For the second year, this event grossed over $100,000 – including $35,600 during a paddle raise

to support the purchase of research-quality science equipment. Thanks to all our alumni who supported this event. The outing served as a reunion event for many classes. Alumni spent the evening enjoying each other’s company and sharing memories. The evening also included a poignant tribute to David Kirkby by the Class of 1973.

40

th

The Class of 1971 celebrated their 40th reunion. Classmates in attendance were John Angsman, Richard Slevin, Jack Hiler, Mike Baldwin, Greg Thoman and Chris Hartnett.

The Class of 1973 held an off-year reunion celebration at the golf outing. In attendance were Mike Shannon, Bob MacLaverty and Brad Johnston, holding placards joking with their missing classmate, Chief Justice of the United States John G. Roberts, Jr.

30

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The Alumni Cup was won hands-down by the Class of 1981 with 24 alumni in attendance across a weekend of festivities marking their 30th reunion.

25

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The Class of 1986 was represented by the headmaster and his classmates, Patrick Buck, Paul Kotz, Len Jennings, and Michael Larkin.

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William Murphy ’68

David Moore ’70

Kevin Nolan ’72

John Malorzo ’75

Lawerence Coffeen ’77

Christopher Hurley ’77

Thomas Crepeau ’78

Warren DeNardo ’80

Lawrence Sullvan

Charles Bayles

Michael Birkholz

Jeffery Bridges

James DeMartini

George Frye

Steven Ganster

Peter Grote

Thomas Hickam

Jack Hiler

Bradley Johnston

Paul Lawler

Michael Nolan

David Ryan

Lawrence Sullivan, Jr.

James Coppens

Ron DeNardo

Richard Magenis

William McKenna

After a hiatus, La Lumiere is re-instituting the Athletic Hall of Fame. During the years of 1996-1998, 15 alumni and three former faculty members were nominated and inducted into the Hall of Fame. On February 11, 2012, eight alumni, and former Headmaster Lawrence Sullivan will be inducted during a ceremony held in Marsch Gymnasium. The 1967-68 football team will be inducted en masse as the team that put La Lumiere athletics on the map. Inductees are chosen based on a level of excellence and commitment to a particular sport (e.g. captain, team MVP, state-wide or national recognition, etc.), especially as it relates to other teammates and the level of competition during the candidate’s era. Consideration is also given to candidates who 43 | La Lumiere Magazine 2011

participated in multiple sports during their careers, even if their level of success varied in those sports. Finally, the committee attempts to select candidates that result in a class of inductees that appropriately represent the range of sports at La Lumiere School. A selection committee comprised of the athletic director, advancement director, headmaster, and selected faculty and alumni meet annually to review nominations, identify a prospective slate of inductees, research their accomplishments and select inductees to be honored. Athletic offerings may have changed over the years, but athletics continues to play a vital role in the life of a La Lumiere student as a means to develop discipline, fitness, and teamwork.


Excerpt from Russell Kirk’s Commencement Address to the La Lumiere School Class of 1986 Spiritually and politically, the twentieth century has been a time of decadence. Yet as that century draws near to its close, we may remind ourselves that ages of decadence often have been followed by ages of renewal. You graduates of 1986 will be little more than thirty years old when the twenty-first century of the Christian era begins. Endowed with what you have learnt at La Lumiere, and fortified by the habits you have acquired here, every one of you may do something important to redeem the time.

the last word Twenty-five years ago, when my classmates and I graduated from La Lumiere, my dad gave the commencement address. Re-reading his words sparked a reflection for me on a few of my dad’s habits of being that allowed him to participate in “redeeming the time.”

You will not need to be rich or famous to take your part in redeeming the time: what you need for that task is moral imagination joined to right reason. It is not by wealth or fame that you will be rewarded, but by eternal moments: those moments of existence in which, as T.S. Eliot put it, time and the timeless intersect. For you and I are put into this present realm of being as into a testing ground – into an arena, if you will. You and I are moral beings meant to accomplish something good, in a small way or a big, in this world. It is a world in which there is so much in need of doing that nobody ought to be bored. All this creation about us is the garden that we erring humans were appointed to tend. Plant some flowers in it, if you can, and pull some weeds. If need be, draw the sword to defend it. The school of Light has sent you on your way, and I wish you all good traveling in your progress toward the Light Eternal.

Cecilia Kirk and family with the Sherwood Forest trees in the background

When my sisters and I were little, my dad wrote to the Sherriff of Nottingham, England, and requested acorns from Sherwood Forest. Amazingly, he received them. He planted them, and they grew into saplings. I remember that he teased one of us when the sapling grew crooked and he had to balance it with ropes to straighten it out. Now the trees are tall and straight, though not yet fully grown. It was with imagination, pluck, and a bit of humor that my dad approached his endeavors from debating with controversial leaders to obtaining trees from Sherwood Forest. The habits of focusing on first principles, a balanced life, rigorous labors, good literature and community that my dad cultivated, and that La Lumiere encouraged, have been more significant to my life than I realized as a high school senior. My dad liked to plant trees as a counterbalance to his intellectual labors. His personal library was a Dutch barn which had been renovated to house his thousands of books and where he often stayed writing until the “wee hours of the night,” as he phrased it. My dad practiced a firm, disciplined approach to his work that enabled him to be very prolific. I remember my dad commenting that his one regret in life was that he wouldn’t be able to read all the books in his library

Russell Kirk (1918–1994) was an American political theorist, moralist, historian, social critic, literary critic, and fiction author known for his influence on 20th century American conservatism.

before he was “lapped in lead.” It is a good life if that’s the only regret. Cecilia Kirk Nelson ’86


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La Lumiere Magazine 2011